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Sample records for galactic nuclear jets

  1. NUCLEAR RADIO JET FROM A LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz ({alpha} {approx} 0.3; F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds ({Gamma} {approx}> 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  2. Nuclear Radio Jet from a Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus in NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Akihiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz (α ~ 0.3; F νvpropνα) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds (Γ >~ 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  3. Launching of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    As black holes accrete gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how jet properties (e.g., jet power) connect to those of the accretion flow (e.g., mass accretion rate) and the black hole (e.g., black hole spin) remains an area of active research. This is because what determines a crucial parameter that controls jet properties—the strength of large-scale magnetic flux threading the black hole—remains largely unknown. First-principles computer simulations show that due to this, even if black hole spin and mass accretion rate are held constant, the simulated jet powers span a wide range, with no clear winner. This limits our ability to use jets as a quantitative diagnostic tool of accreting black holes. Recent advances in computer simulations demonstrated that accretion disks can accumulate large-scale magnetic flux on the black hole, until the magnetic flux becomes so strong that it obstructs gas infall and leads to a magnetically-arrested disk (MAD). Recent evidence suggests that central black holes in jetted active galactic nuclei and tidal disruptions are surrounded by MADs. Since in MADs both the black hole magnetic flux and the jet power are at their maximum, well-defined values, this opens up a new vista in the measurements of black hole masses and spins and quantitative tests of accretion and jet theory.

  4. Stellar and galactic jets - Theoretical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical issues pertaining to the modelling of jets in young stellar objects and in active galactic nuclei are reviewed. The strong morphological similarities between these two types of sources are emphasized, and observational constraints on the basic physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the jet phenomenon are outlined. Particular attention is given to the 'momentum-discharge problem' in molecular-cloud outflows and to its possible resolution in terms of a centrifugally driven magnetohydrodynamic wind from an accretion disk. In addition, various propagation effects are discussed, and the relevance to stellar jets of the de Laval collimation mechanism and of the accelerated-clump model for emission knots is assessed. The review concludes with a brief list of potentially useful observational tests.

  5. Evidence of parsec-scale jets in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mezcua, M.; Prieto, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    The nuclear radio emission of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) is often associated with unresolved cores. In this paper we show that most LLAGNs present extended jet radio emission when observed with sufficient angular resolution and sensitivity. They are thus able to power, at least, parsec-scale radio jets. To increase the detection rate of jets in LLAGNs, we analyze subarcsecond resolution data of three low-ionization nuclear emission regions. This yields the detection of extended jet-like radio structures in NGC 1097 and NGC 2911 and the first resolved parsec-scale jet of NGC 4594 (Sombrero). The three sources belong to a sample of nearby LLAGNs for which high-spatial-resolution spectral energy distribution of their core emission is available. This allows us to study their accretion rate and jet power (Q {sub jet}) without drawing on (most) of the ad hoc assumptions usually considered in large statistical surveys. We find that those LLAGNs with large-scale radio jets (>100 pc) have Q {sub jet} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, while the lowest Q {sub jet} correspond to those LLAGNs with parsec-scale (≤100 pc) jets. The Q {sub jet} is at least as large as the radiated bolometric luminosity for all LLAGN, in agreement with previous statistical studies. Our detection of parsec-scale jets in individual objects further shows that the kinematic jet contribution is equally important in large- or parsec-scale objects. We also find that the Eddington-scaled accretion rate is still highly sub-Eddingtonian (<10{sup –4}) when adding the Q {sub jet} to the total emitted luminosity (radiated plus kinetic). This indicates that LLAGNs are not only inefficient radiators but that they also accrete inefficiently or are very efficient advectors.

  6. Evidence of Parsec-scale Jets in Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezcua, M.; Prieto, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    The nuclear radio emission of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) is often associated with unresolved cores. In this paper we show that most LLAGNs present extended jet radio emission when observed with sufficient angular resolution and sensitivity. They are thus able to power, at least, parsec-scale radio jets. To increase the detection rate of jets in LLAGNs, we analyze subarcsecond resolution data of three low-ionization nuclear emission regions. This yields the detection of extended jet-like radio structures in NGC 1097 and NGC 2911 and the first resolved parsec-scale jet of NGC 4594 (Sombrero). The three sources belong to a sample of nearby LLAGNs for which high-spatial-resolution spectral energy distribution of their core emission is available. This allows us to study their accretion rate and jet power (Q jet) without drawing on (most) of the ad hoc assumptions usually considered in large statistical surveys. We find that those LLAGNs with large-scale radio jets (>100 pc) have Q jet > 1042 erg s-1, while the lowest Q jet correspond to those LLAGNs with parsec-scale (<=100 pc) jets. The Q jet is at least as large as the radiated bolometric luminosity for all LLAGN, in agreement with previous statistical studies. Our detection of parsec-scale jets in individual objects further shows that the kinematic jet contribution is equally important in large- or parsec-scale objects. We also find that the Eddington-scaled accretion rate is still highly sub-Eddingtonian (<10-4) when adding the Q jet to the total emitted luminosity (radiated plus kinetic). This indicates that LLAGNs are not only inefficient radiators but that they also accrete inefficiently or are very efficient advectors.

  7. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  8. Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei from Propagating Turbulent Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Maxwell; Pauls, David; Wiita, Paul J.

    2016-03-01

    We use the Athena hydrodynamics code to model propagating two-dimensional relativistic jets as approximations to the growth of radio-loud active galactic nuclei for various input jet velocities and jet-to-ambient matter density ratios. Using results from these simulations we estimate the changing synchrotron emission by summing the fluxes from a vertical strip of zones behind the reconfinement shock, which is nearly stationary, and from which a substantial portion of the flux variability should arise. We explore a wide range of timescales by considering two light curves from each simulation; one uses a relativistic turbulence code with bulk velocities taken from our simulations as input, while the other uses the bulk velocity data to compute fluctuations caused by variations in the Doppler boosting due to changes in the direction and the speed of the flow through all zones in the strip. We then calculate power spectral densities (PSDs) from the light curves for both turbulent and bulk velocity origins for variability. The range of the power-law slopes of the PSDs for the turbulence induced variations is -1.8 to -2.3, while for the bulk velocity produced variations this range is -2.1 to -2.9 these are in agreement with most observations. When superimposed, these power spectra span a very large range in frequency (about five decades), with the turbulent fluctuations yielding most of the shorter timescale variations and the bulk flow changes dominating the longer periods.

  9. Large-scale X-ray jets from Galactic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.; Corbel, S.; Tomsick, J. A.; Butt, Y.; Fender, R. P.; Lazendic, J.; Miller, J. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2004-06-01

    Observations of jets from stellar-mass sources located in our Galaxy offer a unique opportunity to study the dynamical evolution of relativistic jets on time scales inaccessible for active galactic nuclei jets, with implications for our understanding of the dynamics and energetics of relativistic jets from Galactic x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We review recent observations of X-ray jets from Galactic black hole candidates. Spatially resolved X-ray spectra from SS 433 have provided evidence for re-heating in a hadronic jet and may offer an observational probe of jet collimation. A large-scale jet from the now quiescent transient 4U 1755-33 appears to indicate continual jet formation over a period of 10-30 years. Detection of a jet from XTE J1550-564 has provided the first direct measurement of gradual deceleration of a jet from a black hole and strong evidence for the re-energization of jet particles to energies up to 10 TeV at sites far from the jet origin.

  10. The host galaxies of active galactic nuclei with powerful relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguín-Iglesias, A.; León-Tavares, J.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Chavushyan, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Valtaoja, E.; Añorve, C.; Valdés, J.; Carrasco, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep near-infrared (NIR) images of a sample of 19 intermediate-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.0) radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) with powerful relativistic jets (L1.4 GHz > 1027 W Hz-1), previously classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also compile host galaxy and nuclear magnitudes for blazars from literature. The combined sample (this work and compilation) contains 100 radio-loud AGN with host galaxy detections and a broad range of radio luminosities L1.4 GHz ˜ 1023.7-1028.3 W Hz-1, allowing us to divide our sample into high-luminosity blazars (HLBs) and low-luminosity blazars (LLBs). The host galaxies of our sample are bright and seem to follow the μe-Reff relation for ellipticals and bulges. The two populations of blazars show different behaviours in the MK,nuclear -MK,bulge plane, where a statistically significant correlation is observed for HLBs. Although it may be affected by selection effects, this correlation suggests a close coupling between the accretion mode of the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy, which could be interpreted in terms of AGN feedback. Our findings are consistent with semi-analytical models where low-luminosity AGN emit the bulk of their energy in the form of radio jets, producing a strong feedback mechanism, and high-luminosity AGN are affected by galaxy mergers and interactions, which provide a common supply of cold gas to feed both nuclear activity and star formation episodes.

  11. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  12. Probing nuclear matter with jet conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Fries, R. J.

    2008-05-15

    We discuss the flavor of leading jet partons as a valuable probe of nuclear matter. We point out that the coupling of jets to nuclear matter naturally leads to an alteration of jet chemistry even at high transverse momentum p{sub T}. In particular, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) jets coupling to a chemically equilibrated quark gluon plasma in nuclear collisions will lead to hadron ratios at high transverse momentum p{sub T} that can differ significantly from their counterparts in p+p collisions. Flavor measurements could complement energy loss as a way to study interactions of hard QCD jets with nuclear matter. Roughly speaking they probe the inverse mean free path 1/{lambda} while energy loss probes the average squared momentum transfer {mu}{sup 2}/{lambda}. We present some estimates for the rate of jet conversions in a consistent Fokker-Planck framework and their impact on future high-p{sub T} identified hadron measurements at RHIC and LHC. We also suggest some novel observables to test flavor effects.

  13. The radiative deceleration of ultrarelativistic jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Konigl, Arieh

    1989-05-01

    A detailed study of the dynamical interaction between a highly relativistic jet and the thermal radiation field from an AGN accretion disk is reported, and the Comptonized spectrum arising from this interaction is self-consistently determined. A simple model that captures the essential radiative and geometrical features of realistic disk configurations is presented, and the disk radiation field is calculated. The results confirm Phinney's (1987) suggestion that the thermal radiation field produced by accretion in an AGN could be very effective in decelerating ultrarelativistic jets that are accreted by electromagnetic or hydromagnetic forces closer to the central black hole. Terminal Lorentz factors are consistent with the values inferred in superluminal radio sources are readily produced in this model for plausible disk and jet parameters without additional acceleration in the interaction zone. A new interpretation of the hard X-ray component detected in BL Lac spectra is proposed.

  14. WHAT GOVERNS THE BULK VELOCITY OF THE JET COMPONENTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Bo; Cao Xinwu; Gu Minfeng E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-11-10

    We use a sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with measured black hole masses to explore the jet formation mechanisms in these sources. Based on Koenigl's inhomogeneous jet model, the jet parameters, such as the bulk motion Lorentz factor, magnetic field strength, and electron density in the jet, can be estimated with the very long baseline interferometry and X-ray data.. We find a significant correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample, while no significant correlation is present between the bulk Lorentz factor and the Eddington ratio. The massive black holes will be spun up through accretion, as the black holes acquire mass and angular momentum simultaneously through accretion. Recent investigation indeed suggested that most supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies have on average higher spins than the black holes in spiral galaxies, where random, small accretion episodes (e.g., tidally disrupted stars, accretion of molecular clouds) might have played a more important role. If this is true, then the correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components found in this work implies that the motion velocity of the jet components is probably governed by the black hole spin. No correlation is found between the magnetic field strength at 10R {sub S} (R {sub S} = 2GM/c {sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius) in the jets and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample. This is consistent with the black hole spin scenario, i.e., the faster moving jets are magnetically accelerated by the magnetic fields threading the horizon of more rapidly rotating black holes. The results imply that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism may dominate over the Blandford-Payne mechanism for the jet acceleration, at least in these radio-loud AGNs.

  15. MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with VLBA Experiments. XI. Spectral Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Homan, Daniel C.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Lister, Matthew L.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas

    2014-06-01

    We have obtained milliarcsecond-scale spectral index distributions for a sample of 190 extragalactic radio jets through the Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with the VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) project. The sources were observed in 2006 at 8.1, 8.4, 12.1, and 15.4 GHz, and we have determined spectral index maps between 8.1 and 15.4 GHz to study the four-frequency spectrum in individual jet features. We have performed detailed simulations to study the effects of image alignment and (u, v)-plane coverage on the spectral index maps to verify our results. We use the spectral index maps to study the spectral index evolution along the jet and determine the spectral distributions in different locations of the jets. The core spectral indices are on average flat with a mean value of +0.22 ± 0.03 for the sample, while the jet spectrum is in general steep with a mean index of -1.04 ± 0.03. A simple power-law fit is often inadequate for the core regions, as expected if the cores are partially self-absorbed. The overall jet spectrum steepens at a rate of about -0.001 to -0.004 per deprojected parsec when moving further out from the core with flat spectrum radio quasars having significantly steeper spectra (mean -1.09 ± 0.04) than the BL Lac objects (mean -0.80 ± 0.05). However, the spectrum in both types of objects flattens on average by ~0.2 at the locations of the jet components indicating particle acceleration or density enhancements along the jet. The mean spectral index at the component locations of -0.81 ± 0.02 corresponds to a power-law index of ~2.6 for the electron energy distribution. We find a significant trend that jet components with linear polarization parallel to the jet (magnetic field perpendicular to the jet) have flatter spectra, as expected for transverse shocks. Compared to quasars, BL Lacs have more jet components with perpendicular magnetic field alignment, which may explain their generally flatter spectra. The overall steepening of the

  16. MOJAVE: Monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. XI. Spectral distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Homan, Daniel C.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2014-06-01

    We have obtained milliarcsecond-scale spectral index distributions for a sample of 190 extragalactic radio jets through the Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with the VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) project. The sources were observed in 2006 at 8.1, 8.4, 12.1, and 15.4 GHz, and we have determined spectral index maps between 8.1 and 15.4 GHz to study the four-frequency spectrum in individual jet features. We have performed detailed simulations to study the effects of image alignment and (u, v)-plane coverage on the spectral index maps to verify our results. We use the spectral index maps to study the spectral index evolution along the jet and determine the spectral distributions in different locations of the jets. The core spectral indices are on average flat with a mean value of +0.22 ± 0.03 for the sample, while the jet spectrum is in general steep with a mean index of –1.04 ± 0.03. A simple power-law fit is often inadequate for the core regions, as expected if the cores are partially self-absorbed. The overall jet spectrum steepens at a rate of about –0.001 to –0.004 per deprojected parsec when moving further out from the core with flat spectrum radio quasars having significantly steeper spectra (mean –1.09 ± 0.04) than the BL Lac objects (mean –0.80 ± 0.05). However, the spectrum in both types of objects flattens on average by ∼0.2 at the locations of the jet components indicating particle acceleration or density enhancements along the jet. The mean spectral index at the component locations of –0.81 ± 0.02 corresponds to a power-law index of ∼2.6 for the electron energy distribution. We find a significant trend that jet components with linear polarization parallel to the jet (magnetic field perpendicular to the jet) have flatter spectra, as expected for transverse shocks. Compared to quasars, BL Lacs have more jet components with perpendicular magnetic field alignment, which may explain their generally flatter spectra. The overall

  17. THE INNER GALACTIC BULGE: EVIDENCE FOR A NUCLEAR BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2012-01-15

    Recent data from the VVV survey have strengthened evidence for a structural change in the Galactic bulge inward of |l| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign . Here we show with an N-body barred galaxy simulation that a boxy bulge formed through the bar and buckling instabilities effortlessly matches measured bulge longitude profiles for red clump stars. The same simulation snapshot was earlier used to clarify the apparent boxy bulge-long bar dichotomy, for the same orientation and scaling. The change in the slope of the model longitude profiles in the inner few degrees is caused by a transition from highly elongated to more nearly axisymmetric isodensity contours in the inner boxy bulge. This transition is confined to a few degrees from the Galactic plane; thus the change of slope is predicted to disappear at higher Galactic latitudes. We also show that the nuclear star count map derived from this simulation snapshot displays a longitudinal asymmetry similar to that observed in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) data, but is less flattened to the Galactic plane than the 2MASS map. These results support the interpretation that the Galactic bulge originated from disk evolution and question the evidence advanced from star count data for the existence of a secondary nuclear bar in the Milky Way.

  18. Intrinsic physical conditions and structure of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, E. E.; Beskin, V. S.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Zheltoukhov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of the frequency dependence of the observed shift of the cores of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) allows us to evaluate the number density of the outflowing plasma ne and, hence, the multiplicity parameter λ = ne/nGJ, where nGJ is the Goldreich-Julian number density. We have obtained the median value for λmed = 3 × 1013 and the median value for the Michel magnetization parameter σM, med = 8 from an analysis of 97 sources. Since the magnetization parameter can be interpreted as the maximum possible Lorentz factor Γ of the bulk motion which can be obtained for relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow, this estimate is in agreement with the observed superluminal motion of bright features in AGN jets. Moreover, knowing these key parameters, one can determine the transverse structure of the flow. We show that the poloidal magnetic field and particle number density are much larger in the centre of the jet than near the jet boundary. The MHD model can also explain the typical observed level of jet acceleration. Finally, casual connectivity of strongly collimated jets is discussed.

  19. Trajectories of Cepheid variable stars in the Galactic nuclear bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2012-06-01

    The central region of our Galaxy provides us with a good opportunity to study the evolution of galactic nuclei and bulges because we can observe various phenomena in detail at the proximity of 8 kpc. There is a hierarchical alignment of stellar systems with different sizes; from the extended bulge, the nuclear bulge, down to the compact cluster around the central supermassive blackhole. The nuclear bulge contains stars as young as a few Myr, and even hosts the ongoing star formation. These are in contrast to the more extended bulge which are dominated by old stars, ~10Gyr. It is considered that the star formation in the nuclear bulge is caused by fresh gas provided from the inner disk. In this picture, the nuclear bulge plays an important role as the interface between the gas supplier, the inner disk, and the galactic nucleus. Kinematics of young stars in the nuclear bulge is important to discuss the star forming process and the gas circulation in the Galactic Center. We here propose spectroscopic observations of Cepheid variable stars, ~25 Myr, which we recently discovered in the nuclear bulge. The spectra taken in this proposal will allow timely estimates of the systemic velocities of the variable stars.

  20. Three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations of active galactic nuclei jets: magnetic kink instability and Fanaroff-Riley dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Bromberg, Omer

    2016-09-01

    Energy deposition by active galactic nuclei jets into the ambient medium can affect galaxy formation and evolution, the cooling of gas flows at the centres of galaxy clusters, and the growth of the supermassive black holes. However, the processes that couple jet power to the ambient medium and determine jet morphology are poorly understood. For instance, there is no agreement on the cause of the well-known Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological dichotomy of jets, with FRI jets being shorter and less stable than FRII jets. We carry out global 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic jets propagating through the ambient medium. We show that the flat density profiles of galactic cores slow down and collimate the jets, making them susceptible to the 3D magnetic kink instability. We obtain a critical power, which depends on the galaxy core mass and radius, below which jets become kink-unstable within the core, stall, and inflate cavities filled with relativistically hot plasma. Jets above the critical power stably escape the core and form powerful backflows. Thus, the kink instability controls the jet morphology and can lead to the FR dichotomy. The model-predicted dependence of the critical power on the galaxy optical luminosity agrees well with observations.

  1. Three-dimensional Relativistic MHD Simulations of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets: Magnetic Kink Instability and Fanaroff-Riley Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Bromberg, Omer

    2016-04-01

    Energy deposition by active galactic nuclei jets into the ambient medium can affect galaxy formation and evolution, the cooling of gas flows at the centres of galaxy clusters, and the growth of the supermassive black holes. However, the processes that couple jet power to the ambient medium and determine jet morphology are poorly understood. For instance, there is no agreement on the cause of the well-known Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological dichotomy of jets, with FRI jets being shorter and less stable than FRII jets. We carry out global 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic jets propagating through the ambient medium. We show that the flat density profiles of galactic cores slow down and collimate the jets, making them susceptible to the 3D magnetic kink instability. We obtain a critical power, which depends on the galaxy core mass and radius, below which jets become kink-unstable within the core, stall, and inflate cavities filled with relativistically-hot plasma. Jets above the critical power stably escape the galaxy cores and form powerful backflows. Thus, the kink instability controls the jet morphology and can lead to the FR dichotomy. The model-predicted dependence of the critical power on the galaxy optical luminosity agrees well with observations.

  2. Precessing Gamma Jets in the extended and evaporating galactic halo as the sources of GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Salis, Andrea

    1996-08-01

    Precessing Gamma Jets (GJ) in binary systems located in extended or evaporating galactic halos should be the sources of GRBs. The GJ are born by Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) of thermal photons (optical, infrared,...) onto (power law) electron jets (from GeV energies and above) produced by spinning pulsars or black holes. The thermal photons are emitted by the binary companion (or by their nearby accreting disk). The collimated GJ beam is trembling with the characteristic pulsar millisecond period and it is bent by the companion magnetic field interactions, as a lighthouse, in a nearly conical shape within the characteristic Keplerian period; an additional nutation due to the asymmetric inertial momentum may lead, in general, to aperiodic behaviour of GRB signals. SGRs are GRBs seen at the periphery of the hard energy GJ beam core. The original birth locations of GJ (SNRs, planetary nebulae, globular clusters,...) are smeared out by the high escape velocity of the system; the Neutron Star (NS) high velocity is possibly due to the asymmetric jet precession, and consequent ``rowing'' acceleration, related to the eccentricity of the binary system. The GJ power is, for realistic parameters, comparable to that needed for GRBs in an extended or evaporating galactic halo. Their detailed spectra and time evolution fit the observed data. The expected GRB source number (within present BATSE sensitivity) is tens of thousands, compatible with the allowed presence of 10-20% GRB repeaters.

  3. THE MICROARCSECOND STRUCTURE OF AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JET VIA INTERSTELLAR SCINTILLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Macquart, J.-P.; Godfrey, L. E. H.; Bignall, H. E.

    2013-03-10

    We describe a new tool for studying the structure and physical characteristics of ultracompact active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets and their surroundings with {mu}as precision. This tool is based on the frequency dependence of the light curves observed for intra-day variable radio sources, where the variability is caused by interstellar scintillation. We apply this method to PKS 1257-326 to resolve the core-shift as a function of frequency on scales well below {approx}12 {mu}as. We find that the frequency dependence of the position of the scintillating component is r{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.1{+-}0.24} (99% confidence interval) and the frequency dependence of the size of the scintillating component is d{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.64{+-}0.006}. Together, these results imply that the jet opening angle increases with distance along the jet: d{proportional_to}r{sup n{sub d}} with n{sub d} > 1.8. We show that the flaring of the jet, and flat frequency dependence of the core position is broadly consistent with a model in which the jet is hydrostatically confined and traversing a steep pressure gradient in the confining medium with p{proportional_to}r{sup -n{sub p}} and n{sub p} {approx}> 7. Such steep pressure gradients have previously been suggested based on very long baseline interferometry studies of the frequency dependent core shifts in AGNs.

  4. THE ROLE OF THE ACCRETION DISK, DUST, AND JETS IN THE IR EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. E.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.

    2013-11-10

    We use recent high-resolution infrared (IR; 1-20 μm) photometry to examine the origin of the IR emission in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). The data are compared with published model fits that describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of LLAGN in terms of an advection-dominated accretion flow, truncated thin accretion disk, and jet. The truncated disk in these models is usually not luminous enough to explain the observed IR emission, and in all cases its spectral shape is much narrower than the broad IR peaks in the data. Synchrotron radiation from the jet appears to be important in very radio-loud nuclei, but the detection of strong silicate emission features in many objects indicates that dust must also contribute. We investigate this point by fitting the IR SED of NGC 3998 using dusty torus and optically thin (τ{sub mid-IR} ∼ 1) dust shell models. While more detailed modeling is necessary, these initial results suggest that dust may account for the nuclear mid-IR emission of many LLAGN.

  5. The nuclear jet and counterjet region of the radio galaxy Cygnus A.

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, N; Sorathia, B; Bietenholz, M F; Carilli, C L; Diamond, P

    1995-01-01

    Very-long-baseline interferometry images of the nuclear region of the radio galaxy Cygnus A reveal a pronounced "core" and a knotty jet and counterjet. The knots are moving away from the core at apparent speeds which are subluminal for h = 1 [h = H0/100 km.s-1.Mpc-1;1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16)m] and about c for h = 0.5. The jet is aligned with the outer, kiloparsec-scale jet to within 2 degrees. The counterjet has a total flux density at 5 GHz of about one-fifth of that of the jet. In the context of the twin relativistic jet model for active galactic nuclei, the jet in Cygnus A is oriented at an angle to our line of sight of 35-80 degrees and 55-85 degrees, and the intrinsic velocity of the jet fluid is 0.4-0.6c and 0.6-1c for h = 1 and h = 0.5, respectively. PMID:11607600

  6. A PHYSICAL LINK BETWEEN JET FORMATION AND HOT PLASMA IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong; Cao Xinwu; Ho, Luis C. E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2013-06-10

    Recent observations suggest that in black hole X-ray binaries jet/outflow formation is related to the hot plasma in the vicinity of the black hole, either in the form of an advection-dominated accretion flow at low accretion rates or in a disk corona at high accretion rates. We test the viability of this scenario for supermassive black holes using two samples of active galactic nuclei distinguished by the presence (radio-strong) and absence (radio-weak) of well-collimated, relativistic jets. Each is centered on a narrow range of black hole mass but spans a very broad range of Eddington ratios, effectively simulating in a statistical manner the behavior of a single black hole evolving across a wide spread in accretion states. Unlike the relationship between the radio and optical luminosity, which shows an abrupt break between high- and low-luminosity sources at an Eddington ratio of {approx}1%, the radio emission-a measure of the jet power-varies continuously with the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosity, roughly as L{sub R} {proportional_to} L{sub X}{sup 0.6-0.75}. This relation, which holds for both radio-weak and radio-strong active galaxies, is similar to the one seen in X-ray binaries. Jet/outflow formation appears to be closely linked to the conditions that give rise to the hot, optically thin coronal emission associated with accretion flows, both in the regime of low and high accretion rates.

  7. Proton-synchrotron radiation of large-scale jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    The X-radiation of large-scale extragalactic jets poses a serious challenge for the conventional electron-synchrotron or inverse Compton models suggested to explain the overall non-thermal emission of the resolved knots and hotspots. In this paper I propose an alternative mechanism for X-ray emission - synchrotron radiation by extremely high-energy protons - and discuss implications of this model for the extended jet features resolved by Chandra in several prominent radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) - Pictor A, 3C 120, PKS 0637-752 and 3C 273. I show that if protons are indeed accelerated to energies E p >=1018 eV, it is possible to construct a realistic model that allows an effective cooling of protons via synchrotron radiation on quite `comfortable' time-scales of about 107 -108 yr, i.e. on time-scales that provide effective propagation of protons over the jet structures on kpc scales. This explains quite naturally the diffuse character of the observed X-ray emission, as well as the broad range of spectral X-ray indices observed from different objects. Yet, as long as the proton synchrotron cooling time is comparable with both the particle escape time and the age of the jet, the proton-synchrotron model offers an adequate radiation efficiency. The model requires relatively large magnetic field of about 1mG, and proton acceleration rates ranging from L p ~1043 to 1046 ergs-1 . These numbers could be reduced significantly if the jet structures are moving relativistically towards the observer. I discuss also possible contributions of synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons produced at interactions of relatively low energy (E p <=1013 eV) protons with the compressed gas in the jet structures. This is an interesting possibility which however requires a very large product of the ambient gas density and total amount of accelerated protons. Therefore it could be treated as a viable working hypothesis only if one can reduce the intrinsic X

  8. MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with VLBA Experiments. VI. Kinematics Analysis of a Complete Sample of Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, M. L.; Cohen, M. H.; Homan, D. C.; Kadler, M.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Ros, E.; Savolainen, T.; Zensus, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the jet kinematics of a complete flux-density-limited sample of 135 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) resulting from a 13 year program to investigate the structure and evolution of parsec-scale jet phenomena. Our analysis is based on new 2 cm Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images obtained between 2002 and 2007, but includes our previously published observations made at the same wavelength, and is supplemented by VLBA archive data. In all, we have used 2424 images spanning the years 1994-2007 to study and determine the motions of 526 separate jet features in 127 jets. The data quality and temporal coverage (a median of 15 epochs per source) of this complete AGN jet sample represent a significant advance over previous kinematics surveys. In all but five AGNs, the jets appear one-sided, most likely the result of differential Doppler boosting. In general, the observed motions are directed along the jet ridge line, outward from the optically thick core feature. We directly observe changes in speed and/or direction in one third of the well-sampled jet components in our survey. While there is some spread in the apparent speeds of separate features within an individual jet, the dispersion is about three times smaller than the overall dispersion of speeds among all jets. This supports the idea that there is a characteristic flow that describes each jet, which we have characterized by the fastest observed component speed. The observed maximum speed distribution is peaked at ~10c, with a tail that extends out to ~50c. This requires a distribution of intrinsic Lorentz factors in the parent population that range up to ~50. We also note the presence of some rare low-pattern speeds or even stationary features in otherwise rapidly flowing jets that may be the result of standing re-collimation shocks, and/or a complex geometry and highly favorable Doppler factor.

  9. THE INVARIANT TWIST OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE RELATIVISTIC JETS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes E-mail: dimitris_christodoulou@uml.edu E-mail: gabuzda@physics.ucc.ie

    2009-09-10

    The origin of cosmic magnetic (B) fields remains an open question. It is generally believed that very weak primordial B fields are amplified by dynamo processes, but it appears unlikely that the amplification proceeds fast enough to account for the fields presently observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters. In an alternative scenario, cosmic B fields are generated near the inner edges of accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by azimuthal electric currents due to the difference between the plasma electron and ion velocities that arises when the electrons are retarded by interactions with photons. While dynamo processes show no preference for the polarity of the (presumably random) seed field that they amplify, this alternative mechanism uniquely relates the polarity of the poloidal B field to the angular velocity of the accretion disk, resulting in a unique direction for the toroidal B field induced by disk rotation. Observations of the toroidal fields of 29 AGN jets revealed by parsec-scale Faraday rotation measurements show a clear asymmetry that is consistent with this model, with the probability that this asymmetry came about by chance being less than 1%. This lends support to the hypothesis that the universe is seeded by B fields that are generated in AGNs via this mechanism and subsequently injected into intergalactic space by the jet outflows.

  10. Photon-axion mixing within the jets of active galactic nuclei and prospects for detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Chadwick, P.M. E-mail: p.m.chadwick@durham.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy γ-ray observations of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally result in higher fluxes and harder spectra than expected, resulting in some tension with the level of the extragalactic background light (EBL). If hypothetical axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) were to exist, this tension could be relieved since the oscillation of photons to ALPs would mitigate the effects of EBL absorption and lead to softer inferred intrinsic AGN spectra. In this paper we consider the effect of photon-ALP mixing on observed spectra, including the photon-ALP mixing that would occur within AGN jets. We then simulate observations of three AGN with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a next generation γ-ray telescope, to determine its prospects for detecting the signatures of photon-ALP mixing on the spectra. We conclude that prospects for CTA detecting these signatures or else setting limits on the ALP parameter space are quite promising. We find that prospects are improved if photon-ALP mixing within the jet is properly considered and that the best target for observations is PKS 2155-304.

  11. Large-scale jets from active galactic nuclei as a source of intracluster medium heating: cavities and shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, Manel; Martí, José-María; Quilis, Vicent; Ricciardelli, Elena

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of powerful extragalactic jets is not only interesting by itself, but also for its impact on the evolution of the host galaxy and its surroundings. We have performed long-term axisymmetric numerical simulations of relativistic jets with different powers to study their evolution through an environment with a pressure and density gradient. Our results show key differences in the evolution of jets with different powers in terms of the spatial and temporal scales of energy deposition. According to our results, the observed morphology in X-ray cavities requires that an important fraction of the jet's energetic budget is in the form of internal energy. Thus, light, lepton-dominated jets are favoured. In all cases, heating is mainly produced by shocks. Cavity overpressure is sustained by an important population of thermal particles. Our simulations reproduce the cool-core structure in projected, luminosity-weighted temperature. We have performed an additional simulation of a slow, massive jet and discuss the differences with its relativistic counterparts. Important qualitative and quantitative differences are found between the non-relativistic and the relativistic jets. Our conclusions point towards a dual mode of active galactic nuclei kinetic feedback, depending on the jet power.

  12. THE FERMI BUBBLES: SUPERSONIC ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS WITH ANISOTROPIC COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.-Y. K.; Ruszkowski, M.; Ricker, P. M.; Zweibel, E.; Lee, D.

    2012-12-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveals two large bubbles in the Galaxy, which extend nearly symmetrically {approx}50 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic center. Using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic simulations that self-consistently include the dynamical interaction between cosmic rays (CRs) and thermal gas and anisotropic CR diffusion along the magnetic field lines, we show that the key characteristics of the observed gamma-ray bubbles and the spatially correlated X-ray features in the ROSAT 1.5 keV map can be successfully reproduced by recent jet activity from the central active galactic nucleus. We find that after taking into account the projection of the 3D bubbles onto the sky the physical heights of the bubbles can be much smaller than previously thought, greatly reducing the formation time of the bubbles to about a Myr. This relatively small bubble age is needed to reconcile the simulations with the upper limit of bubble ages estimated from the cooling time of high-energy electrons. No additional physical mechanisms are required to suppress large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities because the evolution time is too short for them to develop. The simulated CR bubbles are edge-brightened, which is consistent with the observed projected flat surface brightness distribution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the sharp edges of the observed bubbles can be due to anisotropic CR diffusion along magnetic field lines that drape around the bubbles during their supersonic expansion, with suppressed perpendicular diffusion across the bubble surface. Possible causes of the slight bends of the Fermi bubbles to the west are also discussed.

  13. Evidence for a Parsec-scale Jet from the Galactic Center Black Hole: Interaction with Local Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Morris, Mark R.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2013-12-01

    Despite strong physical reasons that they should exist and decades of searching, jets from the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, have not yet been convincingly detected. Based on high-resolution Very Large Array images and ultra-deep imaging-spectroscopic data produced by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we report new evidence for the existence of a parsec-scale jet from Sgr A*, by associating a linear feature G359.944-0.052, previously identified in X-ray images of the Galactic center, with a radio shock front on the Eastern Arm of the Sgr A West H II region. We show that the shock front can be explained in terms of the impact of a jet having a sharp momentum peak along the Galaxy's rotation axis, whereas G359.944-0.052, a quasi-steady feature with a power-law spectrum, can be understood as synchrotron radiation from shock-induced ultra-relativistic electrons cooling in a finite post-shock region downstream along the jet path. Several interesting implications of the jet properties are discussed.

  14. Signs of active galactic nucleus quenching in a merger remnant with radio jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Junko; Shidatsu, Megumi; Kawamuro, Taiki; Matsuoka, Kenta

    2016-02-01

    We investigate optical, infrared, and radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) signs in the merger remnant Arp 187, which hosts luminous jets launched in the order of 105 yr ago but whose present-day AGN activity is still unknown. We find AGN signs from the optical Baldwin-Phillips-Telervich diagram and infrared [O IV] 25.89 μm line, originating from the narrow line regions of AGN. On the other hand, Spitzer/IRS show host galaxy dominated spectra, suggesting that the thermal emission from the AGN torus is considerably small or already diminished. Combining the black hole mass, the upper limit of radio luminosity of the core, and the fundamental plane of the black hole enables us to estimate X-ray luminosity, which gives <1040 erg s-1. Those results suggest that the AGN activity of Arp 187 has already been quenched, but the narrow line region is still alive owing to the time delay of emission from the past AGN activity.

  15. The Invariant Twist of Magnetic Fields in the Relativistic Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Gabuzda, Denise C.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of cosmic magnetic (B) fields remains an open question. It is generally believed that very weak primordial B fields are amplified by dynamo processes, but it appears unlikely that the amplification proceeds fast enough to account for the fields presently observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters. In an alternative scenario, cosmic B fields are generated near the inner edges of accretion disks in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) by azimuthal electric currents due to the difference between the plasma electron and ion velocities that arises when the electrons are retarded by interactions with photons. While dynamo processes show no preference for the polarity of the (presumably random) seed field that they amplify, this alternative mechanism uniquely relates the polarity of the poloidal B field to the angular velocity of the accretion disk, resulting in a unique direction for the toroidal B field induced by disk rotation. Observations of the toroidal fields of 29 AGN jets revealed by parsec-scale Faraday rotation measurements show a clear asymmetry that is consistent with this model, with the probability that this asymmetry came about by chance being less than 1 %. This lends support to the hypothesis that the Universe is seeded by B fields that are generated in AGN via this mechanism

  16. A jet model for Galactic black-hole X-ray sources: The correlation between cutoff energy and phase lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, mildy relativistic radio jet when they are in the hard and hard-intermediate states, that is, typically at the beginning and the end of an X-ray outburst. In a series of papers, we have developed a jet model and have shown through Monte Carlo simulations that our model can explain many observational results. Aims: In this work, we investigate one more constraining relationship between the cutoff energy and the phase lag during the early stages of an X-ray outburst of the black-hole X-ray binary GX 339-4: the cutoff energy decreases while the phase lag increases during the brightening of the hard state. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft accretion-disk photons in the jet and computed the phase lag between soft and hard photons and the cutoff energy of the resulting high-energy power law. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the above correlation, with a minor modification consisting of introducing an acceleration zone at the base of the jet. Conclusions: The observed correlation between the cutoff energy and the phase lag in the black-hole binary GX 339-4 suggests that the lags are produced by the hard component. Here we show that this correlation arises naturally if Comptonization in the jet produces these two quantities.

  17. FROM THE BLAZAR SEQUENCE TO THE BLAZAR ENVELOPE: REVISITING THE RELATIVISTIC JET DICHOTOMY IN RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2011-10-20

    We revisit the concept of a blazar sequence that relates the synchrotron peak frequency ({nu}{sub peak}) in blazars with synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub peak}, in {nu}L{sub {nu}}) using a large sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei. We present observational evidence that the blazar sequence is formed from two populations in the synchrotron {nu}{sub peak}-L{sub peak} plane, each forming an upper edge to an envelope of progressively misaligned blazars, and connecting to an adjacent group of radio galaxies having jets viewed at much larger angles to the line of sight. When binned by jet kinetic power (L{sub kin}; as measured through a scaling relationship with extended radio power), we find that radio core dominance decreases with decreasing synchrotron L{sub peak}, revealing that sources in the envelope are generally more misaligned. We find population-based evidence of velocity gradients in jets at low kinetic powers ({approx}10{sup 42}-10{sup 44.5} erg s{sup -1}), corresponding to Fanaroff-Riley (FR) I radio galaxies and most BL Lac objects. These low jet power 'weak-jet' sources, thought to exhibit radiatively inefficient accretion, are distinguished from the population of non-decelerating, low synchrotron-peaking (LSP) blazars and FR II radio galaxies ('strong' jets) which are thought to exhibit radiatively efficient accretion. The two-population interpretation explains the apparent contradiction of the existence of highly core-dominated, low-power blazars at both low and high synchrotron peak frequencies, and further implies that most intermediate synchrotron peak sources are not intermediate in intrinsic jet power between LSP and high synchrotron-peaking (HSP) sources, but are more misaligned versions of HSP sources with similar jet powers.

  18. The inner jet of an active galactic nucleus as revealed by a radio-to-gamma-ray outburst.

    PubMed

    Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G; D'Arcangelo, Francesca D; Smith, Paul S; Williams, G Grant; Larionov, Valeri M; Oh, Haruki; Olmstead, Alice R; Aller, Margo F; Aller, Hugh D; McHardy, Ian M; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Tornikoski, Merja; Valtaoja, Esko; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A; Kopatskaya, Eugenia N; Gear, Walter K; Tosti, Gino; Kurtanidze, Omar; Nikolashvili, Maria; Sigua, Lorand; Miller, H Richard; Ryle, Wesley T

    2008-04-24

    Blazars are the most extreme active galactic nuclei. They possess oppositely directed plasma jets emanating at near light speeds from accreting supermassive black holes. According to theoretical models, such jets are propelled by magnetic fields twisted by differential rotation of the black hole's accretion disk or inertial-frame-dragging ergosphere. The flow velocity increases outward along the jet in an acceleration and collimation zone containing a coiled magnetic field. Detailed observations of outbursts of electromagnetic radiation, for which blazars are famous, can potentially probe the zone. It has hitherto not been possible to either specify the location of the outbursts or verify the general picture of jet formation. Here we report sequences of high-resolution radio images and optical polarization measurements of the blazar BL Lacertae. The data reveal a bright feature in the jet that causes a double flare of radiation from optical frequencies to TeV gamma-ray energies, as well as a delayed outburst at radio wavelengths. We conclude that the event starts in a region with a helical magnetic field that we identify with the acceleration and collimation zone predicted by the theories. The feature brightens again when it crosses a standing shock wave corresponding to the bright 'core' seen on the images. PMID:18432239

  19. Complete multiwavelength evolution of Galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. I. Conditions for 'compact' jet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalemci, E.; Dinçer, T.; Chun, Y. Y.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2013-12-20

    Compact, steady jets are observed in the near infrared and radio bands in the hard state of Galactic black hole transients as their luminosity decreases and the source moves toward a quiescent state. Recent radio observations indicate that the jets turn off completely in the soft state; therefore, multiwavelength monitoring of black hole transients is essential to probe the formation of jets. In this work, we conducted a systematic study of all black hole transients with near infrared and radio coverage during their outburst decays. We characterized the timescales of changes in X-ray spectral and temporal properties and also in near infrared and/or in radio emission. We confirmed that state transitions occur in black hole transients at a very similar fraction of their respective Eddington luminosities. We also found that the near infrared flux increase that could be due to the formation of a compact jet is delayed by a time period of days with respect to the formation of a corona. Finally, we found a threshold disk Eddington luminosity fraction for the compact jets to form. We explain these results with a model such that the increase in the near infrared flux corresponds to a transition from a patchy, small-scale height corona along with an optically thin outflow to a large-scale height corona that allows for collimation of a steady compact jet. We discuss the timescale of jet formation in terms of transport of magnetic fields from the outer parts of the disk, and we also consider two alternative explanations for the multiwavelength emission: hot inner accretion flows and irradiation.

  20. MOJAVE: MONITORING OF JETS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH VLBA EXPERIMENTS. V. MULTI-EPOCH VLBA IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, M. L.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F. E-mail: haller@umich.edu

    2009-03-15

    We present images from a long-term program (MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with VLBA Experiments) to survey the structure and evolution of parsec-scale jet phenomena associated with bright radio-loud active galaxies in the northern sky. The observations consist of 2424 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images of a complete flux-density-limited sample of 135 AGNs above declination -20{sup 0}, spanning the period 1994 August to 2007 September. These data were acquired as part of the MOJAVE and 2 cm Survey programs, and from the VLBA archive. The sample-selection criteria are based on multi-epoch parsec-scale (VLBA) flux density, and heavily favor highly variable and compact blazars. The sample includes nearly all the most prominent blazars in the northern sky, and is well suited for statistical analysis and comparison with studies at other wavelengths. Our multi-epoch and stacked-epoch images show 94% of the sample to have apparent one-sided jet morphologies, most likely due to the effects of relativistic beaming. Of the remaining sources, five have two-sided parsec-scale jets, and three are effectively unresolved by the VLBA at 15 GHz, with essentially all of the flux density contained within a few tenths of a milliarcsecond.

  1. DRIVING OUTFLOWS WITH RELATIVISTIC JETS AND THE DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK EFFICIENCY ON INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INHOMOGENEITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-10-01

    We examine the detailed physics of the feedback mechanism by relativistic active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets interacting with a two-phase fractal interstellar medium (ISM) in the kpc-scale core of galaxies using 29 three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback efficiency, as measured by the amount of cloud dispersal generated by the jet-ISM interactions, is sensitive to the maximum size of clouds in the fractal cloud distribution but not to their volume filling factor. Feedback ceases to be efficient for Eddington ratios P{sub jet}/L{sub edd} {approx}< 10{sup -4}, although systems with large cloud complexes {approx}> 50 pc require jets of Eddington ratio in excess of 10{sup -2} to disperse the clouds appreciably. Based on measurements of the bubble expansion rates in our simulations, we argue that sub-grid AGN prescriptions resulting in negative feedback in cosmological simulations without a multi-phase treatment of the ISM are good approximations if the volume filling factor of warm-phase material is less than 0.1 and the cloud complexes are smaller than {approx}25 pc. We find that the acceleration of the dense embedded clouds is provided by the ram pressure of the high-velocity flow through the porous channels of the warm phase, flow that has fully entrained the shocked hot-phase gas it has swept up, and is additionally mass loaded by ablated cloud material. This mechanism transfers 10% to 40% of the jet energy to the cold and warm gas, accelerating it within a few 10 to 100 Myr to velocities that match those observed in a range of high- and low-redshift radio galaxies hosting powerful radio jets.

  2. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Elitzur, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Roche, P. F.; Oi, N.

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further insights into the nuclear

  3. MOJAVE: MONITORING OF JETS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH VLBA EXPERIMENTS. VIII. FARADAY ROTATION IN PARSEC-SCALE AGN JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Lister, Matthew L.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Homan, Daniel C.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.

    2012-10-01

    We report observations of Faraday rotation measures for a sample of 191 extragalactic radio jets observed within the MOJAVE program. Multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array observations were carried out over 12 epochs in 2006 at four frequencies between 8 and 15 GHz. We detect parsec-scale Faraday rotation measures in 149 sources and find the quasars to have larger rotation measures on average than BL Lac objects. The median core rotation measures are significantly higher than in the jet components. This is especially true for quasars where we detect a significant negative correlation between the magnitude of the rotation measure and the de-projected distance from the core. We perform detailed simulations of the observational errors of total intensity, polarization, and Faraday rotation, and concentrate on the errors of transverse Faraday rotation measure gradients in unresolved jets. Our simulations show that the finite image restoring beam size has a significant effect on the observed rotation measure gradients, and spurious gradients can occur due to noise in the data if the jet is less than two beams wide in polarization. We detect significant transverse rotation measure gradients in four sources (0923+392, 1226+023, 2230+114, and 2251+158). In 1226+023 the rotation measure is for the first time seen to change sign from positive to negative over the transverse cuts, which supports the presence of a helical magnetic field in the jet. In this source we also detect variations in the jet rotation measure over a timescale of three months, which are difficult to explain with external Faraday screens and suggest internal Faraday rotation. By comparing fractional polarization changes in jet components between the four frequency bands to depolarization models, we find that an external purely random Faraday screen viewed through only a few lines of sight can explain most of our polarization observations, but in some sources, such as 1226+023 and 2251+158, internal

  4. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2014-11-01

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer, and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and heavy ion detector systems to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address these issues, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration has designed, built, and characterized a supersonic gas jet target, capable of providing gas areal densities on par with commonly used solid targets within a region of a few millimeters diameter. Densities of over 5×1018 atoms/cm2 of helium have been achieved, making the JENSA gas jet target the most dense helium jet achieved so far.

  5. Coupling hydrodynamics and radiation calculations for star-jet interactions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cita, V. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars and their winds can contribute to the non-thermal emission in extragalactic jets. Because of the complexity of jet-star interactions, the properties of the resulting emission are closely linked to those of the emitting flows. Aims: We simulate the interaction between a stellar wind and a relativistic extragalactic jet and use the hydrodynamic results to compute the non-thermal emission under different conditions. Methods: We performed relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet interacting with a supersonic, non-relativistic stellar wind. We computed the corresponding streamlines out of the simulation results and calculated the injection, evolution, and emission of non-thermal particles accelerated in the jet shock, focusing on electrons or e±-pairs. Several cases were explored, considering different jet-star interaction locations, magnetic fields, and observer lines of sight. The jet luminosity and star properties were fixed, but the results are easily scalable when these parameters are changed. Results: Individual jet-star interactions produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission that peaks from X-rays to MeV energies (depending on the magnetic field), and at ~100-1000 GeV (depending on the stellar type), respectively. The radiation spectrum is hard in the scenarios explored here as a result of non-radiative cooling dominance, as low-energy electrons are efficiently advected even under relatively high magnetic fields. Interactions of jets with cold stars lead to an even harder inverse Compton spectrum because of the Klein-Nishina effect in the cross section. Doppler boosting has a strong effect on the observer luminosity. Conclusions: The emission levels for individual interactions found here are in the line of previous, more approximate, estimates, strengthening the hypothesis that collective jet-star interactions could significantly contribute at high energies under efficient particle acceleration.

  6. THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION CHANDRA VIEW OF PHOTOIONIZATION AND JET-CLOUD INTERACTION IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 4151

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junfeng; Fabbiano, G.; Karovska, M.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Zezas, A.; Mundell, C. G. E-mail: gfabbiano@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: elvis@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-10-20

    We report high resolution imaging of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 obtained with a 50 ks Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC) observation. The HRC image resolves the emission on spatial scales of 0.''5, approx30 pc, showing an extended X-ray morphology overall consistent with the narrow-line region (NLR) seen in optical line emission. Removal of the bright point-like nuclear source and image deconvolution techniques both reveal X-ray enhancements that closely match the substructures seen in the Hubble Space Telescope [O III] image and prominent knots in the radio jet. We find that most of the NLR clouds in NGC 4151 have [O III]/soft X-ray ratio approx10, despite the distance of the clouds from the nucleus. This ratio is consistent with the values observed in NLRs of some Seyfert 2 galaxies, which indicates a uniform ionization parameter even at large radii and a density decreasing as r {sup -2} as expected for a nuclear wind scenario. The [O III]/X-ray ratios at the location of radio knots show an excess of X-ray emission, suggesting shock heating in addition to photoionization. We examine various mechanisms for the X-ray emission and find that, in contrast to jet-related X-ray emission in more powerful active galactic nucleus, the observed jet parameters in NGC 4151 are inconsistent with synchrotron emission, synchrotron self-Compton, inverse Compton of cosmic microwave background photons or galaxy optical light. Instead, our results favor thermal emission from the interaction between radio outflow and NLR gas clouds as the origin for the X-ray emission associated with the jet. This supports previous claims that frequent jet-interstellar medium interaction may explain why jets in Seyfert galaxies appear small, slow, and thermally dominated, distinct from those kpc-scale jets in the radio galaxies.

  7. NEW CLASS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMITTERS: RADIO-DARK MINI SHELLS SURROUNDING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Motoki; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Orienti, Monica

    2013-02-20

    We explore non-thermal emission from a shocked interstellar medium, which is identified as an expanding shell, driven by a relativistic jet in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we particularly focus on parsec-scale size mini shells surrounding mini radio lobes. From the radio to X-ray band, the mini radio lobe emission dominates the faint emission from the mini shell. On the other hand, we find that inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the shell can overwhelm the associated lobe emission at the very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray range, because energy densities of synchrotron photons from the lobe and/or soft photons from the AGN nucleus are large and IC scattering works effectively. The predicted IC emission from nearby mini shells can be detected with the Cherenkov Telescope Array and they are potentially a new class of VHE {gamma}-ray emitters.

  8. Radiation Mechanism and Jet Composition of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GeV-TeV-selected Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Liang, En-Wei; Sun, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Bing; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2013-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P jet) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L jet) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L s, jet) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies (ε) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L bol, jet) for FSRQs and with the L jet for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P jet-L s, jet relation of FSRQs. They have lower ε and L bol, jet values than FSRQs, and a tentative L bol, jet-ε relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters (σ) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with ε for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with ε for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

  9. Diffuse neutrino intensity from the inner jets of active galactic nuclei: Impacts of external photon fields and the blazar sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Dermer, Charles D.

    2014-07-01

    We study high-energy neutrino production in inner jets of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), taking into account effects of external photon fields and the blazar sequence. We show that the resulting diffuse neutrino intensity is dominated by quasar-hosted blazars, in particular, flat spectrum radio quasars, and that PeV-EeV neutrino production due to photohadronic interactions with broadline and dust radiation is unavoidable if the AGN inner jets are ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. Their neutrino spectrum has a cutoff feature around PeV energies since target photons are due to Lyα emission. Because of infrared photons provided by the dust torus, neutrino spectra above PeV energies are too hard to be consistent with the IceCube data unless the proton spectral index is steeper than 2.5, or the maximum proton energy is ≲100 PeV. Thus, the simple model has difficulty in explaining the IceCube data. For the cumulative neutrino intensity from blazars to exceed ˜10-8 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1, their local cosmic-ray energy generation rate would be ˜10-100 times larger than the local UHECR emissivity but is comparable to the averaged γ-ray blazar emissivity. Interestingly, future detectors such as the Askaryan Radio Array can detect ˜0.1-1 EeV neutrinos even in more conservative cases, allowing us to indirectly test the hypothesis that UHECRs are produced in the inner jets. We find that the diffuse neutrino intensity from radio-loud AGN is dominated by blazars with γ-ray luminosity of ≳1048 erg s-1, and the arrival directions of their ˜1-100 PeV neutrinos correlate with the luminous blazars detected by Fermi.

  10. Nuclear processes in the jets of SS 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The very narrow gamma-ray lines observed at 1.495 and 6.695 MeV from SS 433 which are blueshifted 1.369 and 6.129 emissions from deexcitations of (24)Mg-asterisk and (16)O-asterisk in grains moving with the jets and inelastically excited by interactions with the ambient medium are discussed. Energetic particle interactions in grains produce very narrow gamma ray lines from deexcitation of nuclear levels whose lifetimes are long enough that the excited nuclei stop before deexcitation. The presence of grains in the jets resolves hitherto discussed difficulties of inelastic excitation models for gamma ray production in SS 433, the very narrow widths of the observed lines and the absence of other strong lines, expected from abundant elements. A model is proposed which could be distinguished from a previously proposed fusion model by gamma ray line observations.

  11. Nuclear processes in the jets of SS433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The very narrow gamma-ray lines observed at 1.495 and 6.695 MeV from SS433 which are blueshifted 1.369 and 6.129 emissions from deexcitations of (24)Mg* and (16)O* in grains moving with the jets and inelastically excited by interactions with the ambient medium are discussed. Energetic particle interactions in grains produce very narrow gamma ray lines from deexcitation of nuclear levels whose lifetimes are long enough that the excited nuclei stop before deexcitation. The presence of grains in the jets resolves hitherto discussed difficulties of inelastic excitation models for gamma ray production in SS433, the very narrow widths of the observed lines and the absence of other strong lines, expected from abundant elements. A model is proposed which could be distinguished from a previously proposed fusion model by gamma ray line observations.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  13. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  14. CO Line Emission from Compact Nuclear Starburst Disks around Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, J. N.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial evidence for a connection between star formation in the nuclear region of a galaxy and growth of the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, starburst activity in the region around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) may provide the obscuration required by the unified model of AGNs. Molecular line emission is one of the best observational avenues to detect and characterize dense, star-forming gas in galactic nuclei over a range of redshift. This paper presents predictions for the carbon monoxide (CO) line features from models of nuclear starburst disks around AGNs. These small-scale (lsim 100 pc), dense and hot starbursts have CO luminosities similar to scaled-down ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Nuclear starburst disks that exhibit a pc-scale starburst and could potentially act as the obscuring torus show more efficient CO excitation and higher brightness temperature ratios than those without such a compact starburst. In addition, the compact starburst models predict strong absorption when J Upper >~ 10, a unique observational signature of these objects. These findings allow for the possibility that CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) could be used to determine if starburst disks are responsible for the obscuration in z <~ 1 AGNs. Directly isolating the nuclear CO line emission of such compact regions around AGNs from galactic-scale emission will require high-resolution imaging or selecting AGN host galaxies with weak galactic-scale star formation. Stacking individual CO SLEDs will also be useful in detecting the predicted high-J features.

  15. Disk-Jet quenching of the Galactic Black Hole Swift J1753.5-0127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, A. P.; Shaw, A. W.; Fender, R. P.; Altamirano, D.; Gandhi, P.; Uttley, P.; Charles, P. A.; Kolehmainen, M.; Anderson, G. E.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We report on radio and X-ray monitoring observations of the BHC Swift J1753.5-0127 taken over a ˜10 year period. Presented are daily radio observations at 15 GHz with the AMI-LA and X-ray data from Swift XRT and BAT. Also presented is a deep 2hr JVLA observation taken in an unusually low-luminosity soft-state (with a low disk temperature). We show that although the source has remained relatively radio-quiet compared to XRBs with a similar X-ray luminosity in the hard-state, the power-law relationship scales as ζ = 0.96 ± 0.06 i.e. slightly closer to what has been considered for radiatively inefficient accretion disks. We also place the most stringent limit to date on the radio-jet quenching in an XRB soft-state, showing the connection of the jet quenching to the X-ray power-law component; the radio flux in the soft-state was found to be <21~μJy, which is a quenching factor of ≳ 25.

  16. THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT W49B LIKELY ORIGINATES FROM A JET-DRIVEN, CORE-COLLAPSE EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Pearson, Sarah

    2013-02-10

    We present results from a 220 ks observation of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) W49B using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chanrda X-ray Observatory. We exploit these data to perform detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic analyses across the SNR with the aim to investigate the thermodynamic properties and explosive origin of W49B. We find substantial variation in the electron temperature and absorbing column toward W49B, and we show that the mean metal abundances are consistent with the predicted yields in models of bipolar/jet-driven core-collapse SNe. Furthermore, we set strict upper limits on the X-ray luminosity of any undetected point sources, and we exclude the presence of a neutron star associated with W49B. We conclude that the morphological, spectral, and environmental characteristics of W49B are indicative of a bipolar Type Ib/Ic SN origin, making it the first of its kind to be discovered in the Milky Way.

  17. Probing the Relativistic Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei with Multiwavelength Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Aller, Margo

    2005-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycle 7 (March 2002-February 2003) of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project was part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars and radio galaxies in collaboration with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK) and Prof. Thomas Balonek (Colgate U.). The goals of the program are to study the X-ray emission mechanism in blazars and radio galaxies and the relation of the X-ray emission to changes in the relativistic jet. The program includes contemporaneous brightness and linear polarization monitoring at radio and optical wavelengths, total and polarized intensity imaging at at 43 GHz with a resolution of 0.1 milliarcseconds with the VLBA, and well-sampled X-ray light curves obtained from a series of approved RXTE programs. The objects studied in the time period covered by the grant were 3C 120, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 273, all with radio jets containing bright knots that appear to move at superluminal speeds. During RXTE Cycle 7, the project was awarded RXTE time to monitor PKS 1510-089 two times per week, 3C 273 and 3C 279 three times per week, and 3C 120 four times per week. In addition, 3C273 and 3C 279 were observed several times per day during a ten-day period in April 2002. The X-ray data, including those from earlier cycles, were compared with radio measurements obtained in the centimeter-wave band by the monitoring program of Drs. Margo and Hugh Aller at the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, monthly imaging observations with the VLBA at 43 GHz, and optical observations obtained at several telescopes around the world.

  18. The Stored Energy of Gravitational Collapse Powers Gamma Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206 (1) confirms my ````Strong'' Magnetic Field'' model (SMF). In SMF, Storage Ring (SR) particles were accelerated during the gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma that is permeated by a large-scale primordial magnetic field (2.3). The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, coherent Astrophysical Storage Ring stores a small fraction of the gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. Galactic morphology varies as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in each object. GRB are due to a ``rock'' i.e. white dwarf,ordinary star,neutron star,planet,etc. falling through the SR and being rapidly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball. The fireball speeds on into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations. A ``rock'' racing at 1000 km/sec across a 20,000 km path in the beam produces a twenty second burst. Tracking across a short chord yields a short burst. Typical currents in space are sometimes made of many slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular SR at that time. 1. W. Coburn & S. E. Boggs, Nature 423, 425 (2003) 2. H. D. Greyber in After the Dark Ages:When Galaxies Were Young, AIP Conf. Proc. 470, eds. S. Holt & E. Smith, (1998) 3. H. D. Greyber in a Space Telescope Science Institute Report from their 2001 Spring Symposium, ``The Dark Universe: Matter, Energy and Gravity'', ed. Mario Livio, published March 2003.

  19. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - Arc Jet Integrated System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Emrich, William

    2016-01-01

    In the post-shuttle era, space exploration is moving into a new regime. Commercial space flight is in development and is planned to take on much of the low earth orbit space flight missions. With the development of a heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch, System, NASA has become focused on deep space exploration. Exploration into deep space has traditionally been done with robotic probes. More ambitious missions such as manned missions to asteroids and Mars will require significant technology development. Propulsion system performance is tied to the achievability of these missions and the requirements of other developing technologies that will be required. Nuclear thermal propulsion offers a significant improvement over chemical propulsion while still achieving high levels of thrust. Opportunities exist; however, to build upon what would be considered a standard nuclear thermal engine to attain improved performance, thus further enabling deep space missions. This paper discuss the modeling of a nuclear thermal system integrated with an arc jet to further augment performance. The performance predictions and systems impacts are discussed.

  20. Evidence for a nuclear radio jet and its structure down to ≲100 Schwarzschild radii in the center of the Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594)

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Inoue, Makoto

    2013-12-10

    The Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594) is associated with one of the nearest low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We investigated the detailed radio structure of the Sombrero nucleus using high-resolution, quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We obtained high-quality images of this nucleus at seven frequencies, where those at 15, 24, and 43 GHz are the first clear very long baseline interferometry detections. At 43 GHz, the nuclear structure was imaged on a linear scale under 0.01 pc or 100 Schwarzschild radii, revealing a compact, high-brightness-temperature (≳ 3 × 10{sup 9} K) radio core. We discovered the presence of the extended structure emanating from the core on two sides in the northwest and southeast directions. The nuclear radio spectra show a clear spatial gradient, which is similar to that seen in more luminous AGNs with powerful relativistic jets. Moreover, the size and position of the core tend to be frequency dependent. These findings provide evidence that the central engine of the Sombrero is powering radio jets and the jets are overwhelming the emission from the underlying radiatively inefficient accretion flow over the observed frequencies. Based on these radio characteristics, we constrained the following physical parameters for the M 104 jets: (1) the northern side is approaching, whereas the southern one is receding; (2) the jet viewing angle is relatively close to our line-of-sight (≲ 25°); and (3) the intrinsic jet velocity is highly sub-relativistic (≲ 0.2c). The derived pole-on nature of the M 104 jets is consistent with the previous argument that this nucleus contains a true type II AGN, i.e., the broad line region is actually absent or intrinsically weak if the plane of the circumnuclear torus is perpendicular to the jet axis.

  1. The Nuclear Regions of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 4151: Parsec-Scale H I Absorption and a Remarkable Radio Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, C. G.; Wrobel, J. M.; Pedlar, A.; Gallimore, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitive high angular and linear resolution radio images of the 240 pc radio jet in NGC 4151, imaged at linear resolutions of 0.3-2.6 pc using the VLBA and phased VLA at λ21 cm, are presented and reveal for the first time a faint, highly collimated jet (diameter <~1.4 pc) underlying discrete components, seen in lower resolution MERLIN and VLA images, that appear to be shocklike features associated with changes in direction as the jet interacts with small gas clouds within the central ~100 pc of the galaxy. In addition, λ21 cm spectral line imaging of the neutral hydrogen in the nuclear region reveals the spatial location, distribution, and kinematics of the neutral gas detected previously in a lower resolution MERLIN study. Neutral hydrogen absorption is detected against component C4W (E+F) as predicted by Mundell et al, but the absorption, extending over 3 pc, is spatially and kinematically complex on subparsec scales, suggesting the presence of small, dense gas clouds with a wide range of velocities and column densities. The main absorption component matches that detected in the MERLIN study, close to the systemic velocity (998 km s-1) of the galaxy, and is consistent with absorption through a clumpy neutral gas layer in the putative obscuring torus, with higher velocity blue- and redshifted systems with narrow line widths also detected across E+F. In this region, average column densities are high, lying in the range 2.7×1019TSgalactic nucleus (AGN) (as suggested by Ulvestad et al.) and, in combination with the well-collimated continuum structures seen in component D, suggests that component D (possibly subcomponent D3) is the most likely location for the AGN. We suggest that components C and E are shocks

  2. THE JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOW IN THE RADIO GALAXY SDSS J1517+3353: IMPLICATIONS FOR DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Taylor, G. B. E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.ed E-mail: krista@mail.utexas.ed

    2010-06-10

    We report on the study of an intriguing active galaxy that was selected as a potential multiple supermassive black hole merger in the early-type host SDSS J151709.20+335324.7 (z = 0.135) from a complete search for double-peaked [O III] lines from the SDSS spectroscopic quasi-stellar object (QSO) database. Ground-based SDSS imaging reveals two blue structures on either side of the photometric center of the host galaxy, separated from each other by about 5.7 kpc. From a combination of SDSS fiber and Keck/HIRES long-slit spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that, in addition to these two features, a third distinct structure surrounds the nucleus of the host galaxy. All three structures exhibit highly ionized line emission with line ratios characteristic of Seyfert II active galactic nuclei. The analysis of spatially resolved emission-line profiles from the HIRES spectrum reveal three distinct kinematic subcomponents, one at rest and the other two moving at -350 km s{sup -1} and 500 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the host galaxy. A comparison of imaging and spectral data confirm a strong association between the kinematic components and the spatial knots, which implies a highly disturbed and complex active region in this object. A comparative analysis of the broadband positions, colors, kinematics, and spectral properties of the knots in this system lead to two plausible explanations: (1) a multiple active galactic nucleus (AGN) produced due to a massive dry merger, or (2) a very powerful radio jet-driven outflow. Subsequent VLA radio imaging reveals a clear jet aligned with the emission-line gas, confirming the latter explanation. We use the broadband radio measurements to examine the impact of the jet on the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, and find that the energy in the radio lobes can heat a significant fraction of the gas to the virial temperature. Finally, we discuss tests that may help future surveys distinguish between jet

  3. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - II. Nuclear emission line properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Although it is well known that massive galaxies have central black holes, most of them accreting at low Eddington ratios, many important questions still remain open. Among them are the nature of the ionizing source, the characteristics and frequencies of the broad-line region and of the dusty torus. We report observations of 10 early-type galactic nuclei, observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in integral field unit mode, installed on the Gemini South telescope, analysed with standard techniques for spectral treatment and compared with results obtained with principal component analysis Tomography (Paper I). We performed spectral synthesis of each spaxel of the data cubes and subtracted the stellar component from the original cube, leaving a data cube with emission lines only. The emission lines were decomposed in multi-Gaussian components. We show here that, for eight galaxies previously known to have emission lines, the narrow-line region can be decomposed in two components with distinct line widths. In addition to this, broad Hα emission was detected in six galaxies. The two galaxies not previously known to have emission lines show weak Hα+[N II] lines. All 10 galaxies may be classified as low-ionization nuclear emission regions in diagnostic diagrams and seven of them have bona fide active galactic nuclei with luminosities between 1040 and 1043 erg s-1. Eddington ratios are always <10-3.

  4. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  5. Solar modulation and nuclear fragmentation effects in galactic cosmic ray transport through shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, C. F.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G.

    1994-01-01

    Crews of manned interplanetary missions may accumulate significant radiation exposures from the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment in space. Estimates of how these dose levels are affected by the assumed temporal and spatial variations in the composition of the GCR environment, and by the effects of the spacecraft and body self-shielding on the transported fields are presented. In this work, the physical processes through which shielding alters the transported radiation fields are described. We then present estimates of the effects on model calculations of (1) nuclear fragmentation model uncertainties, (2) solar modulation, (3) variations between solar cycles, and (4) proposed changes to the quality factors which relate dose equivalent to absorbed dose.

  6. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  7. Full jet evolution in quark-gluon plasma and nuclear modification of jet production and jet shape in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ning-Bo; Qin, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    We study the evolution of the full jet shower in quark-gluon plasma by solving a set of coupled differential transport equations for the three-dimensional momentum distributions of quarks and gluons contained in full jets. In our jet evolution equations, we include all partonic splitting processes as well as the collisional energy loss and transverse momentum broadening for both the leading and radiated partons of the full jets. Combining with a realistic (2 +1 )-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic simulation for the spacetime profiles of the hot and dense nuclear medium produced in heavy-ion collisions, we apply our formalism to calculate the nuclear modification of single inclusive full jet spectra, the momentum imbalance of photon-jet and dijet pairs, and the jet shape function (at partonic level) in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV. The roles of various jet-medium interaction mechanisms on the full jet modification are studied. We find that the nuclear modification of jet shape is sensitive to the interplay of different interaction mechanisms as well as the energies of the full jets.

  8. Polarimetric Observations of 15 Active Galactic Nuclei at High Frequencies: Jet Kinematics from Bimonthly Monitoring with the Very Long Baseline Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Lister, Matthew L.; Stirling, Alastair M.; Cawthorne, Timothy V.; Gear, Walter K.; Gómez, José L.; Stevens, Jason A.; Smith, Paul S.; Forster, James R.; Robson, E. Ian

    2005-10-01

    We present total and polarized intensity images of 15 active galactic nuclei obtained with the Very Long Baseline Array at 7 mm wavelength at 17 epochs from 1998 March to 2001 April. At some epochs the images are accompanied by nearly simultaneous polarization measurements at 3 mm, 1.35/0.85 mm, and optical wavelengths. Here we analyze the 7 mm images to define the properties of the jets of two radio galaxies, five BL Lac objects, and eight quasars on angular scales >~0.1 mas. We determine the apparent velocities of 106 features in the jets. For many of the features we derive Doppler factors using a new method based on a comparison of the timescale of decline in flux density with the light-travel time across the emitting region. This allows us to estimate the Lorentz factors (Γ), intrinsic brightness temperatures, and viewing angles of 73 superluminal knots, as well as the opening angle of the jet for each source. The Lorentz factors of the jet flows in the different blazars range from Γ~5 to 40 with the majority of the quasar components having Γ~16-18, while the values in the BL Lac objects are more uniformly distributed. The brightest knots in the quasars have the highest apparent speeds, while the more slowly moving components are pronounced in the BL Lac objects. The quasars in our sample have similar opening angles and marginally smaller viewing angles than the BL Lacs. The two radio galaxies have lower Lorentz factors and wider viewing angles than the blazars. Opening angle and Lorentz factor are inversely proportional, as predicted by gasdynamical models. The brightness temperature drops more abruptly with distance from the core in the BL Lac objects than in the quasars and radio galaxies, perhaps owing to stronger magnetic fields in the former resulting in more severe synchrotron losses of the highest energy electrons. In nine sources we detect statistically meaningful deviations from ballistic motion, with the majority of components accelerating with

  9. Jet-induced modifications of the characteristic of the bulk nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkowski, P.; Słodkowski, M.; Kikoła, D.; Sikorski, J.; Porter-Sobieraj, J.; Gawryszewski, P.; Zygmunt, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present our studies on jet induced modifications of the characteristics of bulk nuclear matter. To describe such matter, we use efficient relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in (3+1)-dimension, employing the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in the parallel programming framework. We use Cartesian coordinates in the calculations to ensure a high spatial resolution that is constant throughout the evolution of the system. We show our results on how jets modify the hydrodynamics fields and discuss the implications.

  10. Nuclear Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Zachary; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of energy in the quark gluon plasma is facilitated by measurements of modifications to the observed jet fragmentation. A favorable channel of study relies on direct photons created in the initial parton interactions of heavy ion collisions. Such a photon traverses the created medium unscathed and grants us a proxy for the transverse momentum of an away side jet. PHENIX Au+Au data recorded at √{sNN} = 200 GeV during RHIC run 14 benefit from the background rejection capability of the silicon vertex detector, enabling the extraction of a higher purity hadron signal. This advantage, combined with a larger integrated luminosity, allows previous PHENIX measurements of fragmentation functions to be extended to greater jet energies. In this talk, the status of the analysis of direct photon hadron correlations with the new data set will be discussed.

  11. Discrete knot ejection from the jet in a nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus, M81*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Bietenholz, Michael; Gültekin, Kayhan; Reynolds, Mark T.; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael; Bartel, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    Observational constraints of the relativistic jets from black holes have largely come from the most powerful and extended jets, leaving the nature of the low-luminosity jets a mystery. M81* is one of the nearest low-luminosity jets and it emitted an extremely large radio flare in 2011, allowing us to study compact core emission with unprecedented sensitivity and linear resolution. Using a multiwavelength campaign, we were able to track the flare as it re-brightened and became optically thick. Simultaneous X-ray observations indicated that the radio re-brightening was preceded by a low-energy X-ray flare at least 12 days earlier. Associating the time delay (tdelay) between the two bands with the cooling time in a synchrotron flare, we find that the magnetic field strength was 1.9 < B < 9.2 G, which is consistent with magnetic field estimate from spectral energy distribution modelling, B < 10.2 G. In addition, Very Long Baseline Array observations at 23 GHz clearly illustrate a discrete knot moving at a low relativistic speed of vapp/c = 0.51 +/- 0.17 associated with the initial radio flare. The observations indicate radial jet motions for the first time in M81*. This has profound implications for jet production, as it means radial motion can be observed in even the lowest-luminosity AGN, but at slower velocities and smaller radial extents (≍104 RG).

  12. Accretion Disk Spectra of the Ultra-luminous X-ray Sources in Nearby Spiral Galaxies and Galactic Superluminal Jet Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Ebisawa, Ken; Zycki, Piotr; Kubota, Aya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Watarai, Ken-ya

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-luminous Compact X-ray Sources (ULXs) in nearby spiral galaxies and Galactic superluminal jet sources share the common spectral characteristic that they have unusually high disk temperatures which cannot be explained in the framework of the standard optically thick accretion disk in the Schwarzschild metric. On the other hand, the standard accretion disk around the Kerr black hole might explain the observed high disk temperature, as the inner radius of the Kerr disk gets smaller and the disk temperature can be consequently higher. However, we point out that the observable Kerr disk spectra becomes significantly harder than Schwarzschild disk spectra only when the disk is highly inclined. This is because the emission from the innermost part of the accretion disk is Doppler-boosted for an edge-on Kerr disk, while hardly seen for a face-on disk. The Galactic superluminal jet sources are known to be highly inclined systems, thus their energy spectra may be explained with the standard Kerr disk with known black hole masses. For ULXs, on the other hand, the standard Kerr disk model seems implausible, since it is highly unlikely that their accretion disks are preferentially inclined, and, if edge-on Kerr disk model is applied, the black hole mass becomes unreasonably large (greater than or approximately equal to 300 Solar Mass). Instead, the slim disk (advection dominated optically thick disk) model is likely to explain the observed super- Eddington luminosities, hard energy spectra, and spectral variations of ULXs. We suggest that ULXs are accreting black holes with a few tens of solar mass, which is not unexpected from the standard stellar evolution scenario, and their X-ray emission is from the slim disk shining at super-Eddington luminosities.

  13. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  14. Jet Tomography of Quark Gluon Plasmas in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-04-01

    The attenuation pattern of high energy jet fragments in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions provides information on the space-time evolution and dynamical properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase of matter discovered at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and observed at higher densities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First I review our jet tomography theory of quark and gluon energy loss in a weakly coupled picture of the QGP. While the average attenuation pattern of light and heavy quark jets were well accounted for in that picture, the predicted azimuthal elliptic asymmetry of jets was underestimated when realistic bulk collective flow effects were taken into account. I then show that the elliptic asymmetry of jet fragments can also be quantitatively understood when nonperturbative lattice QCD constraints on the suppression of color electric fluctuations and the enhancement of color magnetic fluctuations near the critical QCD confinement temperature, Tc ~ 160 MeV, are incorporated into the theory. Our analysis provides a novel quantitative connection between the jet transport properties controlling the hard jet quenching observables and the bulk viscous transport properties controlling the remarkable ``perfect fluidity'' of QGP observed at RHIC and LHC.

  15. How Space Radiation Risk from Galactic Cosmic Rays at the International Space Station Relates to Nuclear Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts is a major obstacle for long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have thus been developed to evaluate radiation effects at the International Space Station (ISS) and in missions to the Moon or Mars. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes in such radiation transport affect predictions on the radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays. Taking into account effects of the geomagnetic field on the cosmic ray spectra, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on the radiation risk (represented by dose-equivalent) from galactic cosmic rays behind typical spacecraft materials. These results tell us how the radiation risk at the ISS is related to nuclear cross sections at different energies, and consequently how to most efficiently reduce the physical uncertainty in our predictions on the radiation risk at the ISS.

  16. Star-formation in nuclear clusters and the origin of the Galactic center apparent core distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: build-up of NSCs and Continuous in-situ star-formation. Here we study the effects of star formation on the build-up of NSCs and its implications for their long term evolution and their resulting structure. We show that continuous star-formation can lead to the build-up of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky-way NSC. We also find that the general structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in-situ star-formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger stellar population does not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in-situ star-formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations which are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure towards the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inwards; with younger populations having larger core sizes.

  17. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  18. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  19. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  20. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  1. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  2. Nuclear γ-ray line emission induced by energetic ions in solar flares and by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; de Séréville, N.; Belhout, A.

    2012-05-01

    The γ-ray spectra ol the strongest solar flares often show a broad and complex structure in the 0.1-10 MeV region sitting on a bremsstrahlung continuum. This structure is composed of several outstanding narrow lines and of thousands of unresolved narrow and broad lines forming a quasi-continuum. The major part of this emission is due to prompt deexcitation lines following nuclear interactions of accelerated light and heavy ions with the atomic nuclei composing the solar atmosphere. A similar emission is expected from interactions of galactic cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and dust. Experimental nuclear reaction studies coupled with extensive calculations have been done in the last one and a half decade at Orsay for the modelisation of this γ-ray emission. After a description of the nuclear reaction studies the analysis of one solar flare spectrum and predictions for the emission from the inner Galaxy will be presented.

  3. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  4. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  5. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff. PMID:17316078

  6. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  7. Uncovering the Deeply Embedded Active Galactic Nucleus Activity in the Nuclear Regions of the Interacting Galaxy Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; González-Martín, O.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Mason, R. E.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Colina, L.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (~0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 1044 erg s-1. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (AV ~ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  8. UNCOVERING THE DEEPLY EMBEDDED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; Colina, L.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Mason, R. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (∼0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A{sub V} ∼ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  9. The powerful jet of an off-nuclear intermediate-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 2276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezcua, M.; Roberts, T. P.; Lobanov, A. P.; Sutton, A. D.

    2015-04-01

    Jet ejection by accreting black holes is a mass invariant mechanism unifying stellar and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that should also apply for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), which are thought to be the seeds from which SMBHs form. We present the detection of an off-nuclear IMBH of ˜5 × 104 M⊙ located in an unusual spiral arm of the galaxy NGC 2276 based on quasi-simultaneous Chandra X-ray observations and European VLBI Network (EVN) radio observations. The IMBH, NGC2276-3c, possesses a 1.8 pc radio jet that is oriented in the same direction as large-scale (˜650 pc) radio lobes and whose emission is consistent with flat to optically thin synchrotron emission between 1.6 and 5 GHz. Its jet kinetic power (4 × 1040 erg s-1) is comparable to its radiative output and its jet efficiency (≥46 per cent) is as large as that of SMBHs. A region of ˜300 pc along the jet devoid of young stars could provide observational evidence of jet feedback from an IMBH. The discovery confirms that the accretion physics is mass invariant and that seed IMBHs in the early Universe possibly had powerful jets that were an important source of feedback.

  10. Nuclear planetology: understanding habitable planets as Galactic bulge stellar remnants (black dwarfs) in a Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    model constraining the evolution of a rocky planet like Earth or Mercury from a stellar precursor of the oldest population to a Fe-C BLD, shifting through different spectral classes in a HR diagram after massive decompression and tremendous energy losses. In the light of WD/BLD cosmochronology [1], solar system bodies like Earth, Mercury and Moon are regarded as captured interlopers from the Galactic bulge, Earth and Moon possibly representing remnants of an old binary system. Such a preliminary scenario is supported by similar ages obtained from WD's for the Galactic halo [1] and, independently, by means of 187Re-232Th-238U nuclear geochronometry [2, 4, 5], together with recent observations extremely metal-poor stars from the cosmic dawn in the bulge of the Milky Way [6]. This might be further elucidated in the near future by Th/U cosmochronometry based upon a nuclear production ratio Th/U = 0.96 [5] and additionally by means of a newly developed nucleogeochronometric age dating method for stellar spectroscopy, which will be presented in a forthcoming paper. The model shall stimulate geochemical data interpretation from a different perspective to constrain the (thermal) evolution of a habitable planet as to its geo-, bio-, hydro- and atmosphere. [1] Fontaine et al. (2001), Public. Astron. Soc. of the Pacific 113, 409-435. [2] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting 2015. [3] Arevalo et al. (2010), Chem. Geol. 271, 70-85. [4] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [5] Roller (2015), 78th Annu. Meeting Met. Soc., Abstract #5041. [6] Howes et al. (2015), Nature 527, 484-487.

  11. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  12. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  13. Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of shale-derived refinery products and jet fuels and of experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Bailey, B. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was conducted of Ashland shale oil refinery products, experimental referee broadened-specification jet fuels, and of related isoprenoid model compounds. Supercritical fluid chromatography techniques using carbon dioxide were developed on a preparative scale, so that samples could be quantitatively separated into saturates and aromatic fractions for study by NMR. An optimized average parameter treatment was developed, and the NMR results were analyzed in terms of the resulting average parameters; formulation of model mixtures was demonstrated. Application of novel spectroscopic techniques to fuel samples was investigated.

  14. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  15. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  16. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  17. Measurement of charged jet production cross sections and nuclear modification in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-10-01

    Charged jet production cross sections in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC are presented. Using the anti-kT algorithm, jets have been reconstructed in the central rapidity region from charged particles with resolution parameters R = 0.2 and R = 0.4. The reconstructed jets have been corrected for detector effects and the underlying event background. To calculate the nuclear modification factor, RpPb, of charged jets in p-Pb collisions, a pp reference was constructed by scaling previously measured charged jet spectra at √{ s} = 7 TeV. In the transverse momentum range 20 ≤p T , ch jet ≤ 120 GeV / c, RpPb is found to be consistent with unity, indicating the absence of strong nuclear matter effects on jet production. Major modifications to the radial jet structure are probed via the ratio of jet production cross sections reconstructed with the two different resolution parameters. This ratio is found to be similar to the measurement in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV and to the expectations from PYTHIA pp simulations and NLO pQCD calculations at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV.

  18. Galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David

    There is a broad agreement between the predictions of galactic dynamo theory and observations; although there are still some unresolved difficulties, the theory appears to be robust. Now attention is turning from generic models to studies of particular features of the large-scale magnetic fields, and also to models for specific galaxies. The effects of noncircular flows, for example driven by the interaction of spiral arms and galactic bars with the dynamo, are of current interest.

  19. Spectral Energy Distribution Models for Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Eracleous, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) represent the bulk of the AGN population in the present-day universe and they trace the low-level accreting supermassive black holes. In order to probe the accretion and jet physical properties in LLAGNs as a class, we model the broadband radio to X-rays spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 21 LLAGNs in low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) with a coupled accretion-jet model. The accretion flow is modeled as an inner ADAF outside of which there is a truncated standard thin disk. We find that the radio emission is severely underpredicted by ADAF models and is explained by the relativistic jet. The origin of the X-ray radiation in most sources can be explained by three distinct scenarios: the X-rays can be dominated by emission from the ADAF, or the jet, or the X-rays can arise from a jet-ADAF combination in which both components contribute to the emission with similar importance. For 3 objects both the jet and ADAF fit equally well the X-ray spectrum and can be the dominant source of X-rays whereas for 11 LLAGNs a jet-dominated model accounts better than the ADAF-dominated model for the data. The individual and average SED models that we computed can be useful for different studies of the nuclear emission of LLAGNs. From the model fits, we estimate important parameters of the central engine powering LLAGNs in LINERs, such as the mass accretion rate and the mass-loss rate in the jet and the jet power - relevant for studies of the kinetic feedback from jets.

  20. A Kiloparsec-scale Nuclear Stellar Disk in the Milky Way as a Possible Explanation of the High Velocity Peaks in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debattista, Victor P.; Ness, Melissa; Earp, Samuel W. F.; Cole, David R.

    2015-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment has measured the stellar velocities of red giant stars in the inner Milky Way. We confirm that the line of sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) in the mid-plane exhibit a second peak at high velocities, whereas those at | b| =2^\\circ do not. We use a high resolution simulation of a barred galaxy, which crucially includes gas and star formation, to guide our interpretation of the LOSVDs. We show that the data are fully consistent with the presence of a thin, rapidly rotating, nuclear disk extending to ∼1 kpc. This nuclear disk is orientated perpendicular to the bar and is likely to be composed of stars on x2 orbits. The gas in the simulation is able to fall onto such orbits, leading to stars populating an orthogonal disk.

  1. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  2. The Disk-Jet Connection in Radio-Loud AGN: The X-Ray Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2008-01-01

    Unification schemes assume that radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) contain an accretion disk and a relativistic jet perpendicular to the disk, and an obscuring molecular torus. The jet dominance decreases with larger viewing angles from blazars to Broad-Line and Narrow-Line Radio Galaxies. A fundamental question is how accretion and ejecta are related. The X-rays provide a convenient window to study these issues, as they originate in the innermost nuclear regions and penetrate large obscuring columns. I review the data, using observations by Chandra but also from other currently operating high-energy experiments. Synergy with the upcoming GLAST mission will also be highlighted.

  3. HST/WFPC2 Imaging of the Circumnuclear Structure of Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Data and Nuclear Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Pérez, Enrique; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Schmitt, Henrique

    2008-03-01

    In several studies of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), we have characterized the properties of the stellar populations in LINERs and LINER/H II transition objects (TOs). We have found a populous class of galactic nuclei which stand out because of their conspicuous 0.1-1 Gyr populations. These nuclei are called "Young-TOs" since they all have TO-like emission line ratios. To advance our knowledge of the nature of the central source in LLAGNs and its relation with stellar clusters, we carry out several imaging projects with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at near-UV, optical, and near-IR wavelengths. In this Paper, we present the first results obtained with observations of the central regions of 57 LLAGNs imaged with the WFPC2 through any of the V (F555W, F547M, F614W) and I (F791W, F814W) filters that are available in the HST archive. The sample contains 34% of the LINERs and 36% of the TOs in the Palomar sample. The mean spatial resolution of these images is 10 pc. With these data we have built an atlas that includes structural maps for all the galaxies, useful to identify compact nuclear sources and, additionally, to characterize the circumnuclear environment of LLAGNs, determining the frequency of dust and its morphology. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) We have not found any correlation between the presence of nuclear compact sources and emission-line type. Thus, nucleated LINERs are as frequent as nucleated TOs. (2) The nuclei of "Young-TOs" are brighter than the nuclei of "Old-TOs" and LINERs. These results confirm our previous results that Young-TOs are separated from other LLAGNs classes in terms of their central stellar population properties and brightness. (3) Circumnuclear dust is detected in 88% of the LLAGNs, being almost ubiquitous in TOs. (4) The dust morphology is complex and varied, from nuclear spiral lanes to chaotic filaments and nuclear disk-like structures. Chaotic filaments are as frequent as dust spirals; but

  4. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  5. Calculated performance of a mercury-compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R B

    1951-01-01

    An analysis was made at a flight Mach number of 1.5, an altitude of 45,000 feet, a turbine-inlet temperature of 1460 degrees R, of a mercury compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source. The calculations covered a range of turbine-exhaust and turbine-inlet pressures and condenser-inlet Mach numbers. For a turbine--inlet pressure of 40 pounds per square inch absolute, a turbine-exhaust pressure of 14 pounds per square inch absolute, and a condenser-inlet Mach number of 0.23 the calculated airplane gross weight required to carry a 20,000 pound payload was 322000 pounds and the reactor heat release per unit volume was 8.9 kilowatts per cubic inch. These do not represent optimum operating conditions.

  6. Nuclear Spin Symmetry Conservation and Relaxation in Water (1H216O) Studied by Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) Spectroscopy of Supersonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca Tanner, Carine; Quack, Martin; Schmidiger, David

    2013-10-01

    We report high resolution near-infrared laser spectra of water seeded in a supersonic jet expansion of argon probed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in the R branch of the 2-3 band (above 7500 cm-1) at several effective temperatures T < 30 K. Our goal is to study nuclear spin symmetry conservation and relaxation. For low mole fractions of water in the gas mixture, we obtained the lowest rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry conservation, in agreement with theoretical expectation for inelastic collisions of isolated H2O molecules with Ar and similar to a previous series of experiments with other small molecules in supersonic jet expansions. However, for the highest mole fractions of water, which we used (xH2O < 1.6%), we obtained slightly higher rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry relaxation, which cannot be explained by the intramolecular quantum relaxation mechanism in the monomer H2O. The nuclear spin symmetry relaxation observed is, indeed, seen to be related to the formation of water clusters at the early stage of the supersonic jet expansion. Under these conditions, two mechanisms can contribute to nuclear spin symmetry relaxation. The results are discussed in relation to claims of the stability of nuclear spin isomers of H2O in the condensed phase and briefly also to astrophysical spectroscopy.

  7. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at √{s_{_NN}} =5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-07-01

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of √{s_{_NN}} =5.02 TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 30.1 nb^{-1} is analyzed. The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range -2.0<η _{CM}< 1.5 in the NN center-of-mass frame. The jet production yields at forward and backward pseudorapidity are compared and no significant asymmetry about η _{CM} = 0 is observed in the measured kinematic range. The measurements in the pPb system are compared to reference jet spectra obtained by extrapolation from previous measurements in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV . In all pseudorapidity ranges, nuclear modifications in inclusive jet production are found to be small, as predicted by next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations that incorporate nuclear effects in the parton distribution functions.

  8. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  9. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider presents a systematic study of high-transverse-momentum charged-di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation Δϕ in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation Δη is observed in central Au+Au collisions, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in Δη×Δϕ can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component that is narrow in Δϕ and depends only weakly on Δη, the “ridge.” Using two systematically independent determinations of the background normalization and shape, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger pt>6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse-momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2

  10. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  11. The mid-infrared emission of narrow-line active galactic nuclei: Star formation, nuclear activity, and two populations revealed by WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, David J.; Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Richard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the nature of the long-wavelength mid-infrared (MIR) emission of a sample of 13,000 local Type II (narrow-line) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using 12 μm and 22 μm photometry from the WISE all-sky survey. In combination with FIRST 1.4 GHz photometry, we show that AGNs divide into two relatively distinct populations or 'branches' in the plane of MIR and radio luminosity. Seyfert galaxies lie almost exclusively on an MIR-bright branch (Branch A), while low-ionization nuclear emission line galaxies (LINERs) are split evenly into Branch A and the MIR-faint Branch B. We devise various tests to constrain the processes that define the branches, including a comparison to the properties of pure star-forming inactive galaxies on the MIR-radio plane. We demonstrate that the total MIR emission of objects on Branch A, including most Seyfert galaxies, is governed primarily by host star formation, with ≈15% of the 22 μm luminosity coming from AGN-heated dust. This implies that ongoing dusty star formation is a general property of Seyfert host galaxies. We show that the 12 μm broadband luminosity of AGNs on Branch A is suppressed with respect to star-forming galaxies, possibly due to the destruction of PAHs or deeper 10 μm Si absorption in AGNs. We uncover a correlation between the MIR luminosity and [O III] λ5007 luminosity in AGNs. This suggests a relationship between the star formation rate and nuclear luminosity in the AGN population, but we caution on the importance of selection effects inherent to such AGN-dominated emission-line galaxies in driving such a correlation. We highlight the MIR-radio plane as a useful tool in comparative studies of star formation and nuclear activity in AGNs.

  12. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  13. Radio Jet Interactions with Massive Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wiita, P. J.; Joyce, J.; Hooda, J. S.

    1998-12-01

    Rather high resolution three-dimensional simulations of hydrodynamical jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. The parameters we employ are suitable for moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. Before they cross this interface, these simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive clouds within the galactic halo, with densities 10 or more times higher than the ambient atmospheric density, and 100's of times the jet density. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and could correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for off-center collisions, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets crossing tilted interfaces in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions, particularly with weaker jets, could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. The possibility of jets being bent, yet remaining stable, after such collisions is also investigated. This work was supported by NPACI allocation GSU200 on the Cray T90 and by RPE funds at Georgia State University.

  14. Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2013-04-01

    All galaxies began as spiral galaxies. The early universe began with sets of two or more pre-galactic arms orbiting each other. As gravitational attraction between the arms took effect, the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided forming spiral galaxies when they attached with the orbital motion of the arms being converted to the rotational motion of the newly formed spiral galaxies or (Iφ)arm1+ (Iφ)arm2+ ...+ (Iφ)armn= (Iφ)galaxy. If the centripetal force on the arms is more than the gravitational force on the arms, the spiral galaxy remains a spiral galaxy i.e. mv^2/r>=Gmarmmgalaxy/r^2. If the galaxy is slowly rotating, the spiral arms collapse into the body of the galaxy because the gravitational force is greater than the centripetal force on the arms and an elliptical galaxy is formed i.e. mv^2/r < Gmarmsmgalaxy/r^2.

  15. The nuclear X-ray source in NGC 3628: A strange active galactic nucleus or the most luminous high-mass X-ray binary known?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1995-01-01

    After 12 years, during which its unabsorbed soft X-ray flux in the 0.1-2.0 keV band was almost constant at about f(sub x) approximately 10(exp -12) ergs/s/sq cm, the compact nuclear source in NGC 3628 was not detected in one of our ROSAT observations, with a limiting sensitivity of f(sub x) approximately 5 x 10(exp -14) ergs/s/sq cm. Our data can be explained in two ways. The source is either the most massive X-ray binary known so far, with a greater than and approximately equal to 75 solar mass black hole, or an unusual low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary, while the luminosity of the source of L(sub x) is approximately equal to 10(exp 40) ergs/s is more similar to those of low-luminosity AGNs. If it is an AGN, variable obscuration might explain the observed light curve.

  16. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  17. Radiogenic p-isotopes from Type Ia Supernova, Nuclear Physics Uncertainties, and Galactic Chemical Evolution Compared with Values in Primitive Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2014-11-01

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes 92Nb, 97, 98Tc, and 146Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and 13C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of 92Nb and 146Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  18. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02\\,\\mathrm{TeV} $$$

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-04

    In this study, inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon–nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of √sNN = 5.02TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 30.1 nb–1 is analyzed. The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range –2.0 < ηCM < 1.5 in the NN center-of-mass frame. The jet production yields at forward and backward pseudorapidity are compared and no significant asymmetry about ηCM=0 is observed in the measured kinematic range. The measurements in the pPb system are compared to reference jetmore » spectra obtained by extrapolation from previous measurements in pp collisions at √s = 7TeV. In all pseudorapidity ranges, nuclear modifications in inclusive jet production are found to be small, as predicted by next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations that incorporate nuclear effects in the parton distribution functions.« less

  19. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  20. On particle acceleration in astrophysical relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic jets, e.g., in active galactic nuclei, are believed to be accelerators of high-energy cosmic rays. This is a lore but no justification of it exists. We investigate this problem from the first principles and present arguments that ``no-jets'' are better accelerators than the jets themselves. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  1. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  2. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  3. Integral field unit spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - I. Principal component analysis Tomography and nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Most massive galaxies show emission lines that can be characterized as LINERs. To what extent this emission is related to AGNs or to stellar processes is still an open question. In this paper, we analysed a sample of such galaxies to study the central region in terms of nuclear and circumnuclear emission lines, as well as the stellar component properties. For this reason, we selected 10 massive (σ > 200 km s-1) nearby (d < 31 Mpc) galaxies and observed them with the IFU/GMOS (integral field unit/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectrograph on the Gemini South Telescope. The data were analysed with principal component analysis (PCA) Tomography to assess the main properties of the objects. Two spectral regions were analysed: a yellow region (5100-5800 Å), adequate to show the properties of the stellar component, and a red region (6250-6800 Å), adequate to analyse the gaseous component. We found that all objects previously known to present emission lines have a central AGN-type emitting source. They also show gaseous and stellar kinematics typical of discs. Such discs may be co-aligned (NGC 1380 and ESO 208 G-21), in counter-rotation (IC 1459 and NGC 7097) or misaligned (IC 5181 and NGC 4546). We also found one object with a gaseous disc but no stellar disc (NGC 2663), one with a stellar disc but no gaseous disc (NGC 1404), one with neither stellar nor gaseous disc (NGC 1399) and one with probably ionization cones (NGC 3136). PCA Tomography is an efficient method for detecting both the central AGN and gaseous and stellar discs. In the two cases (NGC 1399 and NGC 1404) in which no lines were previously reported, we found no evidence of either nuclear or circumnuclear emission, using PCA Tomography only.

  4. The Sins/zC-Sinf Survey of z ~ 2 Galaxy Kinematics: Evidence for Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus-Driven Nuclear Outflows in Massive Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Newman, S. F.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Carollo, C. M.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Lang, P.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Peng, Y.; Renzini, A.; Rosario, D.; Shapiro Griffin, K.; Shapley, A. E.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; Vergani, D.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, E.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (>=1011 M ⊙) z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km s-1, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~60 M ⊙ yr-1 and mass loading of ~3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~485 km s-1 and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs 074.A-0911, 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 078.A-0600, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 088.A-0202, 091.A-0126). Also based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  5. Three-dimensional Stellar Kinematics at the Galactic Center: Measuring the Nuclear Star Cluster Spatial Density Profile, Black Hole Mass, and Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Bullock, J.; Kaplinghat, M.; Lu, J. R.; Peter, A. H. G.; Phifer, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M BH), and distance to the Galactic center (R 0) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)vpropr -γ, have a power law slope \\gamma =0.05_{-0.60}^{+0.29}, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of M_{BH}=5.76_{-1.26}^{+1.76}\\times 10^6 M ⊙ and R_0=8.92_{-0.55}^{+0.58} kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R 0 is reduced by 30% (8.46_{-0.38}^{+0.42}\\ kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R 0.

  6. Radio jet interactions with massive clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Wang, Zhongxiang; Hooda, Jagbir S.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of light hydrodynamic jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. We employ parameters corresponding to moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. These simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive dense clouds within the galactic halo. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and nominally correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for the off-center collisions considered, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. Slow, dense jets may be bent, yet remain stable for fairly extended times, thereby explaining some Wide-Angle-Tail and most "dog-leg" morphologies.

  7. 76 FR 37798 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On May..., concerning Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, to the Department of Energy. In... Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing (PJM) at the Waste Treatment...

  8. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  9. On Radiative Acceleration of Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Takahara, F.

    1997-10-01

    The formation and acceleration of relativistic jets by radiative forces in black hole systems are investigated. Under a variety of circumstances, we calculate the bulk acceleration and radiative cooling of a confined plasma cell, immersed in different types of radiation fields and interacting by Compton scattering. Both non-relativistic (cold) and relativistic (hot) jet plasma, comprising mixtures of electron-proton and electron-positron components, are treated. We pay attention to some conceivable effects, previously neglected, which may possibly enhance the bulk acceleration; among them are an anisotropically radiating accretion disk surface, beamed secondary radiation from the inner jet, and scattering in the energy dependent Klein-Nishina regime. Our results are discussed in the context of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole candidates, and the conditions necessary for successfully reproducing their observed properties are highlighted. In particular, the velocities of the recently discovered superluminal jets in Galactic black hole candidates (Lorentz factors of Γ ~ 2.5) are readily and very robustly accounted for if the jet is composed primarily of electron-positron pairs and the disk luminosity is near the Eddington value; the jet kinetic power can be consistent with optical depth and pair annihilation constraints. On the other hand, severe difficulty is met in attaining the velocities of AGN jets (Γ ~ 10), which can only be realized when a significant amount of beamed secondary radiation is present. We also contemplate additional important issues, such as global energetics.

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR KINEMATICS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: MEASURING THE NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER SPATIAL DENSITY PROFILE, BLACK HOLE MASS, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Bullock, J.; Kaplinghat, M.; Peter, A. H. G.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Phifer, K.; Lu, J. R.

    2013-12-10

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M {sub BH}), and distance to the Galactic center (R {sub 0}) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)∝r {sup –γ}, have a power law slope γ=0.05{sub −0.60}{sup +0.29}, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of M{sub BH}=5.76{sub −1.26}{sup +1.76}×10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and R{sub 0}=8.92{sub −0.55}{sup +0.58} kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R {sub 0} is reduced by 30% (8.46{sub −0.38}{sup +0.42} kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R {sub 0}.

  11. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Sensitivity of Pion versus Parton-Jet Nuclear Modification Factors to the Path-Length Dependence of Jet-Energy Loss at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Betz; Miklos, Gyulassy

    2015-12-01

    Not Available Supported by the Helmholtz International Centre for FAIR within the Framework of the LOEWE Program, and the US-DOE Nuclear Science under Grant Nos DE-FG02-93ER40764 and DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. Shifts of the Al-26 line due to Galactic rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, Jeff; Ramaty, Reuven

    1991-01-01

    The shape of the Al-26 line is evaluated using a Galactic disk rotation curve and assuming various galactic distributions of radioactive aluminum. The line shape depends on galactic longitude, detector opening angle, and the assumed aluminum distribution. For a detector of 20 deg aperture and 2.5 keV resolution, the shift of the line peak can be as large as 0.4 keV. Such a shift could be detected with the proposed nuclear astrophysics explorer.

  14. Non-thermal Radiation from Collisions of Compact Objects with Intermediate-scale Jets in Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.; Banasiński, P.

    2015-07-01

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late-type stars in the galactic bulges and also early-type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters, which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical halos on a scale of several kpc that contain from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars, and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of the active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster, and GCs with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc-scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar cluster and also the microwave background radiation to TeV γ-ray energies. We show that such non-thermal radiation is likely to be detectable from the intermediate-scale jets of nearby active galaxies for a reasonable number of stars and GCs immersed within the jet. As an example, we calculate the expected non-thermal emission in X-ray and gamma-ray energies from the nearby radio galaxy Cen A, from which steady gamma-ray emission with a complex spectrum has recently been reported by Fermi and the HESS Observatories.

  15. Gamma ray constraints on the galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma-ray signatures of galactic supernovae of all types are performed in order to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma-ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of nuclear yields, we determine galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma-ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse galactic gamma-ray line emission.

  16. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  17. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  18. The Making of a Galactic Parallelogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows in unprecedented detail the galaxy Centaurus A's last big meal: a spiral galaxy seemingly twisted into a parallelogram-shaped structure of dust. Spitzer's ability to both see dust and see through it allowed the telescope to peer into the center of Centaurus A and capture this galactic remnant as never before.

    An elliptical galaxy located 11 million light-years from Earth, Centaurus A is one of the brightest sources of radio waves in the sky. These radio waves indicate the presence of a supermassive black hole, which may be 'feeding' off the leftover galactic meal.

    A high-speed jet of gas can be seen shooting above the plane of the galaxy (the faint, fuzzy feature pointing from the center toward the upper left). Jets are a common feature of galaxies, and this one is probably receiving an extra boost from the galactic remnant.

    Scientists have created a model that explains how such a strangely geometric structure could arise. In this model, a spiral galaxy falls into an elliptical galaxy, becoming warped and twisted in the process. The folds in the warped disc create the parallelogram-shaped illusion.

  19. Measurements of the Nuclear Modification Factor for Jets in Pb+Pb Collisions at √(s)NN]=2.76  TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Backus Mayes, J; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; 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Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittig, T; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wright, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2015-02-20

    Measurements of inclusive jet production are performed in pp and Pb+Pb collisions at √(s)NN=2.76  TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.0 and 0.14  nb(-1), respectively. The jets are identified with the anti-k(t) algorithm with R=0.4, and the spectra are measured over the kinematic range of jet transverse momentum 32nuclear modification factor R(AA) is evaluated, and jets are found to be suppressed by approximately a factor of 2 in central collisions compared to pp collisions. The R(AA) shows a slight increase with p(T) and no significant variation with rapidity. PMID:25763955

  20. Relativistic jet feedback in high-redshift galaxies - I. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph; Wagner, Alex

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of 3D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of interaction of active galactic nucleus jets with a dense turbulent two-phase interstellar medium, which would be typical of high-redshift galaxies. We describe the effect of the jet on the evolution of the density of the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The jet-driven energy bubble affects the gas to distances up to several kiloparsecs from the injection region. The shocks resulting from such interactions create a multiphase ISM and radial outflows. One of the striking result of this work is that low-power jets (Pjet ≲ 1043 ergs-1), although less efficient in accelerating clouds, are trapped in the ISM for a longer time and hence affect the ISM over a larger volume. Jets of higher power drill through with relative ease. Although the relativistic jets launch strong outflows, there is little net mass ejection to very large distances, supporting a galactic fountain scenario for local feedback.

  1. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  2. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  3. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  4. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  5. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  6. Pondermotive acceleration of charged particles along the relativistic jets of an accreting blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisuzaki, T.; Tajima, T.

    2014-05-01

    Accreting blackholes such as miniquasars and active galactic nuclei can contribute to the highest energy components of intra- (˜1015 eV) galactic and extra-galactic components (˜1020 eV) of cosmic rays. Alfven wave pulses which are excited in the accretion disk around blackholes propagate in relativistic jets. Because of their highly non-linear nature of the waves, charged particles (protons, ions, and electrons) can be accelerated to high energies in relativistic jets in accreting blackhole systems, the central engine of miniquasars and active galactic nuclei.

  7. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  8. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  9. Jet-intracluster medium interaction in Hydra A - I. Estimates of jet velocity from inner knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. A.; Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; McNamara, B. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first stage of an investigation of the interactions of the jets in the radio galaxy Hydra A with the intracluster medium. We consider the jet kinetic power, the galaxy and cluster atmosphere and the inner structure of the radio source. Analysing radio observations of the inner lobes of Hydra A by Taylor et al. we confirm the jet power estimates ˜1045 erg s-1 derived by Wise et al. from dynamical analysis of the X-ray cavities. With this result and a model for the galaxy halo, we explore the jet-intracluster medium interactions occurring on a scale of 10 kpc using two-dimensional, axisymmetric, relativistic pure hydrodynamic simulations. A key feature is that we identify the three bright knots in the northern jet as biconical reconfinement shocks, which result when an overpressured jet starts to come into equilibrium with the galactic atmosphere. Through an extensive parameter space study we deduce that the jet velocity is approximately 0.8c at a distance 0.5 kpc from the black hole. The combined constraints of jet power, the observed jet radius profile along the jet and the estimated jet pressure and jet velocity imply a value of the jet density parameter χ ≈ 13 for the northern jet. We show that for a jet β = 0.8 and θ = 42°, an intrinsic asymmetry in the emissivity of the northern and southern jet is required for a consistent brightness ratio ≈7 estimated from the 6-cm Very Large Array image of Hydra A.

  10. A JET MODEL FOR THE BROADBAND SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY NGC 4051

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Dipankar; Miller, Jon M.; King, Ashley; Markoff, Sera

    2011-07-10

    Recent radio very long baseline interferometry observations of the {approx} parsec-scale nuclear region of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 hint toward the presence of outflowing plasma. From available literature we have collected high-quality, high-resolution broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) data of the nuclear region of NGC 4051 spanning from radio through X-rays, to test whether the broadband SED can be explained within the framework of a relativistically outflowing jet model. We show that once the contribution from the host galaxy is taken into account, the broadband emission from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of NGC 4051 can be well described by the jet model. Contributions from dust and ongoing star formation in the nuclear region tend to dominate the IR emission even at the highest resolutions. In the framework of the jet model, the correlated high variability of the extreme-ultraviolet and X-rays compared to other wavelengths suggests that the emission at these wavelengths is optically thin synchrotron originating in the particle acceleration site(s) in the jet very close (few r{sub g}= GM{sub BH}/c{sup 2}) to the central supermassive black hole of mass M{sub BH}. Our conclusions support the hypothesis that narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (which NGC 4051 is a member of) harbor a 'jetted' outflow with properties similar to what has already been seen in low-luminosity AGNs and stellar mass black holes in hard X-ray state.

  11. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  12. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  13. Jets in AGN at extremely high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid I.; Frey, Sándor; Paragi, Zsolt

    2015-03-01

    The jet phenomenon is a trademark of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In most general terms, the current understanding of this phenomenon explains the jet appearance by effects of relativistic plasma physics. The fundamental source of energy that feeds the plasma flow is believed to be the gravitational field of a central supermassive black hole. While the mechanism of energy transfer and a multitude of effects controlling the plasma flow are yet to be understood, major properties of jets are strikingly similar in a broad range of scales from stellar to galactic. They are supposed to be controlled by a limited number of physical parameters, such as the mass of a central black hole and its spin, magnetic field induction and accretion rate. In a very simplified sense, these parameters define the formation of a typical core-jet structure observed at radio wavelengths in the region of the innermost central tens of parsecs in AGN. These core-jet structures are studied in the radio domain by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) with milli- and sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution. Such structures are detectable at a broad range of redshifts. If observed at a fixed wavelength, a typical core-jet AGN morphology would appear as having a steep-spectrum jet fading away with the increasing redshift while a flat-spectrum core becoming more dominant. If core-jet AGN constitute the same population of objects throughout the redshift space, the apparent ``prominence'' of jets at higher redshifts must decrease (Gurvits 1999): well pronounced jets at high z must appear less frequent than at low z.

  14. 76 FR 13397 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ..., Washington, DC 20004. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Steven Petras, Nuclear Engineer, Departmental... Treatment and Immobilization Plant was published in the Federal Register on December 27, 2010 (72 FR...

  15. Active Galactic Nuclei:. Sources for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P. L.; Becker, J. K.; Caramete, L.; Gergely, L.; Mariş, I. C.; Meli, A.; de Souza, V.; Stanev, T.

    Ultra high energy cosmic ray events presently show a spectrum, which we interpret here as galactic cosmic rays due to a starburst, in the radio galaxy Cen A which is pushed up in energy by the shock of a relativistic jet. The knee feature and the particles with energy immediately higher in galactic cosmic rays then turn into the bulk of ultra high energy cosmic rays. This entails that all ultra high energy cosmic rays are heavy nuclei. This picture is viable if the majority of the observed ultra high energy events come from the radio galaxy Cen A, and are scattered by intergalactic magnetic fields across much of the sky.

  16. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  17. The nuclear region of the spiral galaxy M81.

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, N; Bietenholz, M F; Rupen, M P

    1995-01-01

    Very-long-baseline radio interferometry images of the nuclear region of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 reveal the most compact galactic core outside the Galaxy of which the size has been determined: 700 x 300 astronomical units (AU). The observations exclude a starburst or supernova interpretation for the core. Instead they favor an active galactic nucleus. There is evidence for a northeastern jet bent by approximately 35 degrees over a length scale from 700 to 4000 AU. The jet is, on average, directed toward an extended emission region, probably a radio lobe, about 1 kiloparsec (kpc) away from the core. A corresponding emission region was found in the southwest at a distance of only 30 pc from the core. The observed jet is extremely stable and likely to be associated with a steady-state channel. There is no detectable motion along the jet beyond the nominal value of -60 +/- 60 km.s-1. The level of activities in the core region of M81 is intermediate between that of SgrA* and that of powerful radio galaxies and quasars. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607601

  18. THE GALACTIC CENTER: NOT AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris

    2013-06-01

    We present 10 {mu}m-35 {mu}m Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc Multiplication-Sign 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H{sub 2} emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H{sub 2} suggest that most of the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.

  19. Interaction of Relativistic Jets with Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic jets such as those emitted by active galactic nuclei are observed to be collimated over great distances, but the cause of this collimation is uncertain. Also not fully understood are the means by which these jets become accelerated to their extreme velocities. To probe these questions, I examine the possibility of collimation and acceleration of relativistic jets by the pressure of the ambient medium surrounding the jet base, in the limit in which the jet interior has lost causal contact with its surroundings. I model the jet with an ultrarelativistic equation of state, injected into an ambient medium that has a pressure that decreases as a power of spherical radius, p ~ r^-n. Within the range 2jet interior will be out of causal contact, but the outer layers of the jet gradually collimate toward the jet axis, leading to the formation of a shocked boundary layer. By constructing partially self-similar solutions to the fluid equations within this boundary layer, I examine the impact of the external pressure profile on the behavior of the fluid in the layer. I determine both the structure of the jet and the rate of energy conversion from internal to kinetic as the jet propagates outward, establishing both the collimation and acceleration profiles of the jet. I will discuss the differences in predicted jet behavior based on whether the jet is purely hydrodynamic or whether the model also includes the effects of a toroidal magnetic field threading the jet interior. I will also describe the conditions that create specific observed jet morphology, such as the "hollow cone" structure seen in jets such as M87. Finally, I will discuss the specific application of these models to describe the relativistic jets that are created by some tidal disruption events --- events in which a star passing near a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is torn apart by tidal forces, and the star material then accretes back onto the SMBH --- such as in the observations of Swift

  20. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for powerful active galactic nucleus-driven nuclear outflows in massive star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Kurk, J. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lang, P.; Newman, S. F.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Daddi, E.; Mainieri, V.; Mancini, C.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (≥10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1}, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ∼60 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and mass loading of ∼3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ∼485 km s{sup –1} and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.

  1. Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.

    2015-02-01

    Galactic Archeology is a coined term to describe the fact that the Milky Way's history is encoded both in the amounts of various chemical elements seen in the spectra of stellar atmospheres (abundances), and in stellar motions. One of the pillars of Galactic Archaeology is the use of stellar abundance ratios as an indirect age estimator, which although imprecise, has been proved useful in providing relative ages between the different galactic components. The lack of more precise age determination for large samples of field stars is one of the main reasons why different scenarios for the formation of our Galaxy can still be accommodated to current observational constraints, thus preventing a clear picture of the Milky Way's assembling history. Another difficulty is that most of the available information (especially on ages) has been confined to a region close to the Sun. These two main obstacles can now start to be overcome thanks to a) large spectroscopic and photometric surveys covering larger portions of the Milky Way, and b) the combination of the photometric and spectroscopic information with that coming from asteroseismology. The latter promises a breakthrough in the field of Galactic Archaeology, as it brings the opportunity to, for the first time, measure ages for large samples of distant field giant stars, which cover a large age-baseline. When combining this information with that soon available from Gaia, the field of Galactic Archaeology will be shaken and modelers will certainly have less flexibility in finding models that comply to these precious new observational constraints. The goal of these short lectures is to put Asteroseismology in the context of Galactic Archaeology.

  2. Interaction of Hydra A jets with the intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Mohammad Ali; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Wagner, Alex; Slatyer Sutherland, Ralph; McNamara, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An important research area of modern astronomy is to understand the physics of jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) or intracluster medium (ICM). The aims of our project is to understand the energetics and composition of the jet near its origin, and its interaction with the ICM, focusing on detailed models of the inner structure of a spectacular radio source Hydra A. The key features of our modelling are that 1) We identify the four bright knots in the northern jet of Hydra A as biconical reconfinement shocks, which result when an over-pressured jet starts to come into equilibrium whit the galactic atmosphere 2) The curved morphology of the source and the turbulent transition of the jet to a plume are produced by the dynamical interaction of a precessing jet with the ICM. We provided an innovative theoretical approach to estimate the jet velocity from the information of the inner jet knots and the oscillation of the jet boundary. We also explored the complex morphology of the source and the heating of the ambient medium via the forward shock using a three dimensional precessing jet-ICM interaction model. With the 3D models We successfully reproduced key features of the source, for example, i) Four bright knots along the jet trajectory at approximately correct locations, 2) The curvature of the jet within 10 kpc, 3) The turbulent transition of the jet to a plume, and 4) A misaligned bright knot in the turbulent flaring zone. From our model we determined that the heating of the atmosphere by the jet would be gentle, which is consistent with the assessment of the physics of cooling flow.

  3. Multi-phase Nature of a Radiation-driven Fountain with Nuclear Starburst in a Low-mass Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Keiichi; Schartmann, Marc; Meijerink, Rowin

    2016-09-01

    The structures and dynamics of molecular, atomic, and ionized gases are studied around a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a small (2× {10}6{M}ȯ ) black hole using three-dimensional (3D) radiation–hydrodynamic simulations. We studied, for the first time, the non-equilibrium chemistry for the X-ray-dominated region in the “radiation-driven fountain” with supernova feedback. A double hollow cone structure is naturally formed without postulating a thick “torus” around a central source. The cone is occupied with an inhomogeneous, diffuse ionized gas and surrounded by a geometrically thick (h/r≳ 1) atomic gas. Dense molecular gases are distributed near the equatorial plane, and energy feedback from supernovae enhances their scale height. Molecular hydrogen exists in a hot phase (>1000 K) as well as in a cold (\\lt 100 {{K}}), dense (\\gt {10}3 {{cm}}-3) phase. The velocity dispersion of H2 in the vertical direction is comparable to the rotational velocity, which is consistent with near-infrared observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies. Using 3D radiation transfer calculations for the dust emission, we find polar emission in the mid-infrared band (12 μm), which is associated with bipolar outflows, as suggested in recent interferometric observations of nearby AGNs. If the viewing angle for the nucleus is larger than 75°, the spectral energy distribution is consistent with that of the Circinus galaxy. The multi-phase interstellar medium observed in optical/infrared and X-ray observations is also discussed.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Columns Found toward the Double Helix Nebulae in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Ogawa, Takayuki

    NANTEN2 observations of the galactic molecular gas revealed that molecular columns surround the double helix nebulae at our Galactic center (Enokiya et al. 2014). In order to study the formation mechanism of the double helix nebulae and molecular columns, we carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of a magnetic tower jet ejected from the galactic center with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) gas taking into account the interstellar cooling. The HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold, dense region is formed around the helical magnetic tower jet. These molecular columns can be the evidences of the past activity near the galactic center black hole.

  5. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  6. A wind-type model for the generation of astrophysical jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    1984-01-01

    Wind-type solutions for the generation of astrophysical jets from active galactic nuclei and stellar sources, such as those associated with SS 433 and protostellar objects, are discussed. Acceleration, collimation, and morphology are consistently interpreted in terms of a flow starting from the galactic or stellar core inside the 'throat' of a thick accretion disk.

  7. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Rishat

    2015-12-01

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p-p, p-Pb, Pb-Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  8. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Rishat; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p–p, p–Pb, Pb–Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  9. Superluminal Jets and Other Properties of Black Holes Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discoveries in the past few years of radio jets in Galactic black hole candidates have provided a link between active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and the compact stars in binary systems. The availability of binary systems relatively close by is an opportunity to learn about the jet production mechanism on a timescale a million times shorter than that of an AGN. Evidence is clearly seen of correlated high energy X-ray and gamma ray emission to radio emission from jets, linking the accretion and jet production mechanisms. objects such as GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40 and Cyg X-3 show striking properties which distinguish them from other black hole candidates. Our theoretical understanding of these systems is still in the formative stages. I review some of the most recent multiwavelength data and point out questions raised by these observations.

  10. MILLIMETER RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSIONS AS THE ACTIVITY OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN NEARBY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AND LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Kohno, Kotaro; Kameno, Seiji

    2011-11-15

    We conducted millimeter continuum observations for samples of nearby early-type galaxies (21 sources) and nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; 16 sources) at 100 GHz ({lambda}3 mm) using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA). In addition, we performed quasi-simultaneous observations at 150 GHz ({lambda}2 mm) and 100 GHz for five LLAGNs. Compact nuclear emissions showing flat or inverted spectra at centimeter-to-millimeter wavelengths were found in many LLAGNs and several early-type galaxies. Moreover, significant flux variability was detected in three LLAGNs. These radio properties are similar to Sgr A*. The observed radio luminosities are consistent with the fundamental plane of black hole activity that was suggested on the basis of samples with black hole masses ranging from 10 to 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. This implies nuclear jets powered by radiatively inefficient accretion flows onto black holes.

  11. Catching a Galactic Football: Chandra Examines Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    falling into the Cygnus A galaxy. However, the two jets powered by the nuclear black hole in this galaxy push this gas outward, like a balloon being inflated by a tank of gas. Cygnus A is not alone in its galactic neighborhood, but is a member of a large cluster containing many galaxies. Extremely hot (tens of millions of degrees Celsius) gas is spread between the galaxies. Although it has a very low density, this gas provides enough resistance to slow down the outward advancement of the particle jets from Cygnus A. At the ends of the jets, astronomers find bright areas of radio and X-ray emission known as "hot spots." Scientists believe that fast atomic particles and magnetic fields from the jets spill out into the region, providing pressure that continuously inflates the cavity. In a paper accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Wilson, Young and Shopbell discuss how the Chandra observations resolve a long-standing puzzle about the hot spots at the ends of the jets. By analyzing the X-ray emission of the hot spots, the astronomers have measured the strength of the magnetic field associated with them. "The radio data themselves cannot determine the strength of the magnetic field, a limitation that has inhibited progress in our understanding of cosmic radio sources for 50 years," said Wilson. "Combination of the Chandra X-ray and the radio data allows a quite precise measurement of the field strength." The Chandra observation of Cygnus A was made with the ACIS on May 21, 2000, for over nine hours. The ACIS X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University and MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. This research was supported by the Chandra project at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Images associated with this

  12. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  13. Relativistic jet feedback in high-redshift galaxies I: Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph; Wagner, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of three dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of interaction of AGN jets with a dense turbulent two-phase interstellar medium, which would be typical of high redshift galaxies. We describe the effect of the jet on the evolution of the density of the turbulent ISM. The jet driven energy bubble affects the gas to distances up to several kiloparsecs from the injection region. The shocks resulting from such interactions create a multi-phase ISM and radial outflows. One of the striking result of this work is that low power jets (Pjet ≲ 1043ergs-1) although less efficient in accelerating clouds, are trapped in the ISM for a longer time and hence affect the ISM over a larger volume. Jets of higher power drill through with relative ease. Although the relativistic jets launch strong outflows, there is little net mass ejection to very large distances, supporting a galactic fountain scenario for local feedback.

  14. eRMHD simulations of jets with helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Sogorb, M.; Perucho, M.; Gómez, J. L.; Martí, J. M.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Agudo, I.

    We present numerical magnetohydrodynamic and emission (eRMHD) simulations of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. We focus our study on the role played by the magnetic field in the dynamics of the jet, analyzing the balance of the main driving forces which determine the jet evolution. Overpressured jets with different magnetizations are considered in order to study their influence in the jet collimation, confinement and overall stability. Computation of the synchrotron emission from these models allows a direct comparison with actual sources. We find that the relative brightness of the knots associated with the recollimation shocks decreases with increasing magnetization, suggesting that overpressured jets presenting stationary components may have a relatively weak magnetization, with magnetic fields of the order of equipartition or below.

  15. Abundances of planetary nebulae in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Planetary nebulae (PNe) abundances are poorly known for those nebulae in the Galactic bulge. This is because of the high and uneven extinction in the bulge which makes visual spectral measurements difficult. In addition, the extinction corrections may be unreliable. Elements considered are O, N, Ne, S, Ar, and Cl. Aims: We determine the abundances in 19 PNe, 18 of which are located in the bulge. This doubles the number of PNe abundance determinations in the bulge. The Galactic abundance gradient is discussed for five elements. Methods: The mid-infrared spectra measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope are used to determine the abundances. This part of the spectrum is little affected by extinction for which an uncertain correction is no longer necessary. In addition the connection with the visible and ultraviolet spectrum becomes simpler because hydrogen lines are observed both in the infrared and in the visible spectra. In this way we more than double the number of PNe with reliable abundances. Results: Reliable abundances are obtained for O, N, Ne, S, and Ar for Galactic bulge PNe. Conclusions: The Galactic abundance gradient is less steep than previously thought. This is especially true for oxygen. The sulfur abundance is reliable because all stages of ionization expected have been measured. It is not systematically low compared to oxygen as has been found for some Galactic PNe. Based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  16. Relativistic MHD Simulations of Poynting Flux-driven Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetized jets are observed to propagate to very large distances in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations to study the propagation of Poynting flux-driven jets in AGNs. These jets are already assumed to be being launched from the vicinity (~103 gravitational radii) of supermassive black holes. Jet injections are characterized by a model described in Li et al., and we follow the propagation of these jets to ~parsec scales. We find that these current-carrying jets are always collimated and mildly relativistic. When α, the ratio of toroidal-to-poloidal magnetic flux injection, is large the jet is subject to nonaxisymmetric current-driven instabilities (CDI) which lead to substantial dissipation and reduced jet speed. However, even with the presence of instabilities, the jet is not disrupted and will continue to propagate to large distances. We suggest that the relatively weak impact by the instability is due to the nature of the instability being convective and the fact that the jet magnetic fields are rapidly evolving on Alfvénic time scales. We present the detailed jet properties and show that far from the jet launching region, a substantial amount of magnetic energy has been transformed into kinetic energy and thermal energy, producing a jet magnetization number σ < 1. In addition, we have also studied the effects of a gas pressure supported "disk" surrounding the injection region, and qualitatively similar global jet behaviors were observed. We stress that jet collimation, CDIs, and the subsequent energy transitions are intrinsic features of current-carrying jets.

  17. Simulations of Galactic Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  18. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge is the least studied component of our Galaxy. Yet, its formation and evolution are key to understand the formation of the Galaxy itself. Studies on the Galactic bulge have increased significantly in the last years, but still there are many points of controversy. This volume contains several contributions from experts in different aspects of the bulge. Issues discussed include the following: the presence of an old spheroidal bulge, or identification of its old stellar population with the thick disk or halo; fraction of stars younger than 10 Gyr is estimated to be of < 5 to 22% depending on method and authors; multiple populations or only a metal-poor and a metal-rich ones; spheroidal or ellipsoidal distribution of RR Lyrae; formation of the bulge from early mergers or from secular evolution of the bar; different methods of mapping extinction; selection and identification of bulge globular clusters.

  19. Galactic-scale civilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  20. PREFACE: Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Karas, Vladimir; Krips, Melanie; Eckart, Andreas; Britzen, Silke; Fischer, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei conference. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG), Bad Honnef, Germany, from 28 August to 2 September 2011. It was the second conference of this kind, following the Astronomy at High Angular Resolution conference held in Bad Honnef, three years earlier in 2008. The main objective of the conference was to frame the discussion of the broad range of physical processes that occur in the central 100pc of galactic nuclei. In most cases, this domain is difficult to probe through observations. This is mainly because of the lack of angular resolution, the brightness of the central engine and possible obscurations through dust and gas, which play together in the central regions of host galaxies of galactic nuclei within a broad range of activity. The presence of large amounts of molecular and atomic (both neutral and ionized) gas, dust and central engines with outflows and jets implies that the conditions for star formation in these regions are very special, and probably different from those in the disks of host galaxies. Numerous presentations covering a broad range of topics, both theoretical and experimental, those related to research on Active Galactic Nuclei and on a wide range of observed wavelengths were submitted to the Scientific Organizing Committee. Presentations have been grouped into six sessions: The nuclei of active galaxies The Galactic Center The immediate environment of Super Massive Black Holes The physics of nuclear jets and the interaction of the interstellar medium The central 100pc of the nuclear environment Star formation in that region The editors thank all participants of the AHAR 2011 conference for their enthusiasm and their numerous and vivid contributions to this conference. We would especially like to thank John Hugh Seiradakis from the Aristotle

  1. Topics in galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Frank Blane

    1989-01-01

    The distant satellites of the Milky Way Galaxy are used to probe the distribution of dark matter in the Galactic halo. A new method of statistical analysis based on Bayes' theorem was devised, which directly yields confidence intervals for the mass of the Galaxy once the eccentricity distribution of the satellites is specified. Assuming an isotropic velocity distribution for 10 objects at distances of 50 to 140 kiloparsecs, mass results suggest that the Galaxy's massive dark halo extends to approximately less than 50 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center. A model galaxy with an artificial bar is used to explore the effect of dynamical friction on a galactic bar. An analytic formula is provided which correctly predicts angular momentum changes for a bar in interaction with a non self-gravitating disk. N-body simulations further show that disk self-gravity tends to make a bar without inner Lindblad resonances spin down more rapidly, and tends to make a bar dominated by inner Lindblad resonances spin up less rapidly. The long-term dynamical evolution of galactic bars is investigated using fully self gravitating bar-unstable disk-halo models. The models develop rapidly rotating bars which then slow down through transfers of angular momentum both to the outer disk and to the halo. The models suggest that the distance between the end of a bar and its corotation circle is proportional to the bar's age, and an approximate formula is presented which expresses this relationship. It is also concluded that the average tangential velocity within a barlike object drops by a factor of about 2 over approximately 45 initial rotation periods.

  2. Modeling Relativistic Jets Using the Athena Hydrodynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauls, David; Pollack, Maxwell; Wiita, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We used the Athena hydrodynamics code (Beckwith & Stone 2011) to model early-stage two-dimensional relativistic jets as approximations to the growth of radio-loud active galactic nuclei. We analyzed variability of the radio emission by calculating fluxes from a vertical strip of zones behind a standing shock, as discussed in the accompanying poster. We found the advance speed of the jet bow shock for various input jet velocities and jet-to-ambient density ratios. Faster jets and higher jet densities produce faster shock advances. We investigated the effects of parameters such as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number, the input jet velocity, and the density ratio on the stability of the simulated jet, finding that numerical instabilities grow rapidly when the CFL number is above 0.1. We found that greater jet input velocities and higher density ratios lengthen the time the jet remains stable. We also examined the effects of the boundary conditions, the CFL number, the input jet velocity, the grid resolution, and the density ratio on the premature termination of Athena code. We found that a grid of 1200 by 1000 zones allows the code to run with minimal errors, while still maintaining an adequate resolution. This work is supported by the Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience program at TCNJ.

  3. Plasma jet takes off.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the corrosive acids and chemical solvents traditionally used to clean semiconductor chips, the jet oxidizes contaminants, producing only benign gaseous by-products such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The new technology is also easy to transport, cleans thoroughly and quickly, and presents no hazards to its operators. PMID:10417375

  4. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  5. The generation of bipolar jets of astrophysical relevance using the OMEGA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Blackman, E. G.; Frank, A.; Meyerhofer, D. M.; Seyler, C. E.

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar astrophysical plasma jets are generated by young stellar objects, active galactic nuclei and proto-planetary nebulae. They are not only born in harsh environments, they can encounter extreme conditions along the way. Recent observations have made apparent that electron physics impacts the overall dynamics of bipolar plasma jets. For instance, the Hall effect together with Ohmic resistivity can change completely the magnetic field structure inside protoplanetary disks and can alter significantly the magneto-rotational instabilities in the inner regions of the disks. The Hall effect plays a critical role in the magnetic polarity of galactic jets. The numerical simulations presented here show how the OMEGA laser can be used to produce bipolar plasma jets with large Reynolds, magnetic Reynolds and Mach numbers. It will also show how electron physics can break the jet symmetry. A discussion will follow on how to generate similar jets using pulsed-power generators. Research partially supported by the NSF grant PHY-1102471.

  6. Galactic diffuse gamma rays from galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, N.; Nishimura, J.

    2001-08-01

    The dominant part of the diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic plane, with energy greater than 1TeV, has been thought as due to the inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar photons with the high-energy cosmic electrons. In these energy regions, the diffuse gamma-ray observation gives us unique infor-mation on the energy spectrum of the high-energy electrons in the interstellar space, since we cannot observe those electrons directly. This provides us information on the cosmicray source, production mechanism and propagation in the Galaxy. We discuss the implication of our results by comparing with the work of Porter and Protheroe, and also compare with the data observed by the most recent extensive air showers. It is also pointed out that the patchy structure of gammaray distribution will appear at high-energy side, if we observe the distribution with a higher angular resolution of a few arc degrees. This patchy structure will become clear beyond 10TeV of IC gamma rays, where the number of contributing sources of parent decrease and the diffusion distance of the electrons become smaller.

  7. Jet acceleration of the fast molecular outflows in the Seyfert galaxy IC 5063.

    PubMed

    Tadhunter, C; Morganti, R; Rose, M; Oonk, J B R; Oosterloo, T

    2014-07-24

    Massive outflows driven by active galactic nuclei are widely recognized to have a key role in the evolution of galaxies, by heating the ambient gas, expelling it from the nuclear regions, and thereby affecting the star-formation histories of the galaxy bulges. It has been proposed that the powerful jets of relativistic particles (such as electrons) launched by some active nuclei can both accelerate and heat the molecular gas, which often dominates the mass budgets of the outflows. Clear evidence for this mechanism, in the form of detailed associations between the molecular gas kinematics and features in the radio-emitting jets, has however been lacking. Here we report that the warm molecular hydrogen gas in the western radio lobe of the Seyfert galaxy IC 5063 is moving at high velocities-up to about 600 kilometres per second-relative to the galaxy disk. This suggests that the molecules have been accelerated by fast shocks driven into the interstellar medium by the expanding radio jets. These results demonstrate the general feasibility of accelerating molecular outflows in fast shocks driven by active nuclei. PMID:25043049

  8. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  9. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  10. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived, using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408-MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine-scale structure in the spatial distributions and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in our galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy has been estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  11. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408 MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine scale structure in the spatial distribution and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in the galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy was estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  12. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  14. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  17. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  18. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  19. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  20. Jet pump with labyrinth seal

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, L.L.; Kudirka, A.A.

    1981-08-25

    In a jet pump for a nuclear reactor a slip joint is provided between the mixer and diffuser sections thereof to facilitate jet pump maintenance and to allow thermal expansion. To limit leakage flow through the slip joint to a rate below that which causes unacceptable flow induced vibration of the pump, there is provided a labyrinth seal for the slip joint in the form of a series of flow expansion chambers formed by a series of spaced grooves in the annulus of the slip joint.

  1. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  2. Formation of Relativistic Jets : Magnetohydrodynamics and Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver J. G.

    2011-11-01

    In this thesis, the formation of relativistic jets is investigated by means of special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations and synchrotron radiative transfer. Our results show that the magnetohydrodynamic jet self-collimation paradigm can also be applied to the relativistic case. In the first part, jets launched from rotating hot accretion disk coronae are explored, leading to well collimated, but only mildly relativistic flows. Beyond the light-cylinder, the electric charge separation force balances the classical trans-field Lorentz force almost entirely, resulting in a decreased efficiency of acceleration and collimation in comparison to non-relativistic disk winds. In the second part, we examine Poynting dominated flows of various electric current distributions. By following the outflow for over 3000 Schwarzschild radii, highly relativistic jets of Lorentz factor 8 and half-opening angles below 1 degree are obtained, providing dynamical models for the parsec scale jets of active galactic nuclei. Applying the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the quasi-stationary simulation models, we solve the relativistically beamed synchrotron radiation transport. This yields synthetic radiation maps and polarization patterns that can be used to confront high resolution radio and (sub-) mm observations of nearby active galactic nuclei. Relativistic motion together with the helical magnetic fields of the jet formation site imprint a clear signature on the observed polarization and Faraday rotation. In particular, asymmetries in the polarization direction across the jet can disclose the handedness of the magnetic helix and thus the spin direction of the central engine. Finally, we show first results from fully three-dimensional, high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of jet formation from a rotating magnetosphere and examine the jet stability. Relativistic field-line rotation leads to an electric charge separation force that opposes the magnetic Lorentz

  3. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  4. The age of the Galactic disk - Inflow, chemical evolution, astration, and radioactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of Galactic evolution and observational data on the age of the Galaxy are compared, with a focus on recent results. Topics addressed include the infall of material and its effects on the age-metallicity relation, the distribution of metallicity, the present gas fraction and metallicity, and the age spectrum of interstellar nuclei; the chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood; the key results of nuclear cosmochronology; and astration effects on Galactic age. It is found that both nuclear cosmochronology and detailed stellar and Galactic evolution models tend to support an age of 12-16 Gyr.

  5. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis - the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission - and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  6. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  7. The Galactic center wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effect of winds from a cluster of stars in the central 0.8 pc of the Galaxy is modeled as uniform power and mass input over the central region. The flow becomes supersonic outside the central region, and the expected decrease in pressure is in approximate accord with observations. The pressure variations on a larger scale suggest that the Galactic center wind passes through a shock front at a radius of a few pc, leading to a shocked wind bubble on a scale of 100 pc. The tangential magnetic field can come to dominate the pressure in the shocked wind flow even if the energy density of the magnetic field in the initial wind is only 0.1 percent of the wind kinetic energy density. The magnetic region produced in this way may be related to some of the apparently magnetized structures observed in the central region of the Galaxy.

  8. Galactic antiprotons from photinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Rudaz, S.; Walsh, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    Stable photinos, the photino being the supersymmetry partner of the photon, can explain both the 'missing mass' in galactic halos and the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum up to the highest energies observed so far. This requires a photino mass around 15 GeV; significantly higher masses are cosmologically disfavored. As a consequence, the observed cosmic-ray antiproton-to-proton ratio is predicted to decrease abruptly just above the measured energy range, at E = m(x). If observed, this striking effect would strongly support the hypothesis that photinos make up the missing matter in the galaxy and also lead to a measurement of the photino mass from cosmic-ray data.

  9. Great Galactic Buddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 8.15 Billion Lightyears8.59 Billion Lightyears8.98 Billion Lightyears 9.09 Billion Lightyears

    Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old. The universe is believed to be 13.7 billion years old.

    Collectively, these great galactic buddies are called galaxy clusters. A typical galaxy cluster can contain hundreds of galaxies and trillions of stars.

    In this false-color composite, some of the oldest galaxy clusters in the universe pose for Spitzer's infrared array camera. The individual galaxies that make up the distant clusters are shown as red dots in all four images.

    The green blobs are Milky Way stars along the line of sight, and the blue specks are faint galaxies at various distances along the line of sight. The green and blue data are from a visible-light, ground-based telescope.

    The cluster at 9.1 billion light-years away (lower right panel) is currently the most distant galaxy cluster ever detected.

    These images are three-color composites, in which blue represents visible light with a wavelength of 0.4 microns, and green indicates visible light of 0.8 microns. The visible data were captured by the ground-based Mosaic I camera at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Tucson, Ariz. Red represents infrared light of 4.5 microns, captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera.

  10. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Observations at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) have had a critical formative impact on the study of the Galactic bulge, much of the work being inspired and supported by Victor Blanco and collaborators, which is presented in a historical overview. Recent observations at CTIO include the Blanco 4m/Hydra Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) that has mapped the Galactic bulge velocity field from -10

  11. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  12. Relativistic Doppler Beaming and Misalignments in AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-08-01

    Radio maps of active galactic nuclei often show linear features, called jets, on both parsec and kiloparsec scales. These jets supposedly possess relativistic motion and are oriented close to the line of sight of the observer, and accordingly the relativistic Doppler beaming makes them look much brighter than they really are in their respective rest frames. The flux boosting due to the relativistic beaming is a very sensitive function of the jet orientation angle, as seen by the observer. Sometimes, large bends are seen in these jets, with misalignments being 90° or more, which might imply a change in the orientation angle that should cause a large change in the relativistic beaming factor. Hence, if relativistic beaming does play an important role in these jets such large bends should usually show high contrast in the brightness of the jets before and after the bend. It needs to be kept in mind that sometimes a small intrinsic change in the jet angle might appear as a much larger misalignment due to the effects of geometrical projection, especially when seen close to the line of sight. What really matters are the initial and final orientation angles of the jet with respect to the observer’s line of sight. Taking the geometrical projection effects properly into account, we calculate the consequences of the presumed relativistic beaming and demonstrate that there ought to be large brightness ratios in jets before and after the observed misalignments.

  13. The formation of slow-massive-wide jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-07-01

    I propose a model for the formation of slow-massive-wide (SMW) jets by accretion disks around compact objects. This study is motivated by claims for the existence of SMW jets in some astrophysical objects such as in planetary nebulae (PNs) and in some active galactic nuclei in galaxies and in cooling flow clusters. In this model the energy still comes from accretion onto a compact object. The accretion disk launches two opposite jets with velocity of the order of the escape velocity from the accreting object and with mass outflow rate of ˜1-20% of the accretion rate as in most popular models for jet launching; in the present model these are termed fast-first-stage (FFS) jets. However, the FFS jets encounter surrounding gas that originates in the mass accretion process, and are terminated by strong shocks close to their origin. Two hot bubbles are formed. These bubbles accelerate the surrounding gas to form two SMW jets that are more massive and slower than the FFS jets. There are two conditions for this mechanism to work. Firstly, the surrounding gas should be massive enough to block the free expansion of the FFS jets. Most efficiently this condition is achieved when the surrounding gas is replenished. Secondly, the radiative energy losses must be small.

  14. Causality and stability of cosmic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2015-09-01

    In stark contrast to their laboratory and terrestrial counterparts, cosmic jets appear to be very stable. They are able to penetrate vast spaces, which exceed by up to a billion times the size of their central engines. We propose that the reason behind this remarkable property is the loss of causal connectivity across these jets, caused by their rapid expansion in response to fast decline of external pressure with the distance from the `jet engine'. In atmospheres with power-law pressure distribution, pext ∝ z-κ, the total loss of causal connectivity occurs, when κ > 2 - the steepness which is expected to be quite common for many astrophysical environments. This conclusion does not seem to depend on the physical nature of jets - it applies both to relativistic and non-relativistic flows, both magnetically dominated and unmagnetized jets. In order to verify it, we have carried out numerical simulations of moderately magnetized and moderately relativistic jets. The results give strong support to our hypothesis and provide with valuable insights. In particular, we find that the z-pinched inner cores of magnetic jets expand slower than their envelopes and become susceptible to instabilities even when the whole jet is stable. This may result in local dissipation and emission without global disintegration of the flow. Cosmic jets may become globally unstable when they enter flat sections of external atmospheres. We propose that the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological division of extragalactic radio sources into two classes is related to this issue. In particular, we argue that the low power FR-I jets become reconfined, causally connected and globally unstable on the scale of galactic X-ray coronas, whereas more powerful FR-II jets reconfine much further out, already on the scale of radio lobes and remain largely intact until they terminate at hotspots. Using this idea, we derived the relationship between the critical jet power and the optical luminosity of the host

  15. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  16. VLBA Movies Reveal New Details of Cosmic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Astronomers have known for decades that supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies can shoot out jets of subatomic particles at tremendous speeds. However, details about the physics of such jets, including how they are generated, how the high-speed flows are shaped into jets, and how fast the particles are moving, among many others, have remained elusive. An international team of researchers now is making an unprecedented long-term study of the motions of these giant jets, using the super-sharp imaging capabilities of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). "We're making images of 200 galactic jets at regular intervals, tracking their motions and studying their magnetic-field properties. This is making major contributions to our understanding of such jets," said Matthew Lister, of Purdue University. MOJAVE Poster Click image for high-resolution file (11.9 MB) The research team has produced time-lapse movies of 100 of the jets, allowing measurement of the speed and direction of motion. "The results of these VLBA observations are going into a rich and still-growing set of data that is available to the entire astronomical research community as a tool for understanding the many unresolved questions we have about these jets," Lister said. The jet study is called MOJAVE -- Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments -- and began in 2002. It is a successor to an earlier VLBA study that regularly made images of nearly 200 jets from 1994 to 2002. The jets are powered by the gravitational energy of black holes containing hundreds of millions times more mass than the Sun. Black holes are concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape them. As these monsters draw material toward them, the material falls into a circular disk orbiting the black hole. The jets are propelled outward along the poles of the disk. The MOJAVE movies have given astronomers some surprises and also have spurred follow-on studies of

  17. Starbursts in Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN), which comprise low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and transition-type objects (TOs), represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, we search for spectroscopic signatures of starbursts and post-starbursts in LLAGN, and investigate their relationship to the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the circumnuclear optical continuum of these galaxies. We have found that intermediate-age populations (108-109 yr) are very common in weak-[O I] LLAGN, but that very young stars (≤107 yr) contribute very little to the central optical continuum of these objects. However, ˜ 1 Gyr ago these nuclei harboured starbursts of size ˜ 100 pc and masses 107-108 M⊙. Meanwhile, most of the strong-[O I] LLAGN have predominantly old stellar populations.

  18. CCD Pictures of Peculiar Galaxies with Jets or Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, H.

    1983-06-01

    The phenomenon of "jets" seems to be rather universal in astrophysics. The astrophysical jets are seen in different wavelengths, from radio to X-rays. Their more general definitioni is "some emitting material weil collimated along a straight Or curved line". Such features appear on very different scales. Jets having a length of the order of a megaparsec and of a kiloparsec have been detected in different extragalactic systems, respectively aso (e. g. 4C18.68; Gower, Hutchings, Ap. J. 253, L1, 1982) and radio galaxies (e. g. PKS 0521-36; Danziger et al. MNRAS, 188,415, 1979). Jets of a few parsecs have also been suspected in galactic objects as the exotic SS 433, Sco X-1 and R Aquarii. Königl (Ap. J., 261, 115, 1982) even proposed to call jets the asymmetrical outflows which appear in the models of bipolar nebulae, bipolar CO emission lobes and aligned Herbig-Haro objects. Part of the galactic jets could be miniature models of some of the extragalactic ones.

  19. QUASI-STAR JETS AS UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Czerny, Bozena; Sikora, Marek; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2012-08-10

    Gamma-ray catalogs contain a considerable amount of unidentified sources. Many of these are located out of the Galactic plane and therefore may have extragalactic origin. Here we assume that the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei proceeds through a quasi-star stage and consider the possibility of jet production by such objects. Those jets would be the sources of collimated synchrotron and Compton emission, extending from radio to gamma rays. The expected lifetimes of quasi-stars are of the order of million of years while the jet luminosities, somewhat smaller than that of quasar jets, are sufficient to account for the unidentified gamma-ray sources. The jet emission dominates over the thermal emission of a quasi-star in all energy bands, except when the jet is not directed toward an observer. The predicted synchrotron emission peaks in the IR band, with the flux close to the limits of the available IR all sky surveys. The ratio of the gamma-ray flux to the IR flux is found to be very large ({approx}60), much larger than in BL Lac objects but reached by some radio-loud quasars. On the other hand, radio-loud quasars show broad emission lines while no such lines are expected from quasi-stars. Therefore, the differentiation between various scenarios accounting for the unidentified gamma-ray sources will be possible at the basis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the IR/optical counterparts.

  20. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  1. Observations of diffuse galactic gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of galactic diffuse gamma radiation are reviewed. The connections of the gamma ray observations with galactic structure and cosmic rays are discussed. The high latitude galactic component and the low latitude emission from the galactic plane are examined. The observations in other regions of the gamma ray spectrum are discussed.

  2. What Is Nuclear Medicine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as cosmic radiation, is in the upper atmosphere due to solar and galactic emissions. A typical ... used in medical procedures. 4 Cosmic Radiation Sun - - + - Atmosphere - + +- + + Earth How many nuclear medicine procedures are performed ...

  3. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  4. The JENSA Gas Jet Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2014-03-01

    With the construction of next-generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, the study of many rare and unstable isotopes previously unattainable will be made possible. In order to take full advantage of possible measurements with these new isotope beams, improvements in detectors and targets are necessary. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target is a new and cutting-edge target system, designed to provide a target of light gas, such as hydrogen or helium, that is localized, dense, and pure. In order to accomplish this, the JENSA system involves nearly two dozen vacuum pumps, differential pumping stages, a custom-built industrial compressor, and vacuum chambers designed to incorporate large arrays of both charged-particle and gamma-ray detectors. The JENSA gas jet target was originally constructed and characterized at ORNL, and has now moved to the ReA3 hall at the NSCL. Tests at ORNL show the JENSA system is capable of producing the most dense helium jet target for RIB studies in the world. JENSA will form the main target for the proposed SEparator for CApture Reactions (SECAR), and together the two comprise the equipment necessary to facilitate the studies which form the focus of the U.S. experimental nuclear astrophysics community. Work funded by US DOE Office of Science and the NSF.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the

  6. On Building a 3D Model of the M87 Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunyang; Kosak, Katie; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical and radio images of the M87 jet show a huge variety of parsec-scale bends and helical distortion from HST-1 to knot C. The sinusoidal pattern in the outer jet is observed in both bands, suggesting a possible double helical structure. We developed a mathematical model that converts the observed 2D projection of the jet to a 3D configuration by using three inputs: the viewing angle (estimated from 20 years of HST monitoring of the jet), distances and relative angles between bends measured from the HST optical and VLA/VLBA radio images of the M87 jet. Our model is written in Python, combining nonlinear optimization methods and computer graphics to describe and demonstrate the jet geometry. We are extensively testing the scripts to compare stability of the model, optimization techniques, and model with the data of galactic jets, focusing on M87.

  7. AGN jets under the microscope: A divide? Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, M.; Britzen, S.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, A. J.; Eckart, A.

    2012-06-01

    A new paradigm for active galactic jet kinematics has emerged through detailed investigations of BL Lac objects using very long baseline radio interferometry. In this new scheme, most, if not all, jet components appear to remain stationary with respect to the core but show significant non-radial motions. This paper presents results from our kinematic investigation of the jets of a statistically complete sample of radio-loud flat-spectrum active galaxies, focusing on the comparison between the jet kinematic properties of BL Lacs and flat-spectrum radio-quasars. It is shown that there is a statistically significant difference between the kinematics of the two AGN classes, with BL Lacs showing more bent jets, that are wider and show slower movement along the jet axis, compared to flat-spectrum radio-quasars. This is interpreted as evidence for helically structured jets.

  8. Coupling of axial plasma jets to compressional Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2009-11-01

    The coupling of mass, energy, and momentum from a localized, dense, and rapidly expanding plasma into a large-scale magnetized background plasma is central to understanding many physical processes; these include galactic jets, coronal mass ejections, tokamak pellet fueling, high-altitude nuclear detonations, chemical releases in the ionosphere, and supernovae. The large-scale magnetized plasmas are capable of supporting Alfv'en waves, which mediate the flow of currents and associated changes of magnetic topology on the largest size scales of the external system. We present initial results from a laboratory experiment wherein a fast-moving, laser-produced plasma (LPP) is allowed to propagate along the magnetic field lines of a pre-existing plasma column (17m long by 60 cm diameter). The LPP is generated using a 1J, 8ns Nd:YAG laser fired at a graphite target. The laser is pulsed along with the background plasma at 1Hz. This work focuses on the coupling of the LPP to compressional Alfv'en waves in the background plasma. The experiments are conducted at UCLA's Basic Plasma Science Facility in the Large Plasma Device.

  9. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  10. The shroud around the twin radio jets in NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, R. C.; Ros, E.; Kellermann, K. I.; Cohen, M. H.; Zensus, J. A.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    2003-04-01

    We discuss multiple Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) continuum and spectral line imaging observations and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope spectroscopy of the compact variable nuclear radio jet source in the elliptical galaxy NGC 1052. Absorption and emission signatures reveal ionised, atomic, and molecular components of the surrounding medium. Ten epochs of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data at 15 GHz, spanning almost six years, show bi-symmetric jets, in which multiple sub-parsec scale features display outward motions of typically vapp ~ 0.26c (H0=65 km s-1 Mpc-1) on each side. The jets are most likely oriented near the plane of the sky. Multi-frequency VLBA observations at seven frequencies between 43 and 1.4 GHz show free-free absorption in the inner parsec around the nucleus, probably together with synchrotron self-absorption. The free-free absorption is apparently due to a structure which is geometrically thick and oriented roughly orthogonal to the jets, but which is patchy. The western jet is covered more deeply and extensively, and hence is receding. HI spectral line VLBI observations reveal atomic gas in front of the approaching as well as the receding jet. There appear to be three velocity systems. Broad, shallow absorption asymmetrically straddles the systemic velocity spanning -35 to 85 km s-1. This gas could be local to the AGN environment, or distributed on galactic scales. Superimposed in the range 25 to 95 km s-1 are several sharper (3-15 km s-1) features, each detectable over a few tenths of a pc at various places along the inner 2 pc of the approaching jet. The third, deepest system is at ``high velocities", which is receding by 125 to 200 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 1052. It may have a continuous velocity gradient across the nucleus of some 10 km s-1 pc-1. This atomic gas seems restricted to a shell 1-2 pc away from the core, within which it might be largely ionised. Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

  11. An irradiated jet in M 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Pasquali, A.; Alves de Oliveira, C.

    2013-04-01

    Context. M 17 is one of the best studied giant HII regions in our galactic neighborhood. It should also provide a suitable environment for the class of fully ionized jets externally irradiated by the presence of nearby hot stars. However, no such jets have been observed thus far in M 17. Aims: We report on a visible imaging survey of the M 17 nebula with the goal of identifying likely shock-excited nebulosities. Methods: We imaged M 17 through narrow-band filters centered on the most intense visible lines of [OIII], Hα+[NII], [SII], and Hβ. We obtained follow-up spectroscopy of the only jet-like structure identified in the images. We also used published X-ray observations of M 17 obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, as well as infrared data obtained with the Very Large Telescope and with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to look for evidence of a jet-driving source. Results: We have detected what appears to be the first jet identified in M 17 visible HII region. The jet is composed of a set of knots, two of which have significant radial velocities with respect to the HII region, and a distant arc-like bright nebulosity that may represent an early episode of intense mass loss by the jet-driving source. The follow-up spectra of the structures composing the jet, including the arc, support this interpretation by revealing intense forbidden lines of [NII] and [SII] due to enhanced collisional excitation in shocks. The presence of a X-ray source, most likely a young stellar object, at a position where the jet launching source should be expected to lie reinforces the interpretation. We identify a tentative near-infrared counterpart of the X-ray source, although it is offset by 1".9 from the nominal position of the X-ray source, which is almost three times the radius of its positional uncertainty. The very weak [OI] emission in the spectra of the jet knots and the arc suggests that they are nearly fully ionized, in agreement with the environment in which the jet is

  12. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  13. Spiral Galactic Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2009-05-01

    Before the period of galactic formation the uiverse consisted of a vast number of pre-formed systems consisting of two or more pre-galactic arms, the arms orbiting each other. As the orbits of the arms decayed the sides of the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided and joined and thereby forming multi-armed spiral galaxies which began to rotate.The rotation resulted from the conversion of the orbital motion of the individual arms when joined into faster rotational motion of the newly formed galaxy. The spiral arms were maintained by the centripital force of the rapidly rotational motion of the galaxy system. As the rotational motion of the galaxy slowed down the arms of the spiral galaxy collapsed towards the body of the galaxy due to lessening of centripetal force on the arms and elliptical galaxies were formed and with further lessening of galactic rotational motion galactic disks were formed. One can see in galaxies M51, M100, NGC2336 and NGC4939 the galactic arms came from external orbit, not disks or instabilities in support of this theory. Also in support of this theory of galactic evolution is that spiral galaxies rotate faster than ellipticals or disks.

  14. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  15. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  16. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  17. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  18. EVIDENCE FOR GAMMA-RAY JETS IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Su Meng; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2012-07-01

    Although accretion onto supermassive black holes in other galaxies is seen to produce powerful jets in X-ray and radio, no convincing detection has ever been made of a kpc-scale jet in the Milky Way. The recently discovered pair of 10 kpc tall gamma-ray bubbles in our Galaxy may be signs of earlier jet activity from the central black hole. In this paper, we identify a gamma-ray cocoon feature in the southern bubble, a jet-like feature along the cocoon's axis of symmetry, and another directly opposite the Galactic center in the north. Both the cocoon and jet-like feature have a hard spectrum with spectral index {approx} - 2 from 1 to 100 GeV, with a cocoon total luminosity of (5.5 {+-} 0.45) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} and luminosity of the jet-like feature of (1.8 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} at 1-100 GeV. If confirmed, these jets are the first resolved gamma-ray jets ever seen.

  19. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Cunningham, V.

    2015-12-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions contains ˜2000 H ii region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic H ii region mid-infrared morphology of WISE 12 μ {{m}} emission surrounding 22 μ {{m}} emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope hydrogen radio recombination line and radio continuum detections in the X-band (9 GHz; 3 cm) of 302 WISE H ii region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone 225^\\circ ≥slant {\\ell }≥slant -20^\\circ , | {\\text{}}b| ≤slant 6^\\circ . Here we extend the sky coverage of our H ii region Discovery Survey, which now contains nearly 800 H ii regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, 5 have ({\\ell },{\\text{}}b,v) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to the Galactic warp, these nebulae are found at Galactic latitudes >1° in the first Galactic quadrant, and therefore were missed in previous surveys of the Galactic plane. One additional region has a longitude and velocity consistent with the OSC but lies at a negative Galactic latitude (G039.183-01.422 -54.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1). With Heliocentric distances >22 kpc and Galactocentric distances >16 kpc, the OSC H ii regions are the most distant known in the Galaxy. We detect an additional three H ii regions near {\\ell }≃ 150^\\circ whose LSR velocities place them at Galactocentric radii >19 kpc. If their distances are correct, these nebulae may represent the limit to Galactic massive star formation.

  20. JASMINE: galactic structure surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Suganuma, Masahiro; Niwa, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Noda, Atsushi; Tsuiki, Atsuo; Utashima, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Akira

    2006-06-01

    We introduce a Japanese plan of infrared(z-band:0.9μm) space astrometry(JASMINE-project). JASMINE is the satellite (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) which will measure distances and apparent motions of stars around the center of the Milky Way with yet unprecedented precision. It will measure parallaxes, positions with the accuracy of 10 micro-arcsec and proper motions with the accuracy of ~ 4microarcsec/ year for stars brighter than z=14mag. JASMINE can observe about ten million stars belonging to the bulge components of our Galaxy, which are hidden by the interstellar dust extinction in optical bands. Number of stars with σ/π < 0.1 in the direction of the Galactic central bulge is about 1000 times larger than those observed in optical bands, where π is a parallax and σ is an error of the parallax. With the completely new "map of the bulge in the Milky Way", it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in a development phase, with a target launch date around 2015. We adopt the following instrument design of JASMINE in order to get the accurate positions of many stars. A 3-mirrors optical system(modified Korsch system)with a primary mirror of~ 0.85m is one of the candidate for the optical system. On the astro-focal plane, we put dozens of new type of CCDs for z-band to get a wide field of view. The accurate measurements of the astrometric parameters requires the instrument line-of-sight highly stability and the opto-mechanical highly stability of the payload in the JASMINE spacecraft. The consideration of overall system(bus) design is now going on in cooperation with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(JAXA).

  1. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  2. The Bubbling Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchwell, E.; Povich, M. S.; Allen, D.; Taylor, M. G.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Watson, C.; Whitney, B. A.; Wolfire, M. G.; Bania, T. M.; Benjamin, R. A.; Clemens, D. P.; Cohen, M.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Jackson, J. M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Mathis, J. S.; Mercer, E. P.; Stolovy, S. R.; Uzpen, B.; Watson, D. F.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-10-01

    A visual examination of the images from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) has revealed 322 partial and closed rings that we propose represent partially or fully enclosed three-dimensional bubbles. We argue that the bubbles are primarily formed by hot young stars in massive star formation regions. We have found an average of about 1.5 bubbles per square degree. About 25% of the bubbles coincide with known radio H II regions, and about 13% enclose known star clusters. It appears that B4-B9 stars (too cool to produce detectable radio H II regions) probably produce about three-quarters of the bubbles in our sample, and the remainder are produced by young O-B3 stars that produce detectable radio H II regions. Some of the bubbles may be the outer edges of H II regions where PAH spectral features are excited and may not be dynamically formed by stellar winds. Only three of the bubbles are identified as known SNRs. No bubbles coincide with known planetary nebulae or W-R stars in the GLIMPSE survey area. The bubbles are small. The distribution of angular diameters peaks between 1' and 3' with over 98% having angular diameters less than 10' and 88% less than 4'. Almost 90% have shell thicknesses between 0.2 and 0.4 of their outer radii. Bubble shell thickness increases approximately linearly with shell radius. The eccentricities are rather large, peaking between 0.6 and 0.7; about 65% have eccentricities between 0.55 and 0.85.

  3. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  4. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  5. THE FERMI BUBBLES. I. POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR RECENT AGN JET ACTIVITY IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2012-09-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope reveals two large gamma-ray bubbles in the Galaxy, which extend about 50 Degree-Sign ({approx}10 kpc) above and below the Galactic center (GC) and are symmetric about the Galactic plane. Using axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations with a self-consistent treatment of the dynamical cosmic ray (CR)-gas interaction, we show that the bubbles can be created with a recent active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet activity about 1-3 Myr ago, which was active for a duration of {approx}0.1-0.5 Myr. The bipolar jets were ejected into the Galactic halo along the rotation axis of the Galaxy. Near the GC, the jets must be moderately light with a typical density contrast 0.001 {approx}< {eta} {approx}< 0.1 relative to the ambient hot gas. The jets are energetically dominated by kinetic energy, and overpressured with either CR or thermal pressure which induces lateral jet expansion, creating fat CR bubbles as observed. The sharp edges of the bubbles imply that CR diffusion across the bubble surface is strongly suppressed. The jet activity induces a strong shock, which heats and compresses the ambient gas in the Galactic halo, potentially explaining the ROSAT X-ray shell features surrounding the bubbles. The Fermi bubbles provide plausible evidence for a recent powerful AGN jet activity in our Galaxy, providing new insights into the origin of the halo CR population and the channel through which massive black holes in disk galaxies release feedback energy during their growth.

  6. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  7. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  8. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming.

    The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars.

    The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake.

    Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky!

    Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope

  10. The acceleration and collimation of jets.

    PubMed Central

    Begelman, M C

    1995-01-01

    I will discuss several issues related to the acceleration, collimation, and propagation of jets from active galactic nuclei. Hydromagnetic stresses provide the best bet for both accelerating relativistic flows and providing a certain amount of initial collimation. However, there are limits to how much "self-collimation" can be achieved without the help of an external pressurized medium. Moreover, existing models, which postulate highly organized poloidal flux near the base of the flow, are probably unrealistic. Instead, a large fraction of the magnetic energy may reside in highly disorganized "chaotic" fields. Such a field can also accelerate the flow to relativistic speeds, in some cases with greater efficiency than highly organized fields, but at the expense of self-collimation. The observational interpretation of jet physics is still hampered by a dearth of unambiguous diagnostics. Propagating disturbances in flows, such as the oblique shocks that may constitute the kiloparsec-scale "knots" in the M87 jet, may provide a wide range of untapped diagnostics for jet properties. PMID:11607615

  11. A New Relativistic Jet Model of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James; Benitez, Erika; Howard, Emily

    1998-11-01

    The subclass of Active galaxies called Blazars encompass the most intrinsically luminous and rapidly variable sources known to astrophysicists. Attempts to model these sources has largely been frustrated due in part to observational difficulties, but also due to the lack of theoretical models capable of explaining the different characteristics of the observed sources. Leading candidate models all incorporate a massive, rotating black hole which is accreting galactic material, with some of this material being ejected out the ratational axis of the hole in the form of relativistically expanding jets. These jets are thought to emit energy via the synchrotron process across the entire spectrum from radio frequences all the way through the GEV (sometimes TEV) gamma-ray frequencies. Attempts to model these sources with single relativistic jets has proven difficult. We present a new model which features concentric interacting jets that do a much better job of explaining the types of Blazars we observe. We also discuss ways of testing this new model against multifreuqency observations.

  12. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  13. Galactic gamma-ray observations and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    Recent observations of gamma-rays originating in the galactic disk together with radio observations, support an emerging picture of the overall structure of our galaxy with higher interstellar gas densities and star formation rates in a region which corresponds to that of the inner arms. The emerging picture is one where molecular clouds make up the dominant constituent of the interstellar gas in the inner galaxy and play a key role in accounting for the gamma-rays and phenomena associated with the production of young stars and other population 1 objects. In this picture, cosmic rays are associated with supernovae and are primarily of galactic origin. These newly observed phenomena can be understood as consequences of the density wave theories of spiral structure. Based on these new developments, the suggestion is made that a new galactic population class, Population O, be added to the standard Populations 1 and 2 in order to recognize important differences in dynamics and distribution between diffuse galactic H1 and interstellar molecular clouds.

  14. The Heliosphere and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere deflects galactic cosmic rays from entering the system. Galactic cosmic rays are a very high energy form of particle radiation that are extremely difficult to shield against and are...

  15. Do Jets Precess... or Even Move at All?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Observations of accreting black holes often provoke suggestions that their jets precess. The precession is usually supposed to result from a combination of the Lense-Thirring effect and accretion disk viscosity. We show that this is unlikely for any type of black hole system, as the disk generally has too little angular momentum compared with a spinning hole to cause any significant movement of the jet direction across the sky on short timescales. Uncorrelated accretion events, as in the chaotic accretion picture of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), change AGN jet directions only on timescales >~ 107 yr. In this picture AGN jet directions are stable on shorter timescales, but uncorrelated with any structure of the host galaxy, as observed. We argue that observations of black hole jets precessing on timescales short compared to the accretion time would be a strong indication that the accretion disk, and not the standard Blandford-Znajek mechanism, is responsible for driving the jet. This would be particularly convincing in a tidal disruption event. We suggest that additional disk physics is needed to explain any jet precession on timescales short compared with the accretion time. Possibilities include the radiation warping instability, or disk tearing.

  16. A Study of Radio Polarization in Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécere, Mariana; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Araudo, Anabella T.; De Colle, Fabio; Esquivel, Alejandro; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is commonly observed in connection with shocks of different velocities, ranging from relativistic shocks associated with active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, or microquasars, to weakly or non-relativistic flows such as those observed in supernova remnants. Recent observations of synchrotron emission in protostellar jets are important not only because they extend the range over which the acceleration process works, but also because they allow us to determine the jet and/or interstellar magnetic field structure, thus giving insights into the jet ejection and collimation mechanisms. In this paper, we compute for the first time polarized (synchrotron) and non-polarized (thermal X-ray) synthetic emission maps from axisymmetrical simulations of magnetized protostellar jets. We consider models with different jet velocities and variability, as well as a toroidal or helical magnetic field. Our simulations show that variable, low-density jets with velocities of ˜1000 km s-1 and ˜10 times lighter than the environment can produce internal knots with significant synchrotron emission and thermal X-rays in the shocked region of the leading bow shock moving in a dense medium. While models with a purely toroidal magnetic field show a very large degree of polarization, models with a helical magnetic field show lower values and a decrease of the degree of polarization, in agreement with observations of protostellar jets.

  17. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes in Jet Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Eric; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    Highly collimated plasma jets are frequently observed at galactic, stellar, and laboratory scales. Some models suppose these jets are magnetohydrodynamically-driven magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma, but they do not agree on a collimation process. Some evidence supporting a universal MHD pumping mechanism has been obtained from planar electrode experiments with aspect ratios of ~10:1 however, these jets are subject to kink instabilities beyond a certain length and are unable to replicate the remarkable aspect ratios (10-1000:1) seen in astrophysical systems. Other models suppose these jets are flowing Z-pinch plasmas and experiments that use stabilizing shear flows have achieved aspect ratios of ~30:1, but are line tied at both ends. Can both collimation and stabilization mechanisms work together to produce long jets without kink instabilities and only one end tied to the central object? This question is evaluated from the point of view of canonical flux tubes and canonical helicity transport, indicating that jets can become long and collimated due to a combination of strong helical shear flows and conversion of magnetic helicity into kinetic helicity. The MOCHI LabJet experiment is designed to study this in the laboratory. Supported by US DoE Early Career Grant DE-SC0010340.

  18. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  19. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  20. On the Importance of Very Light Internally Subsonic AGN Jets in Radio-mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2016-07-01

    Radio-mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in the evolution of galaxy groups and clusters. Its physical origin lies in the kiloparsec-scale interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium. Large-scale jet simulations often initiate light internally supersonic jets with density contrast 0.01 < η < 1. Here we argue for the first time for the importance of very light (η < 0.01) internally subsonic jets. We investigated the shapes of young X-ray cavities produced in a suite of hydrodynamic simulations, and found that bottom-wide cavities are always produced by internally subsonic jets, while internally supersonic jets inflate cylindrical, center-wide, or top-wide cavities. We found examples of real cavities with shapes analogous to those inflated in our simulations by internally subsonic and internally supersonic jets, suggesting a dichotomy of AGN jets according to their internal Mach numbers. We further studied the long-term cavity evolution, and found that old cavities resulted from light jets spread along the jet direction, while those produced by very light jets are significantly elongated along the perpendicular direction. The northwestern ghost cavity in Perseus is pancake shaped, providing tentative evidence for the existence of very light jets. Our simulations show that very light internally subsonic jets decelerate faster and rise much slower in the intracluster medium than light internally supersonic jets, possibly depositing a larger fraction of jet energy to cluster cores and alleviating the problem of low coupling efficiencies found previously. The internal Mach number points to the jet’s energy content, and internally subsonic jets are energetically dominated by non-kinetic energy, such as thermal energy, cosmic rays, or magnetic fields.

  1. The Jet Heated X-Ray Filament in the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, R. P.; Forman, W. R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Croston, J. H.; Jones, C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Worrall, D. M.; Murray, S. S.

    2009-06-01

    We present results from a 40 ks XMM-Newton observation of the X-ray filament coincident with the southeast edge of the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe (NML). We find that the X-ray filament consists of five spatially resolved X-ray knots embedded in a continuous diffuse bridge. The spectrum of each knot is well fitted by a thermal model with temperatures ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 keV and subsolar elemental abundances. In four of the five knots, nonthermal models are a poor fit to the spectra, conclusively ruling out synchrotron or IC/CMB mechanisms for their emission. The internal pressures of the knots exceed that of the ambient interstellar medium or the equipartition pressure of the NML by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating that they must be short lived (~3 × 106 yr). Based on energetic arguments, it is implausible that these knots have been ionized by the beamed flux from the active galactic nucleus of Cen A or that they have been shock heated by supersonic inflation of the NML. In our view, the most viable scenario for the origin of the X-ray knots is that they are the result of cold gas shock heated by a direct interaction with the jet. The most plausible model of the NML is that it is a bubble from a previous nuclear outburst that is being re-energized by the current outburst. The northeast inner lobe and the large-scale jet are lossless channels through which the jet material rapidly travels to the NML in this scenario. We also report the discovery of a large-scale (at least 35 kpc radius) gas halo around Cen A.

  2. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  3. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John; Loh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years. The proposed observations are optimized to discover and study (flux evolution, morphology, SED, proper motion, ...) new radio lobes from microquasars. This will have implications not only for the study of jets from Galactic X-ray binaries, but also for our understanding of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  4. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  5. Dust in the galactic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittet, D. C. B.

    An overview of dust in the galactic environment is given which covers general concepts, methods of investigation, important results and their significance, relevant literature, and suggestions for future research. The general topics addressed include: element abundances and depletions, interstellar extinction and scattering, interstellar polarization and grain alignment, spectral absorption features, continuum and line emission, and the origin and evolution of interstellar grains.

  6. Kinematics and dynamics of molecular gas in galactic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K.

    2014-05-01

    The central molecular zone (CMZ) in the central half kpc of the Milky Way is a massive concentration of molecular gas in the center of a barred spiral galaxy. Current and past activities in the Galactic center include the formation of massive stars/clusters, AGN feeding, and feedback. At the same time, observations of molecular gas in external galaxies show that many disk galaxies have similar condensations of molecular gas in their central kpc or so. They also have CMZs, or nuclear molecular rings or concentrations in more common terms among extragalactic observers. The formation of the CMZs are often, but not always, related to stellar bars. The centers of nearby galaxies can provide valuable information on the general properties of galactic centers and CMZs through comparative studies of multiple galactic centers of different characteristics from various viewing angles. Linear resolutions achieved toward nearby extragalactic CMZs with modern radio interferometers are now comparable to those achieved toward the Galactic CMZ with small single-dish telescopes. I review and present work on the formation mechanism and properties of the CMZs in external galaxies with some comparisons with the CMZ of our Galaxy.

  7. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention does away with the necessity of moving parts such as a check valve in a nuclear reactor cooling system. Instead, a jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A main flow exists for a reactor coolant. A point of withdrawal is provided for a secondary flow. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from said coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps said withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature where the heat is no longer a problem. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet pump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. When the nuclear reactor is restarted and the coolant again exceeds the lower temperature setting, the TEMP/jet pump automatically resumes operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is thus automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  8. Jet and Leading Hadron Production in High-energy Heavy-ionCollisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-11-01

    Jet tomography has become a powerful tool for the study ofproperties of dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. I willdiscuss recent progresses in the phenomenological study of jet quenching,including momentum, colliding energy and nuclear size dependence ofsingle hadron suppression, modification of dihadron correlations and thesoft hadron distribution associatedwith a quenched jet.

  9. 75 FR 81250 - Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SAFETY BOARD Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant AGENCY: Defense Nuclear... the use of pulse jet mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant located in Washington... to the Secretary of Energy Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  10. The galactic cycle of extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Michael; Erenler, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Global extinction and geological events have previously been linked with galactic events such as spiral arm crossings and galactic plane oscillation. The expectation that these are repeating predictable events has led to studies of periodicity in a wide set of biological, geological and climatic phenomena. Using data on carbon isotope excursions, large igneous provinces and impact craters, we identify three time zones of high geological activity which relate to the timings of the passage of the Solar System through the spiral arms. These zones are shown to include a significantly large proportion of high extinction periods. The mass extinction events at the ends of the Ordovician, Permian and Cretaceous occur in the first zone, which contains the predicted midpoints of the spiral arms. The start of the Cambrian, end of the Devonian and end of the Triassic occur in the second zone. The pattern of extinction timing in relation to spiral arm structure is supported by the positions of the superchrons and the predicted speed of the spiral arms. The passage times through an arm are simple multiples of published results on impact and fossil record periodicity and galactic plane half-periods. The total estimated passage time through four arms is 703.8 Myr. The repetition of extinction events at the same points in different spiral arm crossings suggests a common underlying galactic cause of mass extinctions, mediated through galactic effects on geological, solar and extra-solar processes. The two largest impact craters (Sudbury and Vredefort), predicted to have occurred during the early part of the first zone, extend the possible pattern to more than 2000 million years ago.

  11. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Ferguson, Henry C.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2000-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: What are galactic bulges?; Part II. The Epoch of Bulge Formation: Origin of bulges; Deep sub-mm surveys: High-z ULIRGs and the formation of spheroids; Ages and metallicities for stars in the galactic bulge; Integrated stellar populations of bulges: First results; HST-NICMOS observations of galactic bulges: Ages and dust; Inside-out bulge formation and the origin of the Hubble sequence; Part III. The Timescales of Bulge Formation: Constraints on the bulge formation timescale from stellar populations; Bulge building with mergers and winds; Role of winds, starbursts, and activity in bulge formation; Dynamical timescales of bulge formation; Part IV. Physical Processes in Bulge Formation: the role of bars for secular bulge formation; Bars and boxy/peanut-shaped bulges: an observational point of view; Boxy- and peanut-shaped bulges; A new class of bulges; The role of secondary bars in bulge formation; Radial transport of molecular gas to the nuclei of spiral galaxies; Dynamical evolution of bulge shapes; Two-component stellar systems: Phase-space constraints; Central NGC 2146 - a firehose-type bending instability?; Bulge formation: the role of the multi-phase ISM; Global evolution of a self-gravitating multi-phase ISM in the central kpc region of galaxies; Part V. Bulge Phenomenology: Bulge-disk decomposition of spiral galaxies in the near-infrared; The triaxial bulge of NGC 1371; The bulge-disk orthogonal decoupling in galaxies: NGC 4698 and NGC 4672; The kinematics and the origin of the ionized gas in NGC 4036; Optically thin thermal plasma in the galactic bulge; X-ray properties of bulges; The host galaxies of radio-loud AGN; The centers of radio-loud early-type galaxies with HST; Central UV spikes in two galactic spheroids; Conference summary: where do we stand?

  12. Probing Galactic 26Al with Exotic Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Alan A.

    2006-07-01

    The goal of understanding the production of galactic 26Al brings together progress in nuclear astrophysics from observations, theory, meteoritics, and laboratory experiments. In the case of experimental work, nuclear reactions involving unstable isotopes are being studied to elucidate the production of 26Al in stellar explosive nucleosynthesis. We discuss a direct measurement of the 26Al(p,γ)27Si reaction with the DRAGON collaboration at TRIUMF, and a measurement of 25Al+p elastic scattering with the CRIB (CNS-U.Tokyo) collaboration, toward constraining the 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction.

  13. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  14. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  15. The importance of jet bending in gamma-ray AGNs—revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that γ-ray-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have a greater tendency for jet bending than γ-ray-loud AGNs, revisiting the analysis of Tingay et al. We perform a statistical analysis using a large sample of 351 radio-loud AGNs along with γ-ray identifications from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our results show no statistically significant differences in jet-bending properties between γ-ray-loud and γ-ray-quiet populations, indicating that jet bending is not a significant factor for γ-ray detection in AGNs.

  16. Observational signatures of galactic winds powered by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nims, Jesse; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2015-03-01

    We predict the observational signatures of galaxy scale outflows powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Most of the emission is produced by the forward shock driven into the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) rather than by the reverse shock. AGN-powered galactic winds with energetics suggested by phenomenological feedback arguments should produce spatially extended ˜1-10 keV X-ray emission ˜ 1041-44 erg s- 1, significantly in excess of the spatially extended X-ray emission associated with normal star-forming galaxies. The presence of such emission is a direct test of whether AGN outflows significantly interact with the ISM of their host galaxy. We further show that even radio-quiet quasars should have a radio luminosity comparable to or in excess of the far-infrared-radio correlation of normal star-forming galaxies. This radio emission directly constrains the total kinetic energy flux in AGN-powered galactic winds. Radio emission from AGN wind shocks can also explain the recently highlighted correlations between radio luminosity and the kinematics of AGN narrow-line regions in radio-quiet quasars.

  17. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  18. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  19. Relativistic HD and MHD modelling for AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Walg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic hydro and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provide a continuum fluid description for plasma dynamics characterized by shock-dominated flows approaching the speed of light. Significant progress in its numerical modelling emerged in the last two decades; we highlight selected examples of modern grid-adaptive, massively parallel simulations realized by our open-source software MPI-AMRVAC (Keppens et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 718). Hydrodynamical models quantify how energy transfer from active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets to their surrounding interstellar/intergalactic medium (ISM/IGM) gets mediated through shocks and various fluid instability mechanisms (Monceau-Baroux et al 2012 Astron. Astrophys. 545 A62). With jet parameters representative for Fanaroff-Riley type-II jets with finite opening angles, we can quantify the ISM volumes affected by jet injection and distinguish the roles of mixing versus shock-heating in cocoon regions. This provides insight in energy feedback by AGN jets, usually incorporated parametrically in cosmological evolution scenarios. We discuss recent axisymmetric studies up to full 3D simulations for precessing relativistic jets, where synthetic radio maps can confront observations. While relativistic hydrodynamic models allow one to better constrain dynamical parameters like the Lorentz factor and density contrast between jets and their surroundings, the role of magnetic fields in AGN jet dynamics and propagation characteristics needs full relativistic MHD treatments. Then, we can demonstrate the collimating properties of an overal helical magnetic field backbone and study differences between poloidal versus toroidal field dominated scenarios (Keppens et al 2008 Astron. Astrophys. 486 663). Full 3D simulations allow one to consider the fate of non-axisymmetric perturbations on relativistic jet propagation from rotating magnetospheres (Porth 2013 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 429 2482). Self-stabilization mechanisms related to the detailed

  20. Structure of Magnetic Tower Jets in Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2006-12-01

    Using a new approach to modeling the magnetically dominated outflows from active galactic nuclei, we study the propagation of magnetic tower jets in gravitationally stratified atmospheres (such as a galaxy cluster environment) at large scales (more than tens of kiloparsecs) by performing three-dimensional MHD simulations. We present the detailed analysis of the MHD waves, the cylindrical radial force balance, and the collimation of magnetic tower jets. As magnetic energy is injected into a small central volume over a finite amount of time, the magnetic fields expand down the background density gradient, forming a collimated jet and an expanded ``lobe'' due to the gradually decreasing background density and pressure. Both the jet and lobes are magnetically dominated. In addition, the injection and expansion produce a hydrodynamic shock wave that moves ahead of and encloses the magnetic tower jet. This shock can eventually break the hydrostatic equilibrium in the ambient medium and cause a global gravitational contraction. This contraction produces a strong compression at the head of the magnetic tower front and helps to collimate the jet radially to produce a slender body. At the outer edge of the jet, the magnetic pressure is balanced by the background (modified) gas pressure, without any significant contribution from the hoop stress. On the other hand, along the central axis of the jet, hoop stress is the dominant force in shaping the central collimation of the poloidal current. The system, which possesses a highly wound helical magnetic configuration, never quite reaches a force-free equilibrium state, although the evolution becomes much slower at late stages. The simulations were performed without any initial perturbations, so the overall structures of the jet remain mostly axisymmetric.

  1. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Jets from Black Hole Accretions Disks: Two-Component Jets Driven by Nonsteady Accretion of Magnetized Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Shinji; Shibata, Kazunari; Kudoh, Takahiro

    1998-03-01

    The radio observations have revealed the compelling evidence of the existence of relativistic jets not only from active galactic nuclei but also from ``microquasars'' in our Galaxy. In the cores of these objects, it is believed that a black hole exists and that violent phenomena occur in the black hole magnetosphere, forming the relativistic jets. To simulate the jet formation in the magnetosphere, we have newly developed the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code. Using the code, we present a model of these relativistic jets, in which magnetic fields penetrating the accretion disk around a black hole play a fundamental role of inducing nonsteady accretion and ejection of plasmas. According to our simulations, a jet is ejected from a close vicinity to a black hole (inside 3rS, where rS is the Schwarzschild radius) at a maximum speed of ~90% of the light velocity (i.e., a Lorentz factor of ~2). The jet has a two-layered shell structure consisting of a fast gas pressure-driven jet in the inner part and a slow magnetically driven jet in the outer part, both of which are collimated by the global poloidal magnetic field penetrating the disk. The former jet is a result of a strong pressure increase due to shock formation in the disk through fast accretion flow (``advection-dominated disk'') inside 3rS, which has never been seen in the nonrelativistic calculations.

  2. Galactic Fountains and Gas Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, F.; Binney, J.; Fraternali, F.; Nipoti, C.; Ciotti, L.; Londrillo, P.

    2010-06-01

    Star-forming disc galaxies such as the Milky Way need to accrete >~1 Msolar of gas each year to sustain their star formation. This gas accretion is likely to come from the cooling of the hot corona, however it is still not clear how this process can take place. We present simulations supporting the idea that this cooling and the subsequent accretion are caused by the passage of cold galactic-fountain clouds through the hot corona. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability strips gas from these clouds and the stripped gas causes coronal gas to condense in the cloud's wake. For likely parameters of the Galactic corona and of typical fountain clouds we obtain a global accretion rate of the order of that required to feed the star formation.

  3. INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Belloni, T.; Chenevez, J.; Ibarra, A.; Munoz-Darias, T.; Bazzano, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; De Cesare, G.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Jourdain, E.; Lubinski, P.; Natalucci, L.; Ness, J. U.; Parmar, A.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rodriguez, J.; Roques, J. P.; Sanchez-Fernandez; C.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    2010-12-01

    The central region of our Galaxy, the Galactic bulge, is a rich host of variable high-energy X-ray and gamma-ray point sources. These sources include bright and relatively faint X-ray transients, X-ray bursters, persistent neutron star and black-hole candidate binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries, etc.. We have a program to monitor the Galactic bulge region regularly and frequently with the gamma-ray observatory INTEGRAL, whenever it is observable. As a service to the scientific community the high-energy light curves of sources present, as well as the images of the region are made available through the WWW at http://integral.esac.esa.int/BULGE/ as soon as possible after the observations have been performed. We show the ongoing results of this exciting program.

  4. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow survey with a flux limit of 1e-14 erg/cm2/s (0.5-10.0 keV) that covers a pair of 6 sq. deg. areas centred 1.5 deg. above and below the Galactic Center. The extinction and crowding in these regions are such that optical/infrared counterparts to the 1640 X-ray sources found with Chandra are accessible to detailed follow-up. The GBS is designed to set constraints on four important areas in astrophysics: stellar-mass black hole formation, the neutron star equation of state, the nature of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae and the common envelope evolution. Here I present the survey properties and goals, our multiwavelength methods to identify and clasify the counterparts to the X-ray sources and the first scientific results.

  5. The Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We are continuing our systematic investigation of the nuclear structure of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). Upon completion, our study will characterize hypothetical constructs such as narrow-line clouds, obscuring tori, nuclear gas disks. and central black holes with physical measurements for a complete sample of nearby AGN. The major scientific goals of our program are: (1) the morphology of the NLR; (2) the physical conditions and dynamics of individual clouds in the NLR; (3) the structure and physical conditions of the warm reflecting gas; (4) the structure of the obscuring torus; (5) the population and morphology of nuclear disks/tori in AGN; (6) the physical conditions in nuclear disks; and (7) the masses of central black holes in AGN. We will use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain high-resolution images and spatially resolved spectra. Far-UV spectroscopy of emission and absorption in the nuclear regions using HST/FOS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) will help establish physical conditions in the absorbing and emitting gas. By correlating the dynamics and physical conditions of the gas with the morphology revealed through our imaging program, we will be able to examine mechanisms for fueling the central engine and transporting angular momentum. The kinematics of the nuclear gas disks may enable us to measure the mass of the central black hole. Contemporaneous X-ray observations using ASCA will further constrain the ionization structure of any absorbing material. Monitoring of variability in the UV and X-ray absorption will be used to determine the location of the absorbing gas, possibly in the outflowing warm reflecting gas, or the broad-line region, or the atmosphere of the obscuring torus. Supporting ground-based observations in the optical, near-IR, imaging polarimetry, and the radio will complete our picture of the nuclear structures. With a comprehensive survey of these characteristics in a complete sample of nearby AGN, our

  6. iShocks: X-ray binary jets with an internal shocks model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, O.; Fender, R. P.; Kaiser, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    In the following paper, we present an internal shocks model, iShocks, for simulating a variety of relativistic jet scenarios; these scenarios can range from a single ejection event to an almost continuous jet, and are highly user configurable. Although the primary focus in the following paper is black hole X-ray binary jets, the model is scale and source independent and could be used for supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei or other flows such as jets from neutron stars. Discrete packets of plasma (or `shells') are used to simulate the jet volume. A two-shell collision gives rise to an internal shock, which acts as an electron re-energization mechanism. Using a pseudo-random distribution of the shell properties, the results show how for the first time it is possible to reproduce a flat/inverted spectrum (associated with compact radio jets) in a conical jet whilst taking the adiabatic energy losses into account. Previous models have shown that electron re-acceleration is essential in order to obtain a flat spectrum from an adiabatic conical jet: multiple internal shocks prove to be efficient in providing this re-energization. We also show how the high-frequency turnover/break in the spectrum is correlated with the jet power, νb ~ L~0.6W, and the flat-spectrum synchrotron flux is correlated with the total jet power, Fν ~ L~1.4W . Both the correlations are in agreement with previous analytical predictions.

  7. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  8. Wanted: Galactic Thief Who Steals Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    A big galaxy is stealing gas right off the 'back' of its smaller companion in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The stolen gas is hot, but it might eventually cool down to make new stars and planets.

    The robber galaxy, called 3C 326 North, and its victim, 3C 326 South, are located about a billion light-years away from Earth in the Serpens constellation. They are both called radio galaxies, because the relativistic jets streaming out of their centers give off a great deal of radio waves. Other dots in the picture are foreground stars and background galaxies.

    When astronomers first collected data on the 3C 326 galaxies with Spitzer's infrared spectrometer, they were surprised to find that 3C 326 North is loaded with an enormous amount of hot gas, called molecular hydrogen gas, which is fuel for stars and planets. They then studied this archived picture taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera and noticed a tail of stars connecting 3C 326 North to 3C 326 South. This tail revealed that the galactic pair are gravitationally tangled and might eventually merge --and that 3C 326 North must be hoisting gas from its smaller companion.

    How is 3C 326 stealing the gas? The answer is gravity. The larger 3C 326 North, which is about the same mass as our Milky Way galaxy, has more gravity so the gas from 3C 326 South falls toward it in the same way that water rolls down hill on Earth. Even in space, it seems the bullies are bigger!

    This image shows infrared light of three wavelengths: 8-micron light is red; 4.5 microns is green; 3.6 microns is blue.

  9. A magnetically collimated jet from an evolved star.

    PubMed

    Vlemmings, Wouter H T; Diamond, Philip J; Imai, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    Planetary nebulae often have asymmetric shapes, even though their progenitor stars were symmetric; this structure could be the result of collimated jets from the evolved stars before they enter the planetary nebula phase. Theoretical models have shown that magnetic fields could be the dominant source of jet-collimation in evolved stars, just as these fields are thought to collimate outflows in other astrophysical sources, such as active galactic nuclei and proto-stars. But hitherto there have been no direct observations of both the magnetic field direction and strength in any collimated jet. Here we report measurements of the polarization of water vapour masers that trace the precessing jet emanating from the asymptotic giant branch star W43A (at a distance of 2.6 kpc from the Sun), which is undergoing rapid evolution into a planetary nebula. The masers occur in two clusters at opposing tips of the jets, approximately 1,000 au from the star. We conclude from the data that the magnetic field is indeed collimating the jet. PMID:16511488

  10. Jet Signatures in the Spectra of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O' Riordan, Michael; Pe'er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-01

    Jets are observed as radio emission in active galactic nuclei and during the low/hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs), but their contribution at higher frequencies has been uncertain. We study the dynamics of jets in XRBs using the general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code HARM. We calculate the high-energy spectra and variability properties using a general-relativistic radiative transport code based on grmonty. We find the following signatures of jet emission: (i) a significant γ-ray peak above ˜1022 Hz, (ii) a break in the optical/UV spectrum, with a change from ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0 to ν {L}ν ˜ ν , followed by another break at higher frequencies where the spectrum roughly returns to ν {L}ν ˜ {ν }0, and (iii) a pronounced synchrotron peak near or below ˜1014 Hz indicates that a significant fraction of any observed X-ray emission originates in the jet. We investigate the variability during a large-scale magnetic field inversion in which the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) jet is quenched and a new transient hot reconnecting plasmoid is launched by the reconnecting field. The ratio of the γ-rays to X-rays changes from {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\gt 1 in the BZ jet to {L}γ /{L}{{X}}\\lt 1 during the launching of the transient plasmoid.

  11. Constraints on galactic wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-09-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft X-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star formation rate of 0.5-3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v∞ to scale with the star formation rate dot{M}_{ast } (in M⊙ yr-1) approximately as v_∞ ≃ (700-1000) {{km s^{-1}}} {dot{M}_{ast }}^{1/6}. The implied mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting that thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from thermal evaporation within the galactic disc alone, however, are somewhat smaller, 0.2-2, so that a further contribution from cloud ablation or evaporation within the wind may be required. Both models may account for the 1.4 GHz luminosity of unresolved radio sources within starburst galaxies for plausible parameters describing the distribution of relativistic electrons. Further observational tests to distinguish the models are suggested.

  12. X-Ray Properties Expected from Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed hydrodynamic simulations of active galactic nucleus feedback have been performed including the effects of radiative and mechanical momentum and energy input on the interstellar medium (ISM) of typical elliptical galaxies. We focus on the observational properties of the models in the soft and hard X-ray bands: nuclear X-ray luminosity; global X-ray luminosity and temperature of the hot ISM; and temperature and X-ray brightness profiles before, during, and after outbursts. After ~10 Gyr, the bolometric nuclear emission L BH is very sub-Eddington (l = L BH/L Edd ~ 10-4), and within the range observed, though larger than typical values. Outbursts last for ≈107 yr, and the duty cycle of nuclear activity is a few × (10-3 to 10-2), over the last 6 Gyr. The ISM thermal luminosity L X oscillates in phase with the nuclear luminosity, with broader peaks. This behavior helps statistically reproduce the observed large L X variation. The average gas temperature is within the observed range, in the upper half of those observed. In quiescence, the temperature profile has a negative gradient; thanks to past outbursts, the brightness profile lacks the steep shape of cooling flow models. After outbursts, disturbances are predicted in the temperature and brightness profiles (analyzed by unsharp masking). Most significantly, during major accretion episodes, a hot bubble of shocked gas is inflated at the galaxy center (within ≈100 pc) the bubble would be conical in shape in real galaxies and would be radio-loud. Its detection in X-rays is within current capabilities, though it would likely remain unresolved. The ISM resumes its smooth appearance on a timescale of ≈200 Myr the duty cycle of perturbations in the ISM is of the order of 5%-10%. While showing general agreement between the models and real galaxies, this analysis indicates that additional physical input may still be required including moving to two-dimensional or three-dimensional simulations, input of

  13. Relativistic 3D precessing jet simulations for the X-ray binary SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau-Baroux, Rémi; Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Context. Modern high-resolution radio observations allow us a closer look into the objects that power relativistic jets. This is especially the case for SS433, an X-ray binary that emits a precessing jet that is observed down to the subparsec scale. Aims: We aim to study full 3D dynamics of relativistic jets associated with active galactic nuclei or X-ray binaries (XRB). In particular, we incorporate the precessing motion of a jet into a model for the jet associated with the XRB SS433. Our study of the jet dynamics in this system focuses on the subparsec scales. We investigate the impact of jet precession and the variation of the Lorentz factor of the injected matter on the general 3D jet dynamics and its energy transfer to the surrounding medium. After visualizing and quantifying jet dynamics, we aim to realize synthetic radio mapping of the data, to compare our results with observations. Methods: For our study we used a block-tree adaptive mesh refinement scheme and an inner time-dependent boundary prescription to inject precessing bipolar supersonic jets. Parameters extracted from observations were used. Different 3D jet realizations that match the kinetic flux of the SS433 jet were intercompared, which vary in density contrast and jet beam velocity. We tracked the energy content deposited in different regions of the domain affected by the jet. Our code allows us to follow the adiabatic cooling of a population of relativistic particles injected by the jet. This evolving energy spectrum of accelerated electrons, using a pressure-based proxy for the magnetic field, allowed us to obtain the radio emission from our simulation. Results: We find a higher energy transfer for a precessing jet than for standing jets with otherwise identical parameters as a result of the effectively increased interaction area. We obtain synthetic radio maps for all jets, from which one can see that dynamical flow features are clearly linked with enhanced emission sites. Conclusions: The

  14. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  15. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  16. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  17. New Developments in Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Kenneth C.; HERMES/GALAH Team

    2014-01-01

    The goal of Galactic Archaeology is to unravel observationally the events that occurred during the assembly of the Milky Way. For example, how did the star formation rate and the mass spectrum of the star-forming clusters change with time since the Galaxy began to form, how much did minor mergers and accretion of satellite galaxies contribute to the stellar content of the Galactic components, and how did the chemical properties of the Galaxy evolve? The data for Galactic Archaeology include the phase space coordinates of stars (position and velocity) and the chemical space coordinates (abundances of up to about 30 chemical elements). Although we know that the distribution of individual elements contains important information about the star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galaxy, the available data for large samples of stars has so far restricted the use of chemical space data mainly to the overall metallicity and the alpha-element enhancement. We are entering an era of large high-resolution spectroscopic surveys in which the abundances of many elements from all of the major nucleosynthesis processes will be measured. It will be possible to use chemical tagging techniques to identify the debris of individual dispersed star forming aggregates. In combination with astrometry from the Gaia mission, it will be possible to derive ages for this recovered star formation debris, and build up the star formation history of the regions of the Milky Way accessible to these large surveys. The Galactic thick disk is of particular interest. Because almost all disk galaxies appear to have an old thick disk, thick disks are an important but as yet poorly understood part of the formation process for disk galaxies. Some theories of thick disk formation associate the thick disk with the large star-bursting complexes seen in proto-disk galaxies at high redshift. If the Galactic thick disk was built in this way, from a relatively small number of large aggregates, it will

  18. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Accleration in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Highly accelerated particles are observed in astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), microquasars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic electron-ion and electron-positron jets injected into a stationary medium show that efficient acceleration occurs downstream in the jet. In collisionless relativistic shocks particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities, e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-stream instabilities, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly non-uniform, small-scale magnetic fields. The instability depends on strength and direction of the magnetic field. Particles in relativistic jets may be accelerated in a complicated dynamics of relativistic jets with magnetic field. We present results of our recent PIC simulations.

  19. Relativistic jet models for the BL Lacertae object Mrk 421 during three epochs of observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Hutter, D. J.; Kondo, Y.; Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1988-01-01

    Coordinated observation of the nearby BL Lacertae object Mrk 421 obtained during May 1980, January 1984, and March 1984 are described. These observations give a time-frozen picture of the continuous spectrum of Mrk 421 at X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio wavelengths. The observed spectra have been fitted to an inhomogeneous relativistic jet model. In general, the models reproduce the data well. Many of the observed differences during the three epochs can be attributed to variations in the opening angle of the jet and in the angle that the jet makes to the line of sight. The jet models obtained here are compared with the homogeneous, spherically symmetric, synchrotron self-Compton models for this source. The models are also compared with the relativistic jet models obtained for other active galactic nuclei.

  20. A Universal Scaling for the Energetics of Relativistic Jets From Black Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemmen, R. S.; Georganopoulos, M.; Guiriec, S.; Meyer, E. T.; Gehrels, N.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Black holes generate collimated, relativistic jets which have been observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), microquasars, and at the center of some galaxies (active galactic nuclei; AGN). How jet physics scales from stellar black holes in GRBs to the supermassive ones in AGNs is still unknown. Here we show that jets produced by AGNs and GRBs exhibit the same correlation between the kinetic power carried by accelerated particles and the gamma-ray luminosity, with AGNs and GRBs lying at the low and high-luminosity ends, respectively, of the correlation. This result implies that the efficiency of energy dissipation in jets produced in black hole systems is similar over 10 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs.

  1. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  2. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  3. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  4. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  5. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  6. Detection of silicon in the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertier, T.; Houck, J. R.; Graf, P.; Gull, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of the forbidden Si II 34.815 micron line in the Galactic center region is reported. It is demonstrated that, in the case of the Galactic center, the emission arises mainly from the photodissociation region and not the shocked molecular component seen via H2, CO, and OH lines. It is also shown that significant Si II emission is not expected from the ionized gas even though the Galactic center is a rather low excitation H II region.

  7. The precessing jets of 1E 1740.7-2942

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Martí, Josep; Martínez-Aroza, José

    2015-12-01

    Context. The source 1E 1740.7-2942 is believed to be one of the two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic center region whose X-ray states strongly resemble those of Cygnus X-1. Yet, the bipolar radio jets of 1E 1740.7-2942 are very reminiscent of a radio galaxy. The true nature of the object has thus remained an open question for nearly a quarter of a century. Aims: Our main goal here is to confirm the Galactic membership of 1E 1740.7-2942 by searching for morphological changes of its extended radio jets in human timescales. This work was triggered as a result of recent positive detection of fast structural changes in the large-scale jets of the very similar source GRS 1758-258. Methods: We carried out an in-depth exploration of the Very Large Array public archives and fully recalibrated all 1E 1740.7-2942 extended data sets in the C configuration of the array. We obtained and analyzed matching beam radio maps for five epochs, covering years 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997 and 2000, with an angular resolution of a few arcseconds. Results: We clearly detected structural changes in the arc-minute jets of 1E 1740.7-2942 on timescales of roughly a year, which set a firm distance upper limit of 12 kpc. Moreover, a simple precessing twin-jet model was simultaneously fitted to the five observing epochs available. The observed changes in the jet flow are strongly suggestive of a precession period of ~1.3 yr. Conclusions: The fitting of the precession model to the data yields a distance of ~5 kpc. This value, and the observed changes, rule out any remaining doubts about the 1E 1740.7-2942 Galactic nature. To our knowledge, this microquasar is the second whose jet precession ephemeris become available after SS433. This kind of information is relevant to the physics of compact objects, since the genesis of the precession phenomenon occurs very close to the interplay region between the accretion disk and the compact object in the system. Appendix A and a movie associated to

  8. Holographic Jet Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficnar, Andrej

    In this dissertation we study the phenomenon of jet quenching in quark-gluon plasma using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We start with a weakly coupled, perturbative QCD approach to energy loss, and present a Monte Carlo code for computation of the DGLV radiative energy loss of quarks and gluons at an arbitrary order in opacity. We use the code to compute the radiated gluon distribution up to n=9 order in opacity, and compare it to the thin plasma (n=1) and the multiple soft scattering (n=infinity) approximations. We furthermore show that the gluon distribution at finite opacity depends in detail on the screening mass mu and the mean free path lambda. In the next part, we turn to the studies of how heavy quarks, represented as "trailing strings" in AdS/CFT, lose energy in a strongly coupled plasma. We study how the heavy quark energy loss gets modified in a "bottom-up" non-conformal holographic model, constructed to reproduce some properties of QCD at finite temperature and constrained by fitting the lattice gauge theory results. The energy loss of heavy quarks is found to be strongly sensitive to the medium properties. We use this model to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA of charm and bottom quarks in an expanding plasma with Glauber initial conditions, and comment on the range of validity of the model. The central part of this thesis is the energy loss of light quarks in a strongly coupled plasma. Using the standard model of "falling strings", we present an analytic derivation of the stopping distance of light quarks, previously available only through numerical simulations, and also apply it to the case of Gauss-Bonnet higher derivative gravity. We then present a general formula for computing the instantaneous energy loss in non-stationary string configurations. Application of this formula to the case of falling strings reveals interesting phenomenology, including a modified Bragg-like peak at late times and an approximately linear path dependence. Based

  9. ATOMIC HYDROGEN IN A GALACTIC CENTER OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-10

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of {approx}14 km s{sup -1}, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at {approx}200 km s{sup -1} in a Galactic wind.

  10. New state of nuclear matter: Nearly perfect fluid of quarks and gluons in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. From charged particle density to jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic flow; followed by hard probe measurements: high- pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy-flavor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly interacting medium is created in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental flow results from Au+Au at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s≈ 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p+A, d+ Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both

  11. Black holes in galactic centers

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    For more than 25 years astronomers have known that some galaxies also have a bright, compact central nucleus whose emission does not come from normal stars. The most extreme instances of these so-called active galactic nuclei are quasars, objects no larger than the solar system whose total radiation exceeds that of 100 billion stars. Quasars seem to represent a particularly agitated stage in the development of some galaxies. Astronomers generally agree that gravity powers active galactic nuclei. The best candidate for the central engine of quasars is a black hole--a collapsed body whose gravity is so great that nothing, including light, can escape from it. The discovery of black holes in galactic centers, exciting in its own right, could affect current ideas about the evolution of the universe. Quasars appeared when the universe was less than one billion years old, indicting that some galaxies had already developed dense central regions. The early appearance of quasars rules out many cosmological models, which predict that the formation of galaxies should require billions of years, and even raises problems for the reigning cold dark matter model. Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation intensify the puzzle. Most theorists think that galaxies formed from density variations in the newborn universe. Yet measurements of the background radiation indicate that any variations were so slight that it is difficult to understand how they could have produced the structures seen today. Apart from its cosmological significance, the detection of massive black holes also could elucidate predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  12. Radiative versus Jet Mode in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the local universe, the vast majority of radio-loud active galaxies show none of the conventional AGN apparatus of accretion disk, torus, corona, or broad/narrow-line regions. Instead such nuclear emission as they have appears to be completely dominated by emission directly from the jet; the accretion, which must be present to drive the jet, appears to be highly radiatively inefficient. However, the most radio-luminous objects in the universe are almost all quasars (type I or type II) which behave in the textbook manner, appearing as a normal radiatively efficient AGN with the addition of a jet. The past decade has seen a substantial evolution in our understanding of the physical origins of these differences, their relation to the host galaxy and environment, and their interpretation in terms of completely unified models of AGN, and I will review our current understanding of these issues in my talk.

  13. Symbiotic starburst-black hole active galactic nuclei - I. Isothermal hydrodynamics of the mass-loaded interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. J. R.; Baker, A. C.; Perry, Judith J.

    1999-12-01

    Compelling evidence associates the nuclei of active galaxies and massive starbursts. The symbiosis between a compact nuclear starburst stellar cluster and a massive black hole can self-consistently explain the properties of active nuclei. The young stellar cluster has a profound effect on the most important observable properties of active galaxies through its gravity, and by mass injection through stellar winds, supernovae and stellar collisions. This mass loss, injected throughout the nucleus, creates a hot nuclear interstellar medium (nISM). The cluster both acts as an optically thin fuel reservoir and enriches the nISM with the products of nucleosynthesis. The nISM flows under gravitational and radiative forces until it leaves the nucleus or is accreted on to the black hole or accretion disc. The radiative force exerted by the black hole-accretion disc radiation field is not spherically symmetric. This results in complex flows in which regions of inflow can coexist with high Mach number outflowing winds and hydrodynamic jets. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic models of such nISM flows, which are highly complex and time-variable. Shocked shells, jets and explosive bubbles are produced, with bipolar winds driving out from the nucleus. Our results graphically illustrate why broad-emission-line studies have consistently failed to identify any simple, global flow geometry. The real structure of the flows is inevitably yet more complex. The structure of these nISM flows is principally determined by two dimensionless quantities. The first is the magnitude of the stellar cluster velocity dispersion relative to the sound speed in the nISM. These speeds measure the gravitational and thermal energies in the nISM respectively, and, therefore, whether the gas is initially bound or escapes in a thermal wind. The second parameter is the Mach number of the ill-collimated nISM flow which is driven away from the central black hole. We discuss a two-parameter classification

  14. Galactic Sodium from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Gibson, B. K.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models which include sodium from type II supernovae (SNe) alone underestimate the abundance of sodium in the interstellar medium by a factor of 2 to 3 over about 3 ridex in metallicity and predict a flat behavior in the evolution of riNafe at super-solar metallicities. Conversely, recent observations of stars with rifeh ˜ +0.4 suggest that riNafe increases at high metallicity. We have combined stellar evolution models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with the latest SN yields in an attempt to resolve these problems dots and have created many more.

  15. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  16. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  17. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  18. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  19. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  20. Centrifugally driven MHD-winds in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenzind, M.

    1986-02-01

    When the prime mover in quasars is a supermassive magnetized and rapidly rotating object, the centrifugal instability can drive strong MHD-winds away from the equatorial region and extract angular momentum and rotational energy from the central object. The author shows that the necessary magnetic fields are produced, when this central object has been formed from the central part of a galactic disc. The position of the light cylinder for these objects requires a relativistic description for the corresponding MHD-winds. The author discusses the relevant equations for any stationary and axisymmetric spacetime and derives explicitly the position of the Alfvén point in the flow. He finds that centrifugally driven winds from supermassive objects carry a Poynting flux comparable with the kinetic energy flux. In addition, the magnetic field structure in the open wind zone requires the existence of a global current topology, which might explain the necessary magnetic collimation for escaping jet material. As a result, centrifugally driven winds from rapidly rotating supermassive objects carry the energy necessary to power the non-thermal emission of BLR AGNs and the material required to fuel the broad emission line clouds and the thermal jets.

  1. Implosive accretion and outbursts of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1994-01-01

    A model and simulation code have been developed for time-dependent axisymmetric disk accretion onto a compact object including for the first time the influence of an ordered magnetic field. The accretion rate and radiative luminosity of the disk are naturally coupled to the rate of outflow of energy and angular momentum in magnetically driven (+/- z) winds. The magnetic field of the wind is treated in a phenomenological way suggested by self-consistent wind solutions. The radial accretion speed u(r, t) of the disk matter is shown to be the sum of the usual viscous contribution and a magnetic contribution proportional to r(exp 3/2)(B(sub p exp 2))/sigma, where B(sub p)(r,t) is the poloidal field threading the disk and sigma(r,t) is the disk's surface mass density. An enhancement or variation in B(sub p) at a large radial distance leads to the formation of a soliton-like structure in the disk density, temperature, and B-field which propagates implosively inward. The implosion gives a burst in the power output in winds or jets and a simultaneous burst in the disk radiation. The model is pertinent to the formation of discrete fast-moving components in jets observed by very long baseline interferometry. These components appear to originate at times of optical outbursts of the active galactic nucleus.

  2. Diffuse γ-Ray Emission from Misaligned Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, M.; Calore, F.; Donato, F.; Ajello, M.; Latronico, L.

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with jets seen at small viewing angles are the most luminous and abundant objects in the γ-ray sky. AGNs with jets misaligned along the line of sight appear fainter in the sky but are more numerous than the brighter blazars. We calculate the diffuse γ-ray emission due to the population of misaligned AGNs (MAGNs) unresolved by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). A correlation between the γ-ray luminosity and the radio-core luminosity is established and demonstrated to be physical by statistical tests, as well as compatible with upper limits based on Fermi-LAT data for a large sample of radio-loud MAGNs. We constrain the derived γ-ray luminosity function by means of the source-count distribution of the radio galaxies detected by the Fermi-LAT. We finally calculate the diffuse γ-ray flux due to the whole MAGN population. Our results demonstrate that MAGNs can contribute from 10% up to nearly the entire measured isotropic gamma-ray background. We evaluate a theoretical uncertainty on the flux of almost an order of magnitude.

  3. Diffuse γ-ray emission from misaligned active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.; Calore, F.; Ajello, M.; Latronico, L.

    2014-01-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with jets seen at small viewing angles are the most luminous and abundant objects in the γ-ray sky. AGNs with jets misaligned along the line of sight appear fainter in the sky but are more numerous than the brighter blazars. We calculate the diffuse γ-ray emission due to the population of misaligned AGNs (MAGNs) unresolved by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). A correlation between the γ-ray luminosity and the radio-core luminosity is established and demonstrated to be physical by statistical tests, as well as compatible with upper limits based on Fermi-LAT data for a large sample of radio-loud MAGNs. We constrain the derived γ-ray luminosity function by means of the source-count distribution of the radio galaxies detected by the Fermi-LAT. We finally calculate the diffuse γ-ray flux due to the whole MAGN population. Our results demonstrate that MAGNs can contribute from 10% up to nearly the entire measured isotropic gamma-ray background. We evaluate a theoretical uncertainty on the flux of almost an order of magnitude.

  4. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  5. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  6. Galactic Building Blocks Seen Swarming Around Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Green Bank, WV - A team of astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) has made the first conclusive detection of what appear to be the leftover building blocks of galaxy formation -- neutral hydrogen clouds -- swarming around the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way. This discovery may help scientists understand the structure and evolution of the Milky Way and all spiral galaxies. It also may help explain why certain young stars in mature galaxies are surprisingly bereft of the heavy elements that their contemporaries contain. Andromeda Galaxy This image depicts several long-sought galactic "building blocks" in orbit of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The newfound hydrogen clouds are depicted in a shade of orange (GBT), while gas that comprises the massive hydrogen disk of Andromeda is shown at high-resolution in blue (Westerbork Sythesis Radio Telescope). CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, WSRT (Click on Image for Larger Version) "Giant galaxies, like Andromeda and our own Milky Way, are thought to form through repeated mergers with smaller galaxies and through the accretion of vast numbers of even lower mass 'clouds' -- dark objects that lack stars and even are too small to call galaxies," said David A. Thilker of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. "Theoretical studies predict that this process of galactic growth continues today, but astronomers have been unable to detect the expected low mass 'building blocks' falling into nearby galaxies, until now." Thilker's research is published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Other contributors include: Robert Braun of the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy; Rene A.M. Walterbos of New Mexico State University; Edvige Corbelli of the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in Italy; Felix J. Lockman and Ronald Maddalena of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia; and Edward Murphy of the

  7. Supernova Nucleosynthesis and Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielemann, F.-K.; Argast, D.; Brachwitz, F.; Hix, W. R.; Höflich, P.; Liebendörfer, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nomoto, K.; Panov, I.

    The understanding of the abundance evolution in the interstellar medium, and especially the enrichment of heavy elements, as a function of space and time reflects the history of star formation and the lifetimes of the diverse contributing stellar objects. Therefore, the understanding of the endpoints of stellar evolution is essential. These are mainly planetary nebulae and type II/Ib/Ic supernovae as evolutionary endpoints of single stars, but also events in binary systems can contribute, like e.g. supernovae of type Ia, novae and possibly X-ray bursts and neutron star or neutron star - black hole mergers. Despite many efforts, a full and self-consistent understanding of supernovae (the main contributors to nucleosynthesis in galaxies) is not existing, yet. However, observed spectra, light curves, radioactivities/decay gamma-rays and galactic evolution witness the composition of their ejecta and constrain model uncertainties. We focus on (i) neutrino-induced explosions for type II supernovae and the innermost ejected layers, (ii) electron captures in type Ia supernovae and neutron-rich Fe-group nuclei and finally (iii) galactic chemical evolution and possible r-process sites.

  8. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  9. Chemical complexity in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Pintado, Jesus

    2007-12-01

    In recent years our knowledge of the chemical complexity in the nuclei of galaxies has dramatically changed. Recent observations of the nucleus of the Milky Way, of the starburst galaxy NGC253 and of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp220 have shown large abundance of complex organic molecules believed to be formed on grains. The Galactic center appears to be the largest repository of complex organic molecule like aldehydes and alcohols in the galaxy. We also measure large abundance of methanol in starburst galaxies and in ULIRGs suggesting that complex organic molecules are also efficiently produced in the central region of galaxies with strong star formation activity. From the systematic observational studies of molecular abundance in regions dominated by different heating processes like shocks, UV radiation, X-rays and cosmic rays in the center of the Milky Way, we are opening the possibility of using chemistry as a diagnostic tool to study the highly obscured regions of galactic centers. The templates found in the nucleus of the Milky Way will be used to establish the main mechanisms driving the heating and the chemistry of the molecular clouds in galaxies with different type of activity. The role of grain chemistry in the chemical complexity observed in the center of galaxies will be also briefly discussed.

  10. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to detailed follow-up. Our strategy is based on going deep enough to detect quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but no deeper in order to avoid an excess of cataclysmic variables (CVs), while covering a large area to maximize the numbers of recovered objects. The primary goals of the GBS are to test predictions of binary evolutionary models through number counts and period distributions of detected sources, and to greatly expand the sample of LMXBs suitable for detailed optical follow-up including mass determination. We have identified 1234 X-ray sources most with optical counterparts, and expect these to be divided evenly between quiescent LMXBs, magnetic CVs, and R CVn stars, with smaller numbers of other source types. We are actively pursuing multiwavelength follow-up including searches for optical, infrared, and ultraviolet counterparts, measurement of variability, and optical spectroscopy. I will summarize the goals of the project and highlight some of the results obtained so far. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789.

  11. Galactic evolution of 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    Lithium represents a key element in cosmology, as it is one of the few nuclei synthesized during the Big Bang. The primordial abundance of 7Li allows us to impose constraints on the primordial nucleosynthesis and on the baryon density of the universe. However, 7Li is not only produced during the Big Bang but also during galactic evolution: measures of stellar Li in our Galaxy suggest an almost constant Li abundance (the so-called Spite plateau) at low metallicities and a subsequent increase in the disk stars, leading to a Li abundance in Population I stars higher by a factor of ten than in Population II stars. This means that there must exist several possible stellar sources of 7Li: asymptotic giant branch stars, supernovae, novae, red giant stars. 7Li is also partly produced in spallation processes while 6Li is entirely produced by such processes. All of these sources have been included in galactic chemical evolution models and constraints have been derived on the primordial 7Li and its evolution, as well on stellar models. I will review these models and their results and what we have learned about 7Li evolution. Some still open problems, such as the disagreement between the primordial 7Li abundance as derived by WMAP and as measured in Population II stars, and the uncertainties about the main sources of stellar 7Li will be discussed.

  12. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  13. Special Features of Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Christos; Voglis, Nikos; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    This is an introductory article to some basic notions and currently open problems of galactic dynamics. The focus is on topics mostly relevant to the so-called `new methods' of celestial mechanics or Hamiltonian dynamics, as applied to the ellipsoidal components of galaxies, i.e., to the elliptical galaxies and to the dark halos and bulges of disk galaxies. Traditional topics such as Jeans theorem, the role of a `third integral' of motion, Nekhoroshev theory, violent relaxation, and the statistical mechanics of collisionless stellar systems are first discussed. The emphasis is on modern extrapolations of these old topics. Recent results from orbital and global dynamical studies of galaxies are then shortly reviewed. The role of various families of orbits in supporting self-consistency, as well as the role of chaos in galaxies, are stressed. A description is then given of the main numerical techniques of integration of the N-body problem in the framework of stellar dynamics and of the results obtained via N-Body experiments. A final topic is the secular evolution and self-organization of galactic systems.

  14. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  15. Observationally constraining the jet power extracted from spinning black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Sera

    2014-03-01

    Black holes of all sizes, from stellar to supermassive, launch relativistic jets of magnetized plasma that can radiate across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. These flows originate from near-event horizon scales, where ordered magnetic fields threading the plasma likely play a defining role in their collimation and source of power. Depending on where the power is extracted from in the system, e.g., the inner accretion flow or the ergosphere of the black hole, there can be a markedly different dependence of observed power on black hole spin. Further complicating our ability to derive the spin from observations is the fact that the exact relationship between jet emission properties and spin will be very model dependent, and the fact that jets themselves evolve depending on the state of the accretion flow. I will present an overview of the current state of the art in understanding black hole jet observations and their relation to spin, as well as discuss some special cases like our Galactic center's supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and the evolving jets observed in X-ray binary systems.

  16. Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

  17. A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-02-15

    We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

  18. Chemical and dynamical evolution of galactic discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Catherine J.

    1989-01-01

    The relative roles of star formation and viscously-induced radial flows in galactic disks are discussed. It is shown that the present-day distributions of stars, gas, and metals in galactic spirals need not reflect initial conditions but may instead indicate a cooperation between star forming and viscous processes over the disk lifetime.

  19. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  20. Benchmark studies of thermal jet mixing in SFRs using a two-jet model

    SciTech Connect

    Omotowa, O. A.; Skifton, R.; Tokuhiro, A.

    2012-07-01

    To guide the modeling, simulations and design of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFRs), we explore and compare the predictive capabilities of two numerical solvers COMSOL and OpenFOAM in the thermal jet mixing of two buoyant jets typical of the outlet flow from a SFR tube bundle. This process will help optimize on-going experimental efforts at obtaining high resolution data for V and V of CFD codes as anticipated in next generation nuclear systems. Using the k-{epsilon} turbulence models of both codes as reference, their ability to simulate the turbulence behavior in similar environments was first validated for single jet experimental data reported in literature. This study investigates the thermal mixing of two parallel jets having a temperature difference (hot-to-cold) {Delta}T{sub hc}= 5 deg. C, 10 deg. C and velocity ratios U{sub c}/U{sub h} = 0.5, 1. Results of the computed turbulent quantities due to convective mixing and the variations in flow field along the axial position are presented. In addition, this study also evaluates the effect of spacing ratio between jets in predicting the flow field and jet behavior in near and far fields. (authors)

  1. Anisotropy and corotation of galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y-Q; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-10-20

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments. PMID:17053141

  2. Research Opportunities on board Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attenborough, S.; Pomerantz, W.; Stephens, K.

    2013-09-01

    Virgin Galactic is building the world's first commercial spaceline. Our suborbital spaceflight system, pictured in Figure 1, consists of two vehicles: WhiteKnightTwo (WK2) and SpaceShipTwo (SS2). WhiteKnightTwo is a four-engine, dual-fuselage jet aircraft capable of high-altitude heavy lift missions, including, but not limited to fulfilling its role as a mothership for SpaceShipTwo, an air-launched, suborbital spaceplane capable of routinely reaching an apogee up to 110 kilometers. In conjunction, these two vehicles allow access to space and to regions of the atmosphere ranging from the troposphere to the thermosphere; additionally, they provide extended periods of microgravity in a reliable and affordable way. SpaceShipTwo, with a payload capacity of up to 1,300 lbs. (~600 kg), features payload mounting interfaces that are compatible with standard architectures such as NASA Space Shuttle Middeck Lockers, Cargo Transfer Bags, and server racks, in addition to custom structures. With the standard interface, payloads are allowed access to the large 17 inch diameter cabin windows for external observations. Each dedicated research flight will be accompanied by a Virgin Galactic Flight Test Engineer, providing an opportunity for limited in-flight interaction. In addition, tended payloads - a flight that includes the researcher and his or her payload - are also an option. At a price point that is highly competitive with parabolic aircraft and sounding rockets and significantly cheaper than orbital flights, SpaceShipTwo is a unique platform that can provide frequent and repeatable research opportunities. Suborbital flights on SpaceShipTwo offer researchers several minutes of microgravity time and views of the external environment in the upper atmosphere and in outer space. In addition to serving as an important research platform in and of itself, SpaceShipTwo also offers researchers a means to test, iterate, and calibrate experiments designed for orbital platforms

  3. Efficient acceleration of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, galactic microquasars, and gamma-ray bursts are widely considered to be magnetohydrodynamically driven by black hole accretion systems, although the conversion mechanism from the Poynting into the particle kinetic energy flux is still open. Recent detailed numerical and analytical studies of global structures of steady, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with specific boundary conditions have not reproduced as rapid an energy conversion as required by observations. In order to find more suitable boundary conditions, we focus on the flow along a poloidal magnetic field line just inside the external boundary, without treating the transfield force balance in detail. We find some examples of the poloidal field structure and corresponding external pressure profile for an efficient and rapid energy conversion as required by observations, and that the rapid acceleration requires a rapid decrease of the external pressure above the accretion disk. We also clarify the differences between the fast magnetosonic point of the MHD flow and the sonic point of the de Laval nozzle.

  4. Quasi-static model of collimated jets and radio lobes. I. Accretion disk and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Pino, Jesse

    2014-07-10

    This is the first of a series of papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetic helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures on very large scales and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we solve a set of one-dimensional equations similar to the steady-state standard accretion disk model, but now including the large-scale magnetic fields giving rises to jets. We find that the frequently made assumption that large-scale fields are frozen into the disk is fundamentally incorrect, due to the necessity for current and the accreting mass to flow perpendicular to magnetic flux surfaces. A correct treatment greatly simplifies the calculations, yielding fields that leave the disk nearly vertically with magnetic profiles uniquely determined by disk angular momentum conservation. Representative solutions of the magnetic fields in different radial regions of the disk surface are given, and they determine the overall key features in the jet structure and its dissipation, which will be the subjects of later papers.

  5. Surprise Discovery of an X-Ray Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Accreting, supermassive black holes that reside at galactic centers can power enormous jets, bright enough to be observed from vast distances away. The recent discovery of such a jet in X-ray wavelengths, without an apparent radio counterpart, has interesting implications for our understanding of how these distant behemoths shine.An Excess of X-RaysQuasar B3 0727+409 was serendipitously discovered to host an X-ray jet when a group of scientists, led by Aurora Simionescu (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), was examining Chandra observations of another object.The Chandra data reveal bright, compact, extended emission from the core of quasar B3 0727+409, with a projected length of ~100 kpc. There also appears to be further X-ray emission at a distance of ~280 kpc, which Simionescu and collaborators speculate may be the terminal hotspot of the jet.The quasar is located at a redshift of z=2.5 which makes this jet one of only a few high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. But what makes it especially intriguing is that, though the authors searched through both recent and archival radio observations of the quasar, the only radio counterpart they could find was a small feature close to the quasar core (which may be a knot in the jet). Unlike what is typical of quasar jets, there was no significant additional radio emission coinciding with the rest of the X-ray jet.Making Jets ShineX-ray-to-radio flux ratio vs. redshift, for X-ray quasar jets detected with Chandra. B3 0727+409 is shown in red (with and without the radio knot). The curves represent inverse-Compton scattering models with different magnetic field strengths. [Simionescu et al. 2016]What does this mean? To answer this, we must consider one of the outstanding questions about quasar jets: what radiation processes dominate their emission? One process possibly contributing to the X-ray emission is inverse-Compton scattering of low-energy cosmic microwave

  6. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  7. The ATLAS3D Project - XXXI. Nuclear radio emission in nearby early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Wrobel, Joan M.; Sarzi, Marc; Morganti, Raffaella; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution, 5 GHz, Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array study of the nuclear radio emission in a representative subset of the ATLAS3D survey of early-type galaxies (ETGs). We find that 51 ± 4 per cent of the ETGs in our sample contain nuclear radio emission with luminosities as low as 1018 W Hz-1. Most of the nuclear radio sources have compact (≲25-110 pc) morphologies, although ˜10 per cent display multicomponent core+jet or extended jet/lobe structures. Based on the radio continuum properties, as well as optical emission line diagnostics and the nuclear X-ray properties, we conclude that the majority of the central 5 GHz sources detected in the ATLAS3D galaxies are associated with the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, even at subarcsecond spatial resolution, the nuclear radio emission in some cases appears to arise from low-level nuclear star formation rather than an AGN, particularly when molecular gas and a young central stellar population is present. This is in contrast to popular assumptions in the literature that the presence of a compact, unresolved, nuclear radio continuum source universally signifies the presence of an AGN. Additionally, we examine the relationships between the 5 GHz luminosity and various galaxy properties including the molecular gas mass and - for the first time - the global kinematic state. We discuss implications for the growth, triggering, and fuelling of radio AGNs, as well as AGN-driven feedback in the continued evolution of nearby ETGs.

  8. A Temporal Analysis Indicates a Mildly Relativistic Compact Jet in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Most of our knowledge of the radio morphology and kinematics of X-ray binary partially synchrotron self-absorbed compact jets (hereafter, compact jets) is based on the observations of GRS 1915+105, which has the most prominent compact jet. Yet, the compact jet bulk velocity, v, is poorly constrained in the literature, 0.07\\lt v/c\\lt 0.98. In spite of this uncertainty, compact jets are often unified with relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. We estimated v as part of a temporal analysis of GRS 1915+105 jets in “high plateau states” (HPS). We define HPS as a state showing a hard X-ray spectrum and low level of long-term (\\gt 10 s) X-ray activity associated with 15 GHz flux density \\gt 70 mJy for \\gt 7 consecutive days. The radio emission is associated with compact jet emission. Two HPS were monitored at 15 GHz during their termination with e-folding times of 3.8 and 8.6 hr. We combine this timescale with the scale of the spatial variation of the linear source of a Very Large Baseline Array image preceding the fade of one of these HPS in order to estimate the jet speed. Our assumption that the reduction in radio emissivity propagates as an approximate discontinuity down the HPS jet (leaving a weak jet in its wake) indicates 0.17\\lt v/c\\lt 0.43. This agrees closely with the only other existing v estimates that are derived directly from radio images, jet asymmetry produced by Doppler enhancement.

  9. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.; Stevens, A. C.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: acs0196@mail.utexas.edu

    2012-06-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotating ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.

  10. Is the `disappearance' of low-frequency QPOs in the power spectra a general phenomenon for Disk-Jet symbiosis ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, A.; Radhika, D.; Seetha, S.

    One of the best possible ways to look for disk-Jet symbiosis in galactic Black Holes is to study the correlation between X-ray and radio emissions. Beyond this study, is there any alternative way to trace the symbiosis? To answer, we investigated the X-ray features of few black hole candidates based on the archival data of PCA/RXTE. We found evidences of `disappearance' of QPOs in the power density spectra and subsequent spectral softening of the energy spectra during the radio flares (i.e., `transient' jets). We delve deep into the nature of the accretion dynamics to understand the disk-jet symbiosis.

  11. Galactic Center Fly-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A.; Fu, C.-W.; Li, Y.; Frisch, P. C.

    2006-06-01

    Beginning with the familiar constellations of the night sky, we present a multispectral zoom into the core of the Milky Way Galaxy. After traveling over seven orders of magnitude in spatial scale, we discover the violent phenomena occurring within one light year of the Black Hole at the Galactic Core. This animated zoom includes data with wavelengths from radio to X-ray, and is based entirely on data or models that have been aligned at all spatial scales in order to provide a single continuous visual trip into the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The visualization challenge has been to align and choreograph data acquired over a wide range of wavelength and spatial scales, and obtain a new scientific as well as educational perspective of the dense core of our Galaxy.

  12. Galactic Interactions and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, T.; Storrs, A.

    2005-12-01

    In studying galactic interactions is it possible with present instrumentation to find evidence of dark matter within these interactions? The present theory is that dark matter and its gravitational force is what accounts for much of spiral galaxy rotation curves. If this is true, we should be able to find evidence of dark matter when two galaxies (one being a spiral galaxy) interact. Several pairs of interacting galaxies in various stages of interaction will be studied. In addition, several non interacting spiral galaxies will be studied for comparisons. We present analysis of a variety of archival imaging data from radio maps through x-ray images in an attempt to observe the effects of dark matter in galaxy interactions.

  13. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  14. The galactic model of GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1997-09-01

    The galactic model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is based upon the observed production of soft gamma ray repeaters (SGRs) in the galaxy and the consequences of a reasonable model to explain them. In this view GRBs are the long term result of the burn-out conditions of the SGRs in this and in other galaxies. A delay of {approximately} 30 million years before GRBs are being actively produced can be understood as the time required for the ejected matter during the SGR phase to cool, condense, and form planetesimals that are eventually captured by the central neutron star. The amount of disk matter and the interaction between each GRB and the disk determine the rate of burst production and turn-off time of GRBs. The x-ray afterglow as well as optical emission is derived from x-ray fluorescence and ionization of previously ablated matter.

  15. Carbon and Oxygen Galactic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Peimbert, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2006-06-01

    A chemical evolution model of the Galaxy has been computed to reproduce the O/H gradients from Galactic HII regions. This model solves the C enrichment problem because it fits the C/H and C/O gradients and the C and O histories of the solar vicinity. The model is based on C yields dependent on metallicity (Z) owing to stellar winds. The C yields of massive stars (MS) increase with Z and those of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) decrease with Z. An important result is that the fraction of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to MS and LIMS is strongly dependent on Z of the ISM, therefore, that fraction depends on time and on the Galactocentric distance. At present and in the solar vicinity about half of the C in the interstellar medium has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

  16. Theory of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The involvement of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in the theory of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is discussed. The physics of thin and thick accretion disks is discussed and the partition between thermal and nonthermal energy production in supermassive disks is seen as uncertain. The thermal limit cycle may operate in supermassive disks (Shields, 1985), with accumulation of gas in the disk for periods of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 7th years, punctuated by briefer outbursts during which the mass is rapidly transferred to smaller radii. An extended X-ray source in AGN is consistent with observations (Tennant and Mushotsky, 1983), and a large wind mass loss rate exceeding the central accretion rate means that only a fraction of the mass entering the disk will reach the central object; the rest being lost to the wind. Controversy in the relationship between the broad lines and the disk is also discussed.

  17. Detecting galactic binaries with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2005-09-01

    One of the main sources of gravitational waves for the LISA space-borne interferometer is galactic binary systems. The waveforms for these sources are represented by eight parameters of which four are intrinsic and four are extrinsic to the system. Geometrically, these signals exist in an 8D parameter space. By calculating the metric tensor on this space, we calculate the number of templates needed to search for such sources. We show in this study that below a particular monochromatic frequency of f0 ~ 1.6 × 10-3 Hz we can ignore one of the intrinsic parameters and search over a 7D space. Beyond this frequency, we have a change in dimensionality of the parameter space from 7 to 8 dimensions. This sudden change in dimensionality results in a change in the scaling of template number as a function of the monochromatic frequency from ~f1.250 to ~f5.880.

  18. Solar modulation of galactic antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Galactic antiproton data of current interest lie in an energy regime heavily influenced by solar modulation. Correcting for it needs to be done more carefully than it has been in the past. The well-known force-field analytic approximation of the spherically-symmetric, steady-state, cosmic-ray transport equation is applied in order to account for modulation down to at least 100 MeV. A sample solution which applies to the currently available antiproton data set (1979-80), and can be used to accurately modulate any possible interstellar antiproton spectrum, is given. The solution is easily adapted for comparison to future measurements. It also shows that boosting the low-energy (less than 600 MeV) side of the interstellar antiproton spectrum will not affect the low-energy spectrum at 1 AU, due to strong adiabatic deceleration during that time.

  19. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  20. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  1. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  2. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  3. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  4. The Galactic evolution of phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Context. As a galaxy evolves, its chemical composition changes and the abundance ratios of different elements are powerful probes of the underlying evolutionary processes. Phosphorous is an element whose evolution has remained quite elusive until now, because it is difficult to detect in cool stars. The infrared weak P i lines of the multiplet 1, at 1050-1082 nm, are the most reliable indicators of the presence of phosphorus. The availability of CRIRES at VLT has permitted access to this wavelength range in stellar spectra. Aims: We attempt to measure the phosphorus abundance of twenty cool stars in the Galactic disk. Methods: The spectra are analysed with one-dimensional model-atmospheres computed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The line formation computations are performed assuming LTE. Results: The ratio of phosphorus to iron behaves similarly to sulphur, increasing towards lower metallicity stars. Its ratio with respect to sulphur is roughly constant and slightly larger than solar, [P/S] = 0.10 ± 0.10. Conclusions: We succeed in taking an important step towards the understanding of the chemical evolution of phosphorus in the Galaxy. However, the observed rise in the P/Fe abundance ratio is steeper than predicted by Galactic chemical evolution model developed by Kobayashi and collaborators. Phosphorus appears to evolve differently from the light odd-Z elements sodium and aluminium. The constant value of [P/S] with metallicity implies that P production is insensitive to the neutron excess, thus processes other than neutron captures operate. We suggest that proton captures on 30Si and α captures on 27Al are possibilities to investigate. We see no clear distinction between our results for stars with planets and stars without any detected planet. Based on observations obtained with the CRIRES spectrograph at ESO-VLT Antu 8.2 m telescope at Paranal, Programme 386.D-0130, P.I. E. Caffau.

  5. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from the coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps the withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet jump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  6. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  7. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Imre

    2016-06-01

    Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes, accounting for as much as ∼ 2% of the mass of the nuclear stellar cluster. A significant fraction (∼ 30%) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We discuss the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. Binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk. The binaries also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, potentially leading to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission.

  8. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  9. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  10. Horizon-scale Lepton Acceleration in Jets: Explaining the Compact Radio Emission in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    It has now become clear that the radio jet in the giant elliptical galaxy M87 must turn on very close to the black hole. This implies the efficient acceleration of leptons within the jet at scales much smaller than feasible by the typical dissipative events usually invoked to explain jet synchrotron emission. Here we show that the stagnation surface, the separatrix between material that falls back into the black hole and material that is accelerated outward forming the jet, is a natural site of pair formation and particle acceleration. This occurs via an inverse Compton pair catastrophe driven by unscreened electric fields within the charge-starved region about the stagnation surface and substantially amplified by a post-gap cascade. For typical estimates of the jet properties in M87, we find excellent quantitive agreement between the predicted relativistic lepton densities and those required by recent high-frequency radio observations of M87. This mechanism fails to adequately fill a putative jet from Sagittarius A* with relativistic leptons, which may explain the lack of an obvious radio jet in the Galactic center. Finally, this process implies a relationship between the kinetic jet power and the gamma-ray luminosity of blazars, produced during the post-gap cascade.

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of AGN Jets: Untangling the Coupled Problems of Emission Mechanism and Jet Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Avachat, Sayali S.; Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Cara, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of X-ray and optical emission from large numbers of AGN jets is one of the key legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. Several dozen optical and X-ray emitting jets are now known, most of which are seen in both bands as well as in the radio, where they were first discovered. Jets carry prodigious amounts of energy and mass out from the nuclear regions out to tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs distant from the central black hole, depositing it into the host galaxy and cluster. Interpreting their multiwavelength emissions has not been easy: while in most jets, the optical and radio emission in many objects is believed to emerge via the synchrotron process, due to its characteristic spectral shape and high radio polarization, the X-ray emission has been a tougher nut to crack. In less powerful, FR I jets, such as M87, the X-ray emission is believed to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration due to the short radiative lifetimes of the particles. However, in FR II and quasar jets, a variety of emission mechanisms are possible. Until the last few years, the leading interpretation had been inverse-Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background photons (the IC/CMB mechanism). This requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. However, that now appears less likely, due to observed high optical polarizations in jets where the optical and X-ray emission appears to lie on the same spectral component, as well as limits derived from Fermi observations in the GeV gamma-rays. It now appears more likely that the X-rays must arise as synchrotron emission from a second, high energy electron population. With this revelation, we must tackle anew the coupling between jet structure and emission mechanisms. Multiwavelength imaging and polarimetry can give us clues to the

  12. Exploratory investigation of the HIPPO gas-jet target fluid dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zach; Shi, Ke; Jemcov, Aleksandar; Couder, Manoel

    2016-08-01

    In order to optimize the performance of gas-jet targets for future nuclear reaction measurements, a detailed understanding of the dependence of the gas-jet properties on experiment design parameters is required. Common methods of gas-jet characterization rely on measuring the effective thickness using nuclear elastic scattering and energy loss techniques; however, these tests are time intensive and limit the range of design modifications which can be explored to improve the properties of the jet as a nuclear reaction target. Thus, a more rapid jet-characterization method is desired. We performed the first steps towards characterizing the gas-jet density distribution of the HIPPO gas-jet target at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory by reproducing results from 20Ne(α,α)20Ne elastic scattering measurements with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the state-of-the-art CFD software ANSYS Fluent. We find a strong sensitivity to experimental design parameters of the gas-jet target, such as the jet nozzle geometry and ambient pressure of the target chamber. We argue that improved predictive power will require moving to three-dimensional simulations and additional benchmarking with experimental data.

  13. Jets at lowest mass accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Dipankar; Cantrell, Andrew; Markoff, Sera; Falcke, Heino; Miller, Jon; Bailyn, Charles

    2011-02-01

    We present results of recent observations and theoretical modeling of data from black holes accreting at very low luminosities (L/LEdd <~ 10-8). We discuss our newly developed time-dependent model for episodic ejection of relativistic plasma within a jet framework, and a successful application of this model to describe the origin of radio flares seen in Sgr A*, the Galactic center black hole. Both the observed time lags and size-frequency relationships are reproduced well by the model. We also discuss results from new Spitzer data of the stellar black hole X-ray binary system A0620-00. Complemented by long term SMARTS monitoring, these observations indicate that once the contribution from the accretion disk and the donor star are properly included, the residual mid-IR spectral energy distribution of A0620-00 is quite flat and consistent with a non-thermal origin. The results above suggest that a significant fraction of the observed spectral energy distribution originating near black holes accreting at low luminosities could result from a mildly relativistic outflow. The fact that these outflows are seen in both stellar-mass black holes as well as in supermassive black holes at the heart of AGNs strengthens our expectation that accretion and jet physics scales with mass.

  14. X ray emission from relativistic jets in AGNs and statistical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Koenigl, Arieh

    1989-11-01

    Calculations of the Compton scattering interaction between an ultrarelativistic jet and a thermal radiation field, in an Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), are presented. This process can be effective in decelerating ultrarelativistic jets that are accelerated by electromagnetic or hydromagnetic forces closer in to the central black hole. A narrow distribution of terminal Lorentz factors gammainfinity, consistent with the values inferred in superluminal radio sources, arises naturally in this model. The hard X-ray component detected in the spectra of 3C273 and several BL Lac objects may be due to the inverse Compton radiation produced in the course of the initial deceleration of their relativistic jets. The requirement that the luminosity of the hard X-ray component must exceed the total power in the associated jet is considered.

  15. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm {NN}}} =5.02\\,\\mathrm{TeV} $$$ s NN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-04

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s[NN])=5.02 TeV is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse nanobarns is analyzed.The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range -2.0

  16. Pitch angle of galactic spiral arms

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    One of the key parameters that characterizes spiral arms in disk galaxies is a pitch angle that measures the inclination of a spiral arm to the direction of galactic rotation. The pitch angle differs from galaxy to galaxy, which suggests that the rotation law of galactic disks determines it. In order to investigate the relation between the pitch angle of spiral arms and the shear rate of galactic differential rotation, we perform local N-body simulations of pure stellar disks. We find that the pitch angle increases with the epicycle frequency and decreases with the shear rate and obtain the fitting formula. This dependence is explained by the swing amplification mechanism.

  17. DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL LOCATIONS FOR SHOCK ACCELERATION IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Polko, Peter; Markoff, Sera; Meier, David L.

    2010-11-10

    Observations of relativistic jets from black hole systems suggest that particle acceleration often occurs at fixed locations within the flow. These sites could be associated with critical points that allow the formation of standing shock regions, such as the magnetosonic modified fast point (MFP). Using the self-similar formulation of special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics by Vlahakis and Koenigl, we derive a new class of flow solutions that are both relativistic and cross the MFP at a finite height. Our solutions span a range of Lorentz factors up to at least 10, appropriate for most jets in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, and a range in injected particle internal energy. A broad range of solutions exists, which will allow the eventual matching of these scale-free models to physical boundary conditions in the analysis of observed sources.

  18. Hydrodynamic stability of jets produced by mass accreting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    The existing model for pulsed X-ray emission from the source Hercules X-1 is reviewed. A necessary part of this model is a processing accretion disk which turns the source on and off with 35 day cycle. It is usually assumed that precession of the primary star in this binary system, Hz Hercules, slaves the disk to its precession rate. This model can account for the system behavior in a qualitative manner. Precession of Hz Hercules with 35 day period requires precession of the binary orbit. Pulse arrival times from Herc X-1 have been analyzed for orbital precession. The inclusion of precession does not significantly improve the results obtained assuming a non-precessing orbit. The fluid dynamical stability of extra-galactic jets and the possible consequences of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the jet surface external medium interface are considered.

  19. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the jet in M 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościbrodzka, Monika; Falcke, Heino; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2016-02-01

    Context. The connection between black hole, accretion disk, and radio jet can be constrained best by fitting models to observations of nearby low-luminosity galactic nuclei, in particular the well-studied sources Sgr A* and M 87. There has been considerable progress in modeling the central engine of active galactic nuclei by an accreting supermassive black hole coupled to a relativistic plasma jet. However, can a single model be applied to a range of black hole masses and accretion rates? Aims: Here we want to compare the latest three-dimensional numerical model, originally developed for Sgr A* in the center of the Milky Way, to radio observations of the much more powerful and more massive black hole in M 87. Methods: We postprocess three-dimensional GRMHD models of a jet-producing radiatively inefficient accretion flow around a spinning black hole using relativistic radiative transfer and ray-tracing to produce model spectra and images. As a key new ingredient in these models, we allow the proton-electron coupling in these simulations depend on the magnetic properties of the plasma. Results: We find that the radio emission in M 87 is described well by a combination of a two-temperature accretion flow and a hot single-temperature jet. Most of the radio emission in our simulations comes from the jet sheath. The model fits the basic observed characteristics of the M 87 radio core: it is "edge-brightened", starts subluminally, has a flat spectrum, and increases in size with wavelength. The best fit model has a mass-accretion rate of Ṁ ~ 9 × 10-3M⊙ yr-1 and a total jet power of Pj ~ 1043 erg s-1. Emission at λ = 1.3 mm is produced by the counter-jet close to the event horizon. Its characteristic crescent shape surrounding the black hole shadow could be resolved by future millimeter-wave VLBI experiments. Conclusions: The model was successfully derived from one for the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way by appropriately scaling mass and

  20. Experimental Results on Jets in pA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelt, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The experimentally observed reduction of jet yields in ultrarelativistic heavy ion (AA) collisions relative to proton-proton (pp) collisions is widely interpreted in terms of energy loss of a hard scattered parton traversing a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) before fragmenting into a jet of hadrons. In order to constrain proposed mechanisms of energy loss, a variety of measurements are needed that quantify both how the jet yields and jet structure are modified in the medium. However, jets may also be modified by differences in the initial state of the nucleus relative to that of the proton. The precise determination of the QGP properties relies on disentangling these additional modifications, collectively termed ``cold nuclear matter'' effects, from energy loss in the QGP. Collisions between heavy ions and protons (pA) provide a potential control environment where cold nuclear matter effects should be present, but QGP formation is generally not expected to occur. In this talk, an overview of recent jet results from proton-lead collisions produced at the LHC will be given. The yield of inclusive jets and distributions of dijet pairs are shown to be compatible with generally accepted theoretical expectations, although significant modification is observed when yields are measured from specific centrality classes of pA collision events. Some measurements of high-pT charged hadron yields suggest a larger modification in pA collisions relative to pp collisions than for inclusive jet yields. The potential implications of this difference along with other measurements relating to jet structure will be discussed.

  1. Unidentified Active Galactic Nuclei in the Fermi-2LAC catalogue: identification of candidate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, L.; van Soelen, B.; Meintjes, P. J.

    Blazars constitute the most violent astronomical objects with jet emitting radiation at all frequencies. In order to fully understand and model blazars and in particular the accretion-black hole system and superluminal jet structure, multi-wavelength observations are required. In the search for Very High Energy (VHE) sources a target sample of twenty unidentified sources with possible blazar characteristics has been constructed from sources listed in the Fermi-2LAC catalogue. The selected targets are all at high galactic latitude (|b| > 10°) with optical/radio counterparts within the Fermi 95% error circle. The selection criteria, which are based on source properties including radio brightness, photon spectral indices, undetermined redshifts, observability and variability, are presented along with the twenty identified sources.

  2. Baryon Loading Efficiency and Particle Acceleration Efficiency of Relativistic Jets: Cases for Low Luminosity BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic jets launched by supermassive black holes, so-called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are known as the most energetic particle accelerators in the universe. However, the baryon loading efficiency onto the jets from the accretion flows and their particle acceleration efficiencies have been veiled in mystery. With the latest data sets, we perform multi-wavelength spectral analysis of quiescent spectra of 13 TeV gamma-ray detected high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) following one-zone static synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. We determine the minimum, cooling break, and maximum electron Lorentz factors following the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. We find that HBLs have {P}B/{P}e∼ 6.3× {10}-3 and the radiative efficiency {ε }{{rad,jet}}∼ 6.7× {10}-4, where P B and P e is the Poynting and electron power, respectively. By assuming 10 leptons per one proton, the jet power relates to the black hole mass as {P}{{jet}}/{L}{{Edd}}∼ 0.18, where {P}{{jet}} and {L}{{Edd}} is the jet power and the Eddington luminosity, respectively. Under our model assumptions, we further find that HBLs have a jet production efficiency of {η }{{jet}}∼ 1.5 and a mass loading efficiency of {ξ }{{jet}}≳ 5× {10}-2. We also investigate the particle acceleration efficiency in the blazar zone by including the most recent Swift/BAT data. Our samples ubiquitously have particle acceleration efficiencies of {η }g∼ {10}4.5, which is inefficient to accelerate particles up to the ultra-high-energy-cosmic-ray (UHECR) regime. This implies that the UHECR acceleration sites should not be the blazar zones of quiescent low power AGN jets, if one assumes the one-zone SSC model based on the DSA theory.

  3. Baryon Loading Efficiency and Particle Acceleration Efficiency of Relativistic Jets: Cases for Low Luminosity BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic jets launched by supermassive black holes, so-called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are known as the most energetic particle accelerators in the universe. However, the baryon loading efficiency onto the jets from the accretion flows and their particle acceleration efficiencies have been veiled in mystery. With the latest data sets, we perform multi-wavelength spectral analysis of quiescent spectra of 13 TeV gamma-ray detected high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) following one-zone static synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. We determine the minimum, cooling break, and maximum electron Lorentz factors following the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. We find that HBLs have {P}B/{P}e˜ 6.3× {10}-3 and the radiative efficiency {ɛ }{{rad,jet}}˜ 6.7× {10}-4, where P B and P e is the Poynting and electron power, respectively. By assuming 10 leptons per one proton, the jet power relates to the black hole mass as {P}{{jet}}/{L}{{Edd}}˜ 0.18, where {P}{{jet}} and {L}{{Edd}} is the jet power and the Eddington luminosity, respectively. Under our model assumptions, we further find that HBLs have a jet production efficiency of {η }{{jet}}˜ 1.5 and a mass loading efficiency of {ξ }{{jet}}≳ 5× {10}-2. We also investigate the particle acceleration efficiency in the blazar zone by including the most recent Swift/BAT data. Our samples ubiquitously have particle acceleration efficiencies of {η }g˜ {10}4.5, which is inefficient to accelerate particles up to the ultra-high-energy-cosmic-ray (UHECR) regime. This implies that the UHECR acceleration sites should not be the blazar zones of quiescent low power AGN jets, if one assumes the one-zone SSC model based on the DSA theory.

  4. Spitzer Digs Up Galactic Fossil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a globular cluster previously hidden in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Globular clusters are compact bundles of old stars that date back to the birth of our galaxy, 13 or so billion years ago. Astronomers use these galactic 'fossils' as tools for studying the age and formation of the Milky Way.

    Most clusters orbit around the center of the galaxy well above its dust-enshrouded disc, or plane, while making brief, repeated passes through the plane that each last about a million years. Spitzer, with infrared eyes that can see into the dusty galactic plane, first spotted the newfound cluster during its current pass. A visible-light image (inset of Figure 1) shows only a dark patch of sky.

    The red streak behind the core of the cluster is a dust cloud, which may indicate the cluster's interaction with the Milky Way. Alternatively, this cloud may lie coincidentally along Spitzer's line of sight.

    Follow-up observations with the University of Wyoming Infrared Observatory helped set the distance of the new cluster at about 9,000 light-years from Earth - closer than most clusters - and set the mass at the equivalent of 300,000 Suns. The cluster's apparent size, as viewed from Earth, is comparable to a grain of rice held at arm's length. It is located in the constellation Aquila.

    Astronomers believe that this cluster may be one of the last in our galaxy to be uncovered.

    This image composite was taken on April 21, 2004, by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

    Galactic Fossil Found Behind Curtain of Dust In Figure 2, the image mosaic shows the same patch of sky in various wavelengths of light. While the

  5. Observational aspects of AGN jets at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun

    2015-03-01

    For the last two decades, significant and dramatic progress has been made in understanding astrophysical jet sources, particularly in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. For example, the Chandra X-ray observatory reveals a number of AGN jets extending from kpc to Mpc scales. More recently, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescopes launched in 2008 started monitoring the gamma-ray sky with excellent sensitivity of about ten times greater than that of EGRET onboard CGRO, and has detected more than 2,000 sources (mostly AGNs) as of 2014. Moreover, Fermi-LAT has discovered gamma-ray emissions not only from blazars but from a dozen radio galaxies not previously known to emit gamma-rays. Closer to home, the Fermi-bubbles were discovered to extend 50 degrees above and below the Galactic center. These large scale diffuse gamma-ray structures are similar in structure to AGN lobes such as those seen in Cen A and provide evidence for past activity in our Galactic center. In this review, I will first summarize recent highlights of large scale jets in radio galaxies, specifically resolved by the Chandra X-ray observatory. Next I will move on to the gamma-ray sky to present some highlights from Fermi-LAT observations of ``misaligned'' blazars, namely radio galaxies. I will discuss a unification scheme connecting blazars and misaligned radio galaxies. In the last part, I will also briefly comment on recent multiband observations of the Fermi-bubble and possible impacts on the AGN jet physics in the near future.

  6. Retardation magnification and the appearance of relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, Sebastian

    2008-10-01

    Thanks to the availability of high-resolution high-sensitivity telescopes such as the Very Large Array, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, there is now a wealth of observational data on relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) as well as galactic sources such as black hole X-ray binaries. Since the jet speeds cannot be constrained well from observations, but are generally believed to be relativistic, physical quantities inferred from observables are commonly expressed in terms of the unknown beaming parameters: the bulk Lorentz factor and the line-of-sight angle, usually in their combination as relativistic Doppler factor. This paper aims to resolve the discrepancies existing in the literature about such `debeaming' of derived quantities, in particular regarding the minimum-energy magnetic field estimate. The discrepancies arise because the distinction is not normally made between the case of a fixed source observed with different beaming parameters and the case where the source projection on the sky is held fixed. The former is usually considered, but it is the latter that corresponds to interpreting actual jet observations. Furthermore, attention is drawn to the fact that apparent superluminal motion has a spatial corollary, here called `retardation magnification', which implies that most parts of a relativistic jet that are actually present in the observer's frame (a `world map' in relativity terminology) are in fact hidden on the observer's image (the `world picture' in general, or `supersnapshot' in the special case of astronomy). Portions of this work were carried at the Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermilab MS 127, PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510, USA; and while the author was an Otto Hahn fellow of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ. E-mail: jester@mpia.de

  7. H II REGION DRIVEN GALACTIC BUBBLES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-12-01

    The relative alignments of mid-infrared traced Galactic bubbles are compared to the orientation of the mean Galactic magnetic field in the disk. The orientations of bubbles in the northern Galactic plane were measured and are consistent with random orientations-no preferential alignment with respect to the Galactic disk was found. A subsample of H II region driven Galactic bubbles was identified, and as a single population they show random orientations. When this subsample was further divided into subthermal and suprathermal H II regions, based on hydrogen radio recombination linewidths, the subthermal H II regions showed a marginal deviation from random orientations, but the suprathermal H II regions showed significant alignment with the Galactic plane. The mean orientation of the Galactic disk magnetic field was characterized using new near-infrared starlight polarimetry and the suprathermal H II regions were found to preferentially align with the disk magnetic field. If suprathermal linewidths are associated with younger H II regions, then the evolution of young H II regions is significantly affected by the Galactic magnetic field. As H II regions age, they cease to be strongly linked to the Galactic magnetic field, as surrounding density variations come to dominate their morphological evolution. From the new observations, the ratios of magnetic-to-ram pressures in the expanding ionization fronts were estimated for younger H II regions.

  8. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Associated Emission in Collisionless Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron)jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Associated Emission in Collisionless Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman. G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  10. PAGaN I: Multi-Frequency Polarimetry of AGN Jets with KVN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Trippe, Sascha; Sohn, Bong Won; Oh, Junghwan; Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Sang-Sung; Lee, Taeseok; Kim, Daewon

    2015-10-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with bright radio jets offer the opportunity to study the structure of and physical conditions in relativistic outflows. For such studies, multi-frequency polarimetric very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations are important as they directly probe particle densities, magnetic field geometries, and several other parameters. We present results from first-epoch data obtained by the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) within the frame of the Plasma Physics of Active Galactic Nuclei (PAGaN) project. We observed seven radio-bright nearby AGN at frequencies of 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz in dual polarization mode. Our observations constrain apparent brightness temperatures of jet components and radio cores in our sample to >10^{8.01} K and >10^{9.86} K, respectively. Degrees of linear polarization m_{L} are relatively low overall: less than 10%. This indicates suppression of polarization by strong turbulence in the jets. We found an exceptionally high degree of polarization in a jet component of BL Lac at 43 GHz, with m_{L} ˜ 40%. Assuming a transverse shock front propagating downstream along the jet, the shock front being almost parallel to the line of sight can explain the high degree of polarization.

  11. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, R. Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-15

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  12. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-01

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  13. The source and distribution of Galactic positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Dixon, D. D.; Cheng, L.-X.; Leventhal, M.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Skibo, J. G.; Smith, D. M.; Tueller, J.

    1997-01-01

    The oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the Galactic plane and the Galactic center region were combined with observations acquired with other instruments in order to produce a map of the Galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation. Two mapping techniques were applied to the data: the maximum entropy method, and the basis pursuit inversion method. The resulting maps are qualitatively similar and show evidence for a central bulge and a weak galactic disk component. The weak disk is consistent with that expected from positrons produced by the decay of radioactive Al-26 in the interstellar medium. Both maps suggest an enhanced region of emission near l = -4 deg, b = 7 deg, with a flux of approximately 50 percent of that of the bulge. The existence of this emission appears significant, although the location is not well determined. The source of this enhanced emission is presently unknown.

  14. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  15. The Heliosphere and the Galactic Environment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boundaries surrounding our heliosphere can change both due to changes in our galactic environment and through changes in the solar wind emitted by the Sun. We see here an animation of the bound...

  16. Active galactic nuclei and galaxy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. Sol; Lambas, Diego G.; Tissera, Patricia; Coldwell, Georgina

    2007-03-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host characteristics and nuclear activity for AGNs in pairs and without companions. Our study concerns a sample of AGNs derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 data by Kauffmann et al. and pair galaxies obtained from the same data set by Alonso et al. An eye-ball classification of images of 1607 close pairs (rp < 25 kpc h-1,ΔV < 350 km s-1) according to the evidence of interaction through distorted morphologies and tidal features provides us with a more confident assessment of galaxy interactions from this sample. We notice that, at a given luminosity or stellar mass content, the fraction of AGNs is larger for pair galaxies exhibiting evidence for strong interaction and tidal features which also show signs of strong star formation activity. Nevertheless, this process accounts only for a ~10per cent increase of the fraction of AGNs. As in previous works, we find AGN hosts to be redder and with a larger concentration morphological index than non-AGN galaxies. This effect does not depend on whether AGN hosts are in pairs or in isolation. The OIII luminosity of AGNs with strong interaction features is found to be significantly larger than that of other AGNs, either in pairs or in isolation. Estimations of the accretion rate, L[OIII]/MBH, show that AGNs in merging pairs are actively feeding their black holes, regardless of their stellar masses. We also find that the luminosity of the companion galaxy seems to be a key parameter in the determination of the black hole activity. At a given host luminosity, both the OIII luminosity and the L[ OIII]/MBH are significantly larger in AGNs with a bright companion (Mr < -20) than otherwise.

  17. A NIR Atlas of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Riffel, R.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2006-06-01

    We present the most comprehensive atlas of near-infrared (NIR) mid-resolution (R=1000) spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) made to date in the interval 0.8-2.4 μm. The aim of this work is to provide a homogeneous database suitable to study the nuclear NIR properties of AGN in a region poorly studied spectroscopically but that keeps useful constraints to model the AGN physics. The sample is composed of 49 objects, 39 of them with z <0.05, distributed between 7 quasars, 25 Seyfert 1 (classical and narrow-line Seyfert 1) and 17 Seyfert 2 galaxies. A few LINERS and Starburst galaxies are also included for comparative purposes. The spectra are dominated by strong emission lines of H I, He I, He II, [S III] and conspicuous forbidden lines of low and high ionization species, including coronal lines. In addition, rotational/vibrational lines of H_2 are detected in most objects. Overall, the continuum of quasars and Seyfert 1s are rather similar, being essentially flat or slightly steep in the H and K bands. In J, the shape of the continuum is different from object to object, varying from that displaying a steep rise in flux towards shorter wavelengths, from 1.1 μm bluewards, to that remaining flat. In Seyfert 2s, the continuum smoothly decreases in flux with wavelength, from 1.2 μm redwards. Bluewards, the continuum flux steeply rises in some sources while in others it decreases towards shorter wavelengths, suggesting reddening. Independently of the AGN type, stellar absorption features of CO, Si I and Mg I are present in the H and K bands. They are found to be particularly strong in Seyfert 2s. Line identification and remarks on the most important characteristics observed in the sample are given.

  18. UNBOUND GEODESICS FROM THE ERGOSPHERE AND THE MESSIER 87 JET PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Gariel, J.; Marcilhacy, G.; Santos, N. O. E-mail: gmarcilhacy@hotmail.com

    2013-09-10

    Assuming that the spin a of the black hole presumably located at the core of the active galactic nucleus Messier 87 takes the value which maximizes the ergospheric volume of the Kerr spacetime, we find the results compatible with the recent observations obtained by high-resolution interferometry on the origin of the jet, which would be located inside the innermost stable circular orbit diameter. Moreover, we find that a flow of unbound geodesics issued from the ergoregion is able to frame the best fits at large scales recently obtained for describing the observed profile of the relativistic jet launched from this central engine.

  19. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  20. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  1. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  2. GLIMPSE360: Completing the Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Barbara; GLIMPSE360 Team

    2009-05-01

    GLIMPSE360 will map the remaining 187 degrees of the Galactic Plane that have not been previously observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Thus the survey will cover longitude l=65-265.5 degrees excluding l 102-109 and l 76-82. The latitude range will be 3.1 degrees, wider than the previous GLIMPSE surveys (2 degrees) because the disk flares more in the Outer Galaxy. The latitude center will follow the CO/HI warp at a Galactocentric radius of 13 kpc. Three visits on each sky position with 0.6&12s HDR frames will provide a high dynamic range of sensitivity that exceeds GLIMPSE at both ends. This will allow us to determine the edge of the Galactic stellar disk, study low- and high-mass star formation in both the nearby Perseus arm and the Far Outer Galaxy, and study evolved stars throughout the Galaxy. Following the tradition of the previous GLIMPSE Legacy programs, we will deliver enhanced data products for the survey --- source lists and cleaned mosaics --- to the community. The science goals are as encompassing as the survey and include: determining the star formation rate of the Galaxy, the stellar disk scale heights and lengths across the Galaxy, how the dust extinction law varies with location in the disk; and cataloging stars, star clusters, PAH bubbles, supernova remnants, infrared dark clouds, outflows from massive protostars, planetary nebulae, external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance, and many other types of objects. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech

  3. Unwrapping the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observational selection bias resulting from the spin-dependence of the radiative efficiency. We review recent progress in our understanding of fast (v˜ (0.1-0.3)c, highly-ionized (mainly visible in Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines), high-column density winds that may dominate quasar-mode galactic feedback. Finally, we end with a brief look forward to the promise of Astro-H and future X-ray spectropolarimeters.

  4. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; Bouwman, J.; van Winckel, H.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Marengo, M.; Meixner, M.; Sloan, G. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods: Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results: We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central source. There also does not seem to be a noticeable difference between the mineralogy of the Galactic and LMC sources. Even though the observed spectra are very similar to those of protoplanetary discs around young stars, showing similar mineralogy and strong grain processing, we do find evidence for differences in the physical and chemical processes of the dust processing. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263 and 077.D-0555, and on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope (program id 3274 and 50092), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Transient Events in Archival VLA Observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiti, Anirudh; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R.; Cordes, J. M.; Lazio, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bower, G. C.; Croft, S.

    2014-01-01

    A number of different classes of stars, sub-stellar objects, and stellar remnants exhibit variability at radio wavelengths on time scales ranging from sub-seconds to hours. The direction toward the Galactic center not only has the highest stellar densities in the Galaxy, but also appears to have a range of interstellar scattering properties that may aid in the detection of new, radio-selected transient events. We have examined all archival VLA observations of the Galactic center field from 1985 to 2005 at 5 GHz and 8.4 GHz for a total of 214 hours of integration time, spanning 99 observations at 5 GHz with a typical area of 4.41E-4 square degrees and 116 observations at 8.4 GHz with a typical area of 8E-4 square degrees. We used a pipeline to search for transient events down to the shortest time scales allowed by the data (typically 10 seconds) by generating model-subtracted visibility data for each observation and then imaging the residual visibilities over short time intervals to search for outlier events. We present one radio transient event and at least 7 other promising candidates with significances ranging from 5.6 to 10.2 sigma that have passed all our tests, and discuss the possible source classes for these candidates and the event rate implications. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation for this work. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  6. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  7. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  8. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  9. Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets are surrounded by rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense medium inhomogeneities. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. Aims: We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. Methods: We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. Results: The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interactions is potentially enhanced by a factor of ~100 when accounting for the whole surface of the shock induced by the obstacle, instead of just the obstacle section. The observer gamma-ray luminosity, including the effective obstacle size, the flow velocity and Doppler boosting effects, can be ~300 (γj/10)2 times higher than when the emitting flow is assumed at rest and only the obstacle section is considered, where γj is the jet Lorentz factor. For a whole population of red giants inside the jet of an active galactic nucleus, the predicted persistent gamma-ray luminosities may be potentially detectable for a jet pointing approximately to the observer. Conclusions: Obstacles interacting with relativistic outflows, for instance clouds and populations of stars for extragalactic jets, or stellar wind inhomogeneities in microquasar jets and in winds of pulsars in binaries, should be taken into account when

  10. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  11. Jet Feedback on the Hosts of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, L.; Ogle, P. M.; Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback due to active galactic nuclei is one of the key components of the current paradigm of galaxy evolution; however our understanding of the process remains incomplete. Radio galaxies with strong rotational H_2 emission provide an interesting window into the effect of radio jet feedback on their host galaxies, since the large masses of warm (>100 K) H_2 cannot solely be heated by star formation, instead requiring jet-driven ISM turbulence to power the molecular emission. I will discuss the insights multiwavelength (X-ray to submm) observations of 22 H_2 luminous radio galaxies yield on the process of jet feedback in these galaxies and the impact on star formation activity. Specifically, I find that the diffuse X-ray and warm H_2 emission are consistent with both being powered by dissipation of the jet's mechanical energy into the interstellar medium (ISM) and that the resulting turbulence injected into the ISM by this process results in the suppression of star formation activity by a factor of 3--6. The hosts of these galaxies show a wide range of star formation activity and optical and IR colors, indicating a diversity of evolutionary states in which this process may be active.

  12. Arrhenius reconsidered: astrophysical jets and the spread of spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Malkah I.; Sheldon, Robert B.

    2015-09-01

    In 1871, Lord Kelvin suggested that the fossil record could be an account of bacterial arrivals on comets. In 1903, Svante Arrhenius suggested that spores could be transported on stellar winds without comets. In 1984, Sir Fred Hoyle claimed to see the infrared signature of vast clouds of dried bacteria and diatoms. In 2012, the Polonnaruwa carbonaceous chondrite revealed fossilized diatoms apparently living on a comet. However, Arrhenius' spores were thought to perish in the long transit between stars. Those calculations, however, assume that maximum velocities are limited by solar winds to ~5 km/s. Herbig-Haro objects and T-Tauri stars, however, are young stars with jets of several 100 km/s that might provide the necessary propulsion. The central engine of bipolar astrophysical jets is not presently understood, but we argue it is a kinetic plasma instability of a charged central magnetic body. We show how to make a bipolar jet in a belljar. The instability is non-linear, and thus very robust to scaling laws that map from microquasars to active galactic nuclei. We scale up to stellar sizes and recalculate the viability/transit-time for spores carried by supersonic jets, to show the viability of the Arrhenius mechanism.

  13. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt{sup -bar}), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb{sup -bar} is also enlarged to 35 GeV≲m{sub χ}≲165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  14. WIMPs at the galactic center

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW,more » ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.« less

  15. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  16. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  17. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  18. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles Dennison; Giebels, Berrie

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV γ rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of γ-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with γ-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions of blazars. However, many fundamental issues remain, including the role of hadronic processes and the rapid variability of a few FSRQs and several BL Lac objects whose synchrotron spectrum peaks at UV or X-ray frequencies. A class of γ-ray-emitting radio galaxies, which are thought to be the misaligned counterparts of blazars, has emerged from the results of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Soft γ-ray emission has been detected from a few nearby Seyfert galaxies, though it is not clear whether those γ rays originate from the nucleus. Blazars and their misaligned counterparts make up most of the ≳100 MeV extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), and are suspected of being the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The future "Cherenkov Telescope Array", in synergy with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and a wide range of telescopes in space and on the ground, will write the next chapter

  19. NuSTAR results from the Galactic Center - diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles

    2016-03-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) was launched in June 2012. It carried the first true, hard X-ray (>~10 keV-79 keV) focusing telescopes into orbit. Its twin telescopes provide 10 times better angular resolution and 100 times better sensitivity than previously obtainable in the hard X-ray band. Consequently NuSTAR is able to resolve faint diffuse structures whose hard X-rays offer insight into some of the most energetic processes in the Galactic Center. One of the surprising discoveries that NuSTAR made in the Galactic Center is the central hard X-ray emission (CHXE). The CHXE is a diffuse emission detected from ~10 keV to beyond 50 keV in X-ray energy, and extending spatially over a region ~8 parsecs x ~4 parsecs in and out of the plane of the galaxy respectively, and centered on the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. The CHXE was speculated to be due to a large population of unresolved black hole X-ray binaries, millisecond pulsars (MSP), a class of highly magnetized white dwarf binaries called intermediate polars, or to particle outflows from Sgr A*. The presence of an unexpectedly large population of MSP in the Galactic Center would be particularly interesting, since MSP emitting at higher energies and over a much larger region have been posited to be the origin of the gamma-ray emission that is also ascribed to dark matter annihilation in the galaxy. In addition, the connection of the CHXE to the ~9000 unidentified X-ray sources in the central the the ~100 pc detected by the Chandra Observatory, to the soft X-ray emission detected by the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories in the Galactic Center, and to the hard X-ray emission detected by both the RXTE and INTEGRAL observatories in the Galactic Ridge, is unclear. I review these results and present recent NuSTAR observations that potentially resolve the origin of the CHXE and point to a unified origin for all these X-ray emissions. Two other noteworthy classes of diffuse structures in the

  20. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  1. Tomography of Accretion Flows in Binary Stars and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livio, Mario

    2001-01-01

    Under this project, a variety of accretion problems have been studied, with two in particular. In the first, astrophysical jets are observed in many objects ranging from young stars to Active Galactic Nuclei. A major unsolved problem is how do these jets originate from accretion disks. In a series of works, I have examined the launching of outflows from magnetized disks, the extraction of energy from black holes, and the formation of jets in systems like Cataclysmic Variables and supermassive accreting black holes. The results of these works were published in a number of papers. In the second, I examined the potential role of vortices in accretion disks around Young Stellar Objects, for the formation of planets and for angular momentum transport. I showed that vortices are surprisingly stable, and that they are able to concentrate dust in their cores. I also examined the development of spiral shocks in disks. Finally, I studied the evolution of magnetically layered protoplanetary disks, and showed that they exhibit outbursts which could 'pump' the jets that are observed in Herbig-Haro objects. The results of these works were published in a number of papers as well. Additional information on the published papers is contained in the original abstract.

  2. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    In this photo of the C-140 JetStar on the Dryden Ramp, a subscale propeller has been fitted to the upper fuselage of the aircraft. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on the ramp at Dryden in Edwards, California. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the wings of airliners. The program also studied ways of reducing the collection of ice and insects on airliner wings.

  3. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  4. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  5. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  6. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  7. Real-time evolution of a large-scale relativistic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Astrophysical jets are ubiquitous in the Universe on all scales, but their large-scale dynamics and evolution in time are hard to observe since they usually develop at a very slow pace. Aims: We aim to obtain the first observational proof of the expected large-scale evolution and interaction with the environment in an astrophysical jet. Only jets from microquasars offer a chance to witness the real-time, full-jet evolution within a human lifetime, since they combine a "short", few parsec length with relativistic velocities. Methods: The methodology of this work is based on a systematic recalibraton of interferometric radio observations of microquasars available in public archives. In particular, radio observations of the microquasar GRS 1758-258 over less than two decades have provided the most striking results. Results: Significant morphological variations in the extended jet structure of GRS 1758-258 are reported here that were previously missed. Its northern radio lobe underwent a major morphological variation that rendered the hotspot undetectable in 2001 and reappeared again in the following years. The reported changes confirm the Galactic nature of the source. We tentatively interpret them in terms of the growth of instabilities in the jet flow. There is also evidence of surrounding cocoon. These results can provide a testbed for models accounting for the evolution of jets and their interaction with the environment.

  8. Accretion disk winds as the jet suppression mechanism in the microquasar GRS 1915+105.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Joseph; Lee, Julia C

    2009-03-26

    Stellar-mass black holes with relativistic jets, also known as microquasars, mimic the behaviour of quasars and active galactic nuclei. Because timescales around stellar-mass black holes are orders of magnitude smaller than those around more distant supermassive black holes, microquasars are ideal nearby 'laboratories' for studying the evolution of accretion disks and jet formation in black-hole systems. Whereas studies of black holes have revealed a complex array of accretion activity, the mechanisms that trigger and suppress jet formation remain a mystery. Here we report the presence of a broad emission line in the faint, hard states and narrow absorption lines in the bright, soft states of the microquasar GRS 1915+105. ('Hard' and 'soft' denote the character of the emitted X-rays.) Because the hard states exhibit prominent radio jets, we argue that the broad emission line arises when the jet illuminates the inner accretion disk. The jet is weak or absent during the soft states, and we show that the absorption lines originate when the powerful radiation field around the black hole drives a hot wind off the accretion disk. Our analysis shows that this wind carries enough mass away from the disk to halt the flow of matter into the radio jet. PMID:19325629

  9. Connections Between Jet Formation and Multiwavelength Spectral Evolution in Black Hole Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakemci, Emrah; Chun, Yoon-Young; Dincer, Tolga; Buxton, Michelle; Tomsick, John A.; Corbel, Stephane; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations are the key to understand conditions of jet formation in Galactic black hole transient (GBHT) systems. By studying radio and optical-infrared evolution of such systems during outburst decays, the compact jet formation can be traced. Comparing this with X-ray spectral and timing evolution we can obtain physical and geometrical conditions for jet formation, and study the contribution of jets to X-ray emission. In this work, first X-ray evolution - jet relation for XTE J1752-223 will be discussed. This source had very good coverage in X-rays, optical, infrared and radio. A long exposure with INTEGRAL also allowed us to study gamma-ray behavior after the jet turns on. We will also show results from the analysis of data from GX 339-4 in the hard state with SUZAKU at low flux levels. The fits to iron line fluorescence emission show that the inner disk radius increases by a factor of greater than 27 with respect to radii in bright states. This result, along with other disk radius measurements in the hard state will be discussed within the context of conditions for launching and sustaining jets.

  10. PAGaN II: The Evolution of AGN Jets on Sub-Parsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junghwan; Trippe, Sascha; Kang, Sincheol; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Taeseok; Kim, Daewon; Kino, Motoki; Lee, Sang-Sung; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-10-01

    We report first results from KVN and VERA Array (KaVA) VLBI observations obtained in the frame of our Plasma-physics of Active Galactic Nuclei (PAGaN) project. We observed eight selected AGN at 22 and 43 GHz in single polarization (LCP) between March 2014 and April 2015. Each source was observed for 6 to 8 hours per observing run to maximize the uv coverage. We obtained a total of 15 deep high-resolution images permitting the identification of individual circular Gaussian jet components and three spectral index maps of BL Lac, 3C~111 and 3C~345 from simultaneous dual-frequency observations. The spectral index maps show trends in agreement with general expectations -- flat core and steep jets -- while the actual value of the spectral index for jets shows indications for a dependence on AGN type. We analyzed the kinematics of jet components of BL Lac and 3C~111, detecting superluminal proper motions with maximum apparent speeds of about 5c. This constrains the lower limits of the intrinsic component velocities to ˜0.98c and the upper limits of the angle between jet and line of sight to ˜20°. In agreement with global jet expansion, jet components show systematically larger diameters d at larger core distances r, following the global relation d≈0.2r, albeit within substantial scatter.

  11. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  12. A NEW DELIVERY ROUTE TO GALACTIC NUCLEI: WARM HALO CLOUD IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Maller, Ariyeh

    2010-08-01

    We propose a new mechanism for the delivery of gas to the heart of galactic nuclei. We show that warm halo clouds (WHCs) must periodically impact galactic centers and potentially deliver a large ({approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub sun}) mass of gas to the galactic nucleus in a singular event. The impact of an accreting WHC originating far in the galactic halo can, depending on mixing, produce a nuclear starburst of low-metallicity stars as well as low-luminosity accretion onto the central black hole. Based on multiphase cooling around a {Lambda}CDM distribution of halos, we calculate the nuclear impact rate, the mass captured by the central black hole, and the fraction of active nuclei for impacting cloud masses in the range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub sun}. If there is moderate braking during cloud infall, our model predicts an average fraction of low-luminosity active nuclei consistent with observations.

  13. Air admixture to exhaust jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1953-01-01

    The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

  14. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars (NAPA part)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John; Loh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years. The proposed observations are optimized to discover and study (flux evolution, morphology, SED, proper motion, ...) new radio lobes from microquasars. This will have implications not only for the study of jets from Galactic X-ray binaries, but also for our understanding of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  15. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 0.31 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 23 GHz.

  16. Development of a liquid jet model for implementation in a 3-dimensional Eularian analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, Francis X., III

    The ability to model the thermal behavior of a nuclear reactor is of utmost importance to the reactor designer. Condensation is an important phenomenon when modeling a reactor system's response to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Condensation is even more important with the use of passive safety systems which rely on condensation heat transfer for long term cooling. The increasing use of condensation heat transfer, including condensation on jets of water, in safety systems puts added pressure to correctly model this phenomenon with thermal-hydraulic system and sub-channel analysis codes. In this work, a stand alone module with which to simulate condensation on a liquid jet was developed and then implemented within a reactor vessel analysis code to improve that code's handling of jet condensation. It is shown that the developed liquid jet model vastly improves the ability of COBRA-TF to model condensation on turbulent liquid jets. The stand alone jet model and the coupled liquid jet COBRA-TF have been compared to experimental data. Jet condensation heat transfer experiments by Celata et al. with a variety of jet diameters, velocities, and subcooling were utilized to evaluate the models. A sensitivity study on the effects of noncondensables on jet condensation was also carried out using the stand alone jet model.

  17. Metallicity of the Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A recent study suggests that the stars in the central parsec of our galaxy are not a single, roughly solar-metallicity population, as previously thought. Instead, these stars have a large variation in metallicities which has interesting implications for the formation history of the Milky Ways nuclear star cluster.Clues from AbundancesWhy do we care about the metallicity of stars and stellar populations? Metallicity measurements can help us to separate multiple populations of stars and figure out when and where they were formed.Measurements of the chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way have demonstrated that theres a metallicity gradient in the galaxy: on average, its below solar metallicity at the outer edges of the disk and increases to above solar metallicity within the central 5 kpc of the galaxy.So far, measurements of stars in the very center of the galaxy are consistent with this galactic trend: theyre all slightly above solar metallicity, with little variation between them. But these measurements exist for only about a dozen stars within the central 10 pc of the galaxy! Due to the high stellar density in this region, a larger sample is needed to get a complete picture of the abundances and thats what this study set out to find.Different PopulationsLed by Tuan Do (Dunlap Fellow at the University of Toronto and member of the Galactic Center Group at UCLA), the authors of this study determined the metallicities of 83 late-type giant stars within the central parsec of the galaxy. The metallicities were found by fitting the stars K-band spectra from observations by the NIFS instrument on the Gemini North telescope.In contrast to the previous studies, the authors found that the 83 stars exhibited a wide range of metallicities, from a tenth of solar metallicity all the way to super-solar metallicities.The abundances of the low-metallicity stars they found are consistent with globular cluster metallicities, suggesting that these stars (about 6% of the sample

  18. GIANT GAMMA-RAY BUBBLES FROM FERMI-LAT: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY OR BIPOLAR GALACTIC WIND?

    SciTech Connect

    Su Meng; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2010-12-01

    Data from the Fermi-LAT reveal two large gamma-ray bubbles, extending 50{sup 0} above and below the Galactic center (GC), with a width of about 40{sup 0} in longitude. The gamma-ray emission associated with these bubbles has a significantly harder spectrum (dN/dE {approx} E {sup -2}) than the inverse Compton emission from electrons in the Galactic disk, or the gamma rays produced by the decay of pions from proton-interstellar medium collisions. There is no significant spatial variation in the spectrum or gamma-ray intensity within the bubbles, or between the north and south bubbles. The bubbles are spatially correlated with the hard-spectrum microwave excess known as the WMAP haze; the edges of the bubbles also line up with features in the ROSAT X-ray maps at 1.5-2 keV. We argue that these Galactic gamma-ray bubbles were most likely created by some large episode of energy injection in the GC, such as past accretion events onto the central massive black hole, or a nuclear starburst in the last {approx}10 Myr. Dark matter annihilation/decay seems unlikely to generate all the features of the bubbles and the associated signals in WMAP and ROSAT; the bubbles must be understood in order to use measurements of the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the inner Galaxy as a probe of dark matter physics. Study of the origin and evolution of the bubbles also has the potential to improve our understanding of recent energetic events in the inner Galaxy and the high-latitude cosmic ray population.

  19. The physics of jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-09-01

    Recent data on the fragmentation of quarks and gluons is discussed in the context of phenomenological models of parton fragmentation. Emphasis is placed on the experimental evidence for parton showers as compared to a fixed order QCD treatment, on new data on inclusive hadron production and on detailed studies of baryon production in jets.

  20. Jet Screech Noise Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    The near-field screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle is simulated numerically. The self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established in the simulation. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels in the near field are in good agreement with existing experimental results.

  1. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  2. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  3. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  4. Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation and solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D

    2007-01-01

    Several investigations of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes have been undertaken during solar cycle 23 which occurred in the period 1993-2003. The radiation field is produced by the passage of galactic cosmic rays and their nuclear reaction products as well as solar energetic particles through the Earth's atmosphere. Galactic cosmic rays reach a maximum intensity when the sun is least active and are at minimum intensity during solar maximum period. During solar maximum an increased number of coronal mass ejections and solar flares produce high energy solar particles which can also penetrate down to aircraft altitudes. It is found that the very complicated field resulting from these processes varies with altitude, latitude and stage of solar cycle. By employing several active and passive detectors, the whole range of radiation types and energies were encompassed. In-flight data was obtained with the co-operation of many airlines and NASA. The EURADOS Aircraft Crew in-flight data base was used for comparison with the predictions of various computer codes. A brief outline of some recent studies of exposure to radiation in Earth orbit will conclude this contribution. PMID:17846031

  5. Physical conditions in photodissociation regions - Application to galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is outlined which determines the physical characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium in the nuclei of luminous galaxies. The method uses millimeter and IR observations to find the mass and density of the molecular and atomic gas components as well as the UV flux incident on clouds. The area and volume filling factors and approximate number of clouds and cloud radii are also found. For the Galactic center, about 100 clouds of radius about 0.4 pc and density about 100,000/cu cm are found within about 5 pc. The atomic gas temperature is about 700 K and the FUV field on clouds is about 100,000 times the local Galactic FUV field. The flux is consistent with a central source of luminosity of 2-3 x 10 to the 7th solar. Roughly 100,000 clouds of radius roughly 0.4 pc are found within the roughly 330 pc nuclear region of M82. The large number of clouds produces a projected area filling factor approaching unity. Cloud heating may be dominated by an intense interstellar UV flux.

  6. Jet production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Rosi; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Particle jets, formed when a hard scattered parton fragments into a jet of hadrons, are an ideal probe of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. The hard-scattered partons that produce them come from early in the collision, prior to the medium formation. These partons lose energy as they traverse the medium, and eventually fragment into jets of hadrons, which exhibit a modification when compared to jets produced in pp and p-Pb collisions. At LHC energies, the parton production cross-section is much larger than at RHIC, allowing jets to be reconstructed over a much wider kinematic range. Jet reconstruction allows for a more differential investigation of the parton energy loss than single hadrons, which have been used as jet proxies in the past, as the jets collect a larger percentage of the final state energy, which means their kinematics are more closely correlated to the kinematics of the initial parton. Jets are reconstructed in ALICE either using information from the tracking systems, or by combining this with the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In these proceedings, jet spectra from 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb and pp collisions will be presented. In particular, the centrality and event-plane dependence of the measured spectra and the background will be discussed. Jets from different centrality classes and event-plane orientations provide additional information necessary for understanding the path-length and temperature dependence of energy loss mechanisms. The reconstruction and correction procedures for jets will be shown. Results from Pb-Pb events will be compared to the baseline pp and p-Pb results, which allows the initial state and cold nuclear matter effects to be disentangled from hot medium effects. The jet nuclear modification, which quantifies the suppression, will be compared to energy-loss models.

  7. Dynamics of relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, Hélène; Mutel, Robert L.

    1998-12-01

    We discuss the structure and relativistic kinematics that develop in three spatial dimensions when a moderately hot, supersonic jet propagates into a denser background medium and encounters resistance from an oblique magnetic field. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (a) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (b) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head, but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese "noren" or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend and twist in 3-D space. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized - but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  8. Models for galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to those compact galactic X-ray sources whose X-ray luminosities are considerably in excess of the solar luminosity. It is pointed out that the key breakthrough in the development of an understanding of compact galactic X-ray sources was the discovery of X-ray pulsars with the UHURU satellite. There is now overwhelming evidence that these objects are neutron stars in close binary stellar systems. The X-ray pulsations are thought to be thermal emission from the magnetic polar caps of a neutron star that is accreting matter from a companion star and whose magnetic field is misaligned with its rotation axis. Among the compact galactic X-ray sources that are not X-ray pulsars, some still show direct evidence of binary membership, such as X-ray eclipses. There is evidence that the galactic-bulge sources are, in fact, close binary stellar systems. It is concluded, that the great majority of bright galactic X-ray sources, with only a tiny handful of exceptions (such as the Crab and Vela pulsars), are likely to be binaries.

  9. Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins with the SuperTIGER Long-Duration Balloon Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (SuperTIGER) long-duration balloon instrument was developed by Washington University in St. Louis, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Caltech, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of Minnesota to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic ray elements from 26Fe to 40Zr with high statistics and single element resolution, and to extend exploratory measurements to about 60Nd. SuperTIGER launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on December 8, 2012 and made over 2.5 revolutions around the continent, flying for a record 55 days and returning data on over 50 million heavy cosmic ray nuclei. The instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, and preliminary results from the SuperTIGER I balloon flight will be presented. The measurements of SuperTIGER will be discussed in context of their stringent tests of the OB association model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Finally, planned improvements to the SuperTIGER instrument and future flight plans will be described.

  10. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  11. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  12. Highlights from the VERITAS Active Galactic Nuclei Observing Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortson, Lucy; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The VERITAS Observatory, located at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory near Tucson, Arizona is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of very-high-energy (VHE; E>100GeV) gamma rays. With an array of four 12-m telescopes, VERITAS detects the Cherenkov light emitted from air showers initiated by astrophysical gamma rays. A sequence of upgrades completed in 2012 aimed at lowering the energy threshold resulted in the instrument being sensitive to gamma rays between 85 GeV and 30 TeV. Fully operational since 2007, VERITAS has so far detected 54 VHE gamma-ray objects in eight different source classes. The active galactic nuclei (AGN) class comprises the majority of these detections, with 34 sources that include several radio galaxies but are predominantly blazars (AGN with relativistic jets pointing towards Earth). The scientific importance of VHE detections of AGN includes studying the details of emission mechanisms in blazars and elucidating whether they are sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and astrophysical neutrinos. Additionally VHE gamma-ray observations can be used to gain cosmological insights such as placing limits on the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) and the extragalactic background light (EBL), which comprises all the diffuse starlight in the universe. This presentation will summarize the VERITAS AGN observing program and highlight a few recent results.

  13. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  14. Des Vents et des Jets Astrophysiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, C.

    Plasma outflows from a central gravitating object are a widespread phenomenon in astrophysics. They include the solar and stellar winds, jets from Young Stellar Objects, jets from compact stellar objects and extra-galactic jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei and quasars. Beyond this huge zoology, a common theoretical ground exists. The aim of this review is to present qualitatively the various theories of winds (Part 1) and how different astrophysical domains interplay. A more or less complete catalog of the ideas proposed for explaining the acceleration and the morphologies of winds and jets is intended. All this part avoids getting into any mathematical formalism. Some macroscopic properties of such outflows may be described by solving the time-independent and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equations. This formalism, underlying most of the theories, is presented in Part 2. It helps to introduce quantitatively the free integrals that such systems possess. Those integrals play an important role in the basic physics of acceleration and collimation, in particular the mass loss rate, the angular momentum loss rate and the energy of the magnetic rotator. Most of the difficulty in modelling flows lies in the necessity to cross critical points, characteristic of non linear equations. The physical nature and the location of such critical points is debated because they are the clue towards the resolution. We thus introduce the notions of topology and critical points (Parts 3 and 4) from the simplest hydrodynamic and spherically symmetric case to the most sophisticated, MHD and axisymmetric cases. Particular attention is given to self-similar models which allows to give some general and simple ideas on the problem due to their semi-analytical treatment. With the use of these notions, a more quantitative comparison of the various models is given (Parts 3 and 4), especially on the shape of the flows. It is thus shown that magnetic collimation of winds into jets is a

  15. Acoustic characteristics of twin jets.

    PubMed

    He, F; Zhang, X W

    2002-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of underexpanded supersonic twin jets in different azimuthal measurement planes. Compared with two independent jets, the twin jets produced additional noise due to the enhanced mixing and entrainment. The larger pressure ratio for switching from the axisymmetric mode to the helical mode led to lower noise levels at 90 degrees than for two independent jets. For pressure ratios greater than 5.00, the noise reduction was due to cessation of screeching of the twin jets while screeching of a single jet was still detected. The apparent shielding phenomenon was measured for the screech helical mode. The screech tone intensities were attenuated largely due to the shielding effects. The noise reductions due to shielding were obtained over a wide range of pressure ratios relative to the sum of two independent jets. PMID:12243185

  16. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging. PMID:23679594

  17. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  18. Galactic Bulge Giants: Probing Stellar and Galactic Evolution. 1. Catalogue of Spitzer IRAC and MIPS Sources (PREPRINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttenthaler, Stefan; Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra; Blommaert, Joris A.; Schultheis, Mathias; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Groenewegen, Martin A.; Price, Stephan D.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We aim at measuring mass-loss rates and the luminosities of a statistically large sample of Galactic bulge stars at several galactocentric radii. The sensitivity of previous infrared surveys of the bulge has been rather limited, thus fundamental questions for late stellar evolution, such as the stage at which substantial mass-loss begins on the red giant branch and its dependence on fundamental stellar properties, remain unanswered. We aim at providing evidence and answers to these questions. Methods. To this end, we observed seven 15 15 arcmin2 fields in the nuclear bulge and its vicinity with unprecedented sensitivity using the IRAC and MIPS imaging instruments on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. In each of the fields, tens of thousands of point sources were detected. Results. In the first paper based on this data set, we present the observations, data reduction, the final catalogue of sources, and a detailed comparison to previous mid-IR surveys of the Galactic bulge, as well as to theoretical isochrones. We find in general good agreement with other surveys and the isochrones, supporting the high quality of our catalogue.

  19. Smallest Black Hole in Galactic Nucleus Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A team of astronomers have reported the detection of the smallest black hole (BH) ever observed in a galactic nucleus. The BH is hosted in the center of dwarf galaxy RGG 118, and it weighs in at 50,000 solar masses, according to observations made by Vivienne Baldassare of University of Michigan and her collaborators. Small Discoveries: Why is the discovery of a small nuclear BH important? Some open questions that this could help answer are: - Do the very smallest dwarf galaxies have BHs at their centers too? Though we believe that there's a giant BH at the center of every galaxy, we aren't sure how far down the size scale this holds true. - What is the formation mechanism for BHs at the center of galaxies? - What's the behavior of the M-sigma relation at the low-mass end? The M-sigma relation is an observed correlation between the mass of a galaxy's central BH and the velocity dispersion of the stars in the galaxy. This relation is incredibly useful for determining properties of distant BHs and their galaxies empirically, but little data is available to constrain the low-mass end of the relation. M-sigma relation, plotting systems with dynamically-measured black hole masses. RGG 118 is plotted as the pink star. The solid and dashed lines represent various determinations of scaling relations. Credit: Baldassare et al. 2015. Identifying a Black Hole: RGG 118 was identified as a candidate host for an accreting, nuclear BH from the catalog of dwarf galaxies observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Baldassare and her team followed up with high-resolution spectroscopy from the Clay telescope in Chile and Chandra x-ray observations. Using these observations, the team determined that RGG 118 plays host to a massive BH at its center based on three clues: 1) narrow emission line ratios, which is a signature of accretion onto a massive BH, 2) the presence of broad emission lines, indicating that gas is rotating around a central BH, and 3) the existence of an X-ray point

  20. A Brief Overview of Fixed-Order Perturbative QCD Calculations of Jet Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitev, I.

    We review recent developments in the QCD description of jet production and modification in reactions with heavy nuclei at relativistic energies. Our goal is to formulate a perturbative expansion in the presence of nuclear matter that allows to systematically improve the accuracy of the theoretical predictions. As an example, we present calculations of inclusive jet cross sections at RHIC, Z(0/gamma^*) -tagged jet cross sections at the LHC, and jet shapes that include both next-to-leading order perturbative effects and the effects of the nuclear medium.

  1. GCN: a gaseous Galactic halo stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shoko

    2010-10-01

    We show that a string of HI clouds that form part of the high-velocity cloud complex known as GCN is a probable gaseous stream extending over more than 50° in the Galactic halo. The radial velocity gradient along the stream is used to deduce transverse velocities as a function of distance, enabling a family of orbits to be computed. We find that a direction of motion towards the Galactic disc coupled with a mid-stream distance of ~20kpc provides a good match to the observed sky positions and radial velocities of the HI clouds comprising the stream. With an estimated mass of 105Msolar, its progenitor is likely to be a dwarf galaxy. However, no stellar counterpart has been found amongst the currently known Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies or stellar streams and the exact origin of the stream is therefore currently unknown.

  2. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, I.; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the bar, estimating that the bar pattern speed is Ωb/Ω0=1.87+/-0.04, where Ω0 is the local circular frequency, and the bar angle lies within 20deg<=φ0<=45deg. We find that the Galactic bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than ~2 km s-1 kpc-1 for the hot stars.

  3. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic Bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the Bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test-particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic Bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the Bar, estimating that the Bar pattern speed is Omega_b/Omega_0=1.87\\pm0.04, where Omega_0 is the local circular frequency, and the Bar angle lies within 20Galactic Bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than 2 km/s/kpc for the hot stars.

  4. The distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdonmez, Aykut; Guver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-07-01

    Using location of the RC stars on the CMDs obtained from the UKIDSS, VISTA and 2MASS photometry, we have derived the reddening-distance relations towards each Galactic nova for which at least one independent reddening measurement exists. We were able to determine the distances of 72 Galactic novae and set lower limits on the distances of 45 systems. The reddening curves of the systems are presented. These curves can be also used to estimate reddening or the distance of any source, whose location is close to the position of the nova in our sample. The distance measurement method in our study can be easily applicable to any source, especially for ones that concentrated along the Galactic plane.

  5. The Distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-06-01

    Utilising the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-IR surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the data of reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyze the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  6. The distances of the Galactic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-infrared surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyse the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  7. Gamma rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of cosmic and gamma radiation by SAS-2 satellite are summarized and analyzed to determine processes responsible for producing observed galactic radiation. In addition to the production of gamma rays in discrete galactic objects such as pulsars, there are three main mechanisms by which high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) radiation is produced by high-energy interactions involving cosmic rays in interstellar space. These processes, which produce what may be called diffuse galactic gamma-rays, are: (1) the decay of pi mesons produced by interactions of cosmic ray nucleons with interstellar gas nuclei; (2) the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by cosmic ray electrons interacting in the Coulomb fields of nuclei of interstellar gas atoms; and (3) Compton interactions between cosmic ray electrons and low-energy photons in interstellar space.

  8. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  9. Nonthermal galactic emission below 10 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaco, J. C.; Brown, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Radio Astronomy Explorer-2 (RAE-2) satellite has provided new measurements of the nonthermal galactic radio emission at frequencies below 10 MHz. Measurements of the emission spectra are presented for the center, anticenter, north polar, and south polar directions at 22 frequencies between 0.25 and 9.18 MHz. Survey maps of the spatial distribution of the observed low frequency galactic emission at 1.31, 2.20, 3.93, 4.70, 6.55, and 9.18 MHz are presented. The observations were obtained with the 229-meter traveling-wave V-antenna on this lunar orbiting spacecraft. The improved frequency coverage offers additional insights into structure of the local galactic neighborhood.

  10. Chemical abundances in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Lecureur, A.; Hill, V.; Barbuy, B.; Renzini, A.; Minniti, D.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    We spectroscopically characterize the Galactic Bulge to infer its star formation timescale, compared to the other Galactic components, through the chemical signature on its individual stars. O, Na, Mg, Al were obtained for 50 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge from UVES spectra (R=45,000), while Fe was measured in more than 400 stars with a slightly low resolution (R=20,000) and the GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. Oxygen and Magnesium show a well defined trend with [Fe/H], with abundances larger than those measured in both thin and thick disk stars, supporting a scenario in which the bulge formed before and more rapidly than the disk. On the other hand the iron distribution peaks at solar metallicity and it is slightly narrower than that measured in previous works. Part of the present results have been published by \\citet{Zoccali06} and \\citet{Lecureur07}, and part will be discussed in forthcoming papers.

  11. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic

  12. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic

  13. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  14. Far-infrared and submillimeter survey of the galactic center and nearby galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Niles, D. W.; Kanskar, M.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Thronson, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Maps are presented with 12-arcmin resolution of the Galactic Center and adjacent galactic plane, from l(Pc) = 359 deg to l(Pc) = 5 deg. The data were obtained with the Steward Observatory's cryogenically-cooled, balloon-borne telescope. The data are from channels filtered for a bandpass of 70 to 110 microns and for a longpass of wavelength greater than 80 microns. For the typical effective temperature of 25 K of a galactic H II region at this spatial resolution, the effective wavelengths of the channels are 93 microns and 145 microns. Continuous emission is mapped along the galactic plane in both wavelengths. There are two contrasts between the immediate vicinity of SgrA l(Pc) smaller than 1 deg, and the galactic plane in general. Firstly, for l(Pi) greater than 1 deg the galactic plane narrows dramatically at 93 microns, while retaining its width at 145 microns. Secondly, the individual sources at l(Pc) (which are associated with H II regions) have greater peak brightness in the 145-micron channel than the 93-micron channel, while SgrA has approximately equal peak brightness in each. The maps demonstrate the importance of submillimeter wavelengths to galactic surveys.

  15. Variable Radio Sources in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Proctor, Deanne D.

    2010-07-01

    Using three epochs of Very Large Array observations of the Galactic plane in the first quadrant taken ~15 years apart, we have conducted a search for a population of variable Galactic radio emitters in the flux density range 1-100 mJy at 6 cm. We find 39 variable sources in a total survey area of 23.2 deg2. Correcting for various selection effects and for the extragalactic variable population of active galactic nuclei, we conclude there are ~1.6 deg-2 Galactic sources which vary by more than 50% on a time scale of years (or shorter). We show that these sources are much more highly variable than extragalactic objects; more than 50% show variability by a factor >2 compared to <10% for extragalactic objects in the same flux density range. We also show that the fraction of variable sources increases toward the Galactic center (another indication that this is a Galactic population), and that the spectral indices of many of these sources are flat or inverted. A small number of the variables are coincident with mid-IR sources and two are coincident with X-ray emitters, but most have no known counterparts at other wavelengths. Intriguingly, one lies at the center of a supernova remnant, while another appears to be a very compact planetary nebula; several are likely to represent activity associated with star formation regions. We discuss the possible source classes which could contribute to the variable cohort and follow-up observations which could clarify the nature of these sources.

  16. The diffuse galactic far-ultraviolet sky

    SciTech Connect

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-20

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin{sup 2} pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N {sub H} {sub I} column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} Å{sup –1} non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr{sup –1}. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N {sub H} {sub I} below 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  17. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  18. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Dryden C-140 JetStar during testing of advanced propfan designs. Dryden conducted flight research in 1981-1982 on several designs. The technology was developed under the direction of the Lewis Research Center (today the Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH) under the Advanced Turboprop Program. Under that program, Langley Research Center in Virginia oversaw work on accoustics and noise reduction. These efforts were intended to develop a high-speed and fuel-efficient turboprop system. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (later the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA), in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on a research flight over the Mojave desert. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called the General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the

  19. High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays Observed by RUNJOB Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, Makoto; RUNJOB Collaboration

    2006-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) from proton to iron with the energy of 1013 - 1015 eV were observed by RUssia-Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) experiments. Each energy spectrum of the primary nuclear components except for helium is in agreement with the results obtained by other observations in the same energy region as the RUNJOB observation within statistical errors, while the intensity of the helium component is nearly half that obtained by the JACEE and the SOKOL observations. The spectrum slopes seem to be almost parallel or become gradually harder as mass becomes heavier. The power indices of the spectra are nearly -2.75 in the energy range of 20 - 500 TeV/nucleous. These our results support the acceleration mechanism and the propagation process in Galaxy of GCRs depend on its rigidity.

  20. Benchmark solutions for the galactic heavy-ion transport equations with energy and spatial coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic heavy ion transport equations in the straightahead approximation with energy and spatial coupling. Analytical representations of the ion fluxes are obtained for a variety of sources with the assumption that the nuclear interaction parameters are energy independent. The method utilizes an analytical LaPlace transform inversion to yield a closed form representation that is computationally efficient. The flux profiles are then used to predict ion dose profiles, which are important for shield design studies.

  1. Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: bridging two fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Serenelli, Aldo; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Milone, Antonino; Asplund, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of field stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. An overview of the ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) is presented, along with recent results using asteroseismology to investigate the age structure of the Milky Way disc.

  2. Probing the central regions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, Anne Maria

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are one of the key players in the Universe. Their energy output can strongly affect the growth of their host galaxy and can promote or suppress star formation on galactic scales. Most of the processes that determine the power of an AGN as well as the form in which that power is released take place in the immediate surroundings of its supermassive black hole, a region that is still not entirely understood. A comprehension of these inner regions is, however, crucial to any ultimate understanding of the AGN's vast influence. This dissertation explores these close-in environments of the black hole using two approaches: X-ray spectroscopy and variability studies. We begin by summarizing our current understanding of why AGN play such a significant role in galaxy formation. This is followed by a discussion of why X-ray spectroscopy is one of the best means to investigate them. We point out that, in particular, the X-ray reflection spectrum is interesting as it can directly probe parameters such as the black hole spin or the inclination of the accretion disk. Since the reflection spectrum is a broad band component, that usually only contributes a fraction of the total observed X-ray flux, the entire X-ray spectrum requires careful modeling. To perform such modeling and gain access to the parameters of the reflection spectrum, we first select a target in which the spectral decomposition is simplified by the absence of absorption - the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. We apply a multi-epoch fitting method that uses more than one spectrum at a time to get the best possible results on the parameters of the reflection spectrum that are invariant on human timescales. This technique enables us to tightly constrain the reflection parameters and leads us to conclude that Fairall 9 most likely possesses a composite soft X-ray excess, consisting of blurred reflection and a separate component such as Comptonization. The reflection spectrum also provides a way

  3. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM ACCRETION DISKS. II. THE FORMATION OF ASYMMETRIC JETS AND COUNTER JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: nezami@mpia.de

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the jet launching from accretion disks, in particular the formation of intrinsically asymmetric jet/counter jet systems. We perform axisymmetric MHD simulations of the disk-jet structure on a bipolar computational domain covering both hemispheres. We apply various models such as asymmetric disks with (initially) different scale heights in each hemisphere, symmetric disks into which a local disturbance is injected, and jets launched into an asymmetric disk corona. We consider both a standard global magnetic diffusivity distribution and a novel local diffusivity model. Typical disk evolution first shows substantial disk warping and then results in asymmetric outflows with a 10%-30% mass flux difference. We find that the magnetic diffusivity profile is essential for establishing a long-term outflow asymmetry. We conclude that bipolar asymmetry in protostellar and extragalactic jets can indeed be generated intrinsically and maintained over a long time by disk asymmetries and the standard jet launching mechanism.

  4. Experiments in axisymmetric supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cyrille Dennis

    An experimental study of the effects of exit Mach number and density ratio on the development of axisymmetric jets is described in this thesis. Jet exit Mach numbers of 1.41, 2.0, and 3.0, were studied for jets of helium, argon, and nitrogen. The jets exit into a gas at rest (velocity ratio = 0), in order to better isolate the effects of compressibility and density ratio. Density ratios vary from 0.23 to 5.5.In order to generate shock free-jets, unique nozzles were designed and constructed for each gas and Mach number combination. A plating method for the construction of the nozzles was developed to ensure high-accuracy and a good surface finish at a cost significantly less than direct-machining techniques.The spreading rate of the jet for several downstream locations is measured with a pitot probe. Centerline data are used to characterise the length of the potential core of the jet, which correlates well with the relative spreading rates. Limited frequency data is obtained through the use of piezo-resistive pressure probes. This method is promising for flows that are not conducive to hot-wire probes.Spark shadography is used to visualize both the mean and instantaneous flow, with the minimum spark time being 20 nanoseconds. The convection velocity of large-scale disturbances is estimated from the visible Mach-type acoustic waves emanating from the jet.For a wide range of jet Mach and Reynolds numbers, the convection velocity of the large scale disturbances in the potential core region of the jet is approximately 0.8 times the jet velocity, the approximate velocity of the first helical instability mode of the jet.The main objectives of the present work were to investigate the effects of compressibility and density on the initial development of the axisymmetric jet. Although the data are not sufficient to determine if the convective Mach number concept used in 2-d shear layer research will work in the case of an axisymmetric jet, it is clear that the axisymmetric

  5. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  6. Spatial Growth of Current-driven Instability in Relativistic Rotating Jets and the Search for Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandra B.; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.

    2016-06-01

    Using the three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code RAISHIN, we investigated the influence of the radial density profile on the spatial development of the current-driven kink instability along magnetized rotating, relativistic jets. For the purposes of our study, we used a nonperiodic computational box, the jet flow is initially established across the computational grid, and a precessional perturbation at the inlet triggers the growth of the kink instability. We studied light and heavy jets with respect to the environment depending on the density profile. Different angular velocity amplitudes have been also tested. The results show the propagation of a helically kinked structure along the jet and a relatively stable configuration for the lighter jets. The jets appear to be collimated by the magnetic field, and the flow is accelerated owing to conversion of electromagnetic into kinetic energy. We also identify regions of high current density in filamentary current sheets, indicative of magnetic reconnection, which are associated with the kink-unstable regions and correlated with the decrease of the sigma parameter of the flow. We discuss the implications of our findings for Poynting-flux-dominated jets in connection with magnetic reconnection processes. We find that fast magnetic reconnection may be driven by the kink-instability turbulence and govern the transformation of magnetic into kinetic energy, thus providing an efficient way to power and accelerate particles in active galactic nucleus and gamma-ray-burst relativistic jets.

  7. AGN jet power, formation of X-ray cavities, and FR I/II dichotomy in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the ability of jets in active galactic nuclei to break out of the ambient gas with sufficiently large advance velocities. Using observationally estimated jet power, we analyze 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters. Because the gas density profiles in the innermost regions of galaxies have not been resolved so far, we consider two extreme cases for temperature and density profiles. We also follow two types of evolution for the jet cocoons: being driven by the pressure inside the cocoon [Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I], and being driven by the jet momentum (FR type II). Our main result is that regardless of the assumed form of the density profiles, jets with observed powers of ≲1044 erg s-1 are not powerful enough to evolve as FR II sources. Instead, they evolve as FR I sources and appear to be decelerated below the buoyant velocities of the cocoons when jets were propagating through the central dense regions of the host galaxies. This explains why FR I sources are more frequent than FR II sources in clusters. Furthermore, we predict the sizes of X-ray cavities from the observed jet powers and compare them with the observed ones-they are consistent within a factor of two if the FR I type evolution is realized. Finally, we find that the jets with a power ≳1044 erg s-1 are less affected by the ambient medium, and some of them, but not all, could serve as precursors of the FR II sources.

  8. Jet decorrelation and jet shapes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heuring, T.C.

    1996-07-01

    We present results on measurements of jet shapes and jet azimuthal decorrelation from {bar p}P collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using data collected during the 1992-1993 run of the Fermilab Tevatron. Jets are seen to narrow both with increasing Awe {sub TTY} and increasing rapidity. While HERWIG, a puritan shower Monte Carlo, predicts slightly narrower jets, it describes the trend of the data well; NO CD described qualitative features of the data but is sensitive to both renormalization scale and jet definitions. Jet azimuthal decorrelation has been measured out to five units of pseudorapidity. While next-to-leading order CD and a leading-log approximation based on BFKL resummation fail to reproduce the effect, HERWIG describes the data well.

  9. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  10. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  11. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  12. Vortex diode jet

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-05-17

    A fluid transfer system is described that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other. 10 figures.

  13. Constraints on primordial black holes from the Galactic gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. J.; Kohri, Kazunori; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-08-01

    The fraction of the Universe going into primordial black holes (PBHs) with initial mass M*≈5 ×1 014 g , such that they are evaporating at the present epoch, is strongly constrained by observations of both the extragalactic and Galactic γ -ray backgrounds. However, while the dominant contribution to the extragalactic background comes from the time-integrated emission of PBHs with initial mass M* , the Galactic background is dominated by the instantaneous emission of those with initial mass slightly larger than M* and current mass below M* . Also, the instantaneous emission of PBHs smaller than 0.4 M* mostly comprises secondary particles produced by the decay of directly emitted quark and gluon jets. These points were missed in the earlier analysis by Lehoucq et al. using EGRET data. For a monochromatic PBH mass function, with initial mass (1 +μ )M* and μ ≪1 , the current mass is (3 μ )1 /3M* , and the Galactic background constrains the fraction of the Universe going into PBHs as a function of μ . However, the initial mass function cannot be precisely monochromatic, and even a tiny spread of mass around M* would generate a current low-mass tail of PBHs below M* . This tail would be the main contributor to the Galactic background, so we consider its form and the associated constraints for a variety of scenarios with both extended and nearly monochromatic initial mass functions. In particular, we consider a scenario in which the PBHs form from critical collapse and have a mass function which peaks well above M* . In this case, the largest PBHs could provide the dark matter without the M* ones exceeding the γ -ray background limits.

  14. THE PARABOLIC JET STRUCTURE IN M87 AS A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC NOZZLE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi E-mail: asada@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2013-10-01

    The structure and dynamics of the M87 jet from sub-milliarcsec to arcsecond scales are continuously examined. We analyzed the Very Long Baseline Array archival data taken at 43 and 86 GHz to measure the size of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) cores. Millimeter/sub-millimeter VLBI cores are considered as innermost jet emissions, which has been originally suggested by Blandford and Königl. Those components fairly follow an extrapolated parabolic streamline in our previous study so that the jet has a single power-law structure with nearly 5 orders of magnitude in the distance starting from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), less than 10 Schwarzschild radius (r{sub s}). We further inspect the jet parabolic structure as a counterpart of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nozzle in order to identify the property of a bulk acceleration. We interpret that the parabolic jet consists of Poynting-flux dominated flows, powered by large-amplitude, nonlinear torsional Alfvén waves. We examine the non-relativistic MHD nozzle equation in a parabolic shape. The nature of trans-fast magnetosonic flow is similar to the one of transonic solution of Parker's hydrodynamic solar wind; the jet becomes super-escape as well as super-fast magnetosonic at around ∼10{sup 3} r{sub s}, while the upstream trans-Alfvénic flow speed increases linearly as a function of the distance at ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} r{sub s}. We here point out that this is the first evidence to identify these features in astrophysical jets. We propose that the M87 jet is magnetically accelerated, but thermally confined by the stratified interstellar medium inside the sphere of gravitational influence of the SMBH potential, which may be a norm in active galactic nucleus jets.

  15. Dominant Nuclear Outflow Driving Mechanisms in Powerful Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheldor, Dan; Tadhunter, Clive; Holt, Joanna; Morganti, Raffaella; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Koekemoer, Anton

    2007-05-01

    In order to identify the dominant nuclear outflow mechanisms in active galactic nuclei, we have undertaken deep, high-resolution observations of two compact radio sources (PKS 1549-79 and PKS 1345+12) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Not only are these targets known to have powerful emission-line outflows, but they also contain all the potential drivers for the outflows: relativistic jets, quasar nuclei, and starbursts. ACS allows the compact nature (<0.15") of these radio sources to be optically resolved for the first time. Through comparison with existing radio maps, we have seen consistency in the nuclear position angles of both the optical emission-line and radio data. There is no evidence for biconical emission-line features on the large scale, and there is a divergence in the relative position angles of the optical and radio structure. This enables us to exclude starburst-driven outflows. However, we are unable to clearly distinguish between radiative AGN wind-driven outflows and outflows powered by relativistic radio jets. The small-scale biconical features, indicative of such mechanisms, could be below the resolution limit of ACS, especially if aligned close to the line of sight. In addition, there may be offsets between the radio and optical nuclei induced by heavy dust obscuration, nebular continuum, or scattered light from the AGN. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 10206.

  16. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  17. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.