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Sample records for galaxias maculatus teleostei

  1. Mechanisms of zinc toxicity in the galaxiid fish, Galaxias maculatus.

    PubMed

    McRae, Nicole K; Gaw, Sally; Glover, Chris N

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential metal, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environments occurring both naturally, and through anthropogenic inputs. This study investigated impacts of sub-lethal Zn exposure in the galaxiid fish Galaxias maculatus. Known as inanga, this amphidromous fish is widespread throughout the Southern hemisphere, but to date almost nothing is known regarding its sensitivity to elevated environmental metals. Fish were exposed to environmentally-relevant concentrations of Zn (control, 8, 270 and 1000?gL(-1)) over 96h. End-points measured included those relating to ionoregulatory disturbance (whole body calcium and sodium influx), oxygen consumption (respirometry), oxidative stress (catalase activity and lipid peroxidation) and whole body accumulation of Zn. Zn exposure caused increases in catalase activity and lipid peroxidation, but only at the highest exposure level tested. Zn also significantly inhibited calcium influx, but stimulated sodium influx, at 1000?gL(-1). The sub-lethal changes induced by Zn exposure in inanga appear to be conserved relative to other, better-studied species. These data are the first to explore the sensitivity of juvenile galaxiid fish to Zn, information that will be critical to ensuring adequate environmental protection of this important species. PMID:26510681

  2. Surviving historical Patagonian landscapes and climate: molecular insights from Galaxias maculatus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The dynamic geological and climatic histories of temperate South America have played important roles in shaping the contemporary distributions and genetic diversity of endemic freshwater species. We use mitochondria and nuclear sequence variation to investigate the consequences of mountain barriers and Quaternary glacial cycles for patterns of genetic diversity in the diadromous fish Galaxias maculatus in Patagonia (~300 individuals from 36 locations). Results Contemporary populations of G. maculatus, east and west of the Andes in Patagonia, represent a single monophyletic lineage comprising several well supported groups. Mantel tests using control region data revealed a strong positive relationship when geographic distance was modeled according to a scenario of marine dispersal. (r = 0.69, P = 0.055). By contrast, direct distance between regions was poorly correlated with genetic distance (r = -0.05, P = 0.463). Hierarchical AMOVAs using mtDNA revealed that pooling samples according to historical (pre-LGM) oceanic drainage (Pacific vs. Atlantic) explained approximately four times more variance than pooling them into present-day drainage (15.6% vs. 3.7%). Further post-hoc AMOVA tests revealed additional genetic structure between populations east and west of the Chilean Coastal Cordillera (coastal vs. interior). Overall female effective population size appears to have remained relatively constant until roughly 0.5 Ma when population size rapidly increased several orders of magnitude [100× (60×-190×)] to reach contemporary levels. Maximum likelihood analysis of nuclear alleles revealed a poorly supported gene tree which was paraphyletic with respect to mitochondrial-defined haplogroups. Conclusions First diversifying in the central/north-west region of Patagonia, G. maculatus extended its range into Argentina via the southern coastal regions that join the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. More recent gene flow between northern populations involved the most ancient and most derived lineages, and was likely facilitated by drainage reversal(s) during one or more cooling events of the late Pleistocene. Overall female effective population size represents the end result of a widespread and several hundred-fold increase over approximately 0.5 Ma, spanning several climatic fluctuations of the Pleistocene. The minor influence of glacial cycles on the genetic structure and diversity of G. maculatus likely reflects the access to marine refugia during repeated bouts of global cooling. Evidence of genetic structure that was detected on a finer scale between lakes/rivers is most likely the result of both biological attributes (i.e., resident non-migratory behavior and/or landlocking and natal homing in diadromous populations), and the Coastal Cordillera as a dispersal barrier. PMID:20211014

  3. A new genus of Cystidicolid nematode from the stomach of Galaxias maculatus (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae) in Patagonia (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Brugni, Norma L; Viozzi, Gustavo P; Fernández, María V; Vega, Rocío M

    2009-02-01

    During a parasitological survey of Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns) from Patagonian Andean Lakes, specimens of a new species of nematode were collected from the stomach of fish and studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. This species is described as the only member of a newly proposed genus of Cystidicolidae by having oral opening dorsoventrally elongated, 2 lateral pseudolabia, 4 cephalic papillae, stoma (vestibule) elongated, esophagus divided into anterior muscular and posterior glandular sections, and caudal alae in males. Placonema n. gen. (Habronematoidea, Cystidicolidae) is characterized by the combination of the following features: oral opening dorsoventrally elongated demarcated by 4 sclerotized plates and 2 well-developed pseudolabia projected to the buccal cavity, each pseudolabium with conspicuous, conical, anterior protuberances. Four cephalic papillae and deirids simple. Male with caudal alae, area rugosa absent, 4 pairs of preanal papillae, unpaired papilla present on anterior cloacal lip, and 6 pairs of postanal papillae. Larvigerous eggs without filaments. Placonema pataguense n. gen. n. sp. infects the stomach of G. maculatus from Lake Patagua (Patagonia, Argentina) and is the first species of Cystidicolidae described from G. maculatus. PMID:18652524

  4. Contrasting Genetic Structure and Diversity of Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1848) Along the Chilean Coast: Stock Identification for Fishery Management.

    PubMed

    González-Wevar, Claudio; Salinas, Pilar; Hüne, Mathias; Segovia, Nicolás; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Oda, Esteban; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Galaxias maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) commonly known as "puye" has a disjunct distribution along the Southern Hemisphere including landlocked and migratory populations at latitudes over 30°S in South America, Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. Chilean artisanal fishery of G. maculatus has become less important as a resource due to multiple factors including overexploitation, pollution, introduction of predators, and competitors. At the same time, the current conservation status of the species in Chile is still uncertain. Here, we used mtDNA control region sequences (925bp) to investigate main patterns of genetic diversity and structure in populations from 2 biogeographic areas along the Chilean coast. Extremely high levels of genetic diversity characterize the species, suggesting a low amount of influence of the last glacial cycle over its demography compared with other studies in freshwater and marine South American fishes. However, we recognized contrasting genetic patterns between the Intermediate Area (between 30°S and 42°S) and the Magellanic Province (between 42°S and 56°S). On the one hand, over a narrow geographical range (<200 km) each Intermediate Area estuarine population constitutes a different genetic unit. On the other hand, the Magellanic populations of the species exhibited low levels of differentiation in an area extending for more than 500 km. Such differences may be a consequence of different coastal configurations, oceanographic regimes, and Quaternary glacial histories. Finally, our results support the existence of different stock units for G. maculatus and this information should be integrated in future management strategies and aquaculture programs for this species. PMID:26245779

  5. Differential expression of Na+, K(+)-ATPase ?-1 isoforms during seawater acclimation in the amphidromous galaxiid fish Galaxias maculatus.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Mauricio A; Schulte, Patricia M; Bystriansky, Jason S; Glover, Chris N

    2013-04-01

    Inanga (Galaxias maculatus) is an amphidromous fish with a well-known capacity to withstand a wide range of environmental salinities. To investigate the molecular mechanisms facilitating acclimation of inanga to seawater, several isoforms of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase ion transporter were identified. This included three ?-1 (a, b and c), an ?-2 and two ?-3 (a and b) isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the inanga ?-1a and ?-1b formed a clade with the ?-1a and ?-1b isoforms of rainbow trout, while another clade contained the ?-1c isoforms of these species. The expression of all the ?-1 isoforms was modulated after seawater exposure (28‰). In gills, the expression of the ?-1a isoform was progressively down-regulated after seawater exposure, while the expression of the ?-1b isoform was up-regulated. The ?-1c isoform behaved similarly to the ?-1a, although changes were less dramatic. Physiological indicators of salinity acclimation matched the time frame of the changes observed at the molecular level. A 24-h osmotic shock period was highlighted by small increases in plasma osmolality, plasma Na(+) and a decrease in muscle tissue water content. Thereafter, these values returned close to their pre-exposure (freshwater) values. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity showed a decreasing trend over the first 72 h following seawater exposure, but activity increased after 240 h. Our results indicate that inanga is an excellent osmoregulator, an ability that is conferred by the rapid activation of physiological and molecular responses to salinity change. PMID:23142926

  6. Phylogeography in Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1848) along Two Biogeographical Provinces in the Chilean Coast.

    PubMed

    González-Wevar, Claudio A; Salinas, Pilar; Hüne, Mathias; Segovia, Nicolás I; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Astorga, Marcela; Cañete, Juan I; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Major geologic and climatic changes during the Quaternary exerted a major role in shaping past and contemporary distribution of genetic diversity and structure of aquatic organisms in southern South America. In fact, the northern glacial limit along the Pacific coast, an area of major environmental changes in terms of topography, currents, and water salinity, represents a major biogeographic transition for marine and freshwater species. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop) to investigate the consequences of Quaternary glacial cycles over the pattern of genetic diversity and structure of G. maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) along two biogeographical provinces in the Chilean coast. Extreme levels of genetic diversity and strong phylogeographic structure characterize the species suggesting a low amount of influence of the last glacial cycle over its demography. However, we recognized contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure between main biogeographical areas here analyzed. Along the Intermediate Area (38°-41° S) each estuarine population constitutes a different unit. In contrast, Magellanic populations (43°-53° S) exhibited low levels of genetic differentiation. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure recorded in the species between the analyzed biogeographic areas are consistent with the marked differences in abiotic factors (i.e., different coastal configurations, Quaternary glacial histories, and oceanographic regimes) and to inherent characteristics of the species (i.e., salt-tolerance, physiology, and reproductive behavior). PMID:26161896

  7. Phylogeography in Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1848) along Two Biogeographical Provinces in the Chilean Coast

    PubMed Central

    González-Wevar, Claudio A.; Salinas, Pilar; Hüne, Mathias; Segovia, Nicolás I.; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Astorga, Marcela; Cañete, Juan I.; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Major geologic and climatic changes during the Quaternary exerted a major role in shaping past and contemporary distribution of genetic diversity and structure of aquatic organisms in southern South America. In fact, the northern glacial limit along the Pacific coast, an area of major environmental changes in terms of topography, currents, and water salinity, represents a major biogeographic transition for marine and freshwater species. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop) to investigate the consequences of Quaternary glacial cycles over the pattern of genetic diversity and structure of G. maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) along two biogeographical provinces in the Chilean coast. Extreme levels of genetic diversity and strong phylogeographic structure characterize the species suggesting a low amount of influence of the last glacial cycle over its demography. However, we recognized contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure between main biogeographical areas here analyzed. Along the Intermediate Area (38°–41° S) each estuarine population constitutes a different unit. In contrast, Magellanic populations (43°–53° S) exhibited low levels of genetic differentiation. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure recorded in the species between the analyzed biogeographic areas are consistent with the marked differences in abiotic factors (i.e., different coastal configurations, Quaternary glacial histories, and oceanographic regimes) and to inherent characteristics of the species (i.e., salt-tolerance, physiology, and reproductive behavior). PMID:26161896

  8. Relationship between fish size and metabolic rate in the oxyconforming inanga Galaxias maculatus reveals size-dependent strategies to withstand hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Mauricio A; Glover, Chris N

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between metabolic rate and body size in animals is unlikely to be a constant but is instead shaped by a variety of intrinsic (i.e., physiological) and extrinsic (i.e., environmental) factors. This study examined the effect of environmental oxygen tension on oxygen consumption as a function of body mass in the galaxiid fish, inanga (Galaxias maculatus). As an oxyconformer, this fish lacks overt intrinsic regulation of oxygen consumption, eliminating this as a factor affecting the scaling relationship at different oxygen tensions. The relationship between oxygen consumption rate and body size was best described by a power function, with an exponent of 0.82, higher than the theoretical values of 0.66 or 0.75. The value of this exponent was significantly altered by environmental P(O2), first increasing as P(O2) decreased and then declining at the lowest P(O2) tested. These data suggest that the scaling exponent is species specific and regulated by extrinsic factors. Furthermore, the external P(O2) at which fish lost equilibrium was related to fish size, an effect explained by the scaling of anaerobic capacity with fish mass. Therefore, although bigger fish were forced to depress aerobic metabolism more rapidly than small fish when exposed to progressive hypoxia, they were better able to enact anaerobic metabolism, potentially extending their survival in hypoxia. PMID:24241070

  9. Modelo de galaxia disco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, M.; Mosconi, M.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar la formación de galaxias anillo, a través de simulaciones numéricas. En el estudio numérico es necesario construir el modelo de una galaxia disco normal, en condición de equilibrio estable, que se ajuste a los parámetros observacionales disponibles de estos objetos. En dicho modelo se considera la galaxia constituída por un halo de materia oscura, un bulge y el disco propiamente dicho. A partir de perfiles de densidad obtenidos de las observaciones, se lleva a cabo la distribución espacial de las partículas, a través del ``Método del rechazo". La asignación de velocidades se realiza considerando que las partículas del disco están aproximadamente en equilibrio rotacional, y se agregan dispersiones de velocidad de acuerdo con el parámetro de Toomre Q=1.5.

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Female seed beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus, remate

    E-print Network

    Gwynne, Darryl T.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Female seed beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus, remate for male-supplied water rather beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus, mate multiply even though association with males and copulations carry through the acquisition of food and water, two material benefits hypothesized to be obtained from

  11. El origen de las galaxias en modelos jerárquicos de formación de la estructura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, J. F.

    En esta charla presentaré una revisión de los modelos corrientes de formación de galaxias. En particular, haré énfasis en el origen de la gran variedad de morfologías galácticas y de las correlaciones entre las propiedades estructurales de discos y esferoides, todo dentro del contexto cosmológico jerárquico provisto por teorías como la de materia oscura fría. En este tipo de teorías las correlaciones observadas entre la luminosidad, velocidad de rotación, momento angular, y tamaño de galaxias son el resultado de la falta de escalas naturales en el proceso de formación de los halos de materia oscura que dichas galaxias habitan. Simulaciones numéricas que incorporan efectos gravitacionales, hidrodinámicos y de formación estelar ilustran estas ideas y demuestran las dificultades que aquejan a modelos donde tanto discos como esferoides son el resultado final de una secuencia de fusiones de sistemas protogalácticos.

  12. Fotometría de grupos compactos de galaxias: Shakhbazian 37, 45, 166, 331 y 362

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, J. M.; Calderón, J. H.; Gimeno, N. G.; Díaz, R. J.

    Continuando con la fotometría CCD de Grupos de Galaxias Compactos de Shakhbazyan (SCGG) en este trabajo se presentan nuevos resultados preliminares sobre los grupos Shakbazyan 37, 45, 166, 331 y 362. EL objeto del proyecto es contribuir al estudio de las propiedades físicas de tales grupos y contribuir a las bases de datos para mejora de las estadísticas. Los datos fueron adquiridos con el Telescopio JKT del Observatorio Norte Europeo. El análisis de las imágenes en las bandas I y B como del índice de color B-I permitió reidentificar las galaxias catalogadas, resultando las mismas muy enrojecidas y verificando que predominan las galaxias tempranas, resultados consistentes con los obtenidos para otros grupos y por otros autores.

  13. Geologic map of the Galaxias quadrangle (MTM 35217) of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Hon, Rene A.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Brick, Eugene E.

    1999-01-01

    The Galaxias region (MTM 35217) is one of a series of 1:500,000-scale science study areas on Mars sponsored by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program. Situated near the northern limit of lava flows associated with Elysium Mons, this region includes a mixture of volcanic and nonvolcanic terrains. The region is also of interest for the fluvial systems that originate along the distal margins of the Elysium lava flows. Resolution of Viking Orbiter images used to prepare the base map ranges from 40 to 160 m/pixel. High-resolution frames (40 to 80 m/pixel) are found in the southeastern part of the map area and along the north edge of the quadrangle, but over half the quadrangle is included in medium-resolution frames (150 m/pixel). Two 8 m/pixel, very high resolution scenes are available (see fig. 1). Interpretation is complicated by variable resolution and sun angles that vary from east to west illumination on different images. Mapping methods and principles are adapted from those developed for lunar photogeologic mapping by Shoemaker and Hackman (1962), refined by Wilhelms (1972), and successfully applied by many workers to a variety of planetary surfaces. Mapping units are distinguished by topography and texture and are ranked by relative age on the basis of superposition and transection relations. Material units are assigned to time-stratigraphic systems defined by Scott and Carr (1978) and Tanaka (1986). This area is included within earlier maps that used Mariner 9 images at 1:5,000,000 scale (Elston, 1979) and globally at 1:25,000,000 scale (Scott and Carr, 1978). Regional maps based on the much higher resolutions of Viking Orbiter allowed more detailed discrimination of materials by Greeley and Guest (1987) at 1:15,000,000 scale and Tanaka and others (1992) at 1:5,000,000 scale. Some map units on this 1:500,000-scale map correspond to, or are partially equivalent to, units on the larger scale maps of Greeley and Guest (1987) and Tanaka and others (1992). Established terminology is used where feasible, but the scale of this map requires that some new units be introduced and that some previous terminology be redefined. Photogeologic methods are limited; therefore, more than one geologic explanation is given for some material units that do not readily lend themselves to an unequivocal interpretation.

  14. Código árbol paralelizado para simulaciones astrofísicas. Experimentos de encuentros de galaxias compuestas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viturro, H. R.; Carpintero, D. D.

    Se describe la implementación de un código árbol octal paralelizado desarrollado por los autores. Este código permite la integración del problema de N--cuerpos simultáneamente en varias computadoras (``cluster''), lo que permite desarrollar altas velocidades de cálculo. Se muestran los resultados de algunas integraciones de encuentros entre galaxias de disco con bulbo y halo, generadas mediante algoritmos no utilizados hasta el momento en este campo.

  15. POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE OF ANOPHELES MACULATUS IN THAILAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anopheles (Cellia) maculatus Theobald is a major malaria vector in southern Thailand and peninsular Malaysia, and previous studies on the population genetics of this mosquito suggested that mountain ranges reduced gene flow among some populations. In this study we examine the genetic variance among...

  16. Phylogenetic Systematics of the Scomberomorus regalis (Teleostei: Scombridae) Species Group: Molecules, Morphology and Biogeography of Spanish Mackerels

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    : Molecules, Morphology and Biogeography of Spanish Mackerels Heidi M. Banford; Eldredge Bermingham; Bruce B (Teleostei: Scombridae) Species Group: Molecules, Morphology and Biogeography of Spanish Mackerels

  17. New cystidicolid species (Nematoda) from Galaxias platei (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae) in Patagonian freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Brugni, Norma L; Viozzi, Gustavo P

    2008-08-01

    During a parasitological survey of Galaxias platei Steindachner, 1898, from Patagonian Andean Lakes, a new species of Cystidicolidae was found in the stomach of fish. The new species was described using light and scanning electron microscopy; the species has characteristics of Ascarophis and is distinguishable from other species by a combination of the following features: well-developed pseudolabia with T-shaped inner extensions, bifurcate deirids, small ratio GE:ME, small left spicule, small ratio LS:RS, and larvigerous eggs with thick and fine filaments in both poles. Intraspecific variation in the morphology of larvigerous eggs was studied. This is the first species of Ascarophis described from freshwater fishes. PMID:18576739

  18. Estudio de la formación de galaxias espirales en un modelo de agregación jerárquica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P.; Saiz, A.; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R.

    El estudio de formación de galaxias espirales ha llevado al desarrollo de numerosos modelos teóricos (e.g. White & Rees 1978). En la actualidad, el modelo más aceptado predice la formación de una galaxia espiral a partir del colapso disipativo del gas en el pozo de potencial de un halo oscuro, conservando su momento angular específco (Fall & Efstathiou 1980). En los últimos años, ha sido posible realizar simulaciones numéricas hidrodinámicas, las cuales describen la evolución conjunta de la materia oscura y los bariones. Estos experimentos han señalado la dificultad de formar estructuras discoidales con propiedades consistentes con las observaciones, en modelos de agregación jerárquica. El problema principal se origina en la pérdida catastrófica de momento angular de la componente disipativa, durante el proceso de ensamblaje de los objetos, a través de la fusión de subestructura (Navarro & Steinmetz 1997). Estos experimentos no incluían procesos de formación estelar. En este trabajo, se expondrán resultados de simulaciones hidrodinámicas cosmológicas, incluyendo formación estelar (Tissera et al 1997), donde ha sido posible reproducir objetos discoidales con contrapartida observacional. El elemento fundamental ha sido la formación de bulbos estelares, los cuales han evitado la pérdida catastrófica de momento angular de los bariones. Se encontró que los discos exponenciales puramente gaseosos son altamente inestables y suceptibles de generar barras, responsables de la pérdida de momento angular y la caída violenta del gas hacia la región central. Estas inestabilidades son fácilmente inducidas durante interacciones y fusiones con objetos vecinos (Barnes & Hernquist 1996). Un bulbo estelar (o un objeto masivo y compacto) estabiliza el disco ante perturbaciones externas, asegurándole un potencial simétrico (Sellwood & Moore 1998, Van der Bosch 1998). En este caso, el gas en el disco no pierde completamente su momento angular intrínseco durante las fusiones, sino que, las sobrevive aportando una contribución distinta de cero, a partir de la cual el disco se regenera acretando en una segunda etapa, gas del halo de acuerdo al modelo tradicional de Fall & Efstathiou.

  19. A novel marker for the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) W chromosome is derived from a Polinton transposon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingchun; Braasch, Ingo; Froschauer, Alexander; Böhne, Astrid; Schultheis, Christina; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    A consensus sequence, encoding a putative DNA polymerase type B derived from a Polinton transposon, was assembled from the sex determination region of Xiphophorus maculatus. This predicted protein, which is 1,158 aa in length, contains a DNA_pol_B_2 domain and a DTDS motif. The DNA polymerase type B gene has about 10 copies in the haploid X. maculatus genome with one Y-specific copy. Interestingly, it has specific copies on the W chromosome in the X. maculatus Usumacinta strain (sex determination with female heterogamety), which represent new markers for this type of sex chromosome in platyfish. This marker with W- and Y-specific copies suggests relationship between different types of gonosomes and allows comparing male and female heterogameties in the platyfish. Further molecular analysis of the DNA polymerase type B gene in X. maculatus will shed new light on the evolution of sex chromosomes in platyfish. PMID:20347827

  20. Mitochondrial and Allozyme Genetics of Incipient Speciation in a Landlocked Population of Galaxias Truttaceus (Pisces: Galaxiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ovenden, J. R.; White, RWG.

    1990-01-01

    Galaxias truttaceus is found in coastal rivers and streams in south-eastern Australia. It spawns at the head of estuaries in autumn and the larvae spend 3 months of winter at sea before returning to fresh water. In Tasmania there are landlocked populations of G. truttaceus in a cluster of geologically young lakes on the recently glaciated Central Plateau. These populations have no marine larval stage and spawn in the lakes in spring. Speciation due to land locking is thought to be a frequent occurrence within Galaxias. To investigate the nature of the speciation event which may be occurring within lake populations of G. truttaceus we studied the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and allozyme diversity of both lake and stream populations. Using the presence or absence of restriction sites recognized by 13 six-base restriction endonucleases, we found 58 mtDNA haplotypes among 150 fish collected from 13 Tasmanian and one south-east Australian mainland stream populations. The most parsimonious network relating the haplotypes by site loss or gain was starlike in shape. We argue that this arrangement is best explained by selection upon slightly beneficial mutations within the mitochondrial genome. Gene diversity analysis under Wright's island model showed that the populations in each drainage were not genetically subdivided. Only two of these stream haplotypes were found among the 66 fish analyzed from four lake populations. Despite the extreme lack of mtDNA diversity in lake populations, the observed nuclear DNA heterozygosity of 40 lake fish (0.10355) was only slightly less than that of 82 stream fish (0.11635). In the short time (3000-7000 years) that the lake fish have been landlocked, random genetic drift in a finite, stable-sized population was probably not responsible for the lack of mtDNA diversity in the lake populations. We infer the lake populations have probably experienced at least one, severe, but transitory bottleneck possibly induced by natural selection for life-history characters essential for survival in the lacustrine habitat. If speciation is occurring in the landlocked populations of G. truttaceus, then it may be driven by genetic transilience. PMID:2155855

  1. Influence of substrate and relative humidity on the efficacy of three entomopathogenic fungi for the hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dermestes maculatus is carrion feeder that is also a pest of poultry houses, museums, silkworm culture, and many stored foods. The Hypocreales, Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, and Isaria fumosorosea, were tested for efficacy against D. maculatus larvae on concrete, plastic, leather, and ...

  2. Abundance of Spanish Mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, in the Southeastern United States Based on Charterboat CPUE Data, 1982-85

    E-print Network

    Abundance of Spanish Mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, in the Southeastern United States Based mackerel, Scombero morus maculatus, a member of the fam ily Scombridae, is closely related to the king mackerel, S. cavalla, the cero, S. regalis, and the recently-described Brazilian Spanish mackerel, S

  3. Why do female Callosobruchus maculatus kick their mates?

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Emile; McNamara, Kathryn B; Simmons, Leigh W

    2014-01-01

    Sexual conflict is now recognised as an important driver of sexual trait evolution. However, due to their variable outcomes and effects on other fitness components, the detection of sexual conflicts on individual traits can be complicated. This difficulty is exemplified in the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, where longer matings increase the size of nutritious ejaculates but simultaneously reduce female future receptivity. While previous studies show that females gain direct benefits from extended mating duration, females show conspicuous copulatory kicking behaviour, apparently to dislodge mating males prematurely. We explore the potential for sexual conflict by comparing several fitness components and remating propensity in pairs of full sibling females where each female mated with a male from an unrelated pair of full sibling males. For one female, matings were terminated at the onset of kicking, whereas the other's matings remained uninterrupted. While fecundity (number of eggs) was similar between treatments, uninterrupted matings enhanced adult offspring numbers and fractionally also longevity. However, females whose matings were interrupted at the onset of kicking exhibited an increased propensity to remate. Since polyandry can benefit female fitness in this species, we argue that kicking, rather than being maladaptive, may indicate that females prefer remating over increased ejaculate size. It may thus be difficult to assess the presence of sexual conflict over contested traits such as mating duration when females face a trade off between direct benefits gained from one mating and indirect benefits from additional matings. PMID:24752530

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Rhinogobio typus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Gobioninae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Shu-Xiang; Xiong, Mei-Hua; Zhu, Bin; Tian, Hua; Liao, Xiao-Lin; Shao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Rhinogobio typus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Gobioninae) was obtained using a PCR-based method. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,608?bp, including 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and a non-coding control region (D-loop), which is similar to that observed in many other reported fishes. The overall-based composition is 31.3% A, 26.6% T, 15.9% G and 26.2% C, with high A?+?T content (57.9%). These results will provide a useful tool for species identification, evolutionary and population genetic studies of R. typus and its related species. PMID:24779592

  5. Localization and analysis of natriuretic peptide receptors in the gills of the toadfish, Opsanus beta (teleostei)

    E-print Network

    Evans, David H.

    Localization and analysis of natriuretic peptide receptors in the gills of the toadfish, Opsanus and analysis of natriuretic peptide receptors in the gills of the toadfish, Opsanus beta (teleostei). Am. JCNP, but residual binding was observed with 1 FM of the type C natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-C) -specific ligand

  6. Reproduction and embryogenesis of the mandi-amarelo catfish, Pimelodus maculatus (Pisces, Pimelodidae), in captivity.

    PubMed

    Arantes, F P; Borçato, F L; Sato, Y; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2013-02-01

    To study reproduction and embryogenesis, Pimelodus maculatus specimens were kept in captivity and captured bimonthly during 1 year. Gonads samples (211 specimens) were collected and submitted to routine histological techniques. Pimelodus maculatus prepared to reproduce when water temperature was high, and even reached advanced maturation but did not spawn in captivity. Spent fish gonads were not documented, and atretic follicles were frequent (60%) in late maturation females. When then submitted to hypophysation, 70% of the females responded positively to hormonal treatment. Oocyte extrusion occurred 8 h after a second hormonal injection at 26°C. The fertilisation rate was 65.1 ± 9.2% at 24°C. Recently spawned oocytes of P. maculatus were spherical, non-adhesive, yellow in colour, with an average diameter of 1113.92 ± 37.02 ?m and covered by a thick gelatinous layer. Blastopore closure occurred 7 h and 30 min after fertilisation. Embryonic development was completed within 18 h after fertilisation. The results of this work provide important knowledge for the handling and cultivation of not only P. maculatus, but other species of potential value for fish culture. PMID:22612443

  7. A cytochemical approach to describe oocyte development in the freshwater ostariophysan, Serrasalmus maculatus (Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani; Wildner, Daniel Dantas; Guimarães-Bassoli, Ariene Cristina Dias

    2014-05-01

    With the intent to provide additional information on the reproductive biology of the ostariophysian fish, the oocyte development in Serrasalmus maculatus is here described under light and electron microscopy by using some cytochemical methods. Our results are discussed considering the cellular processes that drive the oocyte development and comparing to the available information on other groups of fish. Despite the oocyte development to be in general a conserved process, some characteristics of the oocytes of this species come to light. Possibly related to the reproductive strategy of S. maculatus are the absence of oil droplets and the presence of well-developed cortical alveoli. Besides this finding, our results suggest the presence of high content of basic residues in yolk proteins, the presence of acidic polysaccharides in the zona pellucida and a possible involvement of the follicular cells in the steroidogenesis process. PMID:24602268

  8. Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) seed coat phaseolin is detrimental to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus).

    PubMed

    Moraes, R A; Sales, M P; Pinto, M S; Silva, L B; Oliveira, A E; Machado, O L; Fernandes, K V; Xavier-Filho, J

    2000-02-01

    The presence of phaseolin (a vicilin-like 7S storage globulin) peptides in the seed coat of the legume Phaseolus lunatus L. (lima bean) was demonstrated by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Utilizing an artificial seed system assay we showed that phaseolin, isolated from both cotyledon and testa tissues of P. lunatus, is detrimental to the nonhost bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F) (cowpea weevil) with ED50 of 1.7 and 3.5%, respectively. The level of phaseolin in the seed coat (16.7%) was found to be sufficient to deter larval development of this bruchid. The expression of a C. maculatus-detrimental protein in the testa of nonhost seeds suggests that the protein may have played a significant role in the evolutionary adaptation of bruchids to legume seeds. PMID:10657058

  9. Modification of postmortem wounds by Dermestes maculatus (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) activity: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Noelia I; Ferrero, Adriana A; Centeno, Néstor D

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the effects of insect activity on hacking trauma which was inflicted with a small cleaver and a razor blade under controlled conditions. Three pig hooves were each subjected to a blow with a small cleaver and a cut with a razor blade prior to insect exposure. We used Dermestes maculatus DeGeer 1774 species. These beetles made principally depressions and destruction on both wounds, and bites were observed on the edges of the wounds. As time passed and insects fed and refuge, chop marks were deformed and disappeared, taking this less than a month. Thus, D. maculatus could mask postmortem wounds and probably premortem wounds, and so the cause of death. PMID:26352289

  10. UVB-induced gene expression in the skin of Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kuan; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J; Downs, Kevin P; Gaston-Pravia, Kimberly; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Shen, Yingjia; Mitchell, David L; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-06-01

    Xiphophorus fish and interspecies hybrids represent long-standing models to study the genetics underlying spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. The recent release of the Xiphophorus maculatus genome sequence will allow global genetic regulation studies of genes involved in the inherited susceptibility to UVB-induced melanoma within select backcross hybrids. As a first step toward this goal, we report results of an RNA-Seq approach to identify genes and pathways showing modulated transcription within the skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B upon UVB exposure. X. maculatus Jp 163 B were exposed to various doses of UVB followed by RNA-Seq analysis at each dose to investigate overall gene expression in each sample. A total of 357 genes with a minimum expression change of 4-fold (p-adj<0.05) were identified as responsive to UVB. The molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus skin to UVB exposure permitted assessment of; (1) the basal expression level of each transcript for each skin sample, (2) the changes in expression levels for each gene in the transcriptome upon exposure to increasing doses of UVB, and (3) clusters of genes that exhibit similar patterns of change in expression upon UVB exposure. These data provide a foundation for understanding the molecular genetic response of fish skin to UVB exposure. PMID:24556253

  11. Lindane toxicity: histopathological, behavioural and biochemical changes in Etroplus maculatus (Bloch, 1795).

    PubMed

    Bijoy Nandan, S; Nimila, P J

    2012-05-01

    The effects of sub-lethal concentrations of lindane on behavioral, hematological and histological parameters in Etroplus maculatus were investigated. The LC?? value of lindane for E. maculatus was estimated using the Probit method and was found to be 0.028 mg/L. The red blood cell count (RBC) and the hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were significantly reduced (p > 0.0001) in fish exposed to the toxicant concentrations compared to the control groups. However, the white blood cell count (WBC) was observed to be significantly higher (p < 0.0001). Observations of the tissues showed that lindane had profound destructive effects on the gills, liver and kidney of the fish. The gills showed proliferation of the lamellar epithelium and lamellar fusion, the liver showed necrosis and the kidneys had constriction of the tubular lumen. The frequency of observed behaviors had the same levels of significance throughout the period of study. There was a reduction in the frequency of occurrence between test concentrations, but remained significantly higher than the control. The study shows that lindane is harmful to E. maculatus at sub-lethal concentrations and that the application of this pesticide close to bodies of water is a dangerous threat to aquatic life. PMID:22115920

  12. Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of Percocypris (Cyprinidae, Teleostei)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mo; Yang, Jun-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Fierce predatory freshwater fishes, the species of Percocypris (Cyprinidae, Teleostei) inhabit large rivers or lakes, and have a specific distribution pattern. Only a single species or subspecies occurs in each large-scale drainage basin of the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau. In this study, the molecular phylogenetic relationships for all but one of the described subspecies/species of Percocypris were investigated based on three mitochondrial genes (16S; COI; Cyt b) and one nuclear marker (Rag2). The results of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference analyses show that Percocypris is a strongly supported monophyletic group and that it is the sister group of Schizothorax. Combined with analyses of morphological characters, our results suggest that Percocypris needs to be reclassified, and we propose that six species be recognized, with corresponding distributions in five main drainages (including one lake). In addition, based on the results of the estimation of divergence times and ancestral drainages, we hypothesize that Percocypris likely originated in the early Miocene from a paleo-connected drainage system containing the contemporary main drainages of the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau. This study suggests that vicariance (due to the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau modifying the large-scale morphologies of drainage basins in the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau) has played an important role in the speciation of the genus. Furthermore, external morphological characters (such as the length of the fins) and an internal trait (the position of pterygiophore) appear to be correlated with different habitats in rivers and the lake. PMID:23750199

  13. Sex-specific molecular genetic response to UVB exposure in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    PubMed

    Boswell, William; Boswell, Mikki; Titus, James; Savage, Markita; Lu, Yuan; Shen, Jianjun; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    In both Xiphophorus fishes and humans, males are reported to have a higher incidence of melanoma than females. To better understand sex-specific differences in the molecular genetic response to UVB, we performed RNA-Seq experiments in skin of female and male Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B following UVB doses of 8 or 16kJ/m(2) exposure. Male X. maculatus differentially express a significantly larger number of transcripts following exposure to 16kJ/m(2) UVB (1293 genes) compared to 8kJ/m(2) UVB (324 genes). Female skin showed differential gene expression in a larger number of transcripts following 8kJ/m(2) UVB (765) than did males; however, both females and males showed similar numbers of differentially expressed genes at 16kJ/m(2) UVB (1167 and1293, respectively). Although most modulated transcripts after UVB exposure represented the same dominant pathways in both females and males (e.g., DNA repair, circadian rhythm, and fatty acid biosynthesis), we identified genes in several pathways that exhibited opposite modulation in female vs. male skin (e.g., synaptic development, cell differentiation, wound healing, and glucose metabolism). The oppositely modulated genes appear related through uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) that is involved with the regulation of fatty acid oxidation and serves to balance glucose and lipid metabolism. Overall, these results identify gender-specific differences in UVB-induced genetic profiles in the skin of females and males and show female and male X. maculatus respond to UVB differently through pathways involved in reactive oxygen species, wound healing, and energy homeostasis. PMID:26256120

  14. Insecticidal Activity and Chemical Composition of the Morinda lucida Essential Oil against Pulse Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, Moses S.; Ogundajo, Akintayo L.; Ogunwande, Isiaka A.; Yusuff, Olaniyi K.; Flores-Fernandez, Karen Isabel; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Morinda lucida was tested on pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is a pest that causes serious damage to several pulses. The insecticidal activity was compared with two pesticides, Phostoxin and Primo-ban-20. 120 mixed sex adult C. maculatus were introduced, along with 30?g of cowpeas. Four concentrations (0.40, 0.20, 0.10, and 0.05??g/mL) of the M. lucida essential oil, Phostoxin, and Primo-ban-20 were tested. Essential oil chemical composition was analyzed by GC-MS. M. lucida essential oil showed a high toxicological effect, producing 100% mortality after 72 hours at a dose of 0.20??g/mL. M. lucida essential oil had a potent insecticidal activity (LC90 = 0.629??g/mL) compared to both pesticides, Phostoxin (LC90 = 0.652??g/mL) and Primo-ban-20 (LC90 = 0.726??g/mL), at 24?h. The main compounds of the essential oil were the oxygenated monoterpenoids, 1,8-cineole (43.4%), and ?-terpinyl acetate (14.5%), and the monoterpene hydrocarbons, mostly sabinene (8.2%) and ?-pinene (4.0%). Results clearly indicate that M. lucida essential oil can be used as an effective alternative for pulse beetle C. maculatus control, and it could be tested against other pulse beetles affecting Asia and Africa and throughout the world, thereby reducing use of synthetic pesticides. PMID:25143991

  15. Echoes of a distant time: effects of historical processes on contemporary genetic patterns in Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Vera-Escalona, Iván; Habit, Evelyn; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2015-08-01

    Interpreting the genetic structure of a metapopulation as the outcome of gene flow over a variety of timescales is essential for the proper understanding of how changes in landscape affect biological connectivity. Here we contrast historical and contemporary connectivity in two metapopulations of the freshwater fish Galaxias platei in northern and southernmost Patagonia where paleolakes existed during the Holocene and Pleistocene, respectively. Contemporary gene flow was mostly high and asymmetrical in the northern system while extremely reduced in the southernmost system. Historical migration patterns were high and symmetric in the northern system and high and largely asymmetric in the southern system. Both systems showed a moderate structure with a clear pattern of isolation by distance (IBD). Effective population sizes were smaller in populations with low contemporary gene flow. An approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) approach suggests a late Holocene colonization of the lakes in the northern system and recent divergence of the populations from refugial populations from east and west of the Andes. For the southern system, the ABC approach reveals that some of the extant G. platei populations most likely derive from an ancestral population inhabiting a large Pleistocene paleolake while the rest derive from a higher-altitude lake. Our results suggest that neither historical nor contemporary processes individually fully explain the observed structure and geneflow patterns and both are necessary for a proper understanding of the factors that affect diversity and its distribution. Our study highlights the importance of a temporal perspective on connectivity to analyse the diversity of spatially complex metapopulations. PMID:26147523

  16. OfOLITH ULTRASTRUcrURE OF SMOOTH OREO, PSEUDOCYTTUS MACULATUS, AND BLACK OREO, ALWCYTTUS SP., SPECIES

    E-print Network

    OfOLITH ULTRASTRUcrURE OF SMOOTH OREO, PSEUDOCYTTUS MACULATUS, AND BLACK OREO, ALWCYTTUS SP'Udocyttus maculat"U8 and Allocyttus sp. are not suitable for age estimation. The smooth oreo, Pseudocyttus in New Zealand waters, while the smooth oreo is the second-most commonly caught oreo. Little is known

  17. Isolation and characterization of an anti-insect ?-toxin from the venom of the scorpion Isometrus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Tomoyuki; Miyashita, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Im-3 was isolated from the venom of the scorpion Isometrus maculatus through several steps of HPLC fractionation based on the insect paralytic activity. Injecting Im-3 into crickets induced paralysis, but no toxicity was apparent in mice after an intracerebroventricular injection. Im-3 shares sequence similarity to scorpion ?-toxins that specifically affect insect sodium channels. PMID:23291760

  18. Lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Heracleum persicum against the adults of Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Izakmehri, Khadijeh; Saber, Moosa; Mehrvar, Ali; Hassanpouraghdam, Mohammad Bagher; Vojoudi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), is an important pest of stored cowpea, Vigna ungiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae), with ample distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. Many plant essential oils have a broad-spectrum activity against pest insects, and these oils traditionally have been used in the protection of stored products. In this study, the lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) and Heracleum persicum Desf. (Apiales: Apiaceae) were evaluated on the adults of C. maculatus at 26 ± 1° C, 70 ± 5% RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 L:D. The LC50 values of E. camaldulensis and H. persicum were 56.7 and 219.4 µL/L air after 12 hr and 26.1 and 136.4 µL/L air after 24 hr of exposure, respectively. The LT50 values of E. camaldulensis and H.persicum were 6.3 and 10.9 hr, respectively. The results showed that low lethal concentration (LC20) of essential oils negatively affected the longevity, fecundity, and fertility of female adults. The sex ratio of C. maculatus offspring was not significantly affected by essential oils. Therefore, these essential oils can be suggested for controlling C. maculatus in storage systems. The introduction of essential oils into storage systems could potentially decrease seed losses. PMID:24773362

  19. Oviposition of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, the hide beetle, as affected by biological and environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to document the oviposition behaviors and preferences of the female hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, in order to optimize collection of eggs and neonate larvae for biological assays. Factors evaluated were type of oviposition substrate, preference for and type of p...

  20. Effect of diet and refugia on development of Dermestes maculatus DeGeer reared in a laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hide beetle (Dermestes maculatus DeGeer) is a Dermestid beetle that can infest a wide variety of stored products, including pet foods and animal feeds, dried foods, and grains products with high protein content. Although there is published information concerning the biology and habits of D. macu...

  1. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Essential Oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Heracleum persicum Against the Adults of Callosobruchus Maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Izakmehri, Khadijeh; Saber, Moosa; Mehrvar, Ali; Hassanpouraghdam, Mohammad Bagher; Vojoudi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), is an important pest of stored cowpea, Vigna ungiculata (L.) Walpers (Fabales: Fabaceae), with ample distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. Many plant essential oils have a broad-spectrum activity against pest insects, and these oils traditionally have been used in the protection of stored products. In this study, the lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) and Heracleum persicum Desf. (Apiales: Apiaceae) were evaluated on the adults of C. maculatus at 26 ± 1° C, 70 ± 5% RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 L:D. The LC50 values of E. camaldulensis and H. persicum were 56.7 and 219.4 µL/L air after 12 hr and 26.1 and 136.4 µL/L air after 24 hr of exposure, respectively. The LT50 values of E. camaldulensis and H.persicum were 6.3 and 10.9 hr, respectively. The results showed that low lethal concentration (LC20) of essential oils negatively affected the longevity, fecundity, and fertility of female adults. The sex ratio of C. maculatus offspring was not significantly affected by essential oils. Therefore, these essential oils can be suggested for controlling C. maculatus in storage systems. The introduction of essential oils into storage systems could potentially decrease seed losses. PMID:24773362

  2. Molecular analysis of the sex-determining region of the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Christina; Zhou, Qingchun; Froschauer, Alexander; Nanda, Indrajit; Selz, Yvonne; Schmidt, Cornelia; Matschl, Sabine; Wenning, Marina; Veith, Anne-Marie; Naciri, Mariam; Hanel, Reinhold; Braasch, Ingo; Dettai, Agnès; Böhne, Astrid; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Couloux, Arnaud; Bernard-Samain, Sylvie; Schmid, Michael; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Due to the presence of genetically well-defined sex chromosomes, with a relatively restricted sex-determination region containing markers identified at the molecular level, the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus is one of the best models for the positional cloning of a master sex-determining gene in fish. Both male and female heterogametes and three different types of sex chromosomes have been described in the platyfish, with several loci involved in pigmentation, melanoma formation, and sexual maturity closely linked to the master sex-determining locus. Using the melanoma-inducing oncogene Xmrk, its protooncogenic counterpart egfrb, as well as other X- and Y-linked molecular markers, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs have been assembled for the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, which was mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization to the subtelomeric region of the sex chromosomes. Initial sequence analysis of these contigs revealed several gene candidates and uncovered syntenies with different mammalian and chicken autosomes, supporting an independent origin of sex chromosomes in platyfish and tetrapods. Strikingly, the sex determination region of the platyfish is very instable and frequently undergoes duplications, deletions, and transpositions. This instability might be linked to the high genetic variability affecting sex determination and other sex-linked traits in Xiphophorus. PMID:18377211

  3. Intron-loss evolution of hatching enzyme genes in Teleostei

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme, belonging to the astacin metallo-protease family, digests egg envelope at embryo hatching. Orthologous genes of the enzyme are found in all vertebrate genomes. Recently, we found that exon-intron structures of the genes were conserved among tetrapods, while the genes of teleosts frequently lost their introns. Occurrence of such intron losses in teleostean hatching enzyme genes is an uncommon evolutionary event, as most eukaryotic genes are generally known to be interrupted by introns and the intron insertion sites are conserved from species to species. Here, we report on extensive studies of the exon-intron structures of teleostean hatching enzyme genes for insight into how and why introns were lost during evolution. Results We investigated the evolutionary pathway of intron-losses in hatching enzyme genes of 27 species of Teleostei. Hatching enzyme genes of basal teleosts are of only one type, which conserves the 9-exon-8-intron structure of an assumed ancestor. On the other hand, otocephalans and euteleosts possess two types of hatching enzyme genes, suggesting a gene duplication event in the common ancestor of otocephalans and euteleosts. The duplicated genes were classified into two clades, clades I and II, based on phylogenetic analysis. In otocephalans and euteleosts, clade I genes developed a phylogeny-specific structure, such as an 8-exon-7-intron, 5-exon-4-intron, 4-exon-3-intron or intron-less structure. In contrast to the clade I genes, the structures of clade II genes were relatively stable in their configuration, and were similar to that of the ancestral genes. Expression analyses revealed that hatching enzyme genes were high-expression genes, when compared to that of housekeeping genes. When expression levels were compared between clade I and II genes, clade I genes tends to be expressed more highly than clade II genes. Conclusions Hatching enzyme genes evolved to lose their introns, and the intron-loss events occurred at the specific points of teleostean phylogeny. We propose that the high-expression hatching enzyme genes frequently lost their introns during the evolution of teleosts, while the low-expression genes maintained the exon-intron structure of the ancestral gene. PMID:20796321

  4. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products

    PubMed Central

    Tiroesele, Bamphitlhi; Thomas, Kesegofetse; Seketeme, Seipati

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F1 progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils’ damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions. PMID:26463066

  5. Genetic characterization of the Neotropical catfish Pimelodus maculatus (Pimelodidae, Siluriformes) in the Upper Uruguay River.

    PubMed

    Ribolli, Josiane; de Melo, Cláudio Manoel Rodrigues; Zaniboni-Filho, Evoy

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater fish present unique challenges when one attempts to understand the factors that determine the structure of their populations. Habitat fragmentation is a leading cause of population decline that threatens ecosystems worldwide. In this study, we investigated the conservation status of genetic variability in the Neotropical catfish (Pimelodus maculatus). Specifically, we examined the structure and genetic diversity of this species in a region of the Upper Uruguay River fragmented by natural barriers and dams. There was no genetic structure among the four sites analyzed, indicating the existence of only one population group. A combination of environmental management and genetic monitoring should be used to minimize the impact of impoundment on panmitic populations of migratory fish species. PMID:23271936

  6. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products.

    PubMed

    Tiroesele, Bamphitlhi; Thomas, Kesegofetse; Seketeme, Seipati

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F? progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils' damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions. PMID:26463066

  7. Genetic characterization of the Neotropical catfish Pimelodus maculatus (Pimelodidae, Siluriformes) in the Upper Uruguay River

    PubMed Central

    Ribolli, Josiane; de Melo, Cláudio Manoel Rodrigues; Zaniboni-Filho, Evoy

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater fish present unique challenges when one attempts to understand the factors that determine the structure of their populations. Habitat fragmentation is a leading cause of population decline that threatens ecosystems worldwide. In this study, we investigated the conservation status of genetic variability in the Neotropical catfish (Pimelodus maculatus). Specifically, we examined the structure and genetic diversity of this species in a region of the Upper Uruguay River fragmented by natural barriers and dams. There was no genetic structure among the four sites analyzed, indicating the existence of only one population group. A combination of environmental management and genetic monitoring should be used to minimize the impact of impoundment on panmitic populations of migratory fish species. PMID:23271936

  8. The genome of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, provides insights into evolutionary adaptation and several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B.; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Catchen, Julian; Amores, Angel; Braasch, Ingo; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Bisazza, Angelo; Minx, Pat; Hillier, LaDeana; Wilson, Richard K.; Fuerstenberg, Susan; Boore, Jeffrey; Searle, Steve; Postlethwait, John H.; Warren, Wesley C.

    2013-01-01

    Several attributes intuitively considered to be typical mammalian features, such as complex behavior, live birth, and malignant diseases like cancer, also appeared several times independently in so-called “lower” vertebrates. The genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of these elaborate traits are poorly understood. The platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, offers a unique model to better understand the molecular biology of such traits. Herein we detail sequencing of the platyfish genome. Integrating genome assembly with extensive genetic maps uncovered that fish, in contrast to mammals, exhibit an unexpected evolutionary stability of chromosomes. Genes associated with viviparity show signatures of positive selection identifying new putative functional domains and rare cases of parallel evolution. We also discovered that genes implicated in cognition possess an unexpected high rate of duplicate gene retention after the teleost genome duplication suggesting a hypothesis for the evolution of the great behavioral complexity in fish, which exceeds that in amphibians and reptiles. PMID:23542700

  9. The genome of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, provides insights into evolutionary adaptation and several complex traits.

    PubMed

    Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Catchen, Julian; Amores, Angel; Braasch, Ingo; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Bisazza, Angelo; Minx, Pat; Hillier, LaDeana; Wilson, Richard K; Fuerstenberg, Susan; Boore, Jeffrey; Searle, Steve; Postlethwait, John H; Warren, Wesley C

    2013-05-01

    Several attributes intuitively considered to be typical mammalian features, such as complex behavior, live birth and malignant disease such as cancer, also appeared several times independently in lower vertebrates. The genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of these elaborate traits are poorly understood. The platyfish, X. maculatus, offers a unique model to better understand the molecular biology of such traits. We report here the sequencing of the platyfish genome. Integrating genome assembly with extensive genetic maps identified an unexpected evolutionary stability of chromosomes in fish, in contrast to in mammals. Genes associated with viviparity show signatures of positive selection, identifying new putative functional domains and rare cases of parallel evolution. We also find that genes implicated in cognition show an unexpectedly high rate of duplicate gene retention after the teleost genome duplication event, suggesting a hypothesis for the evolution of the behavioral complexity in fish, which exceeds that found in amphibians and reptiles. PMID:23542700

  10. Molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus maculatus-X. couchianus interspecies hybrid skin to UVB exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Bowswell, Mikki; Bowswell, William; Yang, Kuan; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic and genetic similarities between Xiphophorus and human melanoma render Xiphophorus a useful animal model for studying the genetic basis of melanoma etiology. In the Xiphophorus model, melanoma has been shown to be inducible by ultraviolet light (UVB) exposure among interspecies hybrids, but not in parental line fish similarly treated. This leads to questions of what genes are responsive to UVB exposure in the skin of the interspecies hybrids, as well as how parental alleles in hybrids may be differentially regulated and the potential roles they may play in induced melanomagenesis. To address these questions, we produced X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus (Sp-Couch) F1 hybrid fish, exposed both hybrid and parental fish to UVB, and performed gene expression profiling of the skin using RNA-Seq methodology. We characterized a group of unique UVB-responsive genes in Sp-Couch hybrid including dct, pmela, tyr, tyrp1a, slc2a11b, rab38a, rab27, tspan10, slc45a2, oca2, slc24a5, ptn and mitfa. These genes are associated with melanin production and melanocyte proliferation. They were also up-regulated in Sp-Couch hybrid, indicating that their UVB response is hybridization initiated. In the hybrid, several melanin production and pigmentation related genes, including slc45a2, tspan10, dct, slc2a11b and ptn showed either X. couchianus or X. maculatus allele specific expression. The finding that these genes exhibit allele specific expression regulatory mechanisms in Sp-Couch hybrids, but do not exhibit a corresponding UVB response in either one of the parental fishes, may suggest UVB targets and imply mechanisms regarding the susceptibility of Sp-Couch to induced melanomagenesis. PMID:26254713

  11. Efficacy of nanostructured silica as a stored pulse protector against the infestation of bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Ganesh; Velayutham, Veeramani; Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles (SNPs) with the pulse seeds of Cajanus cajan, Macrotyloma uniflorum, Vigna mungo, Vigna radiata, Cicer arietinum and Vigna unguiculata against the infestation of stored pulse beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus revealed a significant reduction in oviposition, adult emergence and seed damage potential. There was a complete retardation of growth of this beetle in the treated seeds of C. cajan. SNP-treated seeds of these six varieties of pulses revealed no effect on the growth of seeds as revealed by seed germination, growth rate of root and shoot. Similarly, the soil microflora measured in terms of colony forming units was not affected by silica nanoparticles upon its treatment with pulse seeds. The results of this study thus clearly demonstrated the useful nature of silica nanoparticles as seed protecting agent for the control of C. maculatus.

  12. Morphological and molecular data reveal a new species of Neoechinorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from Dormitator maculatus in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pinacho-Pinacho, Carlos Daniel; Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; García-Varela, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) mexicoensis sp. n. is described from the intestine of Dormitator maculatus (Bloch 1792) collected in 5 coastal localities from the Gulf of Mexico. The new species is mainly distinguished from the other 33 described species of Neoechinorhynchus from the Americas associated with freshwater, marine and brackish fishes by having smaller middle and posterior hooks and possessing a small proboscis with three rows of six hooks each, apical hooks longer than other hooks and extending to the same level as the posterior hooks, 1 giant nucleus in the ventral body wall and females with eggs longer than other congeneric species. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA including the domain D2+D3 were used independently to corroborate the morphological distinction among the new species and other congeneric species associated with freshwater and brackish water fish from Mexico. The genetic divergence estimated among congeneric species ranged from 7.34 to 44% for ITS and from 1.65 to 32.9% for LSU. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses with each dataset showed that the 25 specimens analyzed from 5 localities of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico parasitizing D. maculatus represent an independent clade with strong bootstrap support and posterior probabilities. The morphological evidence, plus the monophyly in the phylogenetic analyses, indicates that the acanthocephalans collected from intestine of D. maculatus from the Gulf of Mexico represent a new species, herein named N. (N.) mexicoensis sp. n. PMID:25064596

  13. Habitat characterization and mapping of Anopheles maculatus (Theobald) mosquito larvae in malaria endemic areas in Kuala Lipis, Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rohani, A; Wan Najdah, W M A; Zamree, I; Azahari, A H; Mohd Noor, I; Rahimi, H; Lee, H L

    2010-07-01

    In Peninsular Malaysia, a large proportion of malaria cases occur in the central mountainous and forested parts of the country. As part of a study to assess remote sensing data as a tool for vector mapping, we conducted entomological surveys to determine the type of mosquitoes, their characteristics and the abundance of habitats of the vector Anopheles maculatus in malaria endemic areas in Pos Senderot. An. maculatus mosquitoes were collected from 49 breeding sites in Pos Senderot. An. maculatus preferred to breed in water pockets formed on the bank of rivers and waterfalls. The most common larval habitats were shallow pools 5.0-15.0 cm deep with clear water, mud substrate and plants or floatage. The mosquito also preferred open or partially shaded habitats. Breeding habitats were generally located at 100-400 m from the nearest human settlement. Changes in breeding characteristics were also observed. Instead of breeding in slow flowing streams, most larvae bred in small water pockets along the river margin. PMID:21073056

  14. The toxicity of a lipid transfer protein (Cc-LTP1) from Coffea canephora Seeds on the larval development of Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Zottich, Umberto; Da Cunha, Maura; Dias, Germana B; Rabelo, Guilherme R; Oliveira, Antonia Elenir A; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski S; do Nascimento, Viviane V; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we analyzed the effects of coffee seed proteins, especially Cc-LTP1 on the larval development of Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), a bruchid pest of beans and the most important insect pest of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Artificial seed assay, which incorporated the F/0-90 fraction from Coffea canephora seeds, resulted in the reduction of oviposition and caused an inhibition of C. maculatus larval development in a dose-dependent manner. The F/0-90 fraction used at a 4 % concentration resulted in the survival of no larvae. The purified Cc-LTP1, at a concentration of 0.5 %, also demonstrated effective inhibition of larval development, reducing both females oviposition and the weight and number of larvae. Cc-LTP1 was also able to inhibit the C. maculatus gut ?-amylase activity, and immunolabeling by an anti-LTP serum was observed in the midgut tissues of the C. maculatus larvae. Cc-LTP1 has shown binding affinity towards microvillar cells, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, as demonstrated by micrographic images taken by a transmission electron microscope. The results from this study indicate that Cc-LTP1 has insecticidal actions toward C. maculatus and exerts anti-nutritional effects with direct actions on intestinal tissues. PMID:25097041

  15. The importance of carcass volatiles as attractants for the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus (De Geer).

    PubMed

    von Hoermann, C; Ruther, J; Reibe, S; Madea, B; Ayasse, M

    2011-10-10

    A decaying cadaver emits volatile organic compounds that are used by necrophilous and necrophagous insects in order to find their brood substrate. Although volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are released by carcasses have been identified, little is known about the specific compounds that are used by these insects while searching for a brood substrate. Therefore, we have investigated the chemical ecology involved in the attraction of the necrophagous hide beetle Dermestes maculatus, which feeds as an adult and larva upon decomposing carcasses. Our aims have been to identify the responsible compounds in the odours of the carcass that are important for the attraction of the beetles. Furthermore, we have studied sex- and age-related differences in beetle attraction and tested whether the hide beetle can distinguish between various stages of decomposition by means of the emitted odours. Headspace collection of volatiles released from piglet carcasses (bloated stage, post-bloating stage, advanced decay and dry remains), coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), gas chromatography with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and bioassays were conducted to identify the volatiles responsible for the attraction of the beetles. Freshly emerged male beetles were attracted by the odour of piglets in the post-bloating stage (9 days after death; T(mean) = 27 °C) and the EAD-active compound benzyl butyrate. Statistical analysis revealed a higher relative proportion of benzyl butyrate in the odour bouquet of the post-bloating stage in comparison with the other stages. We therefore conclude that this compound plays an important role in the attraction of hide beetles to carcass odour. This underlines the potential use of D. maculatus for the estimation of the post mortem interval. The decomposition stage at which the female beetles are attracted to the odour of a cadaver remains unknown, as does the nature of this attraction. Pheromones (sexual or aggregation pheromones) might play an essential role correlated with their attraction to carrion and consequently with their attraction to the substrate for mating and ovipositioning. PMID:21741784

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of Taiwanese spined loach Cobitis cf. sinensis (Teleostei: Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Shiung; Wang, Chih-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of Taiwanese spined loach, Cobitis cf. sinensis Sauvage and Dabry de Thiersant (Teleostei: Cobitidae) from northern Taiwan has been amplified and sequenced by employing long polymerase chain reaction method. The mitogenome, consisting of 16,553?bp, had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and a non-coding control region (CR). CR of 914?bp length is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the loach is 29.9% for A, 25.9% for C, 27.8% for T and 16.3% for G, with a slight AT bias of 57.7%. The complete mitogenome may provide rather essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic analysis for not only congeneric species but also higher different taxa of the loaches. PMID:24409842

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Taiwanese barbel steed, Hemibarbus schlegelii (Günther) (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Shiung; Liao, Chiao-Ru; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of cyprinid fish, Taiwanese barbel steed, Hemibarbus schlegelii (Günther, 1868) (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) has been amplified and sequenced by employing long polymerase chain reaction method. The mitogenome, consisting of 16,612?bp, had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and a non-coding control region (CR). CR of 933?bp length is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of Hemibarbus schlegelii is 29.9% for A, 27.2% for C, 25.9% for T and 17.0% for G, with a slight AT bias of 55.8%. The complete mitogenome may provide rather essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic analysis for not only congeneric species but also higher different taxa of Cyprinid fishes. PMID:24409841

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hainanese barbel steed Hemibarbus medius Yue (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Shiung; Liao, Chiao-Ru; Shao, Yi-Ta

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of cyprinid fish, Hainanese barbel steed, Hemibarbus medius Yue (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) has been amplified and sequenced by employing long polymerase chain reaction method. The mitogenome, consisting of 16,614 base pairs (bp), had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and a non-coding control region (CR). CR of 933?bp length is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of Hemibarbus medius is 29.8% for A, 27.2% for C, 25.9% for T and 17.1% for G, with a slight AT bias of 55.7%. The complete mitogenome may provide rather essential and important DNA molecular data for further phylogenetic analysis for not only congeneric species but also higher different taxa of Cyprinid fishes. PMID:24460168

  19. Lipid status of the two high latitude fish species, Leptoclinus maculatus and Lumpenus fabricii.

    PubMed

    Murzina, Svetlana A; Nefedova, Zinaida A; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Ripatti, Pauli O; Ruokolainen, Tatiana R; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N; Nemova, Nina N

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of the lipid status (i.e., the total lipid and phospholipid concentrations and the percentage of fatty acids of the total lipids) of adult specimens of daubed shanny (Leptoclinus maculatus) from Svalbard waters (Isfjord) and slender eel blenny (Lumpenus fabricii) from the White Sea (Onega Bay and Tersky shore) was performed to study the metabolism and functions of lipids of these fishes in ontogeny and under various ecological conditions. Slender eel blenny from both areas of the White Sea were distinguished by a high level of sphingomyelin compared with the daubed shanny from Svalbard, and the amount of total phospholipids was higher in slender eel blenny from Onega Bay than in slender eel blenny from the Tersky shore. The extent of saturation and the signature of polyenic fatty acids varied according to the specific species of the Stichaeidae family under study. These results demonstrate the differences in the trophoecological and hydrobiological conditions of habitations of these species and highlighted the importance of considering certain trends in the lipid profiles of these fishes as specific features of the organization of the ecological and biochemical mechanisms of adaptation. PMID:23535338

  20. Molecular genetic response to varied wavelengths of light in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Boswell, William T; Boswell, Mikki; Caballero, Kaela L; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    Xiphophorus fishes represent a model often utilized to study UVB induced tumorigenesis. Recently, varied genetic responses to UVB exposure have been documented in the skin of female and male Xiphophorus, as have differences in UVB response in the skin of different parental species and for interspecies hybrids produced from crossing them. Additionally, it has been shown that exposure to "cool white" fluorescent light induces a shift in the genetic profiles of Xiphophorus skin that is nearly as robust as the UVB response, but involves a fundamentally different set of genes. Given these results and the use of Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as an experimental model for UVB inducible melanoma, it is of interest to characterize genes that may be transcriptionally modulated in a wavelength specific manner. The global molecular genetic response of skin upon exposure of the intact animal to specific wavelengths of light has not been investigated. Herein, we report results of RNA-Seq experiments from the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B following exposure to varied 50nm wavelengths of light ranging from 300-600nm. We identify two specific wavelength regions, 350-400nm (88 genes) and 500-550nm (276 genes), that exhibit transcriptional modulation of a significantly greater number of transcripts than any of the other 50nm regions in the 300-600nm range. Observed functional sets of genes modulated within these two transcriptionally active light regions suggest different mechanisms of gene modulation. PMID:26460196

  1. Feast to famine: The effects of food quality and quantity on the gut structure and function of a detritivorous catfish (Teleostei: Loricariidae)

    E-print Network

    Evans, David H.

    of a detritivorous catfish (Teleostei: Loricariidae) Donovan P. German , Daniel T. Neuberger, Meaghan N. Callahan quality on the structure and function of the GI tract in a detritivorous catfish, Pterygoplichthys tract. The catfish family Loricariidae is diverse--nearly 700 described spec

  2. COWPEA WEEVIL (CALLOSOBRUCHUS MACULATUS) FLIGHTS TO A POINT SOURCE OF FEMALE SEX PHEROMONE: ANALYSES OF FLIGHT TRACKS AT THREE WIND SPEEDS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-day-old male cowpea weevils, Callosobruchus maculatus, were released individually and flew upwind to a point source of female sex pheromone at three wind speeds. All beetles initiating flight along the pheromone plumes made contact with the pheromone source. Analysis of digitized flight tracks i...

  3. Sexual size and shape dimorphism and allometric scaling patterns in head traits in the New Zealand common gecko Woodworthia maculatus.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Clint D

    2015-08-01

    Sexual dimorphism in shape and size is widespread across animal taxa and arises when natural or sexual selection operates differently on the sexes. Male and female common geckos (Woodworthia maculatus; formerly Hoplodactylus maculatus) in New Zealand do not appear to experience different viability selection pressure, nor do males appear to be under intense pre-copulatory sexual selection. It was therefore predicted that this species would be sexually monomorphic with regard to body size and the size and shape of the head. In line with the prediction, there was no sexual difference in head width, depth, or length or in lateral head shape. However, contrary to prediction, males had a larger body and lateral head size than females. This study suggests that males, at least on Maud Island, NZ, might be under stronger pre-copulatory sexual selection than previously recognized and thus have evolved larger heads (i.e. lateral head size) for use in male combat for females. Allometric scaling patterns do not differ between the sexes and suggest that head width and depth are under directional selection whereas lateral head size is under stabilizing selection. Diet ecology - an agent of natural selection common to both sexes - is likely largely responsible for the observed patterns of head size and shape and the lack of sexual dimorphism in them. PMID:25958103

  4. Efficacy of Plectranthus glandulosus (Lamiaceae) and Callistemon rigidus (Myrtaceae) Leaf Extract Fractions to Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Younoussa, Lame; Adler, Cornel; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    As part of on-going efforts to use eco-friendly alternatives to chemical pesticides, methanol crude extracts of Plectranthus glandulosus and Callistemon rigidus leaves were sequentially fractionated in hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol to establish the most active fraction(s) against Callosobruchus maculatus in cowpea. Cowpea seeds (25?g) were treated with 0.5, 1, 2, and 4?g/kg of extract to evaluate the contact toxicity and F1 progeny production of the beetles in the laboratory. Mortality was recorded 1, 3, and 7 d postexposure. P. glandulosus hexane fraction was more toxic than the other fractions recording 100% mortality at 4?g/kg, within 7 d with LC50 of 0.39?g/kg. Hexane fraction of C. rigidus showed superior toxicity, causing 100% mortality at 4?g/kg within only 1 d of exposure with LC50 of 1.02?g/kg. All the fractions greatly reduced progeny emergence, with C. rigidus hexane fraction being the best progeny inhibitor. Fractions of P. glandulosus and C. rigidus leaves had sufficient efficacy to be a component of storage pest management package for C. maculatus. PMID:26443776

  5. Efficacy of Plectranthus glandulosus (Lamiaceae) and Callistemon rigidus (Myrtaceae) Leaf Extract Fractions to Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Younoussa, Lame; Adler, Cornel; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2015-01-01

    As part of on-going efforts to use eco-friendly alternatives to chemical pesticides, methanol crude extracts of Plectranthus glandulosus and Callistemon rigidus leaves were sequentially fractionated in hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol to establish the most active fraction(s) against Callosobruchus maculatus in cowpea. Cowpea seeds (25?g) were treated with 0.5, 1, 2, and 4?g/kg of extract to evaluate the contact toxicity and F1 progeny production of the beetles in the laboratory. Mortality was recorded 1, 3, and 7 d postexposure. P. glandulosus hexane fraction was more toxic than the other fractions recording 100% mortality at 4?g/kg, within 7 d with LC50 of 0.39?g/kg. Hexane fraction of C. rigidus showed superior toxicity, causing 100% mortality at 4?g/kg within only 1 d of exposure with LC50 of 1.02?g/kg. All the fractions greatly reduced progeny emergence, with C. rigidus hexane fraction being the best progeny inhibitor. Fractions of P. glandulosus and C. rigidus leaves had sufficient efficacy to be a component of storage pest management package for C. maculatus. PMID:26443776

  6. Potential of the Lectin/Inhibitor Isolated from Crataeva tapia Bark (CrataBL) for Controlling Callosobruchus maculatus Larva Development.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Natalia N S; Ferreira, Rodrigo S; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A; de Sá, Leonardo F R; de Oliveira, Antônia Elenir A; Correia, Maria Tereza Dos S; Paiva, Patrícia Maria G; Wlodawer, Alexander; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2015-12-01

    Callosobruchus maculatus is an important predator of cowpeas. Due to infestation during storage, this insect affects the quality of seed and crop yield. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CrataBL, a multifunction protein isolated from Crataeva tapia bark, on C. maculatus larva development. The protein, which is stable even in extreme pH conditions, showed toxic activity, reducing the larval mass 45 and 70% at concentrations of 0.25 and 1.0% (w/w), respectively. Acting as an inhibitor, CrataBL decreased by 39% the activity of cysteine proteinases from larval gut. Conversely, the activity of serine proteinases was increased about 8-fold. The toxic properties of CrataBL may also be attributed to its capacity of binding to glycoproteins or glycosaminoglycans. Such binding interferes with larval metabolism, because CrataBL-FITC was found in the fat body, Malpighian tubules, and feces of larvae. These results demonstrate the potential of this protein for controlling larva development. PMID:26568149

  7. Variant vicilins from a resistant Vigna unguiculata lineage (IT81D-1053) accumulate inside Callosobruchus maculatus larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriel B; Kunz, Daniele; Peres, Tanara V; Leal, Rodrigo B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Carlini, Célia R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Terra, Walter R; Xavier-Filho, José; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that variant vicilins are the main resistance factor of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata) against attack by the cowpea beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. There is evidence that the toxic properties of these storage proteins may be related to their interaction with glycoproteins and other microvillar membrane constituents along the digestive tract of the larvae. New findings have shown that following interaction with the microvilli, the vicilins are absorbed across the intestinal epithelium and thus reach the internal environment of the larvae. In the present paper we studied the insecticidal activity of the variant vicilins purified from a resistant cowpea variety (IT81D-1053). Bioassays showed that the seeds of this genotype affected larval growth, causing developmental retardation and 100% mortality. By feeding C. maculatus larvae on susceptible and IT81D-1053 derived vicilins (FITC labelled or unlabelled), followed by fluorescence and immunogold cytolocalization, we were able to demonstrate that both susceptible and variant forms are internalized in the midgut cells and migrate inside vesicular structures from the apex to the basal portion of the enterocytes. However, when larvae were fed with the labelled vicilins for 24h and then returned to a control diet, the concentration of the variant form remained relatively high, suggesting that variant vicilins are not removed from the cells at the same rate as the non-variant vicilins. We suggest that the toxic effects of variant vicilins on midgut cells involve the binding of these proteins to the cell surface followed by internalization and interference with the normal physiology of the enterocytes, thereby affecting larval development in vivo. PMID:24220155

  8. Genetic characterization of hatchery populations of Korean spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) using multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    An, H S; Kim, H Y; Kim, J B; Chang, D S; Park, K D; Lee, J W; Myeong, J I; An, C M

    2014-01-01

    The spotted sea bass, Lateolabrax maculatus, is an important commercial and recreational fishery resource in Korea. Aquacultural production of this species has increased because of recent resource declines, growing consumption, and ongoing government-operated stock release programs. Therefore, the genetic characterization of hatchery populations is necessary to maintain the genetic diversity of this species and to develop more effective aquaculture practices. In this study, the genetic diversity and structure of three cultured populations in Korea were assessed using multiplex assays with 12 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci; 144 alleles were identified. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 6 to 28, with an average of 13.1. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.724 and 0.753, respectively. Low levels of inbreeding were detected according to the inbreeding coefficient (mean FIS = 0.003-0.073). All hatchery populations were significantly differentiated from each other (overall fixation index (FST) = 0.027, P < 0.01), and no population formed a separate cluster. Pairwise multilocus FST tests, estimates of genetic distance, mantel test, and principal component analyses did not show a consistent relationship between geographic and genetic distances. These results could reflect the exchange of breeds and eggs between hatcheries and/or genetic drift due to intensive breeding practices. For optimal resource management, the genetic variation of hatchery stocks should be monitored and inbreeding controlled within the spotted sea bass stocks that are being released every year. This genetic information will be useful for the management of both L. maculatus fisheries and the aquaculture industry. PMID:25177950

  9. Comparative toxicity and micronuclei formation in Tribolium castaneum, Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus oryzae exposed to high doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehrdad; Mozdarani, Hossein; Abd-Alla, Adly M M

    2015-07-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on mortality and micronucleus formation in Tribolium castaneum Herbst, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) genital cells were evaluated. Two groups of healthy and active adult insects 1-3 and 8-10 days old were irradiated with various doses (50-200 Gy) gamma ray. Seven days post-irradiation; mortality rates and micronucleus formation were assessed in genital cells of the irradiated insects. The results show that with increasing gamma doses, the mortality rate of each species increased and T. castaneum and S. oryzae showed the low and high sensitivity respectively. It was shown that the micronucleus appearance in the tested insects had correlation with amount and intensity of radiation doses. Moreover our results indicate different levels in the genotoxicity of gamma radiation among the insects' genital cells under study. The frequency of micronuclei in genital cells of 1-3 days old insects exposed to 50 and 200 Gy were 12.6 and 38.8 Mn/1000 cells in T. castaneum, 20.8 and 46.8 Mn/1000 cells in C. maculatus and 16.8 and 57.2 Mn/1000 cells in S. oryzae respectively. A high sensitivity of the genital cells to irradiation exposure was seen in S. oryzae correlated with its high mortality rate compared with the other two species. These results might be indicative of inflicting chromosomal damage expressed as micronucleus in high mortality rates observed in the pest population; an indication of genotoxic effects of radiation on the studied species. PMID:25898238

  10. New species of Cerambycinae from the Neotropical Region, and nomen novum for Anelaphus maculatus Galileo, Martins, and Santos-Silva, 2014 (Elaphidiini).

    PubMed

    Galileo, Maria Helena M; Martins, Ubirajara R; Santos-Silva, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Six new species and one new genus are described: Criodion spinosum sp. nov. (Cerambycini), from Bolivia; Eburodacrys wappesi sp. nov. and Eburodacrys skillmani sp. nov. (Eburiini), from Bolivia; Eupempelus rileyorum sp. nov. (Heteropsini) from Panama; Sphalloeme mexicana sp. nov. (Oemini), from Mexico; Wappesoeme camiri sp. nov., new genus (Oemini), from Bolivia. Wappesoeme, Eburodacrys wappesi, E. skillmani, Eupempelus rileyorum, and Criodion spinosum are included in previously published keys. Anelaphus erakyra nomen novum for A. maculatus Galileo et al., 2014 is established. PMID:26250192

  11. Effects of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae) seed coat on the embryonic and larval development of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    de Sá, Leonardo Figueira Reis; Wermelinger, Tierry Torres; Ribeiro, Elane da Silva; Gravina, Geraldo de Amaral; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Xavier-Filho, José; Venancio, Thiago Motta; Rezende, Gustavo Lazzaro; Oliveira, Antonia Elenir Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Bruchid beetles infest various seeds. The seed coat is the first protective barrier against bruchid infestation. Although non-host seed coats often impair the oviposition, eclosion and survival of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus larvae, morphological and biochemical aspects of this phenomenon remain unclear. Here we show that Phaseolus vulgaris (non-host) seed coat reduced C. maculatus female oviposition about 48%, increased 83% the seed penetration time, reduced larval mass and survival about 62 % and 40 % respectively. Interestingly, we found no visible effect on the major events of insect embryogenesis, namely the formation of the cellular blastoderm, germ band extension/retraction, embryo segmentation, appendage formation and dorsal closure. Larvae fed on P. vulgaris seed coat have greater FITC fluorescence signal in the midgut than in the feces, as opposed to what is observed in control larvae fed on Vigna unguiculata. Cysteine protease, ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase activities were reduced in larvae fed on P. vulgaris natural seed coat. Taken together, our results suggest that although P. vulgaris seed coat does not interfere with C. maculatus embryonic development, food digestion was clearly compromised, impacting larval fitness (e.g. body mass and survivability). PMID:24211390

  12. The importance of gobies (Gobiidae, Teleostei) as hosts and transmitters of parasites in the SW Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, C. D.; Strohbach, U.; Groenewold, S.

    1993-02-01

    The parasite fauna of five goby species (Gobiidae, Teleostei) was investigated in the Baltic Sea during the period 1987 to 1990. 13 parasite species were found in samples from the Lübeck Bight: Bothriocephalus scorpii, Schistocephalus sp. (Cestoda); Cryptocotyle concavum, Cryptocotyle lingua, Podocotyle atomon, Derogenes varicus (Digenea); Hysterothylacium sp. (cf. auctum), Contracaecum sp., Anisakis simplex (Nematoda); Corynosoma sp., Echinorhynchus gadi, Neoechinorhynchus rutili, Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala). The number of parasite species were: 10 in the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, 8 in the black goby Gobius niger, 7 in the two-spotted goby Gobiusculus flavescens, 6 in the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, and 5 in the painted goby Pomatoschistus pictus. Neoechinorhynchus rutili occurred only in P. minutus, and Corynosoma sp. only in G. niger. The extent to which the gobies were parasitized clearly depended on the respective ways of life and, moreover, on the kind of prey ingested by the hosts. Additionally, the age of the hosts might be important. The highest rate of parasitism, more than 60%, was reached by Hysterothylacium sp. in G. niger and by Cryptocotyle concavum in P. microps. Infestation incidence lay mostly below 40% which means a satellite species status (Holmes, 1991). The number of parasite species was highest in summer; the highest intensities of single parasites occurred in spring ( Podocotyle atomon) or autumn ( Crytocotyle concavum). Bothriocephalus scorpii, Hysterothylacium sp. and Podocotyle infested their juvenile hosts very early, but only Hysterothylacium was accumulated by G. niger during its whole life span, whereas Bothriocephalus persisted also in older gobies in low intensities. The cercariae of Cryptocotyle spp. penetrate actively into their hosts; all the other parasites named were transmitted in larval form by prey organisms which consisted mainly of planktonic and benthic crustaceans. The gobies were final hosts for only 5 parasites; but two species may be transmitted to larger fish, and 6 species to sea birds or mammals. The parasite community of the five gobies may possibly be taken to characterize the ecological quality of the environment of the Lübeck Bight.

  13. Ergasilus thatcheri n. sp. (Copepoda, Poecilostomatoida, Ergasilidae) from the gills of Rhamdia quelen (Teleostei, Siluriformes, Pimelodidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Engers, K B; Boeger, W A; Brandào, D A

    2000-10-01

    The female of Ergasilus thatcheri n. sp. (Copepoda, Poecilostomatoida, Ergasilidae) is described from the gills of the "jundiá," Rhamdia quelen (Teleostei, Siluriformes, Pimelodidae), from fish ponds in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The new species has a falciform semipinnate terminal seta on the first exopod, which suggests phylogenetic affinity to 10 other congeners, all from fishes of the Amazon Basin. Based on general morphology, the new species shows great similarity to E. callophysus Thatcher and Boeger, 1984, a parasite of another pimelodid fish Callophysus macropterus. Ergasilus thatcheri n. sp., however, can be easily differentiated from E. callophysus in its possession of a more distal sensillum not located on a cuticular elevation, and a row of spinules on the inner margin of the second antennal segment (first endopodal segment). PMID:11128515

  14. A RAD-Tag Genetic Map for the Platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) Reveals Mechanisms of Karyotype Evolution Among Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3–40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24–25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ?120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ?195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years. PMID:24700104

  15. Genetic variability and resistance of cultivars of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] to cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr.).

    PubMed

    Vila Nova, M X; Leite, N G A; Houllou, L M; Medeiros, L V; Lira Neto, A C; Hsie, B S; Borges-Paluch, L R; Santos, B S; Araujo, C S F; Rocha, A A; Costa, A F

    2014-01-01

    The cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr.) is the most destructive pest of the cowpea bean; it reduces seed quality. To control this pest, resistance testing combined with genetic analysis using molecular markers has been widely applied in research. Among the markers that show reliable results, the inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) (microsatellites) are noteworthy. This study was performed to evaluate the resistance of 27 cultivars of cowpea bean to cowpea weevil. We tested the resistance related to the genetic variability of these cultivars using ISSR markers. To analyze the resistance of cultivars to weevil, a completely randomized test design with 4 replicates and 27 treatments was adopted. Five pairs of the insect were placed in 30 grains per replicate. Analysis of variance showed that the number of eggs and emerged insects were significantly different in the treatments, and the means were compared by statistical tests. The analysis of the large genetic variability in all cultivars resulted in the formation of different groups. The test of resistance showed that the cultivar Inhuma was the most sensitive to both number of eggs and number of emerged adults, while the TE96-290-12-G and MNC99-537-F4 (BRS Tumucumaque) cultivars were the least sensitive to the number of eggs and the number of emerged insects, respectively. PMID:24737480

  16. A RAD-tag genetic map for the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) reveals mechanisms of karyotype evolution among teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3-40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24-25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ?120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ?195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years. PMID:24700104

  17. A screen for bacterial endosymbionts in the model organisms Tribolium castaneum, T. confusum, Callosobruchus maculatus, and related species.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Sara L; Fricke, Claudia; Martin, Oliver Y

    2015-04-01

    Reproductive parasites such as Wolbachia are extremely widespread amongst the arthropods and can have a large influence over the reproduction and fitness of their hosts. Undetected infections could thus confound the results of a wide range of studies that focus on aspects of host behavior, reproduction, fitness, and degrees of reproductive isolation. This potential problem has already been underlined by work investigating the incidence of Wolbachia infections in stocks of the model system Drosophila melanogaster. Here we survey a range of lab stocks of further commonly used model arthropods, focusing especially on the flour beetles Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum, the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus and related species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae and Bruchidae). These species are widespread stored product pests so knowledge of infections with symbionts further has potential use in informing biocontrol measures. Beetles were assessed for infection with 3 known microbial reproductive parasites: Wolbachia, Rickettsia, Spiroplasma. Infections with some of these microbes were found in some of the lab stocks studied, although overall infections were relatively rare. The consequences of finding infections in these or other species and the type of previous studies likely to be affected most are discussed. PMID:24347564

  18. Growth and reproduction aspects of Pimelodus maculatus Lacépède, 1803 (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae) of the Cachoeira Dourada reservoir, state of Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sabinson, L M; Rodrigues Filho, J L; Peret, A C; Verani, J R

    2014-05-01

    Growth and reproduction parameters of the yellow-mandi, Pimelodus maculatus Lacépède, 1803 (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae), were determined for the Cachoeira Dourada reservoir (GO/MG). The field work occurred throughout February 2007 to January 2008 (with the exception of December 2007). Gill nets with mesh sizes from 1.5 to 10 centimeters were placed in three different areas in the reservoir and were collected 24 hours later. A total of 538 specimens were captured, amongst which 242 were females, 219 were males and 77 could not have their sex determined. Sex ratio differed from 1:1 only during July 2007 and January 2008, with males and females predominating in each of those months. Males occupied the medium length classes (18.9 to 24.3 cm) while females were most abundant in the superior classes (from 27 to 37.8 cm).The growth constant K was statistically equal for males (K=0.1851) and females (K=0.1708), however, females P. maculatus may have a greater investment in reproductive tissue, a fact indicated by the elevated values of Kn and GSI during the summer. Bearing in mind that P. maculatus reproduces in the rainy season, a greater gain in weight is expected during the months before the reproduction season, and that after it occurs the fish loses fat and weight as a consequence of metabolic effort. Still, the absence of juveniles may be an indication that the species did not find in the reservoir the proper conditions for reproduction and growth of its fry. PMID:25166330

  19. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the digenean Tergestia acanthocephala (Stossich, 1887) (Gymnophalloidea: Fellodistomidae): An intestinal parasite of Belone belone gracilis (Pisces: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Kacem, H; Ndiaye, P I; Neifar, L; Torres, J; Miquel, J

    2015-06-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of the digenean Tergestia acanthocephala (Gymnophalloidea: Fellodistomidae) is described. Live digeneans were collected from Belone belone gracilis (Teleostei: Belonidae), caught off the Gulf of Gabès in Chebba (Tunisia). The mature spermatozoon of T. acanthocephala exhibits the general pattern described in numerous digeneans, characterized by the presence of two axonemes of the different length of the 9+'1' pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation, spine-like bodies and granules of glycogen. Moreover, the morphology of the posterior spermatozoon extremity in T. acanthocephala corresponds to the fasciolidean type of Quilichini et al. (2010a). PMID:25796547

  20. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  1. Isolation and purification of a papain inhibitor from Egyptian genotypes of barley seeds and its in vitro and in vivo effects on the cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.).

    PubMed

    Abd El-Latif, Ashraf Oukasha

    2015-02-01

    The cysteine inhibitors that are known as cystatin have been identified and characterized from several plant species. In the current study, 44 barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes including 3 varieties and 41 promising lines were screened for their potential as protease inhibitors. The barley genotypes showed low inhibitory activity against trypsin and chymotrypsin enzymes with a mean of 4.15 TIU/mg protein and 4.40 CIU/mg protein. The barley variety, Giza 123, showed strong papain inhibitory activity of 97.09 PIU/mg proteins and was subjected for further purification studies using ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Barley purified proteins showed two bands on SDS-PAGE corresponding to a molecular mass of 12.4-54.8?kDa. The purified barley PI was found to be stable at a temperature below 80?°C and at a wide range of pH from 2 to 12. Barley PI was found to have higher potential inhibitory activity against papain enzyme compared to the standard papain inhibitor, E-64 with an IC50 value of 21.04?µg/ml and 25.62?µg/ml for barley PI and E-64, respectively. The kinetic analysis revealed a non-competitive type of inhibition with a Ki value of 1.95?×?10(-3?)µM. The antimetabolic effect of barley PI was evaluated against C. maculatus by incorporating the F30-60 protein of the purified inhibitor into the artificial diet using artificial seeds. Barley PI significantly prolonged the development of C. maculatus in proportion to PI concentration. Barley PI significantly increased the mortality of C. maculatus and caused a significant reduction in its fecundity. On the other hand, barley PI seemed to have non-significant effects on the adult longevity and the adult dry weight. The in vitro and in vivo results proved the efficiency of the papain inhibitory protein isolated from barley as a tool for managing the cowpea bruchid, C. maculatus. PMID:25752426

  2. Developmental temperature affects the expression of ejaculatory traits and the outcome of sperm competition in Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, R; Deeming, D C; Eady, P E

    2014-09-01

    The outcome of post-copulatory sexual selection is determined by a complex set of interactions between the primary reproductive traits of two or more males and their interactions with the reproductive traits of the female. Recently, a number of studies have shown the primary reproductive traits of both males and females express phenotypic plasticity in response to the thermal environment experienced during ontogeny. However, how plasticity in these traits affects the dynamics of sperm competition remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate plasticity in testes size, sperm size and sperm number in response to developmental temperature in the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. Males reared at the highest temperature eclosed at the smallest body size and had the smallest absolute and relative testes size. Males reared at both the high- and low-temperature extremes produced both fewer and smaller sperm than males reared at intermediate temperatures. In the absence of sperm competition, developmental temperature had no effect on male fertility. However, under conditions of sperm competition, males reared at either temperature extreme were less competitive in terms of sperm offence (P(2)), whereas those reared at the lowest temperature were less competitive in terms of sperm defence (P(1)). This suggests the developmental pathways that regulate the phenotypic expression of these ejaculatory traits are subject to both natural and sexual selection: natural selection in the pre-ejaculatory environment and sexual selection in the post-ejaculatory environment. In nature, thermal heterogeneity during development is commonplace. Therefore, we suggest the interplay between ecology and development represents an important, yet hitherto underestimated component of male fitness via post-copulatory sexual selection. PMID:24891122

  3. CO2 enhances effects of hypoxia on mortality, development, and gene expression in cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weining; Lei, Jiaxin; Ahn, Ji-Eun; Wang, Yu; Lei, Chaoliang; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2013-11-01

    Modified atmosphere based on lack of O2 offers a safe, residue-free alternative to chemical fumigants for pest control in stored grains. In this study, we intended to determine whether elevated CO2 (at a biologically achievable level) has an enhanced suppressive effect over low O2 atmosphere alone on the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus), a storage pest of cowpea and other legumes. Experiments were performed under two modified atmospheric conditions, (1) 2% O2+18% CO2+80% N2 and (2) 2% O2+98% N2. Both hypoxic environments significantly affected the development and survival of all insect developmental stages. Eggs were most vulnerable to hypoxia, particularly at the early stage (4-6h old), surviving only up to a maximum of 2 days in both treatments. These were followed by adults, pupae and larvae, in order of decreasing susceptibility. The 3rd and 4th instar larvae were most resilient to hypoxia and could survive up to 20 days of low O2. The presence of 18% CO2 significantly increased the mortality of adults, the later stage of eggs, as well as 1st and 4th instar larvae caused by hypoxia. However, the surviving insects exhibited faster development, evidenced by their earlier emergence from cowpea seeds compared to those without CO2. One interesting observation was the frequent, premature opening of the emergence windows in the 4th instar larvae when CO2 was involved. This phenomenon was not observed at all in insects stressed by low O2 alone. Differential expression profiling of metabolic genes and proteolytic activity of midgut digestive enzymes suggested that the rate of metabolic activity could contribute in part to the difference in insect development and survival under hypoxia in the presence and absence of CO2. PMID:24001922

  4. Import of exotic and zoonotic trematodes (Heterophyidae: Centrocestus sp.) in Xiphophorus maculatus: implications for ornamental fish import control in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Jensen, Hannah M; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    Ornamental fish, Xiphophorus maculatus, were imported from Singapore to Denmark for distribution to local aquarists. Importers observed lethargic and erratic swimming patterns among fish and forwarded a total of 30 fish for pathological examination to a university diagnostic service. All fish were diagnosed infected with encysted Centrocestus sp. metacercariae in gills (prevalence of 100% and mean intensity of 454.5 ± 161.9 parasites per fish). Metacercariae were identified by morphological and molecular methods. Cysts (mean length 163.3 ± 13.7 ?m and mean width 113.3 ± 10.6 ?m) contained a bent metacercaria with an X-shaped excretory bladder. PCR amplification of a rDNA region (5.8S rRNA gene, ITS-2, 28S rRNA gene) and subsequent sequencing confirmed the diagnosis. Metacercariae were found in gill filaments adjacent to the cartilage associated with cartilage hypertrophy, epithelial and mucous cell hyperplasia, clubbing and lamellar fusion. Host cell encapsulation of cysts comprised several layers of leucocytes, chondroblast-like and fibroblast-like cells. The observations raise concerns with regard to veterinary inspection and quarantine procedures. The zoonotic potential of these trematodes and a possible spread of the parasites in natural habitats in Europe should be regarded as a public health issue. So far, several cases of human infections have been reported only in Asia, but the potential intermediate host snail, Melanoides tuberculata, has been recorded in Germany. Accordingly, establishment of the parasite in Europe with climate changes should be considered a risk. PMID:24827099

  5. Extracellular matrix remodeling of the testes through the male reproductive cycle in Teleostei fish.

    PubMed

    Santana, Julio Cesar de Oliveira; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2014-12-01

    During the fish reproductive cycle, testes undergo morphological changes related to germinal epithelium and remodeling of extracellular matrix components (ECM). ECM is degraded mainly by action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Due to the natural renewal of ECM in fish testes, we choose Pimelodus maculatus to study remodeling of ECM throughout reproductive cycle, using picrosirius (to identify type I, II, III collagen) and reticulin (type III collagen), and to immunolocalize MT1-MMP (membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase) and MMP-2 in testis cells. Testes were classified in four reproductive phases: regenerating, development, spawning capable and regressing. Picrosirius and reticulin demonstrated a differential distribution of total collagen fibers during the reproductive cycle. Immunohistochemistry showed MT1-MMP only in acidophilic granulocyte cells mainly inside blood vessels, in connective tissue of capsule close to the germinal compartment, and also infiltrated in interstitial connective tissue. MMP-2 was detected in fibroblast and endothelial cells of interstitial and capsule blood vessels, in epithelial cells of capsule, and in acidophilic granulocyte cells at same description for MT1-MMP. The fish testes ECM were remodeled throughout reproductive cycle in according to morphophysiological alterations. During reproductive season (spawning capable), the interstitium increased in total collagen fibers (type I, II, III). After spermiation period (regression and regenerating), the amount of collagen fibers decreased in response to action of MMPs on collagen degradation and other interstitial components (not assessed in this study). MMPs seem to be indispensable components for natural cyclic events of ECM remodeling of fish testes and for guarantee tissue homeostasis throughout reproductive cycle. PMID:25142725

  6. Identification of Albizia lebbeck seed coat chitin-binding vicilins (7S globulins) with high toxicity to the larvae of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Souza, A.J.; Ferreira, A.T.S.; Perales, J.; Beghini, D.G.; Fernandes, K.V.S.; Xavier-Filho, J.; Venancio, T.M.; Oliveira, A.E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seed coat is a specialized maternal tissue that interfaces the embryo and the external environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination. In addition, it is the first defensive barrier against penetration by pathogens and herbivores. Here we show that Albizia lebbeck seed coat dramatically compromises the oviposition, eclosion and development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Dietary supplementation of bruchid larvae with A. lebbeck seed coat flour causes severe weight loss and reduces survival. By means of protein purification, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, we show that chitinbinding vicilins are the main source of A. lebbeck tegumental toxicity to C. maculatus. At concentrations as low as 0.1%, A. lebbeck vicilins reduce larval mass from 8.1 ± 1.7 (mass of control larvae) to 1.8 ± 0.5?mg, which corresponds to a decrease of 78%. Seed coat toxicity constitutes an efficient defense mechanism, hindering insect predation and preventing embryo damage. We hypothesize that A. lebbeck vicilins are good candidates for the genetic transformation of crop legumes to enhance resistance to bruchid predation. PMID:22267002

  7. Molecular taxonomy and identification within the Antarctic genus Trematomus (Notothenioidei, Teleostei): How valuable is barcoding with COI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautredou, A.-C.; Bonillo, C.; Denys, G.; Cruaud, C.; Ozouf-Costaz, C.; Lecointre, G.; Dettai, A.

    2010-08-01

    The Trematominae are a particularly interesting subfamily within the antarctic suborder Notothenioidei (Teleostei). The 14 closely related species occupy a large range of ecological of niches, extremely useful for evolutionary and biogeography studies in the Antarctic Ocean. But some Trematomus species can be difficult to identify by using morphological criteria, specially young stages and damaged specimens. Molecular identification would therefore be highly useful, however the suitability of the cytochrome oxidase I gene in a barcoding approach needs to be assessed. We evaluated species delineation within the genus Trematomus comparing morphological identification, nuclear markers (the rhodopsin retrogene and a new nuclear marker pkd1: polycystic kidney disease 1) and COI. We show that Trematomus vicarius is not distinguishable from Trematomus bernacchii with the molecular markers used, and neither is Trematomus loennbergii from Trematomus lepidorhinus. We suggest that until this is investigated further, studies including these species list them as T. loennbergii/ T. lepidorhinus group, and keep voucher samples and specimens. Generally, COI gives a congruent result with the rhodopsin retrogene, and except for the previously cited species pairs, COI barcoding is efficient for identification in this group. Moreover pkd1 might not be suitable for a phylogenetic study at this scale for this group.

  8. Analysis of the morphogenesis and cell proliferation in the retina of a pleuronectiform fish, the turbot Psetta maxima (Pleuronectiformes: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Cid, Patricia; Doldán, María Jesús; Rodríguez, María Soledad; Prego, Benjamin; de Miguel, Encarnación

    2013-06-01

    The morphogenesis and cell proliferation in the retina of turbot (Psetta maxima, Pleuronectiformes: Teleostei) from embryo through metamorphosis have been examined by using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunohistochemistry and general histological procedures. In the embryonic retina, cell proliferation and spatial cell reorganization form the anlage of the pigment epithelium and neural retina. Neurogenesis begins around hatching in the temporal retina, dorsal to the optic nerve exit, and then a wave of cell differentiation spreads to the nasal retina to yield a laminated retina by the end of the prolarval turbot stage. Germinal zones in the differentiated retina persist as a rim at the retinal margin, as well as surrounding the optic fissure in premetamorphic and metamorphic turbot larvae. In these zones, progenitor cells with different morphologies show a similar spatial arrangement, which suggests that they have a similar retinogenic potential. During metamorphosis, asymmetric proliferative activity in turbot germinal zones is associated with a marked expansion of the retinal tissue. Scattered stem cells in the laminated retina, related to the lineage of rod photoreceptors, were also observed both in large premetamorphic larvae and metamorphic turbots. The proliferative activity of these cells increases considerably during metamorphosis, when rod photoreceptors become morphologically differentiated. PMID:23495202

  9. First report of toxicity of Xylopiaparviflora (A. Rich.) Benth (Annonaceae) root bark's essential oil against cowpea seed bruchid, Callososbruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    PubMed

    Babarinde, Samuel Adelani; Pitan, Olufemi Olutoyin Richard; Olatunde, Ganiyu Olatunji; Ajala, Michael Oluwole

    2015-01-01

    The fumigant toxicity of Xylopia parviflora (A. Rich.) Benth (Annonaceae) root bark's essential oil (EO) against cowpea seed bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus, was investigated in the laboratory. Dose had significant (P < 0.0001) effect on mortality at 6 hours after treatment (HAT) at a concentration of 6.25 ?L/mL air which exerted 81.70% mortality, while there was no mortality in all other lower doses. At 12 HAT, 75.05% and 90.00% mortality were observed at doses of 3.15 and 6.25 ?L/mL air, respectively. It was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the mortality (50.58%) observed when 0.78 ?L/mL air was applied. The lethal time for 50% of assayed adults (LT50) obtained when the bruchid was exposed to X. parviflora EO at a dose of 6.25 ?L/mL air (2.71 h) was significantly lower than LT50 obtained at exposure of bruchid to other lower doses of 0.78-3.15 ?L/mL air. PMID:25105241

  10. Differences in transcription and promoters of Xmrk-1 and Xmrk-2 genes suggest a role for Xmrk-2 in pigment pattern development in the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Woolcock, B W; Schmidt, B M; Kallman, K D; Vielkind, J R

    1994-06-01

    Pigment (macromelanophore) patterns in the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus are due to a complex pigmentary locus; for example, the spotted-dorsal (Sd) fin pattern is due to the Sd locus. In interspecific backcross hybrids with the swordtail X. helleri, the Sd pattern changes into benign or malignant dorsal fin melanoma as a result of hemi- or homozygous loss of a platyfish regulatory (R) gene, the tumor suppressor gene Diff, that appears to play a role in the final differentiation of macromelanophores. Closely linked to the pigmentary locus is an epidermal growth factor receptor-like gene, Xmrk-2, that has arisen by duplication from the linked Xmrk-1. The transcriptional expression of the Xmrk genes was determined in various tissues including Sd pigment patterns and melanomas of various growth potential using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. While Xmrk-1 expression was found in all tissues examined, Xmrk-2 expression correlated with pigment cell growth. Xmrk-2 was highly expressed in the dorsal fin exhibiting the Sd pattern but drastically reduced in a platyfish mutant which has lost the capacity to form these pigment cells in the dorsal fin. Most interestingly, Xmrk-2 expression increased with the proliferative capacity of the melanomas but declined once melanoma growth ceased. We conclude that Xmrk-2 plays a role in the formation of the pigment pattern cell type, perhaps in proliferation of precursor cells, which, in melanoma, are kept in a proliferative state due to loss of Diff.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7522032

  11. Agujeros negros supermasivos en galaxias espirales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchetto, F. D.

    It is now believed that massive black holes exist at the center of all galaxies. Searches with the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed massive central condensations in all those galaxies where the measurements have been carried out. Furthermore, the mass of these central objects appears to correlate with the mass of the galactic bulges and with the velocity dispersion, even in galaxies that do not show any evidence for central activity. This has important consequences for the study of galaxy evolution since it means that central black holes existed or were formed at the very beginning of the galaxy formation process. However many questions remain open; are the central condensations really massive black holes or are they more diffuse objects, such as compact star clusters?; do the black holes masses really correlate with the bulge mass?; are the masses determined with photometric methods really the black hole masses?; do the correlations extend to the low luminosity objects and to spiral galaxies?. To answer some of these questions we have embarked in an HST program to determine the masses of black holes in spiral galaxies directly by measuring the line emission arising from an extended accretion disk. I will present some results from this work.

  12. Propiedades dinámicas de grupos de galaxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragone Figueroa, C. J.; Muriel, H.; Merchán, M. E.

    In the present work we study dynamical properties of groups when falling towards the clusters potential and the dependence of such properties on the cluster-group distance. We work with a sample of more than 4000 galaxies with redshifts estimations directed towards 41 clusters of galaxies. Using a group-finding algorithm (Huchra y Geller 1982), we identify in a homogeneous way, a sample of groups laying at diferent distances to the clusters. In a similar way we apply the same algorithm in order to identify groups in a mock catalogue, wich reproduces the galaxies completitude and the velocity dispersion distribution of the clusters in the observed sample.

  13. Effects of insecticide formulations used in cotton cultivation in West Africa on the development of flat-backed toad tadpoles (Amietophrynus maculatus).

    PubMed

    Stechert, Christin; Kolb, Marit; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Bahadir, Müfit

    2015-02-01

    In the West African savanna zone, traditional subsistence farming increasingly shifts to cash crop farming and in particular to cotton cultivation, which is accompanied by application of pesticides. Increasing use of pesticides by smallholder farmers is suspected to have negative effects on non-target organisms. In this study, possible pesticide impact on the development of tadpoles was investigated. Two insecticide formulations used in cotton cultivation in Benin were compared: Cotofan® (active ingredient (a.i.): ?- and ?-endosulfan) and Tihan® (a.i.: spirotetramat and flubendiamide). Tadpoles of the widespread species Amietophrynus maculatus were kept in small water basins with increasing insecticide concentrations (1, 10 and 100 ?g a.i./L) over a period of 28?days. Tadpoles showed reduced survival at the highest endosulfan concentrations (100 ?g/L). Survival of tadpoles undergoing metamorphosis was not influenced by Tihan®. Endosulfan in concentrations of 10 and 100 ?g/L negatively impacted the movement of the tadpoles which was not the case for the mixture of spirotetramat and flubendiamide. Time to metamorphosis was not significantly different in the various treatments. Tail length of tadpoles was significantly shorter in Cotofan® treatments compared to controls. Pesticide residues in the tadpoles were relatively low after keeping them in concentrations of 1 and 10 ?g a.i./L (25 and 26 ?g/kg wet weight (w/w) for the sum of ?-endosulfan, ?-endosulfan and endosulfan sulphate and below the detection limits for flubendiamide and spirotetramat). For the 100 ?g a.i./L treatments, 1,600 ?g/kg w/w was found of ?-endosulfan, ?-endosulfan and endosulfan sulphate together in the survived tadpoles and 21 ?g/kg w/w of flubendiamide. PMID:25192667

  14. Protecting embryos from stress: Corticosterone effects and the corticosterone response to capture and confinement during pregnancy in a live-bearing lizard (Hoplodactylus maculatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cree, A.; Tyrrell, C.L.; Preest, M.R.; Thorburn, D.; Guillette, L.J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Hormones in the embryonic environment, including those of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have profound effects on development in eutherian mammals. However, little is known about their effects in reptiles that have independently evolved viviparity. We investigated whether exogenous corticosterone affected embryonic development in the viviparous gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus, and whether pregnant geckos have a corticosterone response to capture and confinement that is suppressed relative to that in non-pregnant (vitellogenic) females and males. Corticosterone implants (5 mg, slow-release) administered to females in mid-pregnancy caused a large elevation of corticosterone in maternal plasma (P<0.001), probable reductions in embryonic growth and development (P=0.069-0.073), developmental abnormalities and eventual abortions. Cool temperature produced similar reductions in embryonic growth and development (P???0.036 cf. warm controls), but pregnancies were eventually successful. Despite the potentially harmful effects of elevated plasma corticosterone, pregnant females did not suppress their corticosterone response to capture and confinement relative to vitellogenic females, and both groups of females had higher responses than males. Future research should address whether lower maternal doses of corticosterone produce non-lethal effects on development that could contribute to phenotypic plasticity. Corticosterone implants also led to increased basking in pregnant females (P<0.001), and basal corticosterone in wild geckos (independent of reproductive condition) was positively correlated with body temperature (P<0.001). Interactions between temperature and corticosterone may have broad significance to other terrestrial ectotherms, and body temperature should be considered as a variable influencing plasma corticosterone concentrations in all future studies on reptiles. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A new species of Taeniacanthus (Copepoda: Taeniacanthidae) parasitic on two pufferfish species, Marilyna meraukensis and M. darwinii (Teleostei: Tetraodontidae), from Australia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Danny

    2011-09-01

    A new species of Taeniacanthidae (Copepoda, Cyclopoida), Taeniacanthus kiemae sp. n., is described based on adult female and male specimens collected from the branchial cavity wall of Marilyna meraukensis (de Beaufort) and M. darwinii (Castelnau) (Teleostei, Tetraodontidae) caught in Australian waters. The new species differs from its congeners by having the following combination of characters in the adult female: (1) maxilla armed with a stout terminal process and two small elements; (2) multiple rows of spinules on the large pectinate process of the antenna; (3) an extremely long and thin maxilliped claw; (4) second exopodal segment of leg 1 with eight setae; (5) third exopodal segment of leg 3 with three spines and four setae; (6) third exopodal segment of leg 4 with three spines and two setae; and (7) each spine on the free exopodal segment of leg 5 with a subterminal flagellum. Taeniacanthus kiemae is the second copepod species reported from M. meraukensis and M. darwinii and the first taeniacanthid species reported from pufferfishes in Australia. PMID:22053619

  16. Diversification of substrate specificities in teleostei Fads2: characterization of ?4 and ?6?5 desaturases of Chirostoma estor[S

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Madrigal, Jorge; Navarro, Juan C.; Hontoria, Francisco; Tocher, Douglas R.; Martínez-Palacios, Carlos A.; Monroig, Óscar

    2014-01-01

    Currently existing data show that the capability for long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis in teleost fish is more diverse than in other vertebrates. Such diversity has been primarily linked to the subfunctionalization that teleostei fatty acyl desaturase (Fads)2 desaturases have undergone during evolution. We previously showed that Chirostoma estor, one of the few representatives of freshwater atherinopsids, had the ability for LC-PUFA biosynthesis from C18 PUFA precursors, in agreement with this species having unusually high contents of DHA. The particular ancestry and pattern of LC-PUFA biosynthesis activity of C. estor make this species an excellent model for study to gain further insight into LC-PUFA biosynthetic abilities among teleosts. The present study aimed to characterize cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl elongases and desaturases, key genes involved in the LC-PUFA biosynthesis. Results show that C. estor expresses an elongase of very long-chain FA (Elovl)5 elongase and two Fads2 desaturases displaying ?4 and ?6/?5 specificities, thus allowing us to conclude that these three genes cover all the enzymatic abilities required for LC-PUFA biosynthesis from C18 PUFA. In addition, the specificities of the C. estor Fads2 enabled us to propose potential evolutionary patterns and mechanisms for subfunctionalization of Fads2 among fish lineages. PMID:24792929

  17. The Basement Membrane and the Sex Establishment in the Juvenile Hermaphroditism During Gonadal Differentiation of the Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Talita Sarah; Grier, Harry J; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2015-12-01

    Although there are several studies on morphogenesis in Teleostei, until now there is no research describing the role of the basement membrane in the establishment of the germinal epithelium during gonadal differentiation in Characiformes. In attempt to study these events that result in the formation of ovarian and testicular structures, gonads of Gymnocorymbus ternetzi were prepared for light microscopy. During gonadal development in G. ternetzi, all individuals first developed ovarian tissue. The undifferentiated gonad was formed by somatic cells (SC) and primordial germ cells (PGCs). After successive mitosis, the PGCs became oogonia, which entered into meiosis originating oocytes. An interstitial tissue developed. In half of the individuals, presumptive female, prefollicle cells synthesized a basement membrane around oocyte forming a follicle. Along the ventral region of the ovary, the tissue invaginated to form the ovigerous lamellae, bordered by the germinal epithelium. Stroma developed and the follicle complexes were formed. The gonadal aromatase was detected in interstitial cells in the early steps of the gonadal differentiation in both sexes. In another half of the individuals, presumptive male, there was no synthesis of basement membrane. The interstitium was invaded by numerous granulocytes. Pre-Leydig cells proliferated. Apoptotic oocytes were observed and afterward degenerated. Spermatogonia appeared near the degenerating oocytes and associated to SCs, forming testicular tubules. Germinal epithelium developed and the basement membrane was synthesized. Concomitantly, there was decrease of the gonadal aromatase and increase in the 3?-HSD enzyme expression. Thus, the testis was organized on an ovary previously developed, constituting an indirect gonochoristic differentiation. Anat Rec, 298:1984-2010, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26386207

  18. Scale surface microstructure and scale size in the tooth-carp genus Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from endorheic basins in Southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Zeinab; Teimori, Azad; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Reichenbacher, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    A substantial number of species within the tooth-carp Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodontidae, Teleostei) has been recorded from the endorheic drainage systems of Iran, and several isolated populations in these systems may deserve species status. Descriptions of these species and populations have been based mainly on morphological and molecular data; however, the characters related to the fish scales have not up to now been intensively studied and employed for the identification of the species belonging to this genus. The objective of this study is to test as to whether (i) scale surface morphology, (ii) scale surface microstructure, and (iii) scale size can be used to discriminate species and/or populations and, (iv) to discuss the possible causes of the observed differences. To achieve these objectives, scales of three species of the genus Aphanius from endorheic basins in SW Iran, viz. A. sophiae (nine populations from the Kor River Basin), A. farsicus (four populations from the Maharlu Lake Basin) and A. pluristriatus (a single population from the Mond River Basin) have been studied using SEM images, scale measurements, and uni- and multivariate statistics. It is opined that scale surface morphology and microstructure cannot help in distinguishing the species, but can be employed to discriminate certain populations of A. sophiae (those from Safashahr, Kharameh, Tashk, Gol). In addition, scale size and J-indices, respectively, represent a valuable tool for species separation, which corroborates earlier studies for the use of these indices in taxonomy. Major driving forces of the differentiation within A. sophiae probably include habitat fragmentation resulting from the geological history and local adaptations. Thus the differentiation results from a balance between both genetic and environmental effects. PMID:26131487

  19. Variable survival across low pH gradients in freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Jellyman, P G; Harding, J S

    2014-11-01

    A series of 14 day experiments was conducted on five common New Zealand fish species (redfin bully Gobiomorphus huttoni, inanga Galaxias maculatus, brown trout Salmo trutta, longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii and koaro Galaxias brevipinnis) to assess the effect of pH on survival and changes in body mass. No species survived in water of pH <4 although there was 100% survival of all adults at pH 4.5, G. maculatus larvae were also tested and had high mortality at this pH. Results suggest that adults are tolerant of low-pH waters; however, successful remediation of anthropogenically acidified streams will require an understanding of the susceptibility to low pH on different life cycle stages. PMID:25230112

  20. A specimen of Paralycoptera Chang & Chou 1977 (Teleostei: Osteoglossoidei) from Hong Kong (China) with a potential Late Jurassic age that extends the temporal and geographical range of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Tze-Kei; Chang, Mee-mann

    2015-01-01

    We describe a Mesozoic fish Paralycoptera sp. (Teleostei: Osteoglossoidei), on the basis of a postcranial skeleton collected from the volcaniclastic mudstones of the Lai Chi Chong Formation of Hong Kong, China. The new finding—representing the city’s first Mesozoic fish—extends the geographical distribution of Paralycoptera from eastern mainland China into Hong Kong, demonstrating a wider distribution than previously appreciated for this genus. A radiometric age for the Lai Chi Chong Formation of 146.6 ± 0.2 Ma implies a temporal range expansion for Paralycoptera of approximately 40 million years back from the Early Cretaceous (?110 Ma). However, spores found in the Formation suggest an Early Cretaceous age that is consistent with the existing age assignment to Paralycoptera. We argue that the proposed temporal range extension is genuine because it is based on recent high precision radiometric age data, but given the discrepancies with the biostratigraphic ages further investigation is needed to confirm this. This study provides an important step towards revealing Hong Kong’s Mesozoic vertebrate fauna and understanding its relationship to well-studied mainland Chinese ones. PMID:25834774

  1. Detection of dwarf gourami iridovirus (Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus) in populations of ornamental fish prior to and after importation into Australia, with the first evidence of infection in domestically farmed Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus).

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Anneke E; Becker, Joy A; Tweedie, Alison; Lintermans, Mark; Landos, Matthew; Stephens, Fran; Whittington, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    The movement of ornamental fish through international trade is a major factor for the transboundary spread of pathogens. In Australia, ornamental fish which may carry dwarf gourami iridovirus (DGIV), a strain of Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), have been identified as a biosecurity risk despite relatively stringent import quarantine measures being applied. In order to gain knowledge of the potential for DGIV to enter Australia, imported ornamental fish were sampled prior to entering quarantine, during quarantine, and post quarantine from wholesalers and aquatic retail outlets in Australia. Samples were tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for the presence of megalocytivirus. Farmed and wild ornamental fish were also tested. Megalocytivirus was detected in ten of fourteen species or varieties of ornamental fish. Out of the 2086 imported gourami tested prior to entering quarantine, megalocytivirus was detected in 18.7% of fish and out of the 51 moribund/dead ornamental fish tested during the quarantine period, 68.6% were positive for megalocytivirus. Of fish from Australian wholesalers and aquatic retail outlets 14.5% and 21.9%, respectively, were positive. Out of 365 farmed ornamental fish, ISKNV-like megalocytivirus was detected in 1.1%; these were Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus). Megalocytivirus was not detected in free-living breeding populations of Blue gourami (Trichopodus trichopterus) caught in Queensland. This study showed that imported ornamental fish are vectors for DGIV and it was used to support an import risk analysis completed by the Australian Department of Agriculture. Subsequently, the national biosecurity policy was revised and from 1 March 2016, a health certification is required for susceptible families of fish to be free of this virus prior to importation. PMID:26452601

  2. Estructuras circumnucleares en la galaxia Seyfert interactuante NGC 1241

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. J.; Carranza, G.; Dottori, H.

    We have studied the rotation curve and morphology of the central 10 kiloparsecs (~40'') of NGC 1241 obtaining 50 radial velocity measurements in three different position angles. These observations indicate a large velocity gradient of 70 km/sec/('') in the central 5''. The fitting of different density distribution laws to the derived rotation curve indicates a mass of ~ 9 E9 Msolar in the inner kpc. HST-NICMOS images show the presence of a circumnuclear star formation ring at radius ~ 2.8'' (720 pc). This ring is more defined than most of the known cases and harbours a mini-bar and nuclear spiral arms with a sense of rotation opposite than the main spiral arms. This morphological evidence suggest the presence of a dynamically decoupled system inside the circumnuclear ring. As in other cases studied by us, the ring seems to be inside an Inner Lindblad Resonance and the Lindblad curve ?-?/2 for this object begins to drop for Rmax = 400 pc (~1.5''), but the limited spatial resolution does not allow us to find out a definitive evidence for the existence of a second ILR inside at inner radii. Up to date there is no published morphological or kinematical evidence for the presence of a second ILR at such small radii, a necessary ingredient for the presence of circumnuclear ring of star formation, considering the results of recent hydrodynamic simulations. We have proposed the observation of NGC 1241 with better instruments in order to extend the rotation curve to the central 2'', unveil the presence of a second inner resonance, study in detail the structural properties of the nuclear counterrotating arms and establish accurate models of mass distribution in galaxies with circumnuclear rings. This program has been awarded with Band 1 observing time at the Gemini North Telescope Quick Start Stage (Brasil and Argentina).

  3. Agujeros negros de masas estelares en la Galaxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cúneo, V. A.; Gómez, M. N.

    In this contribution we present a catalogue of stellar mass black-hole candidates; mainly in our galaxy; that represents the largest database available in the literature to date. The confirmed candidates; all of them in binary systems; are analyzed in detail. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  4. Ruprecht 44 y la estructura espiral externa de la Galaxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, E. E.; Solivella, G. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; De Laurenti, M. A.

    We present first results of a photometric study UBVI CCD; complemented with MK spectral classification and 2MASS data; focusing on the region of the open cluster Ruprecht 44. This cluster is in an area of very low interstellar absorption; through which it is possible examine in the optical range the spiral structure outside the solar circle. Precise distances determination of blue stars in the field of this cluster enable analyze; with other data recently obtained; the structure of great design in the third galactic quadrant. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. El origen de las galaxias esferoidales en simulaciones Cosmológicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algorry, D. G.; Abadi, M. G.

    We use the GIMIC cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to perform a study of the properties of spheroidal galaxies formed without merger events. We select a sample of galaxies with stellar mass greater than 10 M and we classified them according to the degree of rotation support through the ratio of the rotational kinetic energy respect to the total at redshift z=0. Taken only those with ; we focus on those with accreted mass fraction less than 20 to ensure that they are merger free. We found that these spheroidal galaxies have stellar mass M M and have an important barred component. Interestingly; we found that in many cases the simulated galaxies present two external rings around the bar being both coplanar and counter-rotating to each other. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. Superestructuras y las propiedades del clustering de galaxias brillantes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaryura, C. Y.; Lares, M.; Luparello, H. E.; Paz, D. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Padilla, N.; Sgró, M. A.

    This article is based on the results presented in Yaryura et al. (2012, MNRAS, 426, 708), where the clustering properties of galaxies is analyzed as a function of their large-scale environment. In order to characterize the environment on large scales, we use the catalogue of future virialized superstructures (FVS) by Luparello et al. (2011, MNRAS, 415, 964) and separate samples of luminous galaxies according to whether or not they belong to FVS. The correlations have similar amplitudes at scales r ? 1 h^{-1} Mpc. We have performed a similar analysis using a semi-analytic implementation in a ?CDM cosmological model, where we found that the cross-correlation functions depend on the large-scale structures in a similar way to the observations. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  7. Life-cycle stages of a Posthodiplostomum species (Digenea: Diplostomidae) from Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ritossa, Luciano; Flores, Verónica; Viozzi, Gustavo

    2013-10-01

    In Patagonia, populations of the galaxiid fish Galaxias maculatus are parasitized by metacercariae of a species of Posthodiplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomidae). The aim of this work was to describe larval and adult stages of this species in experimental and natural hosts from an Andean Patagonian lake. Specimens of G. maculatus and the pulmonate snail, Anisancylus obliquus, were collected in Patagua Lake. The snails were isolated in individual containers to observe emergence of cercariae, dissected, and examined under a stereoscopic microscope to record sporocysts and cercariae. Fish were examined to obtain metacercariae, and uninfected fish from Gutiérrez Lake were exposed to cercariae from A. obliquus to obtain experimental metacercariae. Chicks and mice were infected with metacercariae from naturally infected G. maculatus to obtain experimental adults. Specimens recovered belong to Posthodiplostomum sp. on the basis of morphological features. This is the first description of sporocysts, cercariae, metacercariae, and adults stages of a Posthodiplostomum species in Patagonia, including data about its natural intermediate hosts. PMID:23628085

  8. Validating the use of embryonic fish otoliths as recorders of sublethal exposure to copper in estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Barbee, Nicole C; Greig, Alan; Swearer, Stephen E

    2013-07-01

    In this study we explore the use of fish otoliths ('earbones') as a tool for detecting exposure to heavy metals in sediments. Because otoliths are metabolically inert and incorporate chemical impurities during growth, they can potentially provide a more permanent record of pollutant exposure history in aquatic environments than soft tissues. To validate this technique we cultured embryos of a native Australian fish, the common Galaxias (Galaxias maculatus), in the laboratory on sediments spiked with copper in a concentration gradient. Our aims were to test whether exposure to copper contaminated sediments is recorded in the otoliths of embryos and determine over what range in concentrations we can detect differences in exposure. We found elevated copper levels in otoliths of embryos exposed to high copper concentrations in sediments, suggesting that otoliths can be used as a tool to track a history of exposure to elevated copper levels in the environment. PMID:23628888

  9. Biogeography of the Mesoamerican Cichlidae (Teleostei: Heroini)

    E-print Network

    Zardoya, Rafael

    Antilles, ichthyological provinces, Middle America, molecular clocks, molecular phylogeny, plate tectonics's crust, composed of a dynamic pattern of tectonic plates and terranes. Its relatively small size-calibrated beast molecular clock analyses were used to assess the timing of dispersal, vicariance

  10. Cinemática y masas de agujeros negros en galaxias activas del tipo "Narrow Line Seyfert 1"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oío, G.; Schmidt, E.; Vega Neme, L. R.

    We apply a spectral synthesis method to Narrow Line Seyfert 1 active galax- ies with public spectra available. Our goal will be to obtain the stellar ve- locity dispersions, and then the central black hole masses via the Tremaine relation. We comment several problems we found in fitting this type of objects and the possibility of obtaining masses through the emission lines. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  11. La abundancia de galaxias y halos de materia oscura en el universo CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, M. G.; Benítez-Llambay, A.; Ferrero, I.

    A long-standing puzzle of CDM cosmological model concerns to the different shape of the galaxy stellar mass function and the halo mass function on dwarf galaxy scales. Dwarf galaxies are much less numerous than halos massive enough to host them; suggesting a complex non-linear relation between the mass of a galaxy and the mass of its surrounding halo. Usually; this is reconciled by appealing to baryonic processes that can reduce the efficiency of galaxy formation in low-mass halos. Recent work applying the abundance matching technique require that virtually no dwarf galaxies form in halos with virial mass below . We use rotation curves of dwarf galaxies compiled from the literature to explore whether their total enclosed mass is consistent with these constraints. Almost one-half of the dwarfs in our sample are at odds with this restriction; they are in halos with masses substantially below . Using a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group of galaxies we found that ram-pressure stripping against the cosmic web removes baryons from low-mass halos without appealing to feedback or reionization. This mechanism may help to explain the scarcity of dwarf galaxies compared with the numerous low-mass halos expected in CDM and the large diversity of star formation histories and morphologies characteristic of faint galaxies. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  12. Diferenciación de Galaxias Activas de Líneas Delgadas a Partir de Diagramas BPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J.; Portilla, J. G.

    Classification of active galaxies is made through careful analysis of their spectra, either by measuring the width of the emission lines or comparing the flux ratios between these lines. One of the best known methods for this process is the use of BPT (Baldwin, Phillips, & Terlevich) diagrams which allow the distinction of different types of active galaxies. In this article we present the study of a sample of active galaxies with thin lines taken from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) whose flux ratios were measured and diagnostic diagrams were constructed, thus allowing the differentiation between starburst (or H II) galaxies and authentic type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We show that there are some objects with similar spectra that have been misclassified. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  13. Sistemas de Cúmulos Globulares: trazando la formación y evolución de las galaxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faifer, F. R.

    In this paper; we review some properties and mentioned several aspects that have caused a marked and renewed interest in the study of globular cluster systems in the last decade. We emphasised on the relationship between some of these properties and galaxies formation processes. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  14. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) en modelos semi-analíticos de formación de galaxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A. N.; Domínguez, M. J.; Padilla, N. D.; Cora, S. A.; García Lambas, D.; Tecce, T. E.; Gargiulo, I. D.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.

    We present preliminary results of calibrations of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model performed using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique. This method involves the exploration of the parameter space by random walks of a set of ``particles'' that share information between them. Thus, comparing the model results against a set of observables (e.g. luminosity functions, the relation between black hole mass and bulge mass, morphological fractions), the PSO method yields a set of best-fitting values for the free parameters of the model. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  15. Interacciones de galaxias: sistemas co-rotantes y contra-rotantes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, V.; Duplancic, F.; Alonso, S.; García Lambas, D.

    In this paper we present a sample of interacting galaxy pairs with tidal tails. We perform a visual cassification according to the sense of rotation of the spiral arms of each member of the tidal system. We study general features of interacting galaxies such as mass content in stars (M^*), luminosity ratios and local environment through an analysis of the ?_5 parameter. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  16. Fotometria de Washington de cumulos abiertos proyectados en direccion hacia el centro de la Galaxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcionni, N.; Clariá, J. J.; Parisi, M. C.; Palma, T.; Oddone, M. A.; Ahumada, A. V.; Piatti, A. E.

    We present preliminary results obtained from the photometric analysis in the and bands of the Washington photometric system of four poorly studied open clusters (OCs): Dias6; NGC5381; Ruprecht128 and Czernik37; projected in the Galactic center direction. We derived their fundamental parameters from their (; ) color-magnitude diagrams; using theoretical isochrones computed for the Washington system. The present results are part of a major project which aims at characterizing almost a hundred OCs observed and analyzed in a homogeneous way. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  17. Cinematica del gas ionizado y perfiles de luminosidad de las Galaxias Porotos Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, R. J.; Aguero, M.; Schirmer, M.; Holheim, K.; Levenson, N.; Winge, C.

    We present preliminary spectroscopic results of a sample of green bean galaxies (GBG); known to show ultra-luminous; galaxy-wide; narrow-line regions. We analyze Gemini GMOS-S;N spectra of a sample of 12 GBG in order to obtain emission line ratios; gas kinematics and luminosity profiles in some continuous bands. We report here new results that confirm that the 5008 emission extends from 5 to 17 kpc; in all cases scales similar or larger than the stellar continuums at the spectra. In the extreme case of J145533.6+044643 the emission reaches a diameter of 17.51.6kpc. We find that the continuum half light radii extend from 3 to 7 kpc; the largest scale radius at shortest wavelengths; which is consistent with the scale lengths of large spiral galaxies or merging systems. Another new result is that the spatial variation of the continuum color profiles indicate the presence of extinction and possibly star formation. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  18. Una nueva galaxia IR con nucleo compuesto: Seyfert 1.5 y estallido de formacion estelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, S. L.; Merlo, D. C.; Moyano, M. M.

    Optical aperture spectroscopy and CCD broad- and narrow-band images are presented for the barred Seyfert 1 galaxy: IRAS 22117-3903. IRAS data are also used to analyse this object. The CTIO broad band CCD imaging show interesting morphological features: a compact nucleus with a prominent bar; two bright spiral arms; and a partial/segmented inner ring. The narrow-band imaging show that the nuclear H+[NII] emission is concentrate mainly in the nucleus. We find optical spectral features characteristic of a Seyfert 1.5 nucleus; i.e.; showing hydrogen emission lines with broad and narrow components. We detected high excitation emission lines ([CaV]+[FeXIV]; [FeVII]). We study the stellar population in the nuclear region. We find that the stellar population that represent quite well the nuclear stellar population is an average of spiral galaxies dominated by the old population plus a contribution of young stars. Physical conditions are derived for the narrow emission line region; and we detected very high electron temperature (T=4400045000 K); untypical for the ordinary AGNs and probably associated to shocks in a starburst component. Finally; at the optical and IR wavelength; we find properties typical of an nucleus with compound nature; in good agreement with the AGN/QSOs evolutionary model of Lípari ; Terlevich (2006; ; 368; 1001). FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  19. Cúmulos globulares en galaxias elípticas aisladas: el peculiar caso de NGC7507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caso, J. P.; Richtler, T.; Bassino, L.

    We present results of the study of the glolular cluster system of NGC7507. The number of members of the system is calculated; and compared with other elliptical galaxies from literature. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  20. Análisis de la polarización de la emisión en radio de galaxias cercanas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Kamenetzky, A. R.; Ferraro, M. E.; Valotto, C. A.

    We present a study of the linearly polarized radio emission of nearby spiral galaxies. We describe an analysis of correspondence between optical prop- erties of the sample of galaxies and the parameters related with their polar- ization. For this purpose we selected galaxies from the "Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies" (RC3) with optical data, and used the "NRAO VLA Sky Survey" (NVSS) at the radio frequency of 1.4 GHz to obtain the distribution of Stokes parameters I,Q and U across these galaxies. In order to obtain the vector distribution of polarized synchrotron emission, we pro- cessed radio images, providing information about the structure of magnetic fields in this kind of galaxies. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  1. Propiedades de grupos de galaxias en la vecindad de cúmulos masivos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragone, C. J.; Merchán, M. E.; Muriel, M.; Zandivarez, A.

    This work analyses the properties of groups of galaxies in the surroundings of clusters. On the basis of a very large public Virgo Consortium Simulation, we identified systems of galaxies in a wide range of masses. Systems with masses greater than Mcut= 4 × 1014 M? h-1 are considered ``host", whereas smaller systems are taken as groups. Our results show that groups properties are affected by the proximity of massive hosts. Physical properties such as velocity dispersion, internal energy (E) and virial radius, show an increment, whereas the mean density decreases as the host-group distance is smaller. By analysing groups with different properties, we find that the low mass and the weakly bounded (E > 0) subsamples, are strongly affected by the presence of the host; on the other hand, massive groups and groups with E < 0 do not show dependence on the host-group distance. Using a sample of groups identified in the final version of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, we find a very similar velocity dispersion behaviour in the observational data compared to results in the simulation. We also study the dependence of the groups velocity dispersion on the host masses in both, observations and simulation; finding that the larger is the host mass the higher is the effect on its vicinity. These results are discussed in the framework of the tidal forces exerted by the host massive clusters.

  2. Extensive genetic divergence among Diptychus maculatus populations in northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Wei; Yang, Tianyan; Hai, Sa; Ma, Yanwu; Cai, Lingang; Ma, Xufa; Gao, Tianxiang; Guo, Yan

    2015-05-01

    D. maculates is a kind of specialized Schizothoracinae fish has been locally listed as a protected animal in Xinjiang Province, China. Ili River located in north of Tianshan Mountain and Tarim River located in north of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were two main distribution areas of this fish. To investigate the genetic diversity and genetic structure of D. maculates, four populations from Tarim River system and two populations from Ili River system were collected in this study. A 570-bp sequence of the control region was obtained for 105 specimens. Twenty-four haplotypes were detected from six populations, only Kunes River population and Kashi River population shared haplotypes with each other. For all the populations examined, the haplotype diversity ( h) was 0.904 8±0.012 6, nucleotide diversity (?) was 0.027 9±0.013 9, and the average number of pairwise nucleotide differences ( k) was 15.878 3±7.139 1. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 86.31% of the total genetic variation was apportioned among populations, and the variation within sampled populations was 13.69%. Genetic differences among sampled populations were highly significant. F st statistical test indicated that all populations were significantly divergent from each other ( P<0.01). The largest F st value was between Yurungkash River population and Muzat River population, while the smallest F st value was between Kunes River population and Kashi River population. NJ phylogenetic tree of D-loop haplotypes revealed two main clades. The neutrality test and mismatch distribution analysis suggested that the fish had went through a recent population expansion. The uplift of Tianshan Mountain and movement of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau might contribute to the wide genetic divergence of D. maculates in northwest China.

  3. Causes and consequences of ejaculate size in Callosobruchus maculatus beetles 

    E-print Network

    Lethbridge, Fiona Margaret Douglas

    2012-11-30

    Post-copulatory sexual selection is a strong evolutionary force, affecting morphological and behavioural traits in males and females in species with polyandrous mating systems. Many insects are subject to sperm competition; ...

  4. Protease inhibitors from several classes work synergistically against Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Amirhusin, Bahagiawati; Shade, Richard E; Koiwa, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Paul M; Bressan, Ray A; Murdock, Larry L; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2007-07-01

    Targeting multiple digestive proteases may be more effective in insect pest control than inhibition of a single enzyme class. We therefore explored possible interactions of three antimetabolic protease inhibitors fed to cowpea bruchids in artificial diets, using a recombinant soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, an aspartic protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor KI. scN and pepstatin, inhibiting major digestive cysteine and aspartic proteases, respectively, significantly prolonged the developmental time of cowpea bruchids individually. When combined, the anti-insect effect was synergistic, i.e., the toxicity of the mixture was markedly greater than that of scN or pepstatin alone. KI alone did not impact insect development even at relatively high concentrations, but its anti-insect properties became apparent when acting jointly with scN or scN plus pepstatin. Incubating KI with bruchid midgut extract showed that it was partially degraded. This instability may explain its lack of anti-insect activity. However, this proteolytic degradation was inhibited by scN and/or pepstatin. Protection of KI from proteolysis in the insect digestive tract thus could be the basis for the synergistic effect. These observations support the concept that cowpea bruchid gut proteases play a dual role; digesting protein for nutrient needs and protecting insects by inactivating dietary proteins that may otherwise be toxic. Our results also suggest that transgenic resistance strategies that involve multigene products are likely to have enhanced efficacy and durability. PMID:17482206

  5. The importance of cutaneous gas exchange during aerial and aquatic respiration in galaxiids.

    PubMed

    Urbina, M A; Meredith, A S; Glover, C N; Forster, M E

    2014-03-01

    The Canterbury mudfish Neochanna burrowsius was found to be a pseudo-aestivating galaxiid with a low metabolic rate and significant cutaneous oxygen uptake (c. 43%) in both air and water. Another galaxiid, inanga Galaxias maculatus, had a higher metabolic rate in both media but the proportion of oxygen uptake met by cutaneous respiration rose significantly from 38 to 63% when the fish were exposed to air. Besides its important role in oxygen uptake, the skin of both species also contributed significantly to excretion of carbon dioxide in air, indicating the critical role of the integument as a respiratory tissue. In air, G. maculatus may increase cutaneous gas exchange to meet metabolic demands owing to the reduced utility of the gills, but as emersed G. maculatus were only able to maintain metabolic rates at c. 67% of that measured in water, this strategy probably only permits short-term survival. By contrast, the low and unchanging metabolic rate in water and air in N. burrowsius is a feature that may facilitate tolerance of long periods of emersion in the desiccating environments they inhabit. PMID:24417441

  6. A new hedrurid species (Nematoda) from galaxiid fishes in Patagonia (Argentina) and infection of amphipods as intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Brugni, Norma L; Viozzi, Gustavo P

    2010-02-01

    During a parasite survey of galaxiid fishes (Galaxiidae) from Patagonian Andean lakes, a new species of nematode, Hedruris suttonae n. sp. was collected from the stomach of the native Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns) and G. platei (Steindachner). Specimens were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy, especially head morphology, female caudal prehensile structure, and distribution of spines. The new species is distinguished by body and tail size, morphology and size of spicules, the arrangement of caudal papillae in the male, the female caudal hook, and size of eggs. Hyalella patagonica (Ortmann), a Neotropical species of Amphipoda, is reported as its natural intermediate host. Data regarding prevalence and mean intensity in the intermediate and definitive hosts are included. The diet and habitat of the hosts, the percentage of gravid females, the high values of prevalence, and mean intensity in galaxiid fishes, as well as the wide distribution of H. suttonae , collectively indicate that, in these oligotrophic Andean lakes, G. maculatus and G. platei are true definitive hosts of this nematode. PMID:19737026

  7. Evidencia de fusión múltiple de galaxias, formación estelar masiva extendida, vientos galácticos y flujo de acreción nuclear en NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lípari, S.; Díaz, R.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terlevich, R.; Dottori, H.; Carranza, G.

    We report detailed studies of NGC 3256 based on observation of high resolution imaging (obtained at HST and ESO--NTT), and extensive kinematical/spectroscopic data (more than 1000 spectra, collected at Bosque Alegre, CASLEO, CTIO and IUE Observatories). We find in a detailed morphological study (at ~15 pc resolution) that the extended massive star formation process, detected previously in NGC 3256 shows: (i) extended triple asymmetrical spiral arms structure (r ~ 5 kpc); and (ii) the spiral arms emanate from three different nuclei. The main optical nucleus shows a small spiral--disk (r ~ 500 pc) which is a continuation of the external one and reach the very nucleus. And this very nucleus shows blue elongate structure (63 pc × 30 pc), and luminous blue star cluster properties. We study the kinematics of this system and present a detailed H? velocity field for the central region (40''×40'' rmax ~30'' ~5 kpc); with a spatial resolution of 1'', and errors of ±15 km s-1. The color and isovelocity maps show mainly: (i) a clear kinematical center of circular motion with ``spider" shape and located between the main optical nucleus and the close (5'') mid-IR knot/nucleus; (ii) non--circular motions in the external parts. In the main optical nucleus we found a clear ``outflow component" associated to galactic--winds and a ``inflow radial motion" (in the spiral-disk nuclear structure, r ~700 pc). In addition, we detected the outflow component in the central and external regions (r <= 5-6 kpc), with a very wide opening angle ? ~ 140o. We found that the mean value of the inflow region (at PA ~80o) is practically perpendicular to the axis of the bipolar outflow (at PA ~160o). We analyze in detail the physical conditions in the giant H II regions located in the asymmetric spiral arms, the two main optical knots/nuclei, and the outflow component (using long slit spectroscopy, plus standard models of fotoionization, shocks and starburst). We present four detailed emission line ratios (N II/H?, S II/H?, S II/S II) and FWHM(H?) maps for the central region (30''×30'' rmax ~22'' ~4 kpc), with a spatial resolution of 1''. In the central region (r ~ 5--6 kpc) we detected that the nuclear starburst and the extended giant HII regions (in the spiral arms) have very similar properties, i.e., high metallicity and low ionization spectra, with: Teff = 35000oK, solar abundance, a range of Te ~6000--7000oK and Ne ~100--1000 cm-3. In addition, the nuclear and extended outflow shows properties typical of galactic--wind/shocks, associated to the nuclear starburst. And, we suggest that the interaction between dynamical effects, the galactic--wind (outflow), low-energy cosmic rays, and the molecular+ionized gas (probably in the inflow phase) could be the possible mechanism that generate the ``similar extended properties in the massive star formation, at scale of 5-6 kpc!". Finally, we have also studied the presence of the close merger/interacting systems NGC 3256C (at ~150 kpc, and ?V ~ 200 km s-1), and NGC 3256A, plus the possible association between the NGC 3256 and 3263 groups of galaxies. Furthermore, we analyze for NGC 3256 the possible evolution from luminous IR galaxy to QSOs, elliptical, cD, or radio galaxy (Toomre, Schweizer, Joseph et al., Sanders et al., Terlevich et al.'s models), where the powerful galactic--wind and the relation between mergers and extreme dusty-starburst play a main role in this evolutive process (Rieke et al., Joseph et al., Heckman et al., Lipari et al.'s hypothesis), and probably in the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  8. La conexión rayos-X -- óptico en la NLR de la galaxia Mrk 573. Mecanismos de ionización.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaldi, V.; Guainazzi, M.; Feinstein, C.; Combi, J. A.

    We analyze the ionizing mechanisms for the narrow-line region (NLR) of Mrk 573. The alignment of radio, optical and X-ray features suggest that some interaction may be taking place in this region. We investigate if the optical and X-ray emission are being generated in shock waves triggered by the interaction between the radio jet and the intergalactic medium. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  9. Estudio del sistema de cúmulos globulares de la galaxia lenticular NGC6861: en busca de evidencias de una fusión.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. G.; Faifer, F. R.; Bassino, L. P.; Calderón, J. P.; Caso, J. P.

    We present a photometric study of the globular cluster system (GCS); associated to the lenticular galaxy NGC6861. It is based on GEMINI/GMOS images in the filters g'; r'; i' of three fields; one of them centered on the galaxy. Studying the colour-magnitude diagram of the system; we detect the presence of at least two populations of GCs (``blue'' and ``red'') and the presence of the phenomenon known as ``blue-tilt''. However; analyzing the colour distribution we infer the existence of a third population with intermediate colours which could be interpreted as evidence of a past interaction or fusion event. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  10. A new species of Ptychochromis from southeastern Madagascar (Teleostei: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christopher M; Arroyave, Jairo; Sparks, John S

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new species in the endemic Malagasy cichlid genus Ptychochromis. Ptychochromis mainty, new species, is known from four individuals, all collected in the Fort Dauphin region of southeastern Madagascar, and shares a palatine morphology (eastern-type palatine) with other eastern congeners. Ptychochromis mainty is distinguished from all congeners by a nearly uniform dark brown to black pigmentation pattern in preservation and by the presence of a relatively continuous and expansive black longitudinal midlateral blotch in life, extending from the posterior margin of the opercle to the caudal peduncle. The new species is further distinguished from other eastern Ptychochromis species by having minimal or no overlap of the first supraneural with the dorsoposterior region of the supraoccipital crest (vs. marked overlap). We present a molecular-based phylogeny for all available Ptychochromis species, which supports the hypothesis that P. mainty is a distinct taxon. The new species is recovered as the sister taxon to P. grandidieri within a clade comprising species with an eastern-type palatine morphology. We present a geometric morphometric analysis that provides additional evidence to distinguish P. mainty from congeners. PMID:26624703

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus (Teleostei, Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Wang, Long; Guo, Huayang; Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Junda; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus was determined by the overlapped polymerase chain reaction. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence is 16,544 bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions. Overall base composition of its mitochondrial genome is estimated to be 28.68% for A, 16.27% for G, 26.00% for T, 29.06% for C, respectively, with a high A+T content (54.68%). The control region contains three conserved sequence blocks, a termination-associated sequence and a TATA box. The sequence data of T. carolinus can provide useful information for the studies on population structure, molecular systematic, stock evaluation and conservation genetics. It is also helpful to develop the rational management strategies for T. carolinus resource. PMID:24730608

  12. Phylogenetic footprints of an Antarctic radiation: the Trematominae (Notothenioidei, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Lautrédou, A-C; Hinsinger, D D; Gallut, C; Cheng, C-H C; Berkani, M; Ozouf-Costaz, C; Cruaud, C; Lecointre, G; Dettai, A

    2012-10-01

    The teleost suborder Notothenioidei is restricted to the Southern Ocean and has been described as a species flock spanning the whole of it. Within the suborder, the subfamily Trematominae is important for coastal Antarctic ecosystems. The eleven Trematomus species occupy a large range of ecological niches. The genus is monophyletic if the genus Pagothenia (two additional species) and Cryothenia amphitreta, also nested within it, are included. Although the Trematominae have received much interest, the relationships among these fourteen species are still unclear. Several recent studies have tried to resolve these interrelationships; however no complete and clear picture has emerged, probably because of the use of a low number of insufficiently variable markers. The only common results places T. scotti as the sister-group of the rest of the subfamily and T. loennbergi close to T. lepidorhinus. We use here more variable markers. Four nuclear markers, two of which are new, and a mitochondrial marker for the biggest trematomine sampling ever gathered (14 species, 78 specimens). We found that several nuclear haplotypes are shared by several species (mostly in very closely related species). The haplotype patterns coupled with the cytogenetics of the subfamily suggest that a phenomenon of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) is likely to be at play. Using a calibration linked to fossil evidence, we evaluate the relative ages of each clade within the Trematominae to assess the proximity of the speciation events to one another. The main trematomine diversification was recent and sudden. PMID:22683562

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome of Schizopygopsis malacanthus (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Chen, Yong-Bo; Pan, Bao-Zhu; Zhang, Da-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizopygopsis malacanthus is a circular molecule of 16,677?bp in size, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 2 main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). Most of the genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNAs. The control region is 938?bp in length and located between the tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe) genes, some typical conserved elements (TAS, CSB1-3 and CSB D-F) were found in this region. All these features reflect a typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement of the S. malacanthus. PMID:25103444

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Rhinogobio ventralis (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Gobioninae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Li, Qiang; Gong, Quan; Li, Hua; Du, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Rhinogobio ventralis, a small-sized economic fish living in the bottom of the fast-flowing water, has a limited geographical distribution in the upper reaches of Yangtze River in China. The complete mito-genome of R. ventralis is 16,607?bp in length, containing 37 genes of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and a control region (D-loop). The gene order and composition of R. ventralis is similar to that of most other fishes, and its nucleotide composition is 31.10% A, 26.64% T, 26.28% C and 15.98% G, with a slight AT bias of 57.74%. It is first report of the complete mitochondrial genome in the bottom dwelling Rhinogobio species. PMID:24090006

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Rhinogobio cylindricus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Jian; Lai, Jiansheng; Zhao, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Rhinogobio cylindricus, a bottom-dwelling fish, is the one of two endemic species of genus Rhinogobio in the upper Yangtze River. Its phylogenetic status remains controversial. In this study, we sequenced the complete mito-genome of R. cylindricus. The genome is 16,610?bp in length, containing 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region (D-loop). The nucleotide composition is 31.03% A, 26.91% C, 16.20% G and 25.86% T, with a slight AT bias of 56.89%, which is similar to that of most other fishes. PMID:24409921

  16. Evolutionary origin and early biogeography of otophysan fishes (Ostariophysi: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Lavoué, Sébastien; Mayden, Richard L

    2013-08-01

    The biogeography of the mega-diverse, freshwater, and globally distributed Otophysi has received considerable attention. This attraction largely stems from assumptions as to their ancient origin, the clade being almost exclusively freshwater, and their suitability as to explanations of trans-oceanic distributions. Despite multiple hypotheses explaining present-day distributions, problems remain, precluding more parsimonious explanations. Underlying previous hypotheses are alternative phylogenies for Otophysi, uncertainties as to temporal diversification and assumptions integral to various explanations. We reexamine the origin and early diversification of this clade based on a comprehensive time-calibrated, molecular-based phylogenetic analysis and event-based approaches for ancestral range inference of lineages. Our results do not corroborate current phylogenetic classifications of otophysans. We demonstrate Siluriformes are never sister to Gymnotiformes and Characiformes are most likely nonmonophyletic. Divergence time estimates specify a split between Cypriniformes and Characiphysi with the fragmentation of Pangea. The early diversification of characiphysans either predated, or was contemporary with, the separation of Africa and South America, and involved a combination of within- and between-continental divergence events for these lineages. The intercontinental diversification of siluroids and characoids postdated major intercontinental tectonic fragmentations (<90 Mya). Post-tectonic drift dispersal events are hypothesized to account for their current distribution patterns. PMID:23888847

  17. Phylogenetic placement of enigmatic percomorph families (Teleostei: Percomorphaceae).

    PubMed

    Sanciangco, Millicent D; Carpenter, Kent E; Betancur-R, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Percomorphs are a large and diverse group of spiny-finned fishes that have come to be known as the "bush at the top" due to their persistent lack of phylogenetic resolution. Recently, the broader Euteleost Tree of Life project (EToL) inferred a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis that groups the diversity of percomorphs into nine well-supported series (supraordinal groups): Ophidiaria, Batrachoidaria, Gobiaria, Syngnatharia, Pelagiaria, Anabantaria, Carangaria, Ovalentaria, and Eupercaria. The EToL also provided, for the first time, a monophyletic definition of Perciformes - the largest order of vertebrates. Despite significant progress made in accommodating the diversity of percomorph taxa into major clades, some 62 families (most previously placed in "Perciformes", as traditionally defined) were not examined by the EToL. Here, we provide evidence for the phylogenetic affinities of 10 of those 62 families, seven of which have largely remained enigmatic. This expanded taxonomic sampling also provides further support for the nine EToL supraordinal series. We examined sequences from 21 genes previously used by the EToL and added two fast-evolving mitochondrial markers in an attempt to increase resolution within the rapid percomorph radiations. We restricted the taxonomic sampling to 1229 percomorph species, including expanded sampling from recent studies. Results of maximum likelihood analysis revealed that bathyclupeids (Bathyclupeidae), galjoen fishes (Dichistiidae), kelpfishes (Chironemidae), marblefishes (Aplodactylidae), trumpeters (Latridae), barbeled grunters (Hapalogenyidae), slopefishes (Symphysanodontidae), and picarel porgies (formerly Centracanthidae) are members of the series Eupercaria ("new bush at the top"). The picarel porgies and porgies (Sparidae) are now placed in the same family (Sparidae). Our analyses suggest a close affinity between the orders Spariformes (including Lethrinidae, Nemipteridae and Sparidae) and Lobotiformes (including the tripletails or Lobotidae, the barbeled grunters, and tigerperches or Datnioididae), albeit support for this group is low. None of the newly examined families belong in the order Perciformes, as recently defined. Finally, we confirm results from other recent studies that place the Australasian salmons (Arripidae) within Pelagiaria, and the false trevallies (Lactariidae) close to flatfishes, jacks, and trevallies, within Carangaria. PMID:26493227

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Jinshaia sinensis (Teleostei, Balitoridae, Balitorinae).

    PubMed

    Que, Yan-Fu; Xu, Dong-Mei; Xiong, Mei-Hua; Yang, Zhi; Gao, Shao-Bo; Shi, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Jinshaia sinensis is an endemic and typical fish which is successfully adaptive to mountain torrents in the upper stream of the Yangtze River and its tributaries. In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of J. sinensis has been first sequenced by DNA sequencing based on the PCR fragments. The mitogenome, consisting of 16,567 base pairs (bp), had typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and a noncoding control region (CR). The overall base composition of J. sinensis is 30.37% A, 28.82% C, 16.59% G, and 24.22% T, with a relatively a slight AT bias of 54.59%. CR of 903?bp length is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The complete mitochondrial genome may provide fundamental informative data not only for unravel the population structure and differentiation, but also for further conservation genetics studies on this balitorid species. PMID:24937572

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lepturichthys fimbriata (Teleostei, Balitoridae, Balitorinae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Nian; Xiong, Mei-Hua; Lei, Pan; Que, Yan-Fu

    2016-03-01

    Lepturichthys fimbriata is an endemic and an important commercial fish which distributes in the upper stream of the Yangtze River. In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of L. fimbriata has been first sequenced by DNA sequencing based on the PCR fragments. The mitogenome, consisting of 16,567 base pairs (bp), includes 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding control region (CR). The overall base composition of L. fimbriata is 30.4% A, 28.7% C, 16.5% G, and 24.4% T, with a relatively a slight AT bias of 54.7%. CR of 903?bp length is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence would be useful for further studies on conservation genetics and resource management in L. fimbriata. PMID:24963762

  20. Growth and mortality of larval Myctophum affine (Myctophidae, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Namiki, C; Katsuragawa, M; Zani-Teixeira, M L

    2015-04-01

    The growth and mortality rates of Myctophum affine larvae were analysed based on samples collected during the austral summer and winter of 2002 from south-eastern Brazilian waters. The larvae ranged in size from 2·75 to 14·00?mm standard length (L(S)). Daily increment counts from 82 sagittal otoliths showed that the age of M. affine ranged from 2 to 28 days. Three models were applied to estimate the growth rate: linear regression, exponential model and Laird-Gompertz model. The exponential model best fitted the data, and L(0) values from exponential and Laird-Gompertz models were close to the smallest larva reported in the literature (c. 2·5?mm L(S)). The average growth rate (0·33?mm?day(-1)) was intermediate among lanternfishes. The mortality rate (12%) during the larval period was below average compared with other marine fish species but similar to some epipelagic fishes that occur in the area. PMID:25846857

  1. The complete mitochondrial gemone of Phoxinus lagowskii (Teleostei, Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinliang; Wang, Dengqiang; Wei, Qiwei

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we determined the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Phoxinus lagowskii, a small freshwater fish that is distributed in rivers of north China, Russia and North Korea. The entire sequence of P. lagowskii mitochondrial genome is 16,699?bp in size, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNA) and 1 putative control region. Most of the genes are encoded on the heavy strand except ND6 and eight tRNA genes (Gln, Ala, Asn, Cys, Try, Ser, Glu and Pro) encoded on the light strand. PMID:24865913

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Schizothoracinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunna; Li, Hua; Huang, Yingying; Gong, Quan; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus, an endangered cold-water fish belonging to the specialized schizothoracins, is distributed in plateau lakes and the upper reaches of the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in China. In this study, we determined the complete mitogenome sequence of G. pachycheilus. Its complete mitochondrial genome is 16,675?bp in size, and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region, which has identical genomic organization and structure to other vertebrates, with the exception of 86?bp non-coding region between tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro). This new complete mitogenome could provide useful data for further studies on stock evaluation and conservation genetics of this species. PMID:24617490

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Liobagrus marginatus (Teleostei, Siluriformes: Amblycipitidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Du, Jun; Liu, Ya; Zhou, Jian; Ke, Hongyu; Liu, Chao; Liu, Guangxun

    2014-04-01

    The Liobagrus marginatus is an economic fish which distribute in the upstream of Yangtze river and its distributary. For its taste fresh, environmental pollution and overfishing, its population declined drastically and body miniaturization in recent decades, so it is essential to protect its resource. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Liobagrus marginatus was sequenced, which contains 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a non-coding control region with the total length of 16,497 bp. The gene arrangement and composition are similar to most of other fish. Most of the genes are encoded on heavy-strand, except for eight tRNA and ND6 genes. Just like most other vertebrates, the bias of G and C has been found in statistics results of different genes/regions. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Liobagrus marginatus would contribute to better understand population genetics, evolution of this lineage, and will help administrative departments to make rules and laws to protect it. PMID:23795826

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Plectorhinchus cinctus (Teleostei, Haemulidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yang, Huirong; Zhao, Huihong; Sun, Jijia; Han, Xingpeng; Zhu, Shaoxuan; Li, Guifeng

    2016-03-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genome of the Plectorhinchus cinctus in this study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,523?bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand are 31.30% of C, 27.66% of A, 24.54% of T, and 16.50% of G. With the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. All the protein-coding genes begin with an ATG initiation codon except for COX1 with GTG. Five types of termination codons revealed are TAA (ND1, ND2, ATP8, ND4L, ND5), T (COX?, ND3, ND4, CYTB), TA (ATP6, COX?), AGG (COX?) and TAG (ND6). PMID:24865922

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Culter recurviceps (Teleostei, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Huirong; Zhao, Huihong; Sun, Jijia; Xie, Zhenzhen; Yang, Zituo; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genome of the Culter recurviceps in this study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,622?bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The gene order and composition of C. recurviceps mitochondrial genome was similar to that of most other vertebrates. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand are 31.36% of A, 24.77% of T, 27.77% of C and 16.09% of G. With the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. Two copies of tandem repeat sequence (24?bp) was observed in the end of the 123?bp in control region. PMID:24810061

  6. Mahseers genera Tor and Neolissochilus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoàng, Huy ??c; Ph?m, Hùng M?nh; Durand, Jean-Dominique; Tr?n, Ngân Tr?ng; Phan, Phúc ?ình

    2015-01-01

    Two new species and two new basin records of mahseers in the genera Tor and Neolissochilus are described from the upper Krong No and middle ??ng Nai drainages of the Langbiang Plateau in southern Vietnam. These new species and new records are known from streams and rivers in montane mixed pine and evergreen forests between 140 and 1112 m. Their populations are isolated in the Sre Pok River of the Mekong basin, the middle of the ??ng Nai basin, and the An Lão River. Both new species are differentiated from their congeners by a combination of the following characters: 23-24 lateral scales, 9-10 predorsal scales, 2/7 or 1/8 pelvic-fin rays, mouth position, median lobe of lower lip, rostral hood, colour in life and by divergent mitochondrial DNA. Tor mekongensis sp. nov. is differentiated from Tor dongnaiensis sp. nov. by the number of transverse scale rows (3/1/2 vs. 4/1/2), number of pelvic-fin rays (2/7 vs. 1/8), a blunt rostral hood vs. pointed, caudal-fin lobes that are equal vs. unequal, and by mitochondrial DNA (0.7% sequence divergence). Molecular evidence identifies both species as members of the genus Tor and distinct from all congeners sampled (uncorrected sequence divergences >1.9% for all Tor species for which homologous COI sequences are available). Tor sinensis is recorded in the Krong No and the Sre Pok rivers, further south of its known distribution. Polymorphism is described in Neolissochilus stracheyi with a Tor-like morph and a Neolissochilus-like morph. PMID:26623783

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Deng, Yuanping; Wu, Jiayun; Yan, Chaochao; Song, Zhaobin

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus was sequenced and characterized. The genome is 16,586?bp in length. As with most teleosts, the mitogenome of G. pachycheilus is structurally conserved, containing two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and one displacement loop (D-loop) region. The 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of G. pachycheilus and other 15 Schizothoracinae species were used for phylogenetic analysis by Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods. The topology demonstrated that G. pachycheilus is relatively close to species in genera of Gymnocypris, Schizopygopsis and Oxygymnocypris but differentiated earlier in Schizothoracinae than them. PMID:24521493

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of Alburnus tarichi (Teleostei, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Kubanç, Nerdin; Eldem, Vahap; Kubanç, Cüneyt

    2016-03-01

    Alburnus tarichi is the only vertebrate species that can survive in Lake Van, the largest soda lake on Earth, which is characterized by extremely high pH and salinity. The circular mitogenomes of A. tarichi was 16,602 base pairs in size, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 2 major non-coding control regions (D-Loop and OL). Congurence was observed between the Alburnus mtDNAs in terms of genome organization, base composition, gene arrangement, and tRNA structure. Mitogenome sequences may be useful for conservation efforts of this endangered species. PMID:25090382

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of Alburnus istanbulensis (Teleostei, Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Eldem, Vahap; Kubanç, Cüneyt; Kubanç, Nerdin

    2016-03-01

    Alburnus istanbulensis (Thracian shemaya) is an endemic fish species to the northwestern region of Turkey. Alburnus istanbulensis has a remarkably limited geographic distribution, and no genetic data have been available on this species until now. The mitogenome (16,612?bp) had the typical mitochondrial characteristics of other Leuciscinae fishes. This mitogenome sequence can help to further resolve phylogenetic relationships among Cyprinidae. PMID:25093400

  10. Constraints upon the Response of Fish and Crayfish to Environmental Flow Releases in a Regulated Headwater Stream Network

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Edwin T.; Matthews, Ty G.; Howson, Travis J.; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Mackie, Jonathon K.; Strachan, Scott R.; Robson, Belinda J.

    2014-01-01

    In dry climate zones, headwater streams are often regulated for water extraction causing intermittency in perennial streams and prolonged drying in intermittent streams. Regulation thereby reduces aquatic habitat downstream of weirs that also form barriers to migration by stream fauna. Environmental flow releases may restore streamflow in rivers, but are rarely applied to headwaters. We sampled fish and crayfish in four regulated headwater streams before and after the release of summer-autumn environmental flows, and in four nearby unregulated streams, to determine whether their abundances increased in response to flow releases. Historical data of fish and crayfish occurrence spanning a 30 year period was compared with contemporary data (electrofishing surveys, Victoria Range, Australia; summer 2008 to summer 2010) to assess the longer–term effects of regulation and drought. Although fish were recorded in regulated streams before 1996, they were not recorded in the present study upstream or downstream of weirs despite recent flow releases. Crayfish (Geocharax sp. nov. 1) remained in the regulated streams throughout the study, but did not become more abundant in response to flow releases. In contrast, native fish (Gadopsis marmoratus, Galaxias oliros, Galaxias maculatus) and crayfish remained present in unregulated streams, despite prolonged drought conditions during 2006–2010, and the assemblages of each of these streams remained essentially unchanged over the 30 year period. Flow release volumes may have been too small or have operated for an insufficient time to allow fish to recolonise regulated streams. Barriers to dispersal may also be preventing recolonisation. Indefinite continuation of annual flow releases, that prevent the unnatural cessation of flow caused by weirs, may eventually facilitate upstream movement of fish and crayfish in regulated channels; but other human–made dispersal barriers downstream need to be identified and ameliorated, to allow native fish to fulfil their life cycles in these headwater streams. PMID:24647407

  11. Eugregarines reduce susceptibility of the hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus, to apicomplexan pathogens and retard larval development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eugregarines are abundant in a great diversity of invertebrates, and yet their relationships with their hosts are subject to controversy and confusion. We tested the effect of the eugregarine, Pyxinia crystalligera, on growth, development, and susceptibility to two Apicomplexa pathogens of the hide ...

  12. Journal of Insect Physiology 51 (2005) 12201226 Cost of reproduction in Callosobruchus maculatus: effects of mating

    E-print Network

    Kotiaho, Janne S.

    2005-01-01

    ; Trade-off 1. Introduction Evolution of life-histories is moulded by trade-offs between traits that have products, produ- cing eggs, pregnancy, giving birth, parental care or, as is most likely, some combination

  13. Genetic architecture of population differences in oviposition behaviour of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

    E-print Network

    Fox, Charles W.

    Genetic architecture of population differences in oviposition behaviour of the seed beetle. Abstract Few studies have examined the genetic architecture of population differences in behaviour and its often assume that quantifying the additive genetic component of variation is adequate for predicting

  14. Integrating multiple bioassays to detect and assess impacts of sublethal exposure to metal mixtures in an estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Barbee, Nicole C; Ganio, Katherine; Swearer, Stephen E

    2014-07-01

    Estuaries are natural sinks for a wide range of urban, industrial and agricultural contaminants that accumulate at potentially toxic but non-lethal concentrations, yet we know relatively little about the long-term impacts of toxicants at these levels on aquatic organisms. In this study, we present an integrated, multi-pronged approach to detect and assess the impacts to estuarine fish of exposure to sublethal concentrations of metal mixtures. Our aims were to (1) examine the effects of sublethal metal exposure on the embryonic development of Galaxias maculatus, an estuarine spawning fish native to southeastern Australia, (2) determine whether sublethal exposure during development has knock-on effects on larval behaviour, and (3) establish whether a signature of metal exposure during embryogenesis can be detected in larval otoliths ("ear bones"). G. maculatus eggs are fertilised in water but develop aerially, in direct contact with estuarine sediments. We were thus also able to explore the relative importance of two exposure pathways, water and sediment. Embryos were exposed to two concentrations of a metal mixture containing Cu, Zn and Pb in water (during fertilisation) and on spiked sediments (during development), using a fully crossed experimental design. Overall, we found that exposure to the metal mixture reduced embryo survival and slowed embryonic development, resulting in poorer quality larvae that exhibited a reduced phototactic response. Differences in exposure to metals between treatment and control embryos were also permanently recorded in the developing otoliths. Combined these three approaches have the potential to be a powerful novel bioassessment tool as they provide a means of identifying a history of metal exposure during the embryonic period and linking it to suboptimal early growth and performance traits which could have long term fitness consequences. PMID:24794343

  15. Leap of faith: voluntary emersion behaviour and physiological adaptations to aerial exposure in a non-aestivating freshwater fish in response to aquatic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Mauricio A; Forster, Malcolm E; Glover, Chris N

    2011-05-01

    Lowland stream fauna in areas of intensive agriculture are increasingly under threat from anthropogenic activities leading to eutrophication and subsequent hypoxia. Survival of hypoxic episodes depends upon a combination of behavioural and physiological adaptations. Responses of inanga (Galaxias maculatus: Galaxiidae) to aquatic hypoxia were investigated in the laboratory. Contrary to expectation inanga did not display behaviour that might reduce energy expenditure during oxygen limitation, with swimming activity slightly, but significantly elevated relative to normoxia. Instead, as dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased, the fish moved higher in the water column, increased their swimming speed and exhibited aquatic surface respiration. Physiological changes such as enhanced opercular frequency were also noted. As hypoxia deepened inanga started to leap out of the water, emersing themselves on a floating platform. Once emersed, fish exhibited an enhanced oxygen consumption rate compared to hypoxic fish. Thus inanga appear better adapted to escape hypoxia (a behavioural adaptation) rather than tolerate it (physiological adaptation). The emersion strategy used for inanga in response to severe hypoxia is in agreement with their ability to take up more oxygen from the air than from hypoxic water and therefore may justify the potentially increased risks of desiccation and predation associated with leaving the water. PMID:21316378

  16. Physiological and biochemical strategies for withstanding emersion in two galaxiid fishes.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Mauricio A; Walsh, Patrick J; Hill, Jonathan V; Glover, Chris N

    2014-10-01

    The galaxiid fishes of the Southern hemisphere display variable tolerance to aerial exposure. Brown mudfish (Neochanna apoda), for example, pseudoaestivate, inhabiting moist soil for months at a time, whereas inanga (Galaxias maculatus) emerse under unfavourable water conditions, but only for periods of a few hours. This study sought to identify the physiological and biochemical strategies that determine emersion tolerance in these species. Nitrogenous waste excretion was measured before and after an experimental emersion period (14 days for mudfish, 6 h for inanga). Both species showed significantly elevated ammonia "washout" upon return to water, but no increase in plasma or muscle ammonia. Post-emersion urea levels were elevated in plasma and muscle in both fish, however the extent of the accumulation did not indicate significant de novo urea production. This was supported by the lack of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase activity in tissues. Consequently, mudfish metabolism was examined to determine whether changes in parameters such as oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide excretion, and/or altered metabolic costs (represented by the key ionoregulatory enzyme Na(+), K(+)-ATPase; NKA) could explain emersion tolerance. Oxygen consumption rates, already very low in immersed mudfish, were largely maintained over the course of emersion. Carbon dioxide excretion decreased during emersion, and a small, but significant, decrease in NKA was noted. These data suggest that the extended emersion capacity of mudfish may result from a generally low metabolic rate that is maintained throughout aerial exposure via cutaneous gas exchange, and which limits the production of potentially toxic nitrogenous waste. PMID:25026541

  17. Antagonistic Regulation, Yet Synergistic Defense: Effect of Bergapten and Protease Inhibitor on Development of Cowpea Bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yucheng; Chi, Yong Hun; Ge, Feng; Patil, Bhimanagouda S.; Koiwa, Hisashi; Zeng, Rensen; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2012-01-01

    The furanocoumarin compound bergapten is a plant secondary metabolite that has anti-insect function. When incorporated into artificial diet, it retarded cowpea bruchid development, decreased fecundity, and caused mortality at a sufficient dose. cDNA microarray analysis indicated that cowpea bruchid altered expression of 543 midgut genes in response to dietary bergapten. Among these bergapten-regulated genes, 225 have known functions; for instance, those encoding proteins related to nutrient transport and metabolism, development, detoxification, defense and various cellular functions. Such differential gene regulation presumably facilitates the bruchids' countering the negative effect of dietary bergapten. Many genes did not have homology (E-value cutoff 10?6) with known genes in a BlastX search (206), or had homology only with genes of unknown function (112). Interestingly, when compared with the transcriptomic profile of cowpea bruchids treated with dietary soybean cysteine protease inhibitor N (scN), 195 out of 200 coregulated midgut genes are oppositely regulated by the two compounds. Simultaneous administration of bergapten and scN attenuated magnitude of change in selected oppositely-regulated genes, as well as led to synergistic delay in insect development. Therefore, targeting insect vulnerable sites that may compromise each other's counter-defensive response has the potential to increase the efficacy of the anti-insect molecules. PMID:22927917

  18. Egg-Dumping Behavior Is Not Correlated With Wider Host Acceptance in the Seed Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera

    E-print Network

    Fox, Charles W.

    BEHAVIOR Egg-Dumping Behavior Is Not Correlated With Wider Host Acceptance in the Seed Beetle, some herbivorous insects "dump" eggs on unsuitable substrates, even though this can cause complete.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae), the tendency to dump eggs varies genetically both within and between

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Japanese threadfin bream, Nemipterus japonicus (Teleostei, Nemipteridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Yinglei; Chen, Jianhua; Yan, Binlun; Meng, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial sequence of the Japanese threadfin bream, Nemipterus japonicus has been determined. The circle genome is 16,995?bp in size, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The gene order and composition of N. japonicus was similar to that of most other teleosts. The base composition of H-strand is 28.11% (A), 28.02% (T), 16.64 % (G) and 27.24 % (C), with an AT content of 56.12%. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of N. japonicus presented will be in favor of resolving phylogenetic relationships within the family Nemipteridae and the Perciformes. PMID:24660929

  20. Phylogenetic relationships and natural hybridization in rabbitfishes (Teleostei: Siganidae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Kuriiwa, Kaoru; Hanzawa, Naoto; Yoshino, Tetsuo; Kimura, Seishi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of rabbitfishes (the family Siganidae), ecologically important components as primary consumers in coral reef communities, were studied using mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and nuclear ITS1 (internal transcribed spacer 1) sequence analyses. The analyses of 19 out of 22 species known in the Western Pacific region revealed that siganids are genetically clustered into three major clades, which are characterized by some morphological and ecological traits. Between closely related species, such as Siganus guttatus-S. lineatus and S. virgatus-S. doliatus, and also between two morphs recognized in S. corallinus, small but discernible genetic differentiation was found, implying that the components of each pair are incipient species. On the other hand, between some species, such as S. fuscescens-S. canaliculatus and S. unimaculatus-S.vulpinus, individuals of the components of each pair were found to construct a genetic mosaic, suggesting that the components are genetic color morphs within a single biological species, respectively. Moreover, evidence from morphological characters, mtDNA, and nuclear DNA gave an inconsistent picture of identity and relationships for several individuals. They were regarded as hybrids or individuals with hybrid origin. Such instances were observed not only between closely related species, such as S. guttatus-S. lineatus, S. virgatus-S. doliatus, and two morphs (incipient species) in S. corallinus, respectively, but also between distantly related ones, such as S. corallinus-S. puellus. In fact, more than half of the species examined (11/20, when treating the two morphs in S. corallinus as independent species) were involved in hybridization. These suggest that hybridization is much more prevalent in marine fishes than previously assumed, and may have some relevance to their diversification. PMID:17590356

  1. Lake Tanganyika—A 'Melting Pot' of Ancient and Young Cichlid Lineages (Teleostei: Cichlidae)?

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Juliane D.; Cotterill, Fenton P. D.; Schliewen, Ulrich K.

    2015-01-01

    A long history of research focused on the East Africa cichlid radiations (EAR) revealed discrepancies between mtDNA and nuclear phylogenies, suggesting that interspecific hybridisation may have been significant during the radiation of these fishes. The approximately 250 cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika have their roots in a monophyletic African cichlid assemblage, but controversies remain about the precise phylogenetic origin and placement of different lineages and consequently about L. Tanganyika colonization scenarios. 3312 AFLP loci and the mitochondrial ND2 gene were genotyped for 91 species representing almost all major lacustrine and riverine haplotilapiine east African cichlid lineages with a focus on L. Tanganyika endemics. Explicitly testing for the possibility of ancient hybridisation events, a comprehensive phylogenetic network hypothesis is proposed for the origin and diversification of L. Tanganyika cichlids. Inference of discordant phylogenetic signal strongly suggests that the genomes of two endemic L. Tanganyika tribes, Eretmodini and Tropheini, are composed of an ancient mixture of riverine and lacustrine lineages. For the first time a strong monophyly signal of all non-haplochromine mouthbrooding species endemic to L. Tanganyika (“ancient mouthbrooders”) was detected. Further, in the genomes of early diverging L. Tanganyika endemics Trematocarini, Bathybatini, Hemibatini and Boulengerochromis genetic components of other lineages belonging to the East African Radiation appear to be present. In combination with recent palaeo-geological results showing that tectonic activity in the L. Tanganyika region resulted in highly dynamic and heterogeneous landscape evolution over the Neogene and Pleistocene, the novel phylogenetic data render a single lacustrine basin as the geographical cradle of the endemic L. Tanganyika cichlid lineages unlikely. Instead a scenario of a pre-rift origin of several independent L. Tanganyika precursor lineages which diversified in ancient rivers and precursor lakes and then amalgamated in the extant L. Tanganyika basin is put forward as an alternative: the 'melting pot Tanganyika' hypothesis. PMID:25928886

  2. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of Bothriocephalus claviceps (Cestoda, Pseudophyllidea): a parasite of Anguilla anguilla (Fish, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Bâ, Aïssatou; Marchand, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    The mature Bothriocephalus claviceps spermatozoon is filiform and tapered at both extremities. It contains two axonemes of unequal lengths of the 9+"1" pattern of the trepaxonemata. The anterior extremity exhibits an apical cone of an electron-dense material about 6.6 microm long by 0.2 microm wide at its base and a crest-like body making an angle of about 40 degrees with the spermatozoon axis. It is spiralized around the whole extremity of the spermatozoon. The nucleus is a cord of electron-dense material that interposes itself between the two axonemes. The cortical microtubules are of two types: hollow-centred and electron-dense centred. The cytoplasm is slightly electron dense and contains numerous electron-dense granules in regions III, IV, and V of the spermatozoon. The anterior and posterior extremities of the spermatozoon contain a single axoneme. The presence of an apical cone of the electron dense material has never, to our knowledge, been reported in the Pseudophyllidea. In addition, we show for the first time the existence of a crested body in the Bothriocephalidae. PMID:17235546

  3. Genetic admixture of burbot (Teleostei: Lota lota) in Lake Constance from two European glacial refugia.

    PubMed

    Barluenga, Marta; Sanetra, Matthias; Meyer, Axel

    2006-10-01

    The burbot, Lota lota, is the only freshwater species of the codfish family and has a Holarctic distribution. Pleistocene glaciations caused significant geographical differentiation in the past, but its life history characterized by winter spawning migrations over large distances is likely to homogenize populations by contemporary gene flow. We investigated the population genetic structure of 541 burbots from Lake Constance and adjacent Rhine and Danube tributaries in Europe using the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and 11 microsatellites. Microsatellites revealed considerable population divergence (F(ST) = 0.26) and evidenced recent bottlenecks in two Central European rivers. In accordance to previous evidence two main phylogeographic lineages (Atlantic and Danubian) were found co-occurring at similar frequencies in Lake Constance, where they currently undergo random mating as indicated by microsatellites. The Danubian lineage contributed only a small proportion to the lake's mtDNA diversity, and probably expanded within the lake shortly after its formation approximately 10,000-15,000 BP. The larger Atlantic haplotype diversity suggested a population expansion older than the lake itself. Levels of admixture at microsatellite loci were less obvious due to their high variability, and coalescence methods were used to estimate past admixture proportions. Our results reinforce a model of a two-step colonization of Europe by burbot from an ancestral Danubian refuge, and confirm the persistence of a secondary Atlantic refuge, as proposed to exist for other freshwater fish. We conclude that the present-day burbot population in Lake Constance bears the genetic signature of both contemporary gene flow and historical separation events. PMID:17032259

  4. Molecular Evidence for Multiple Origins of the European Spined Loaches (Teleostei, Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Perdices, Anabel; Bohlen, Joerg; Šlechtová, Vendula; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic investigation of the Northern Clade, the major monophyletic clade within the freshwater fish family Cobitidae, one of the most prominent families of freshwater fishes found in Asian and European waters. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on the cytochrome b and RAG-1 genes show the genera Microcobitis, Sabanejewia, Koreocobitis and Kichulchoia as monophyletic groups. These reconstructions also show a Cobitis sensu lato and a Misgurnus sensu lato group. The Cobitis sensu lato group includes all species of Cobitis, Iksookimia, Niwaella and Kichulchoia, while the Misgurnus sensu lato group includes Misgurnus, Paramisgurnus and Koreocobitis. Although the monophyly of both the Cobitis sensu lato and Misgurnus sensu lato groups is supported, relationships within the groups are incongruent with current generic definitions. The absence of monophyly of most genera included in the Cobitis sensu lato group (Cobitis, Iksookimia and Niwaella) or their low genetic differentiation (Kichuchoia) supports their consideration as synonyms of Cobitis. Molecular phylogenies indicate that the Asian species of Misgurnus experienced a mitochondrial introgression from a lineage of Cobitis. We also find two nuclear haplotypes in the same Cobitis species from the Adriatic area that, in the absence of morphological differentiation, may indicate molecular introgression. Most lineages within the Northern Clade consist of species found in East Asia. However, some lineages also contain species from Europe and Asia Minor. The phylogenetic relationships presented here are consistent with previous studies suggesting an East Asian origin of the Northern Clade. According to the current distributions and phylogenetic relationships of the Misgurnus sensu lato and Cobitis clade lineages, particularly of M. fossilis and C. melanoleuca, the range expansion of East Asian species into Europe was most likely via Siberia into Northern and Central Europe. Phylogenetic analyses also show that the Cobitis sensu lato group consists of two clear subgroups (I and II), each presenting geographical differences. Subgroup I is distributed exclusively in East Asian drainages with an Eastern European offshoot (C. melanoleuca), whereas Subgroup II includes species widespread throughout Europe (including the Mediterranean), Asia Minor, the Black Sea and the Caucasus, with some lineages related to species restricted to East Asia. PMID:26727121

  5. Molecular phylogeny of the Neotropical fish genus Tetragonopterus (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Melo, Bruno F; Benine, Ricardo C; Silva, Gabriel S C; Avelino, Gleisy S; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Tetragonopterinae encompasses characid species of the genus Tetragonopterus, which are widely distributed throughout east of the Andes in South America. While taxonomy has recently clarified the species diversity and molecular evidence strongly supports the monophyly of Tetragonopterus, no interspecific relationship studies are currently available. Here we used a large molecular dataset composed of two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci containing an extensive taxon sampling within the family Characidae and included eleven species of Tetragonopterus to generate the first time-calibrated phylogeny for Tetragonopterinae. Our results support monophyly of the subfamily represented solely by Tetragonopterus and corroborate previous molecular hypothesis of close relationship with Exodon plus Roeboexodon and the subfamily Characinae. Internally, we found Moenkhausia georgiae as sister species to all remaining species followed by T. rarus, being both species endemic to the Guiana Shield drainages. Species-level relationships are first hypothesized and putative morphological apomorphies are discussed as support to monophyletic clades. Our time-calibrated phylogeny suggested an origin of the genus during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene. We hypothesized that the Andean geological activity followed by transformations in the Amazonian hydrographic scenario during the Miocene may have promoted most of the lineage diversification within the Tetragonopterus. PMID:26541240

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of two locariid species (Teleostei, Siluriformes) from Iguatemi River (Parana River drainage) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Alves, Diandra Soares; Guterres, Zaira da Rosa; Martins-Santos, Isabel Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fishes of the Loricariidae family, known as “cascudos”, constitute an endemic group in Neotropical freshwaters. In this study, were cytogenetically examined two species of Loricariidae (Pterygoplichthys anisitsi Eigenmann & Kennedy, 1903 and Farlowella amazonum (Günther, 1864) belonging to Hypostominae and Loricariinae subfamilies respectively) from Iguatemi River. Our study provide the first description regarding C-band and fluorochromic analysis in Farlowella amazonum. In Farlowella amazonum, diploid number was 58 chromosomes, with single Ag-NOR and heterochromatic blocks in centromeric regions of some chromosomes and large subtelomeric blocks were evidenced on the long arm of the pair 27, being this region CMA3+/DAPI-. The Pterygoplichthys anisitsi showed diploid number equal 52 chromosomes, with single Ag-NOR and heterochromatic blocks in centromeric and telomeric regions of some chromosomes and conspicuous large telomeric blocks on the long arm of the pair 10, being this region CMA3+/DAPI-. The results show that karyotype formula is nonconservative in Pterygoplichthys anisitsi and Farlowella amazonum. PMID:25893075

  7. Population structure in the Gulf Killifish Fundulus grandis (Teleostei : Cyprinodontidae) inferred from allozymes and mitochondrial DNA 

    E-print Network

    Gricius, Eric Edward

    1994-01-01

    and Atlantic coast of Florida. Significant heterogeneity was revealed among sampled localities in both nuclear-gene and mtDNA allele frequencies. No consistent geographic pattern of genetic diversity was detected. UPGMA cluster analyses revealed similarities...

  8. Redescription of Paraliparis holomelas Gilbert, 1896 (Teleostei: Liparidae), with a description of early life history stages

    E-print Network

    the southeastern Bering Sea and later reported from the Sea of Okhotsk, this material also represents an eastward,the two type specimens from the Bering Sea, and one specimen from the Sea of Okhotsk [reported in Schmidt and paralectotype. Two additional specimens were re- ported by Schmidt (1950) from the Sea of Okhotsk at depths

  9. Chriolepis prolata, a new species of Atlantic goby (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from the North American continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Philip A; Findley, Lloyd T

    2015-01-01

    A new species of seven-spined goby of the genus Chriolepis is described from five specimens collected from the continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean off South Carolina in depths of ca 54 to 110 m. The "Platform Goby", Chriolepis prolata, is distinguishable from all other western Atlantic species currently assigned to the genus Chriolepis and the morphologically similar genus Varicus in having pelvic-fin rays one through four branched, the fifth (innermost) pelvic-fin ray unbranched and relatively long (longer than the second ray to longer than all other pelvic-fin rays); most lateral body scales ctenoid, extending anteriorly in a wedge to a level anterior to the first dorsal-fin insertion or nearly to the pectoral-fin axil, with two or more rows of small cycloid scales extending anteriorly to near the pectoral-fin axil, cycloid scales along the bases of the dorsal and anal fins, and no scales on the belly; and the first two anal-fin pterygiophores inserted anterior to the first haemal spine. It closely resembles C. bilix but differs from that species which has a scaled belly, a shorter fifth pelvic-fin ray, prolonged dorsal-fin spines and smaller teeth in the lower jaw. An earlier report of C. bilix from Florida waters apparently refers to C. prolata.  PMID:25660803

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of snubnose pompano Trachinotus blochii (Teleostei, Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Wang, Long; Guo, Huayang; Ma, Zhenhua; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Trachinotus blochii was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence is 16,558?bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions. Overall base composition of its mitochondrial genome is estimated to be 29.21% for A, 15.74% for G, 26.49% for T, 28.56% for C, respectively, with a high A?+?T content (55.70%). The control region contains three conserved sequence blocks, a termination-associated sequence and a TATA box. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of T. blochii can provide a basic data for the studies on population structure, molecular systematic, stock evaluation and conservation genetics. It is also helpful to develop the rational management strategies for T. blochii resource. PMID:24893877

  11. Changes in predation by the juvenile goby deltentosteus quadrimaculatus (teleostei, gobiidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiers, L.

    Juveniles of the goby Deltentosteus quadrimaculatus hunt at sight lying in wait for their prey. They feed mainly on benthic organisms which are swallowed alive. The stomachs were analysed. The preys counted belong to 11 zoological groups of which seven are crustacean orders. The crustaceans comprise on average 92% of the total number of preys or 85% of the weight of preys. The species composition of the food changes during early growth. The postlarvae feed on zooplankton. Once the gobies reach 15 mm total length, the contribution of zoobenthos to their diet increases, to become the almost exclusive food source above 20 mm length. They then pass through two stages according to the size of their prey, feeding firstly on meiobbenthos and passing over progressively on macrobenthos. This development in the choice of food is related to the goby's behaviour. Food composition also appeared to depend on water depth. For youngs the frequency of harpacticoid copepods in the stomach contents decreased with depth whereas the occurrence of amphipods increased. The selective character of predation was also evident from the fact that the mean size of preys increased regularly with that of the gobies. This increase, even as that of the total weight of the stomach contents, followed exponential trends.

  12. Neoniphon pencei, a new species of holocentrid (Teleostei: Beryciformes) from Rarotonga, Cook Islands

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Richard L.; Earle, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neoniphon pencei, n. sp., is described from thirteen specimens, 132-197 mm standard length (SL) collected from mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) at Rarotonga, Cook Islands by divers using mixed-gas closed-circuit rebreathers. It differs from all other species of the genus in number of lateral line scales, scales above and below lateral line, elements of life color, and in COI and cytochrome b DNA sequences. Of the five other known species of Neoniphon, it is most similar to the Indo-Pacific N. aurolineatus and the western Atlantic N. marianus both morphologically and genetically. PMID:25698898

  13. Eviota nigramembrana, a new dwarfgoby from the Western Pacific (Teleostei: Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David W; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Eviota nigramembrana is described from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan and also recorded from the Philippine Islands. It belongs to the cephalic sensory-pore system pattern group I (complete), has a dorsal/anal fin-ray formula of 8/8, 5th pelvic-fin ray absent, some lower pectoral-fin rays branched, five dark internal bands between anal-fin origin and caudal fin, no distinct marking on pectoral-fin base, dark internal rectangular mark above midline of ural centrum, a light spinous dorsal fin, and black pigment on the opercular membrane. PMID:26046191

  14. Two new dwarfgobies of the genus Eviota from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan (Teleostei: Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David W; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Shibukawa, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Two species of dwarfgoby are described from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Eviota flebilis n. sp. belongs to cephalic sensory-pore system pattern 2 (lacking only IT pore), has a dorsal/anal fin-ray formula of 8/7, unbranched pectoral-fin rays, the 5th pelvic-fin ray 12.9% of the 4th, a distinctive narrow, red-orange line under the eye, and a dark vertical line at the caudal-fin base. Eviota specca n. sp. has a cephalic sensory-pore system pattern 1 (complete), has a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 8/8, the body heavily sprinkled with chromatophores, and a single dark spot on the upper pectoral-fin base. PMID:24871515

  15. Two new dwarfgobies (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from the Ryukyu Islands, Japan: Eviota flavipinnata and Eviota rubrimaculata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Greenfield, David W; Motomura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of Eviota from Yoron Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, are described. Both species belong to the cephalic sensory-canal pore system pattern 2 (lacking only the H [IT] pore); have some pectoral-fin rays branched; have a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 9/8; no dark spot over the ural centrum; no prominent distinct dark spots on the pectoral-fin base; no postocular spots; and no strong dark spots on the caudal fin. The species share the most characters with E. afelei, E. bimaculata and E. punctulata, but differ from Eviota afelei and E. punctulata by having two versus three dark marks over the anal-fin base, and from Eviota bimaculata by lacking the two dark, prominent occipital spots present in that species. Both species differ from all other described species of Eviota in fresh coloration. Eviota flavipinnata has bright golden-yellow dorsal fins and an orange anal fin, and a fifth pelvic-fin ray that is 12% the length of the fourth ray. Eviota rubrimaculata has clear dorsal fins with red spots, large red spots on the body, and lacks the fifth pelvic-fin ray. PMID:26623818

  16. Taxonomic status of Tetragonopterus anomalus Steindachner, 1891, an inquirenda species in Characidae (Teleostei: Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando R; Santos, Ana Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Tetragonopterus anomalus Steindachner was briefly described in July of 1891 (Steindachner 1891a:173) solely based on the holotype, which measured 144 mm (probably SL). Subsequently, in October, Steindachner (1891b:369) illustrated and redescribed the species in more detail. The type specimen was collected in the Paraná River, in the vicinity of Corrientes, Argentina. A few months before, in April of the same year, Perugia (1891:643) described Tetragonopterus nigripinnis, from de la Plata River. Ulrey (1895:273) considered T. anomalus as a junior synonym of T. nigripinnis, but did not justify the reasons for this synonymy, which was later supported by Perugia (1897:25). Eigenmann (1903:145) proposed the genus Markiana, with T. nigripinnis (= M. nigripinnis) as type species (type by monotypy), but did not mention T. anomalus in the description of this genus. However, in his later review of Markiana, Eigenmann (1918:124) confirmed T. anomalus as a junior synonym of Markiana nigripinnis, followed also by Fowler (1948:136). Nonetheless, uncertainty about the taxonomic status of T. anomalus, a poorly known species, led Lima et al. (2003:161) to consider it an inquirenda species in Characidae, and this status has been maintained until the present (Eschmeyer 2015). PMID:26624034

  17. Retroculus acherontos, a new species of cichlid fish (Teleostei) from the Rio Tocantins basin.

    PubMed

    Landim, Maria Isabel; Moreira, Cristiano R; Figueiredo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Retroculus acherontos is described from the Rio Tocantins basin, Brazil. It is distinguished from all congeners by the presence of a nuchal hump in large specimens, an irregular black blotch located on the middle of the anterior soft dorsal-fin rays, fewer pectoral-fin rays (15-16), a deeper body, a convex ventral profile, a more transversely convex ventral surface of the body, and by chest scales similar in size to the scales on the side. An expanded diagnosis for the genus Retroculus is provided. PMID:26249865

  18. Tracking the elusive monophyly of nototheniid fishes (Teleostei) with multiple mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    PubMed

    Dettai, A; Berkani, M; Lautredou, A-C; Couloux, A; Lecointre, G; Ozouf-Costaz, C; Gallut, C

    2012-12-01

    Since the first molecular study of the suborder Notothenioidei in 1994, many phylogenetic studies have been published. Among these, those with a sufficient number of taxa have all suggested that the Nototheniidae, as currently defined, is monophyletic only with the inclusion of the Channichthyidae, Artedidraconidae, Bathydraconidae and Harpagiferidae. This is corroborated by more recent studies including more taxa, but in these studies either the number of nuclear markers or the number of taxa included remained low. We obtained sequences for a large sampling covering most nototheniid genera for five markers described previously for other samplings (COI, Rhodopsin retrogene, Pkd1, HECW2, and SSRP1) and one nuclear marker never used before in phylogenetic inference (PPM1d). The topology for the combined analysis of the nuclear coding genes, as well as the topology for SSRP1 (non-coding) and the combined analysis for all markers all support the paraphyly of Nototheniidae, the genus Notothenia (including Paranotothenia) is the sister group of the clade Channichthyidae, Artedidraconidae, Bathydraconidae and Harpagiferidae, and genus Gobionotothen is a sister group to both. As in previous studies, Trematomus, Lepidonotothen and Patagonotothen form a clade that also includes Indonotothenia cyanobrancha. The position of Pleuragramma antarctica, Dissostichus species and Aethotaxis mitopteryx remains unstable and dependant on markers and analyses. We therefore propose the inclusion of the four families of the High Antarctic clade in the Nototheniidae, and their transformation into subfamilies. We transfer Paranotothenia magellanica to the genus Notothenia, as Notothenia magellanica. PMID:23199880

  19. Evolution of ontogenetic dietary shifts and associated gut features in prickleback fishes (Teleostei: Stichaeidae).

    PubMed

    German, D P; Gawlicka, A K; Horn, M H

    2014-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an ontogenetic dietary shift from carnivory to herbivory or omnivory, and concomitant changes in the gut facilitating digestion of algae, are synapomorphies of the tribes Xiphisterini and Esselenichthyini in the family Stichaeidae (pricklebacks). Previous investigations have revealed that two xiphisterine pricklebacks-Xiphister mucosus and Xiphister atropurpureus-become herbivorous or omnivorous, respectively, as their bodies grow larger, and that their guts show related changes in length and function. In this study we found that, with increase in size, the basal member of the Xiphisterini, Phytichthys chirus, showed an increased proportion of algae in its diet, increased activity of ?-amylase and decreased activity of aminopeptidase, all of which support the synapomorphy hypothesis. Cebidichthys violaceus, a herbivore in the Esselenichthyini, shows similar ontogenetic changes in diet and digestive tract length and physiology, but these features were not observed in two derived carnivores, Dictyosoma burgeri and Dictyosoma rubrimaculatum, within the clade. These results suggest that herbivory is isolated to C. violaceus within the Esselenichthyini. Allometric relationships of gut length as a function of body size generally follow diet within the Xiphisterini and Esselenichthyini, with herbivores having the longest guts, which become disproportionately longer than body size as the fishes grow, omnivores intermediate gut lengths, and carnivores the shortest. A carnivore from an adjacent clade, Anoplarchus purpurescens, had the shortest gut, which did not change in length relative to body length as the fish grew. Overall, our results clarify the patterns of dietary evolution within the Stichaeidae and lay the foundation for more detailed studies of dietary and digestive specialization in fishes in the family. PMID:24269211

  20. Steroid sex hormone dynamics during estradiol-17? induced gonadal differentiation in Paralichthys olivaceus (Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; You, Feng; Liu, Mengxia; Wu, Zhihao; Wen, Aiyun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Peijun

    2010-03-01

    Steroid sex hormones, such as estradiol-17? (E2) and testosterone (T), are important regulators of sex change in fish. In this study, we examined the effects of E2 treatment on the dynamics of E2 and T during gonadal differentiation in the olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using histology and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Flounder larvae were divided into five groups (G0-G4), and fed with 0 (control), 0.2, 2, 20 and 100 mg E2/kg feed from 35 to 110 day post hatching (dph). Fish growth in the G1 and G2 groups was not significantly different from that of the control group ( P>0.05), while fish in the G3 and G4 groups were less active and showed growth depression and high mortality. The gonads of fish in the G3 and G4 groups were smaller and surrounded by hyperplastic connective tissue. The frequency of females in the G0-G4 groups was 54.5%, 75.0%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. The RIA analyses of E2 and T showed that T levels decreased during gonadal differentiation, and increased slightly at the onset of ovarian differentiation, while E2 levels increased gradually and peaked at the onset of ovarian differentiation in the control group. In the E2-treated groups, T levels decreased before the onset of ovarian differentiation. E2 levels were high on the 48 dph, but declined to a lower level on the 54 dph, and then increased gradually during gonadal differentiation. And a sharp increase of E2 levels were observed in all E2-treated groups at the onset of ovarian differentiation. The data suggest that T and E2 play important roles during gonadal differentiation, and an E2 dose of 2 mg/kg feed could induce sex reversal in P. olivaceus.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese balitorine loach, Metahomaloptera omeiensis (Teleostei, Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Tang, Min; Xue, Yang; Chen, Hui-Juan; Ye, Qin; Li, Yun

    2016-03-01

    The Metahomaloptera omeiensis is the only one species within the genus, Metahomaloptera. The complete mitochondrial genome of M. omeiensis was sequenced, which was 16,558?bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 7 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 1 control region. It has the typical circular molecule structure of vertebrate's mitochondrial genome. The whole base composition was estimated to be 29.44% A, 25.44% T, 28.28% C and 16.84% G with AT bias of 54.88%. The complete mitogenome of M. omeiensis provides the basis for genetic resources and phylogenetic analyses on this freshwater fish species. PMID:25162765

  2. Saurenchelys gigas sp. nov., a new nettastomatid eel (Teleostei, Anguilliformes, Nettastomatidae) from the western central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Lin, James; Smith, David G; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Chen, Hong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Some large Saurenchelys specimens collected from Daxi, Yilan, NE Taiwan, and Da Nang, Vietnam, by bottom trawl at depths of 100-200 m, are described as Saurenchelys gigas new species. They differ from all known adult Saurenchelys species by predorsal length 40.9-46.8, head length 36.8-39.3in % of preanal length, 38-40 preanal vertebrae, 63-70 precaudal vertebrae, 38-42 preanal lateral-line pores, 56-63 preanal dorsal fin rays, and larger size (the maximum size 1155 mm TL). PMID:26701596

  3. Phylogeny and biogeography of a shallow water fish clade (Teleostei: Blenniiformes)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Blenniiformes comprises six families, 151 genera and nearly 900 species of small teleost fishes closely associated with coastal benthic habitats. They provide an unparalleled opportunity for studying marine biogeography because they include the globally distributed families Tripterygiidae (triplefin blennies) and Blenniidae (combtooth blennies), the temperate Clinidae (kelp blennies), and three largely Neotropical families (Labrisomidae, Chaenopsidae, and Dactyloscopidae). However, interpretation of these distributional patterns has been hindered by largely unresolved inter-familial relationships and the lack of evidence of monophyly of the Labrisomidae. Results We explored the phylogenetic relationships of the Blenniiformes based on one mitochondrial (COI) and four nuclear (TMO-4C4, RAG1, Rhodopsin, and Histone H3) loci for 150 blenniiform species, and representative outgroups (Gobiesocidae, Opistognathidae and Grammatidae). According to the consensus of Bayesian Inference, Maximum Likelihood, and Maximum Parsimony analyses, the monophyly of the Blenniiformes and the Tripterygiidae, Blenniidae, Clinidae, and Dactyloscopidae is supported. The Tripterygiidae is the sister group of all other blennies, and the Blenniidae is the sister group of the remaining blennies. The monophyly of the Labrisomidae is supported with the exclusion of the Cryptotremini and inclusion of Stathmonotus, and we elevate two subgenera of Labrisomus to establish a monophyletic classification within the family. The monophyly of the Chaenopsidae is supported with the exclusion of Stathmonotus (placed in the Stathmonotini) and Neoclinus and Mccoskerichthys (placed in the Neoclinini). The origin of the Blenniiformes was estimated in the present-day IndoPacific region, corresponding to the Tethys Sea approximately 60.3 mya. A largely Neotropical lineage including the Labrisomidae, Chaenopsidae and Dactyloscopidae (node IV) evolved around 37.6 mya when the Neotropics were increasingly separated from the IndoPacific, but well before the closure of the Tethys Sea. Conclusions Relationships recovered in this study are similar to those of earlier analyses within the Clinidae and Chaenopsidae, and partially similar within the Blenniidae, but tripterygiid relationships remain poorly resolved. We present the first comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis for a monophyletic Labrisomidae with five tribes (Labrisomini, Mnierpini, Paraclinini, Stathmonotini and Starksiini). Global distributions of blenny genera included in our analysis support the evolution of a largely Neotropical clade whose closest relatives (clinids and cryptotremines) are temperate in distribution. PMID:24067147

  4. A new marine gobiid species of the genus Clariger Jordan & Snyder (Gobiidae, Teleostei) from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Gong, You-Hai; Chen, I-Shiung

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Clariger Jordan & Snyder, 1901 was collected from northern Taiwan. The genus was previously known only from Japanese waters. This discovery is the first formal and southernmost record of these marine gobies from the waters of subtropical Taiwan. The new species, Clariger taiwanensis sp. n., is distinguished from its congeners by a unique combination of features: (1) fin rays: dorsal-fin rays III, I/8; anal-fin rays modally I/8; and pectoral-fin rays modally 19 (2+16+1); (2) longitudinal dermal ridge on head with 6 barbels; and (3) specific coloration pattern: head and trunk dark brown with scattered pale spots and blotches; cheek, ventral portion of head sometimes pale with deep brown spots; pectoral-fin base with a dark brown band; and caudal fin mostly dark brown proximally and with alternating and irregular dark brown and pale bands distally. A diagnostic key to all nominal species from Japan and Taiwan is provided. PMID:22711994

  5. Gaidropsarus (Gadidae, Teleostei) of the North Atlantic Ocean: a brief phylogenetic review.

    PubMed

    Francisco, S M; Robalo, J I; Stefanni, S; Levy, A; Almada, V C

    2014-08-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the North Atlantic Gaidropsarus and between the three Gaidropsarinae genera Gaidropsarus, Ciliata and Enchelyopus are reviewed with the hitherto most comprehensive taxonomic sampling of this group. Phylogenetic results (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference) based on nuclear (rhodopsin) and concatenated mitochondrial (12s, 16s and cytb) markers clearly support this subfamily. For the north-eastern Atlantic species of Gaidropsarus, two previously unreported clades were strongly supported, clarifying the relationships within the genus, and revealing fewer distinct taxa in the north Atlantic Gaidropsarus than previously stipulated. The data challenge the specific status of Gaidropsarus mediterraneus and Gaidropsarus guttatus and raise doubts concerning the distinctiveness of other species. A taxonomic revision of the genus is suggested. PMID:24961593

  6. Powered control mechanisms contributing to dynamically stable swimming in porcupine puffers (Teleostei: Diodon holocanthus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Alexis M.; Lauritzen, Dean V.; Gordon, Malcolm S.

    2007-11-01

    Balances of multiple varying forces must be the basis for the unusually great dynamic stability of swimming pufferfishes. We used high-speed digital video recordings to study biomechanics and kinematics of rectilinear swimming at different speeds of five porcupine puffers in a water tunnel. We measured critical swimming speeds ( U crit); fin biomechanics, kinematics, and coordination; recoil movements; and gait changes. Major propulsors were pectoral fins at lower speeds; dorsal, anal, and caudal fins at higher speeds. Precise coordination of fin movements produced small recoil movements at speeds below U crit. The unusual body shape probably contributes to unconscious stability control.

  7. Powered control mechanisms contributing to dynamically stable swimming in porcupine puffers (Teleostei: Diodon holocanthus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Alexis M.; Lauritzen, Dean V.; Gordon, Malcolm S.

    Balances of multiple varying forces must be the basis for the unusually great dynamic stability of swimming pufferfishes. We used high-speed digital video recordings to study biomechanics and kinematics of rectilinear swimming at different speeds of five porcupine puffers in a water tunnel. We measured critical swimming speeds (Ucrit); fin biomechanics, kinematics, and coordination; recoil movements; and gait changes. Major propulsors were pectoral fins at lower speeds; dorsal, anal, and caudal fins at higher speeds. Precise coordination of fin movements produced small recoil movements at speeds below Ucrit. The unusual body shape probably contributes to unconscious stability control.

  8. Evolution of Herbivory in a Carnivorous Clade of Minnows (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): Effects on Gut Size

    E-print Network

    Evans, David H.

    contexts. The herbivorous taxa had longer digestive tracts and higher activity of the carbohydrases amylase independent-contrast analysis suggested that the evolution of amylase and chitinase activities was cor

  9. Haematological parameters in Umbrina cirrosa (Teleostei, Sciaenidae): a comparison between diploid and triploid specimens.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, Loriano; Dall'Oro, Manuela; Bertotto, Daniela; Libertini, Angelo; Francescon, Antonia; Barbaro, Alvise

    2004-05-01

    Haematological features were compared between diploid and triploid specimens of the ray-finned fish Umbrina cirrosa. No significant differences between diploids and triploids were reported in haematocrit and total haemoglobin concentration, but erythrocytes and thrombocytes were significantly greater in size in triploids. Glycaemia was significantly lower in diploids, whereas triploid erythrocytes were more resistant to osmotic stress. In triploids, a greater fraction of leukocytes was positive for alkaline phosphatase activity, when stimulated with Bacillus clausii spores, otherwise no significant increase of oxygen consumption was observed in triploid leukocytes after stimulation, based on assays for superoxide anions. Triploids were characterized by a lower concentration of circulating blood cells with a lower surface/volume ratio when compared with diploids. These features may lead to a general disadvantage of triploids in withstanding stress conditions: a situation that needs to be taken into account in aquaculture practice. PMID:15165570

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hoeven's mullet-goby Hemigobius hoevenii (Bleeker) (Teleostei, Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Pin; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chen, I-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Hoeven's mullet-goby Hemigobius hoevenii (Bleeker, 1851) collected from Malay Peninsula has been amplified and sequenced. The complete mitochondrial genome is 16,469 base pairs (bp) in total length, had the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, 1 control region (CR) and 1 light-strand replication origin (OL). The overall base composition of H. hoevenii is 27.1% for A, 26.6% for T, 29.0% for C, 17.3% for G, with higher AT content 53.7%. This study will contribute for understanding the phylogenetic approach of Hemigobius species as well as the related genera of gobiid fishes. PMID:24779596

  11. Spermatozoon ultrastructure of Aponurus laguncula (Digenea: Lecithasteridae), a parasite of Aluterus monoceros (Pisces: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Y; Foata, J; Justine, J-L; Bray, R A; Marchand, B

    2010-03-01

    The mature spermatozoon of Aponurus laguncula, a parasite of the unicorn leatherjacket Aluterus monoceros, was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The spermatozoon possesses 2 axonemes of the 9+"1" trepaxonematan pattern, attachment zones, a nucleus, a mitochondrion, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane and cortical microtubules. The major features are the presence of: 1) external ornamentation in the anterior part of the spermatozoon not associated with cortical microtubules; 2) one mitochondrion; and 3) cortical microtubules arranged as a single field in the ventral side. The maximum number of microtubules is in the nuclear region. The extremities of the axonemes are characterized by the disappearance of the central core and the presence of microtubule doublets or singlets. This study is the first undertaken with a member of the Lecithasteridae and exemplifies the sperm ultrastructure for the superfamily Hemiuroidea. PMID:19559102

  12. Karyotypic diversity and evolutionary trends in the Neotropical catfish genus Hypostomus Lacépède, 1803 (Teleostei, Siluriformes, Loricariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Anderson Luis; de Borba, Rafael Splendore; Oliveira, Claudio; Mauro Nirchio; Granado, Angel; Foresti, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The family Loricariidae with 813 nominal species is one of the largest fish families of the world. Hypostominae, its more complex subfamily, was recently divided into five tribes. The tribe Hypostomini is composed of a single genus, Hypostomus Lacépède, 1803, which exhibits the largest karyotypic diversity in the family Loricariidae. With the main objective of contributing to a better understanding of the relationship and the patterns of evolution among the karyotypes of Hypostomus species, cytogenetic studies were conducted in six species of the genus from Brazil and Venezuela. The results show a great chromosome variety with diploid numbers ranging from 2n=68 to 2n=76, with a clear predominance of acrocentric chromosomes. The Ag-NORs are located in terminal position in all species analyzed. Three species have single Ag-NORs (Hypostomus albopunctatus (Regan, 1908), Hypostomus prope plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758), and Hypostomus prope paulinus (Ihering, 1905)) and three have multiple Ag-NORs (Hypostomus ancistroides (Ihering, 1911), Hypostomus prope iheringi (Regan, 1908), and Hypostomus strigaticeps (Regan, 1908)). In the process of karyotype evolution of the group, the main type of chromosome rearrangements was possibly centric fissions, which may have been facilitated by the putative tetraploid origin of Hypostomus species. The relationship between the karyotype changes and the evolution in the genus is discussed. PMID:24260683

  13. Observations on the reproductive and larval biology of Blennius pavo (Pisces: Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westernhagen, H.

    1983-09-01

    Social behaviour and spawning of adult Blennius pavo kept in the laboratory are described. Eggs are deposited in batches on the walls of artificial spawning places (PVC pipes). One male guards and tends the eggs of different females in one spawning place. Larval hatching occurs in groups according to oviposition. Minimum incubation temperature is around 14 15°C. Larval survival in 1-1 rearing jars is not related to larval total length but to density of larval stock. An experimental population of laboratory reared juvenile and adolescent B. pavo displays a male to female ratio of 1:1.4. Factors possibly influencing the sex ratio of this littoral fish are discussed in view of the situation in its natural environment.

  14. Systematics and biogeography of Cyprinella venusta (Cyprinidae: Teleostei) inferred from analysis of mitochondrial DNA 

    E-print Network

    Kristmundsdottir, Asrun Yr

    1994-01-01

    . stigmatura. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA restriction-sites assayed from 20 geographic populations of C. venusta collected throughout the range of the species employed maximum parsimony, Neighbor-joining, and UPGMA cluster analysis. Cyprinella galactura...

  15. Liver transcriptome characterization of the endangered freshwater silverside Basilichthys microlepidotus (Teleostei: Atherinopsidae) using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vega-Retter, Caren; Véliz, David

    2014-10-25

    Twenty eight out of 44 Chilean freshwater fishes have been considered to fall within the vulnerable or threatened category. Thus, information about the biology, ecology and the effects of the anthropic activity on these species is fundamental to take appropriate conservation measures. In Chile the endemic silverside Basilichthys microlepidotus inhabits mainly rivers surrounded by cities; during the last 10years it was categorized as an endangered species, thus more basic information is needed in order to elaborate a plan of protection for this species. To this end, the transcriptome of B. microlepidotus was sequenced, assembled and characterized. A total of 7.8 million reads (1.05Gb) were obtained from the sequencing and 5.93 million reads (0.83Gb) were used for the de novo assembly, obtaining a total of 31,523 contigs. Of these, 13,724 contigs with expression in all the individuals used were retained for the functional annotation. 7938 sequences were successfully annotated; the biological processes class was the most highly represented, followed by molecular function and cellular component. These sequence data provide a useful new molecular resource for future studies on gene expression and the effects of the human activity on B. microlepidotus, which will facilitate obtaining more information about that, as well as the developing of appropriate conservation strategies for this species. PMID:25468065

  16. Two new species of the South Asian catfish genus Pseudolaguvia from northeastern India (Teleostei: Sisoridae).

    PubMed

    Tamang, Lakpa; Sinha, Bikramjit

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of sisorid catfish, Pseudolaguvia magna and P. jiyaensis, are described from the upper Brahmaputra River basin in Arunachal Pradesh, northeastern India. Pseudolaguvia magna differs from its congeners by its much larger size (47.0 mm standard length vs. a maximum of 35.6 mm), by having a broader rhomboid thoracic adhesive apparatus, two pale-brown or cream patches on the mid-dorsal region across the dorsal midline: one rectangular to elliptic patch on the mid-interdorsal region, and another indistinct elliptic to irregular patch between the adipose and caudal-fins; and a small, round, pale-brown to cream spot on the lateral side of the head; and except for P. inornata, P. austrina, P. virgulata, and P. assula, in lacking pale to cream cross-bands on the body. Another syntopic new species, Pseudolaguvia jiyaensis, is distinguished from its congeners by having the thoracic adhesive apparatus almost reaching the pelvic-fin origin, and by having fewer vertebrae (25-27 vs. 28-34; except in P. tenebricosa and P. tuberculata). Details of the combination of characters differentiating each of the new species from its congeners are provided in the respective diagnoses. PMID:25543922

  17. Electric Signals in the Social Behavior of Sympatric Elephantfish (Mormyridae, Teleostei) from the Upper Zambezi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, A.; Kramer, B.

    Electrocommunication in mormyrid fish from African freshwaters is a challenging research field in neuroethology (Turner et al. 1999). However, virtually nothing is known about electrocommunication within natural mormyrid populations involving sympatric, syntopic species. Here we report on the nocturnal activities and electrocommunication among three syntopic species in a spacious laboratory setting resembling the natural one. Petrocephalus catostoma, Cyphomyrus discorhynchus, and Hippopotamyrus sp. nov. differ characteristically in their behavior, such as in territorial defense, schooling, and joining members of other species during foraging. Comparing social encounters within and between species, the first evidence for interspecific electrocommunication among syntopic species was found.

  18. Spawning migrations of the endemic Labeobarbus (Cyprinidae, Teleostei) species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia: status and threats.

    PubMed

    Anteneh, W; Getahun, A; Dejen, E; Sibbing, F A; Nagelkerke, L A J; De Graaf, M; Wudneh, T; Vijverberg, J; Palstra, A P

    2012-07-01

    The reproductive biology of the only known intact species flock of large cyprinids, the 16 Labeobarbus species of Lake Tana (Ethiopia), has been extensively studied for the past two decades. Seven species of Labeobarbus are known to migrate >50 km upstream into tributary rivers for spawning during the rainy season (July to October), whereas eight other species are absent from these rivers and probably developed a new strategy of lacustrine spawning (macro-spatial segregation). One species (L. intermedius) probably spawns in the lake as well as in the rivers. Between the early 1990s and 2000s, the riverine spawners showed a decline of 75% in both biomass and number in both fishery independent surveys and in commercial catches. Reproductive migration makes fishes vulnerable to fisheries and other threats like habitat modifications. Lacustrine spawners are probably more resilient as they are not known to form spawning aggregations that can easily be exploited by fishermen. In addition, upstream rivers and catchments around Lake Tana are highly degraded by erosion and recently subjected to intensive habitat modification for irrigation and hydroelectric power generation. This article reviews results of field studies on the Labeobarbus spawning migration from Lake Tana to spawning rivers, giving emphasis on segregation and homing. It also summarizes existing and emerging threats which form potential causes for the decline of the migratory Labeobarbus species. Knowledge gaps on the reproductive biology are identified for further investigation. PMID:22803734

  19. Parasitofauna study of the brown trout, Salmo trutta (Pisces, Teleostei) from Corsica (Mediterranean island) rivers.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Y; Foata, J; Orsini, A; Mattéi, J; Marchand, B

    2007-09-01

    Corsica is a Mediterranean island characterised by a great number of rivers. Salmonides are the main fishes which populate these rivers. Very appreciated by fishermen, Salmonides are represented by three species in the insular hydrographical network, among which an autochthonous species, the brown trout (Salmo trutta). In the present work, we have analysed the parasitofauna of this species. According to our knowledge, this research has never been carried out in Corsica. In a first step, we drew up an inventory of the parasites found in this freshwater fish. In a second step, we studied the differences which appeared in the composition of parasite communities of this species. PMID:17933306

  20. Developmental Osteology of Two Species of Economically Important Sciaenids, Sciaenops ocellatus and Cynoscion nebulosus (Teleostei: Sciaenidae) 

    E-print Network

    Kubicek, Kole

    2014-04-22

    developed and there are only four ossifications present. In the orbital region, the frontal is present as a domed lamina of dermal bone, situated dorsal to the taenia marginalis posterior. The frontal also dorsally overlaps the lateral edge... of the epiphyseal bar, with the majority of the bone situated posterior to this element. The thin dermal parasphenoid is located centrally along the ventral surface of the chondrocranium, between the medial edges of the parachordal cartilages. Anteriorly...

  1. Fluctuating asymmetry as a pollution monitor: The Australian estuarine smooth toadfish Tetractenos glaber (Teleostei: Tetraodontidae).

    PubMed

    Lajus, Dmitry; Yurtseva, Anastasia; Birch, Gavin; Booth, David J

    2015-12-30

    The relationship between pollution level in estuarine sediment and fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of resident smooth toadfish Tetractenos glaber was evaluated. A total of 188 fish from Sydney and Hawkesbury River estuaries (5 locations from each) were analysed for 28 bilateral skull bone characters. Sediment pollution was quantified based on analysis of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and organochlorine pesticides (DDT, DDD, DDE, chlordane, dieldrin, lindane). Sediment toxicity was characterized using the mean quotient approach (MERMQ) and ranged from low to moderate level for heavy metals and from low to severe for organochlorides. The mean shape and directional asymmetry of fish bones differed among locations, suggesting a response to local environments. FA was positively correlated with organochlorine pesticides across locations, but not with heavy metals. These results suggest that fish FA could be a useful estimator of stress caused by organic toxicity based on the MERMQ approach. PMID:26443385

  2. Molecular systematics of the enigmatic Middle American genus Vieja (Teleostei: Cichlidae)

    E-print Network

    Piller, Kyle R.

    Cichlid Phylogeny Neotropical Systematics a b s t r a c t The genus Vieja represents a group of heroine generic designations have been proposed for members of Vie- ja, and recent systematic studies of heroine Vieja. Vieja represents a group of heroine cichlids that occur on both the Atlantic and Pacific slopes

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of the pseudobream, Pseudobrama simoni (Teleostei:Cypriniformes:Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Xiong; Song, Yong; Zhou, Qiao; Xue, Yang; Xu, Hao; Luo, Xi; Li, Yun

    2015-10-01

    The Pseudobrama simoni (Bleeker) is the only one species within the genus Pseudobrama of the subfamily Xenocyprinae. In this study, we first determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the P. simoni. The whole mitogenome is 16,618?bp in size, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 1 control region. The gene order and molecule structure are similar to most vertebrates. The complete mitogenome of P. simoni provides the valuable information for the biogeographic and phylogenetic studies on the subfamily Xenocyprinae. PMID:24156718

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese lizard gudgeon, Saurogobio dabryi (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Xue, Yang; Li, Xin-Yue; Luo, Xi; Li, Yang; Li, Yun

    2015-12-01

    The Chinese lizard gudgeon, Saurogobio dabryi Bleeker, belongs to the subfamily Gobioninea, which is an economic fish widely distributed in East Asia. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the S. dabryi. The complete mitogenome was 16,601?bp in size, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 1 control region. It has the typical circular molecule structure of vertebrate's mitochondrial genome. The whole base composition was estimated to be 29.64%A, 26.47%T, 27.06%C and 16.83%G with AT bias of 56.11%. This study is a first report the complete mitogenome of S. dabryi and provides the basis for preservation of genetic resources and phylogenetic analyses on this species. PMID:24409846

  5. First record of the black bullhead Ameiurus melas (Teleostei: Ictaluridae) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowak, M; Kosco, J; Popek, W; Epler, P

    2010-04-01

    The North American catfish, the black bullhead Ameiurus melas, is recorded for the first time in Poland. The origin of these fish is not clear, but their presence may be associated with unregulated introductions by anglers. PMID:20537032

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizothorax chongi (Fang, 1936) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Schizothoracinae).

    PubMed

    Que, Yan-Fu; Xu, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei-Tao; Yang, Zhi; Tang, Hui-Yuan; Shao, Ke

    2016-03-01

    Schizothorax chongi is an endemic and important polyploidy fish in the upper stream of the Yangtze River. S. chongi represents a typical model species to study historical adaptation and evolution in the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, the complete mitochondrial DNA genome sequence of S. chongi was first determined by DNA sequencing based on the PCR fragments. The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome sequence of S. chongi is a circular molecule of 16,584?bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a control region (D-loop). The gene nucleotide composition of S. chongi is 29.6% A, 27.1% C, 17.9% G, and 25.4% T, with a high AT content (55.0%). The results could provide useful data for further studies on phylogenetics, conservation genetics and rational resource management for S. chongi. PMID:24865916

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Triplophysa anterodorsalis (Teleostei, Balitoridae, Nemacheilinae).

    PubMed

    Que, Yan-Fu; Liao, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zhi; Tang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Triplophysa anterodorsalis is an endemic fish in the upper stream of the Yangtze River, Jinsha River and its tributaries. However, wild populations of T. anterodorsalis declined sharply due to cascade hydropower stations constructed successively in the Jinsha River during the past decades. In the present study, the complete mitochondrial DNA genome sequence of T. anterodorsalis was first determined by DNA sequencing based on the PCR fragments. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of T. anterodorsalis is a circular molecule of 16,567?bp in size. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a control region (D-loop). The gene nucleotide composition of T. anterodorsalis is 27.37% A, 25.68% C, 18.37% G, and 28.57% T, with a relatively a relatively high A?+?T content (55.94%). The results could provide useful data for studies on genetic structure and diversity and rational resource conservation in T. anterodorsalis. PMID:24919506

  8. Two new species of the genus Cobitis linnaeus (Teleostei: Cobitidae) from southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxia; Sui, Xiaoyun; Liang, Na; Chen, Yifeng

    2015-10-01

    Two new species of the genus Cobitis from southern China, C. hereromacula from the Luohe River in Guangdong Province and C. baishagensis from the Nandujiang River in Hainan Province, are described and illustrated here. C. hereromacula can be distinguished from its congeners by possessing the following combination of characteristics: absence of the second and third pigmentary zones of Gambetta; 13-16 oval blotches on the dorsum and 10-13 vertical, elongated triangular blotches below the midlateral line with more than 20 vertical dark brown bars between them; 6-7 narrow rows of dark spots on the caudal fin; a vertical oval spot smaller than the eye diameter on the upper part of the caudal peduncle; pointed mental lobes of the lower lip pointed with a slightly filiform tip; one slender and long needle-shaped lamina circularis at the base of the first branched ray of the male pectoral fins. C. baishagensis can be distinguished from its congeners by the fourth Gambetta zone being covered by 10-12 transverse elongated blotches; 4-5 narrow rows of dark spots on the caudal fin; a vertical blotch smaller than the eye diameter on the upper part of the caudal peduncle; males with a slender and long needle-shaped lamina circularis at the second branched pectoral fin ray in males; large scales with a slightly large focal zone; undeveloped mental lobes with a lower lip that does not end posteriorly in a filiform tip.

  9. A new species of Pseudophoxinus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from Southwestern Anatolia, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ekmekçi, F Güler; Atalay, M Altu?; Yo?urtçuo?lu, Baran; Turan, Davut; Küçük, Fahrettin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophoxinus mehmeti, new cyprinid species from the Alanköy basin in south-western Turkey, is distinguished from all species of Pseudophoxinus in adjacent regions by the combination of the following characters: body slender, its length 1.3-1.5 times its depth; caudal peduncle length 1.6-2.0 times its depth; mouth almost superior, with the tip of the mouth-cleft approximately level with the middle of the pupil; snout with a pointed tip, its length markedly greater than eye diameter; lateral line not complete, with 30-50 perforated scales and 48-60+2 scale rows in lateral series; 11½-13½ scale rows between lateral line and dorsal-fin origin, 3½-5½ scale rows between lateral line and anal-fin origin; dorsal-fin with 6½-7½ branched rays; anal-fin with 6½-7½ branched rays; a distinct black epidermal stripe from eye to caudal-fin base in preserved individuals. PMID:26624395

  10. The complete mitogenome of the Murray Cod, Maccullochella peelii (Mitchell, 1838) (Teleostei: Percichthyidae).

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Croft, Laurence J; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the iconic Australian freshwater fish, the Murray Cod, Maccullochella peelii, was recovered from partial genome sequencing data using the HiSeq platform (Illumina, San Diego, CA). The mitogenome consists of 16,442?bp (58% A?+?T content) containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a 768?bp non-coding AT-rich region. This is the first mitogenome sequence for the genus Maccullochella, and the fourth for the family Percichthyidae. PMID:24779601

  11. Phylogeny of the snailfishes (Teleostei: Liparidae) based on molecular and morphological data.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, S W; Møller, P R; Gravlund, P

    2007-08-01

    Liparidae (snailfishes) is one of the most diverse and abundant fish families in polar and deep-sea habitats. However, the evolution of this family is poorly known because of the rarity of many species and difficulties in scoring morphological characters. We perform phylogenetic analyses of Liparidae using sequences from two mtDNA genes, 16S (585 bp) and cytochrome b (426 bp), and 84 morphological characters from 24 species of Liparidae and 4 species of Cyclopteridae (outgroup). The present study confirms earlier hypotheses that the shallow-water genera, such as Liparis and Crystallichthys, occupy basal positions and that deep-water genera, such as Careproctus, Elassodiscus, Rhinoliparis, Paraliparis, Rhodichthys and Psednos, are increasingly derived. The later two genera form a terminal clade which does not include Paraliparis. The topology shows that the family has undergone a reductive type of evolution, with a gradual loss of characters (e.g. sucking disc/pelvic fins, pseudobranchial filaments, skin spinules). Nectoliparis, which had previously been placed either as the basal most genus or among the most derived genera, are found to occupy the most basal position among the taxa analyzed. This result indicates that the sucking disc has been lost at least twice during the evolution of the Liparidae. The basal position of Nectoliparis is supported by its plesiomorphic otolith morphology, whereas an advanced overgrown otolith ostium, unique among teleosts, is found to be apomorphic for a clade containing the derived genera: Paraliparis, Psednos, Rhinoliparis and Rhodichthys. We also identify the presence of probable nuclear inserts of mitochondrial DNA (Numts) in three species of Careproctus and in Elassodiscus caudatus. PMID:17544302

  12. Badis britzi, a new percomorph fish (Teleostei: Badidae) from the Western Ghats of India.

    PubMed

    Dahanukar, Neelesh; Kumkar, Pradeep; Katwate, Unmesh; Raghavan, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Badis britzi, the first species of the genus endemic to southern India, is described from the Nagodi tributary of the west-flowing Sharavati River in Karnataka. It is distinguished from congeners by a combination of characters including a slender body, 21-24 pored lateral-line scales and a striking colour pattern consisting of 11 bars and a mosaic of black and red pigmentation on the side of the body including the end of caudal peduncle, and the absence of cleithral, opercular, or caudal-peduncle blotches, or an ocellus on the caudal-fin base. Badis triocellus Khynriam & Sen is considered a junior synonym of B. singenensis Geetakumari & Kadu. PMID:25947522

  13. Autonomic control of post-air-breathing tachycardia in Clarias gariepinus (Teleostei: Clariidae).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Mariana Teodoro; Armelin, Vinicius Araújo; Abe, Augusto Shinya; Rantin, Francisco Tadeu; Florindo, Luiz Henrique

    2015-08-01

    The African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) is a teleost with bimodal respiration that utilizes a paired suprabranchial chamber located in the gill cavity as an air-breathing organ. Like all air-breathing fishes studied to date, the African catfish exhibits pronounced changes in heart rate (f H) that are associated with air-breathing events. We acquired f H, gill-breathing frequency (f G) and air-breathing frequency (f AB) in situations that require or do not require air breathing (during normoxia and hypoxia), and we assessed the autonomic control of post-air-breathing tachycardia using an infusion of the ?-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine. During normoxia, C. gariepinus presented low f AB (1.85 ± 0.73 AB h(-1)) and a constant f G (43.16 ± 1.74 breaths min(-1)). During non-critical hypoxia (PO2 = 60 mmHg), f AB in the African catfish increased to 5.42 ± 1.19 AB h(-1) and f G decreased to 39.12 ± 1.58 breaths min(-1). During critical hypoxia (PO2 = 20 mmHg), f AB increased to 7.4 ± 1.39 AB h(-1) and f G decreased to 34.97 ± 1.78 breaths min(-1). These results were expected for a facultative air breather. Each air breath (AB) was followed by a brief but significant tachycardia, which in the critical hypoxia trials, reached a maximum of 143 % of the pre-AB f H values of untreated animals. Pharmacological blockade allowed the calculation of cardiac autonomic tones, which showed that post-AB tachycardia is predominantly regulated by the parasympathetic subdivision of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:25982049

  14. Nuclear gene-inferred phylogenies resolve the relationships of the enigmatic Pygmy Sunfishes, Elassoma (Teleostei: Percomorpha).

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Sandel, Michael; Kuhn, Kristen L; Unmack, Peter J; Wainwright, Peter C; Smith, Wm Leo

    2012-05-01

    Elassoma, the Pygmy Sunfishes, has long proven difficult to classify among the more than 15,000 species of percomorph fishes. Hypotheses dating to the 19th Century include Elassoma in Centrarchidae or in the monogeneric Elassomatidae, and more recent phylogenetic hypotheses have classified Elassoma in Smegmamorpha that also contained Synbranchiformes, Mugiliformes, Gasterosteiformes, and Atherinomorpha. No published phylogenetic analysis of morphological or molecular data has supported the monophyly of Smegmamorpha, or a consistent resolution of Elassoma relationships. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of Elassoma and test the monophyly of Smegmamorpha with a nucleotide dataset comprising 10 protein-coding nuclear genes sampled from 65 percomorph species. Maximum likelihood analyses of each individual gene and the concatenated 10 genes all result in strong support for a clade composed of Elassoma and Centrarchidae, and no analysis supports monophyly of Smegmamorpha. Based on these results, a rank-free phylogenetic definition of Centrarchidae is presented that includes Elassoma, and the continued recognition of Smegmamorpha is discouraged. We discuss the implications of these phylogenetic analyses for relationships of several other percomorph lineages, including Kyphosidae, Terapontidae, Kuhliidae, Cheilodactylidae, Percichthyidae, Howellidae, Enoplosidae, Sinipercidae, and Cirrhitidae. PMID:22293156

  15. Genetic population structure of sympatric and allopatric populations of Baltic ciscoes (Coregonus albula complex, Teleostei, Coregonidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Teleost fishes of the Coregonidae are good model systems for studying postglacial evolution, adaptive radiation and ecological speciation. Of particular interest is whether the repeated occurrence of sympatric species pairs results from in-situ divergence from a single lineage or from multiple invasions of one or more different lineages. Here, we analysed the genetic structure of Baltic ciscoes (Coregonus albula complex), examining 271 individuals from 8 lakes in northern Germany using 1244 polymorphic AFLP loci. Six lakes had only one population of C. albula while the remaining two lakes had C. albula as well as a sympatric species (C. lucinensis or C. fontanae). Results AFLP demonstrated a significant population structure (Bayesian ?B = 0.22). Lower differentiation between allopatric (?B = 0.028) than sympatric (0.063-0.083) populations contradicts the hypothesis of a sympatric origin of taxa, and there was little evidence for stocking or ongoing hybridization. Genome scans found only three loci that appeared to be under selection in both sympatric population pairs, suggesting a low probability of similar mechanisms of ecological segregation. However, removal of all non-neutral loci decreased the genetic distance between sympatric pairs, suggesting recent adaptive divergence at a few loci. Sympatric pairs in the two lakes were genetically distinct from the six other C. albula populations, suggesting introgression from another lineage may have influenced these two lakes. This was supported by an analysis of isolation-by-distance, where the drift-gene flow equilibrium observed among allopatric populations was disrupted when the sympatric pairs were included. Conclusions While the population genetic data alone can not unambiguously uncover the mode of speciation, our data indicate that multiple lineages may be responsible for the complex patterns typically observed in Coregonus. Relative differences within and among lakes raises the possibility that multiple lineages may be present in northern Germany, thus understanding the postglacial evolution and speciation in the C. albula complex requires a large-scale phylogenetic analysis of several potential founder lineages. PMID:20350300

  16. A new species of redfin (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Pseudobarbus) from the Verlorenvlei River system, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chakona, Albert; Swartz, Ernst R.; Skelton, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pseudobarbus verloreni, a new species, is described from material collected in the Verlorenvlei River system on the west coast of South Africa. It differs from its congeners (except Pseudobarbus skeltoni, Pseudobarbus burchelli, and Pseudobarbus burgi) by the presence of two pairs of oral barbels. Pseudobarbus verloreni sp. n. can be distinguished from the three currently described double barbeled Pseudobarbus species by the following combination of characters: pigment pattern, generally deeper body relative to standard length, a longer intestine associated with the deeper body form, shorter snout relative to head length, and much shorter anterior barbels relative to head length. The new species is distinguished from Pseudobarbus burgi in the neighbouring Berg River system by its longer head and longer pre-dorsal length. It seems as if Pseudobarbus verloreni sp. n. has been extirpated from the Langvlei River system and face several threats to its survival in the Verlorenvlei River system. PMID:25493062

  17. †Kenyaichthyidae fam. nov. and †Kenyaichthys gen. nov. – First Record of a Fossil Aplocheiloid Killifish (Teleostei, Cyprinodontiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Altner, Melanie; Reichenbacher, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    The extant Cyprinodontiformes (killifishes) with their two suborders Cyprinodontoidei and Aplocheiloidei represent a diverse and well-studied group of fishes. However, their fossil record is comparatively sparse and has so far yielded members of the Cyprinodontoidei only. Here we report on cyprinodontiform fossils from the upper Miocene Lukeino Formation in the Tugen Hills of the Central Rift Valley of Kenya, which represent the first fossil record of an aplocheiloid killifish. A total of 169 specimens - mostly extraordinarily well preserved - and a sample of ten extant cyprinodontiform species were studied on the basis of morphometrics, meristics and osteology. A phylogenetic analysis using PAUP was also conducted for the fossils. Both the osteological data and the phylogenetic analysis provide strong evidence for the assignment of the fossils to the Aplocheiloidei, and justify the definition of the new family †Kenyaichthyidae, the new genus †Kenyaichthys and the new species †K. kipkechi sp. nov. The phylogenetic analysis unexpectedly places †Kenyaichthys gen. nov. in a sister relationship to the Rivulidae (a purely Neotropical group), a probable explanation might be lack of available synapomorphies for the Rivulidae, Nothobranchiidae and Aplocheilidae. The specimens of †K. kipkechi sp. nov. show several polymorphic characters and large overlap in meristic traits, which justifies their interpretation as a species flock in statu nascendi. Patterns of variation in neural and haemal spine dimensions in the caudal vertebrae of †Kenyaichthys gen. nov. and the extant species studied indicate that some previously suggested synapomorphies of the Cyprinodontoidei and Aplocheiloidei need to be revised. PMID:25923654

  18. Macropharyngodon pakoko, a new species of wrasse (Teleostei: Labridae) endemic to the Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Delrieu-Trottin, Erwan; Williams, Jeffrey T; Planes, Serge

    2014-01-01

    A new species of wrasse, Macropharyngodon pakoko, is described from the Marquesas Islands, bringing the total number of species of the genus Macropharyngodon to 12. Macropharyngodon pakoko was found at depths from 0-42 m and is endemic to the Marquesas Islands. Macropharyngodon pakoko is similar to M. meleagris, which is widely distributed from the central and western Pacific to Cocos-Keeling in the Indian Ocean, but differs genetically and in several coloration characters: males with irregularly curved black humeral blotch with incomplete iridescent blue border; inverted irregular "U"- shaped band on the cheek; a small black spot at the upper base of the pectoral fin; and background color of the body greenish with faint bluish black spots on each scale. Females lack black pigment on the chest posterior to the ventral attachment of the gill membranes; reddish black blotches on the body are widely spaced, particularly on the head where they are more reddish and half the size of those on body; caudal fin with small, bright yellow spots arranged in narrow vertical bands with pale interspaces; pelvic fins pale with three reddish yellow cross-bands; a small black spot at the upper base of the pectoral fin; and small reddish spots along the base of the anal fin. Juveniles have irregular black blotches on the body, a small black spot instead of an ocellus posteriorly on the dorsal fin and lack large black spots and ocellus on the anal fin.  PMID:25283116

  19. The eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae, Teleostei): novel ocular specializations for vision in dim light.

    PubMed

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Marshall, N Justin; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-05-01

    Lanternfishes are one of the most abundant groups of mesopelagic fishes in the world's oceans and play a critical role in biomass vertical turnover. Despite their importance, very little is known about their physiology or how they use their sensory systems to survive in the extreme conditions of the deep sea. In this study, we provide a comprehensive description of the general morphology of the myctophid eye, based on analysis of 53 different species, to understand better their visual capabilities. Results confirm that myctophids possess several visual adaptations for dim-light conditions, including enlarged eyes, an aphakic gap, a tapetum lucidum, and a pure rod retina with high densities of long photoreceptors. Two novel retinal specializations were also discovered. The first specialization is a fundal pigmentation in adult eyes, found within an isolated retinal region (typically central retina) composed of modified pigment epithelial cells, which we hypothesize to be the remnant of a more pronounced visual specialization important in larval stages. The second specialization is an aggregation of extracellular microtubular-like structures found within the sclerad region of the inner nuclear layer of the retina. We hypothesize that the marked interspecific differences in the hypertrophy of these microtubular-like structures may be related to inherent differences in visual function. A general interspecific variability in other parts of the eye is also revealed and examined in this study. The contribution of both ecology and phylogeny to the evolution of ocular specializations and vision in dim light are discussed. PMID:24638897

  20. Nannoperca pygmaea, a new species of pygmy perch (Teleostei: Percichthyidae) from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L; Beatty, Stephen J; Adams, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A new species of pygmy perch (Percichthyidae) from south-western Australia is described on the basis of 15 specimens collected from the Hay River system. Nannoperca pygmaea sp. nov. differs from the sympatric congener N. vittata (Castelnau) by the absence of dark pigment on the ventral surface anterior to the anus, the possession of thin latero-ventral stripes, generally fewer dorsal rays and fewer anal rays, hind margin of scales on caudal peduncle without distinct pigment, and a more pronounced spot (ocellus) that is surrounded by a halo at the termination of the caudal peduncle. The new species is distinguished from congeners Nannoperca australis Günther, N. oxleyana Whitley and N. variegata Kuiter and Allen in possessing an exposed and serrated preorbital bone and jaws that may just reach to below the anterior margin of the eye, versus a smooth and hidden preorbital and the jaws reaching to at least below the pupil; and from the remaining congener, N. obscura (Klunzinger) in possessing a distinct haloed ocellus at base of caudal fin versus an indistinct barring, as well as a dark spot behind operculum, and the lack of dusky scale margins. It differs from the other sympatric pygmy perch found in the region, N. balstoni Regan, by the presence of an exposed rear edge of the preorbital (vs. hidden under skin), fewer transverse scale rows (13 vs. 15-16), small mouth (rarely reaching eye vs. reaching well beyond eye), ctenoid (vs. cycloid) body scales, generally fewer pectoral rays and smaller maximum size. Allozyme analyses unequivocally demonstrate that sympatric populations of N. pygmaea sp. nov. and N. vittata belong in different genetic lineages, display no genetic intermediates, and are diagnosable by fixed allozyme differences at 15 different loci. Due to its extremely restricted range, where it is known from only 0.06 km2, N. pygmaea sp. nov. requires urgent legislative protection. PMID:26046207

  1. Retinal response in the post metamorphic American eel ( Anguilla rostrata) (Pisces, Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed Ather; Dutil, Jean-Denis; Fortier, Lyne

    1987-12-01

    Retinas of light and dark adapted post metamorphic American eel Anguilla rostrata were examined. The retinal epithelial pigment migrates vitreally in light and sclerally in darkness. Two layers of rods and a layer of single cones are present. Some cones elongate slightly in the dark and contract in the light. The cone synaptic ribbons show no difference between the light and dark adapted stages. It appears that this eel stage is capable of functioning in bright and dim environments.

  2. Cryptic Diversity and Venom Glands in Western Atlantic Clingfishes of the Genus Acyrtus (Teleostei: Gobiesocidae)

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kevin W.; Baldwin, Carole; White, Macaulay D.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of genetic data (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I) for western Atlantic clingfishes revealed two distinct lineages within a group of individuals originally identified as Acyrtus artius. Subsequent investigation of preserved voucher specimens was conducted to reconcile the genetic data and the existing classification, which is based on morphology. In addition to discovering that one of the genetic lineages is an undescribed species, which we describe as Acyrtus lanthanum, new species, we found that the nominal species Acyrtus artius has a putative venom gland associated with the subopercle that has been overlooked since the species was described nearly 60 years ago. The new species lacks the subopercular gland as does Acyrtus rubiginosus, but one is present in the related Arcos nudus. Venom glands have not been reported previously for the Gobiesocidae, and the venom gland described herein for Acyrtus and Arcos represents the first example in teleost fishes of a venom gland associated with the subopercle. PMID:24825326

  3. Astyanax hastatus Myers, 1928 (Teleostei, Characidae): A new species complex within the genus Astyanax?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Four populations of Astyanax hastatus Myers 1928 from the Guapimirim River basin (Rio de Janeiro State) were analyzed and three distinct cytotypes identified. These cytotypes presented 2n = 50 chromosomes, with 4M+8SM+10ST+28A (Cytotype A), 8M+10SM+14ST+18A (Cytotype B), 6M+8SM+4ST+32A (Cytotype C) and scanty heterochromatin, mainly located throughout pericentromeric regions of several chromosomal pairs. No homologies with the As-51 satellite DNA were observed in the three cytotypes, although all of them presented multiple 18S rDNA sites, as detected by both silver nitrate staining and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). The application of the term “species complex” in Astyanax is discussed from a cytotaxonomic viewpoint. PMID:21637509

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Zig-zag eel Mastacembelus armatus (Teleostei, Mastacembelidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Xu, Ruilin; Shu, Hu; Chen, Qian; Huang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Mastacembelus armatus was determined. The mitochondrial genome is 16,486?bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and a noncoding control region as those found in other vertebrates, with the gene identical to that of typical vertebrates. The overall base composition of the heavy strand are 25.28% of A, 29.13% of T, 14.65% of C and 30.93% of G, with a slight AT bias of 54.41%. With the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. PMID:24617467

  5. Mitochondrial genome of the sucking disc gudgeon, Discogobio yunnanensis (Teleostei, Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Chen, Hui-Juan; Li, Yang; Tang, Min; Chen, Hong-Jun; Ye, Qin; Li, Yun

    2016-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Discogobio yunnanensis was determined using the polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced with the primer walking method. The whole mitogenome was 16,602?bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 1 control region. It had the typical circular molecule structure of vertebrate's mitogenome. The whole base composition was estimated to be 32.10% A, 26.79% T, 25.95% C, 15.16% G with AT bias of 58.89%. The complete mitogenome of D. yunnanensis provides the fundamental data for conservation genetics study on this freshwater fish species. PMID:25162381

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizothorax prenanti (Tchang) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Schizothoracinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Na; Huang, Ying-Ying; Li, Hua; Long, Zhi-Hai; Lai, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Guang-Xun; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ya-fish, Schizothorax prenanti, is a well-known commercial cold-water fish species with the hexaploid karyotype distributed in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River and its tributaries on the western Sichuan Plateau in China. The complete mitogenome of S. prenanti is 16,587?bp in length, containing 37 genes of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region (D-loop). The gene nucleotide composition of S. prenanti is 29.6% A, 25.4% T, 27.1% C and 17.9% G, with a slight AT bias of 55.0%. The complete mitogenome sequence of S. prenanti could provide useful data for further studies on genetic structure and diversity, as well as the artificial cultivation and breeding of S. prenanti. PMID:24521499

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of the natural triploid loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cobitididae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Yao; Li, Yan-He; Li, Ru-Wei; Wang, Wei-Min; Zhou, Xiao-Yun

    2014-10-01

    Abstract The complete mitochondrial genome of the natural triploid loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a circular molecule of 16,646 bp in size, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 2 main noncoding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). Most of the genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and 8 tRNAs. The control region is 918 bp in length and located between the tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe) genes, some typical conserved elements (TAS, CSB1-3 and CSB D-F) were found in this region. All these features reflect a typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement of the triploid M. anguillicaudatus. PMID:23815325

  8. Highly differentiated and conserved sex chromosome in fish species (Aulopus japonicus: Teleostei, Aulopidae).

    PubMed

    Ota, Kinya; Tateno, Yoshio; Gojobori, Takashi

    2003-10-23

    While highly differentiated and long-conserved sex chromosomes such as XY and ZW chromosomes are observed, respectively, in mammalian and avian species, no counterparts to such chromosomes were observed in fish until we reported in the previous study that well-conserved and highly differentiated ZW sex chromosomes existed in the family of Synodontidae. Then, the problem was if the evolutionary history of the fish ZW chromosomes was long enough to be comparable to the mammalian and avian counterparts. To tackle the problem, we had to extend our finding of the fish sex chromosomes further than a family alone. For this purpose, we chose Aulopus japonicus that belonged to one of the related families to Synodontidae. Our cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses have clearly demonstrated that A. japonicus also has ZW chromosomes. We have also found that 5S rDNA clusters are located on the Z and W chromosomes in this species. Using nontranscribed intergenic sequences in the 5S rDNA clusters as PCR primers, we successfully amplified a 6-kb-long female-specific sequence on the W chromosome. The 6-kb-long sequence contained one transposable element and two tRNA sequences. The function of the sequence remains to be studied. Our Southern blot analysis confirmed that the 6-kb sequence was located only on the W chromosome.Therefore, it is now said that highly differentiated ZW chromosomes have been conserved over two fish families. As these families were reported to have been diverged 30-60 million years ago, the fish ZW chromosomes have an evolutionary history corresponding to the history of the families. This is perhaps the first case that fish sex chromosomes are shown to have such a long evolutionary lineage. PMID:14604807

  9. Genetic differentiation among natural populations of the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Teleostei, cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Agnèse, J F; Adépo-Gourène, B; Abban, E K; Fermon, Y

    1997-07-01

    We analysed the genetic differentiation among 17 natural populations of the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) using allozymes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The populations studied, from the River Senegal to Lake Tana and from Lake Manzalla to Lake Baringo, represent all subspecies which have been previously described. Sixteen variable nuclear loci showed that these populations can be clustered in three groups: (1) West African populations (Senegal, Niger, Volta and Chad drainages), (2) Ethiopian Rift Valley populations (Lakes Awasa, Ziway, Koka and the Awash River) and (3) Nile drainage (Manzalla, Cairo, Lake Edward) and Kenyan Rift Valley populations (Lakes Turkana, Baringo and River Suguta). Nine different mtDNA haplotypes were found in the RFLP analysis of a 1 kb portion of the D-loop region. The network obtained showed that there are three geographically distinct groups; all West African populations and O. aureus are clustered, the two Ethiopian Rift Valley populations are distinct and between these two groups are the Kenyan and Ugandan Rift Valley populations. Nile populations show affinities both with West African populations and with specimens from Lakes Tana and Turkana. Taxonomic and biogeographical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:9253615

  10. Structure and function of placental exchange surfaces in goodeid fishes (Teleostei: Atheriniformes).

    PubMed

    Schindler, Joachim F

    2015-08-01

    The species of the family Goodeidae have evolved reproductive strategies involving intraovarian gestation, early evacuation of nearly yolk-exhausted embryos from the ovigerous tissue into the ovarian cavity, placental matrotrophy during intraluminal gestation, and the birth of highly developed fry. The inner ovarian lining becomes hypervascularized during gestational periods and functions as the maternal component of the placental association. Embryotrophic liquid is secreted by the inner ovarian epithelium into the ovarian cavity. Comparative electrophoretic analyses of embryotrophe and maternal blood serum provide evidence for the transfer of maternal serum proteins into the embryotrophe. Trophotaeniae, proctodaeal processes of the embryos, provide a surface for nutrient absorption. Endocytic activity was demonstrated by ingestion of unspecific tracer proteins in various species. Moreover, the trophotaenial absorptive cells (TACs) in Ameca splendens ingest various proteins or random copolymers conjugated to colloidal gold as well as radioiodinated proteins in a way that satisfies the criteria of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several aminopeptidases (APs) on the surface of TACs were identified as protein binding sites as evidenced by inhibition of binding and uptake of marker proteins in the presence of AP substrates or AP inhibitors. Morphological adaptations of the embryonic circulatory system pertaining to nutrient and gas exchange were characterized. The embryonic epidermis comprises two layers of squamous cells closely underlain by a dense capillary net. Efficient gas exchange is facilitated by a thin embryotrophe-blood barrier of both the embryonic skin and the intraovarian lining. PMID:24797516

  11. Evolutionary history of the genus Rhamdia (Teleostei: Pimelodidae) in Central America

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    - ascens. Application of fish-based mitochondrial DNA clocks ticking at 1.3­1.5% sequence divergence per rights reserved. Keywords: Catfishes; Neotropical freshwater fishes; Mitochondrial DNA; ATP synthase relationships were inferred from analysis of 1990 base pairs (bp) of mito- chondrial DNA (mtDNA), represented

  12. Behavioral and neurotoxic effects of arsenic exposure in zebrafish (Danio rerio, Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    de Castro, Micheli Rosa; Lima, Juliane Ventura; de Freitas, Diana Paula Salomão; Valente, Roberto de Souza; Dummer, Natália Seus; de Aguiar, Rosiane Borba; dos Santos, Luciane Cougo; Marins, Luis Fernando; Geracitano, Laura Alicia; Monserrat, José María; Barros, Daniela Martí

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the passive avoidance conditioning in zebrafish (Danio rerio). An instrument was developed for measuring escape responses triggered by a conditioned stimulus. This system allowed quantification of latency of crossing from a light to a dark zone. Zebrafish were trained to swim from an illuminated to a dark compartment, where they received a body shock (training session). The proposed methodology was efficient for evaluation of working, short, and long-term memory formation of an aquatic animal model. The possibility of employing memory measurements in toxicity tests, in order to obtain an ecologically meaningful biomarker response, was also analyzed. In this experiment, immediately after the training session, fish were exposed to three arsenic (As(V)) concentrations. After the test session, the brain was removed for biochemical analyses. A control group was kept in tap water. After exposure, animals were submitted to a one-trial inhibitory avoidance test for measurement of long-term memory (LTM). Results from behavioral and biochemical analyses showed that the three As(V) concentrations impaired LTM (p<0.05) and increased protein oxidation, which suggests an amnesic and pro-oxidant effect of As(V). Evaluation of behavior parameters in aquatic models is an important complement in studies concerning the environmental impact of chemical substances. PMID:19501674

  13. Sexual ornaments, body morphology, and swimming performance in naturally hybridizing swordtails (teleostei: xiphophorus) 

    E-print Network

    Johnston, James B.; Macedo, Danielle C.; Passow, Courtney N.; Rosenthal, Gil G.

    2014-10-15

    Determining the costs of sexual ornaments is complicated by the fact that ornaments are often integrated with other, non-sexual traits, making it difficult to dissect the effect of ornaments independent of other aspects of the phenotype...

  14. Mitogenomic Evidence for an Indo-West Pacific Origin of the Clupeoidei (Teleostei: Clupeiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Lavoué, Sébastien; Miya, Masaki; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Chen, Wei-Jen; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-01-01

    The clupeoid fishes are distributed worldwide, with marine, freshwater and euryhaline species living in either tropical or temperate environments. Regional endemism is important at the species and genus levels, and the highest species diversity is found in the tropical marine Indo-West Pacific region. The clupeoid distribution follows two general pattern of species richness, the longitudinal and latitudinal gradients. To test historical hypotheses explaining the formation of these two gradients, we have examined the early biogeography of the Clupeoidei in reconstructing the evolution of their habitat preferences along with their ancestral range distributions on a time-calibrated mitogenomic phylogeny. The phylogenetic results support the distinction of nine main lineages within the Clupeoidei, five of them new. We infer several independent transitions from a marine to freshwater environment and from a tropical to temperate environment that occurred after the initial diversification period of the Clupeoidei. These results combined with our ancestral range reconstruction hypothesis suggest that the probable region of origin and diversification of the Clupeoidei during the Cretaceous period was the tropical marine precursor to the present Indo-West Pacific region. Thus, our study favors the hypotheses of “Region of origin” and “Tropical conservatism” to explain the origins of the longitudinal and latitudinal gradients of clupeoid species richness, respectively. Additional geological and paleontological evidence further define the tropical marine paleo-region of origin as the eastern Tethys Sea region. The Cretaceous fossil record of the Clupeoidei is partially incongruent with the results here as it contains taxa found outside this region. We discuss three possible causes of conflict between our biogeographical hypothesis and the distributions of the Cretaceous clupeoid fossils: regional extinction, incomplete taxonomic sampling and incorrect timescale estimation. PMID:23431379

  15. Pethia rutila (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), a new species from Mizoram, Northeast India .

    PubMed

    Lalramliana, Lalramliana; Knight, J D Marcus; Laltlanhlua, Zathang

    2014-01-01

    Pethia rutila, a new species is described from Karnaphuli drainage, Mizoram, Northeast India. It is distinguished from its congeners in having a complete lateral line with 21-22 scales, an inconspicuous black humeral spot on the scale row below the 3rd and 4th lateral-line scales, a black blotch on the caudal peduncle centered above the insertion of the last anal-fin ray, overlapping lateral-line scales 16-18 or 17-19 and ½4/1/3½ scales in transverse line from dorsal-fin origin to pelvic-fin origin. PMID:25081166

  16. A review of the species of Oreichthys (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) in the Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Knight, J D Marcus; Kumar, Rahul G

    2015-01-01

    Fishes currently assigned to Oreichthys cosuatis from the Western Ghats are shown to belong to a closely-related group of three valid species: Puntius coorgensis, which is raised from synonymy, and two new species, O. duospilus and O. incognito. Oreichthys coorgensis can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of characters that include 22-23+1-2 scales in the longitudinal series with 5-8 pored scales; ½3/1/2½ scales in the transverse row; 6-7 predorsal scales and usually a faint blackish spot on the caudal-fin base. Oreichthys duospilus,  sp. nov., can be distinguished by possessing an almost complete lateral line with 11-21 pored scales and two black spots: one on the dorsal fin and the other on the anal fin. Oreichthys incognito,  sp. nov., can be distinguished by a lateral line with 5 pored scales; ½3/1/1½ scales in the transverse row; 8 predorsal scales and a vertical black bar on the dorsal fin.  PMID:25661937

  17. Microsatellite variation and genetic structuring in Mugil liza (Teleostei: Mugilidae) populations from Argentina and Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Ana C. G.; Miño, Carolina I.; Marins, Luis F. F.; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Miranda, Laura; Schwingel, Paulo R.; Lemos, Valéria M.; Gonzalez-Castro, Mariano; Castello, Jorge P.; Vieira, João P.

    2014-08-01

    The mullet Mugil liza is distributed along the Atlantic coast of South America, from Argentina to Venezuela, and it is heavily exploited in Brazil. We assessed patterns of distribution of neutral nuclear genetic variation in 250 samples from the Brazilian states of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul (latitudinal range of 23-31°S) and from Buenos Aires Province in Argentina (36°S). Nine microsatellite loci revealed 131 total alleles, 3-23 alleles per locus, He: 0.69 and Ho: 0.67. Significant genetic differentiation was observed between Rio de Janeiro samples (23°S) and those from all other locations, as indicated by FST, hierarchical analyses of genetic structure, Bayesian cluster analyses and assignment tests. The presence of two different demographic clusters better explains the allelic diversity observed in mullets from the southernmost portion of the Atlantic coast of Brazil and from Argentina. This may be taken into account when designing fisheries management plans involving Brazilian, Uruguayan and Argentinean M. liza populations.

  18. Redescription of Nemachilichthys rueppelli, a senior synonym of N. shimogensis (Teleostei: Nemacheilidae).

    PubMed

    Keskar, Ashwini; Kumkar, Pradeep; Katwate, Unmesh; Ali, Anvar; Raghavan, Rajeev; Dahanukar, Neelesh

    2015-01-01

    The hill-stream loach genus Nemachilichthys, an endemic of the Western Ghats of India, comprises two nominal species, N. rueppelli and N. shimogensis. The validity of the latter has been questioned by several authors. Here we show that there is only a marginal raw mitochondrial genetic distance (0.5% in cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 1.2% in cytochrome b) between topotypic specimens of the two nominal species. Further, although population-level morphometric variations appear in a multivariate morphometric analysis, the two nominal species are morphologically similar, with apparently no significant characters separating them. We therefore consider N. shimogensis to be a junior synonym of N. rueppelli and redescribe the latter, providing further details on population variation and distribution. PMID:26701578

  19. Taxonomic revision and stratigraphic provenance of 'Histiophorus rotundu' Woodward 1901 (Teleostei, Perciformes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsch, K.A.; Fierstine, H.L.; Weems, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, Histiophorus rotundus Woodward 1901, was known from a single, poorly preserved rostrum from the Tertiary phosphate beds near Charleston, South Carolina, an area from which many fossils have been described. The specimen is relatively featureless externally; its internal anatomy is unknown and the documentation of its geological provenance was poor. In an earlier revision the species was transferred to the fossil billfish genus Xiphiorhynchus Van Beneden, 1871. Here we confirm this designation, supported by new morphological studies of the holotype, recently found specimens of Xiphiorhynchus rotundus (Woodward, 1901), and the stratigraphic record of Xiphiorhynchus. The systematic paleontology we present is a contribution to the taxonomic revision of billfishes world-wide. Because the holotype is heavily phosphatized and the type locality was vaguely described, we discuss the geology of the phosphate mining districts of the Charleston region. Based on our studies, we can narrow the possible age of the holotype to late Oligocene or early Miocene. We suggest X. rotundus was extinct by the Burdigalian. 

  20. The dusky rockfishes (Teleostei: Scorpaeniformes) of the North Pacific Ocean: resurrection of

    E-print Network

    Pacific Ocean has been considered a single variable species with light and dark forms distributed in deep slope at depths down to 675 m, and less frequently in nearshore habitats. The dark-blue to black form, commonly known as the dark dusky rockfish, is found in more shallow habitats from nearshore rocky reefs

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizopygopsis chengi baoxingensis (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Schizopygopsis).

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Huang, Yong; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yeyu; Liu, Ya; Liu, Guangxun

    2014-11-12

    Abstract Schizopygopsis chengi baoxingensis is endemic to the Baoxing River in China and may become an endangered species due to its very narrow habitat and the construction of hydropower dams. In this study, we successfully sequenced the first mitochondrial genome of S. c. baoxingensis. The mitogenome is 16,787?bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region (D-loop). The overall base composition of the H-strand is 28.5% A, 26.2% T, 18.4% C, and 26.9% G, with a slight AT bias of 54.7%. The sequenced mtDNA genome of S. c. baoxingensis is similar in gene arrangement to that of other cyprinidaes except for a 191?bp non-coding region found between tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro). PMID:25391033

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of the natural pentaploid loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cobitididae).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Chen, Yong-Bo; Pan, Bao-Zhu; Zhang, Da-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the natural pentaploid loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a circular molecule of 16,643?bp in size, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and two main noncoding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). Most of the genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNAs. The control region is 918?bp in length and located between the tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe) genes, some typical conserved elements (TAS, CSB1-3 and CSB D-F) were found in this region. All these features reflect a typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement of the pentaploid M. anguillicaudatus. PMID:25162828

  3. Phylogeny and polyploidy: resolving the classification of cyprinine fishes (Teleostei: Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Sado, Tetsuya; Vincent Hirt, M; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Arunachalam, M; Li, Junbing; Wang, Xuzhen; Freyhof, Jörg; Saitoh, Kenji; Simons, Andrew M; Miya, Masaki; He, Shunping; Mayden, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Cyprininae is the largest subfamily (>1300 species) of the family Cyprinidae and contains more polyploid species (?400) than any other group of fishes. We examined the phylogenetic relationships of the Cyprininae based on extensive taxon, geographical, and genomic sampling of the taxa, using both mitochondrial and nuclear genes to address the phylogenetic challenges posed by polyploidy. Four datasets were analyzed in this study: two mitochondrial gene datasets (465 and 791 taxa, 5604bp), a mitogenome dataset (85 taxa, 14,771bp), and a cloned nuclear RAG1 dataset (97 taxa, 1497bp). Based on resulting trees, the subfamily Cyprininae was subdivided into 11 tribes: Probarbini (new; Probarbus+Catlocarpio), Labeonini Bleeker, 1859 (Labeo & allies), Torini Karaman, 1971 (Tor, Labeobarbus & allies), Smiliogastrini Bleeker, 1863 (Puntius, Enteromius & allies), Poropuntiini (Poropuntius & allies), Cyprinini Rafinesque, 1815 (Cyprinus & allies), Acrossocheilini (new; Acrossocheilus & allies), Spinibarbini (new; Spinibarbus), Schizothoracini McClelland, 1842 (Schizothorax & allies), Schizopygopsini Mirza, 1991 (Schizopygopsis & allies), and Barbini Bleeker, 1859 (Barbus & allies). Phylogenetic relationships within each tribe were discussed. Two or three distinct RAG1 lineages were identified for each of the following tribes Torini, Cyprinini, Spinibarbini, and Barbini, indicating their hybrid origin. The hexaploid African Labeobarbus & allies and Western Asian Capoeta are likely derived from two independent hybridization events between their respective maternal tetraploid ancestors and Cyprinion. PMID:25698355

  4. Etheostoma erythrozonum, a new species of darter (teleostei: Percidae) from the Meramec River drainage, missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, J.F.; Wood, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new species of darter, Etheostoma erythrozonum, is described from the Meramec River drainage of Missouri, USA. Etheostoma erythrozonum is the first known fish species endemic to the Meramec River drainage. It differs morphologically and genetically from populations of its sister species, Etheostoma tetrazonum, from the Gasconade River, Osage River, and Moreau River drainages. Copyright ?? 2009 ?? Magnolia Press.

  5. First record of the Atlantic bumper Chloroscombrus chrysurus (Teleostei: Carangidae) in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Peña Rivas, L; Azzurro, E; Lloris, D

    2013-03-01

    In December 1997, one specimen of the Atlantic bumper, Chloroscombrus chrysurus was recorded for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, off Almuñécar (Granada, Spain: 36°?43'?26??N; 3°?41'?39??W). This species probably entered the Mediterranean Sea via the Strait of Gibraltar. PMID:23464561

  6. Cobitis avicennae, a new species of spined loach from the Tigris River drainage (Teleostei: Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Mousavi-Sabet, Hamed; Vatandoust, Saber; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Geiger, Matthias F; Freyhof, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cobitis avicennae, new species, from the Karkheh and Karun sub-drainages in the Tigris catchment is distinguished from other Cobitis species in the Persian Gulf, Kor and the southern Caspian Sea basins by having a single lamina circularis in males, a small comma-shaped black spot on the upper caudal-fin base, 5½ branched anal-fin rays, 5-6 rows of dark spots on the dorsal and caudal fins, scales below the dorsal-fin base with a small focal zone and pigmentation zone Z4 with 12-17 large, partly fused blotches. It is also distinguished from other Cobitis species in the comparison group by six fixed, diagnostic nucleotide substitutions in the mtDNA COI barcode region. PMID:25661962

  7. Is sexual selection driving diversification of the bioluminescent ponyfishes (Teleostei: Leiognathidae)?

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Davis, Matthew P; Smith, W Leo; Baldwin, Zachary H; Sparks, John S

    2011-07-01

    Sexual selection may facilitate genetic isolation among populations and result in increased rates of diversification. As a mechanism driving diversification, sexual selection has been invoked and upheld in numerous empirical studies across disparate taxa, including birds, plants and spiders. In this study, we investigate the potential impact of sexual selection on the tempo and mode of ponyfish evolution. Ponyfishes (Leiognathidae) are bioluminescent marine fishes that exhibit sexually dimorphic features of their unique light-organ system (LOS). Although sexual selection is widely considered to be the driving force behind ponyfish speciation, this hypothesis has never been formally tested. Given that some leiognathid species have a sexually dimorphic LOS, whereas others do not, this family provides an excellent system within which to study the potential role of sexual selection in diversification and morphological differentiation. In this study, we estimate the phylogenetic relationships and divergence times for Leiognathidae, investigate the tempo and mode of ponyfish diversification, and explore morphological shape disparity among leiognathid clades. We recover strong support for a monophyletic Leiognathidae and estimate that all major ponyfish lineages evolved during the Paleogene. Our studies of ponyfish diversification demonstrate that there is no conclusive evidence that sexually dimorphic clades are significantly more species rich than nonsexually dimorphic lineages and that evidence is lacking to support any significant diversification rate increases within ponyfishes. Further, we detected a lineage-through-time signal indicating that ponyfishes have continuously diversified through time, which is in contrast to many recent diversification studies that identify lineage-through-time patterns that support mechanisms of density-dependent speciation. Additionally, there is no evidence of sexual selection hindering morphological diversity, as sexually dimorphic taxa are shown to be more disparate in overall shape morphology than nonsexually dimorphic taxa. Our results suggest that if sexual selection is occurring in ponyfish evolution, it is likely acting only as a genetic isolating mechanism that has allowed ponyfishes to continuously diversify over time, with no overall impact on increases in diversification rate or morphological disparity. PMID:21623980

  8. New approach data in electric fish (Teleostei: Gymnotus): sex chromosome evolution and repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maelin; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    Antagonist sexual selection is the driving force behind the origin and diversification of sex chromosomes such as XX/XY and ZZ/ZW. However, chromosome mobility, mainly in fishes, may result in the formation of chromosomes of recent origin, a process known as turnover. The family Gymnotidae, which is composed of the genera Electrophorus+Gymnotus, presents a multiple system of the type X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, which has been described for Gymnotus pantanal. This article describes the karyotype of three Amazon Gymnotus species, revealing the presence of both simple and multiple systems: Gymnotus carapo "Catalão" 2n=40 XX/XY, Gymnotus coropinae 2n=49?/50? X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, and Gymnotus sp. "Negro" 2n=50 XX/XY. Our hypothesis is that the simple system present in G. carapo "Catalão" is ancestral in relation to G. pantanal's multiple system and that the diversification of the subsequent multiple system occurred after the final separation of the Amazon and Paraná basins. Moreover, G. coropinae's multiple system may have originated from the simple system present in Gymnotus sp. "Negro." The distant position between the species in the Gymnotidae family's phylogeny in addition to differences in sex chromosome formula and number between Clade G1 G. coropinae and G. sp. "Negro" species and "Carapo" Clade. G. carapo and G. pantanal species suggest that both sequences of sexual systems occurred independently, supporting other proposed models and highlighting the fact that species of the genus Gymnotus may serve as a model for studying sex chromosome turnover. PMID:25264714

  9. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found. PMID:26372604

  10. Multiple Invasions into Freshwater by Pufferfishes (Teleostei: Tetraodontidae): A Mitogenomic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yamanoue, Yusuke; Miya, Masaki; Doi, Hiroyuki; Mabuchi, Kohji; Sakai, Harumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2011-01-01

    Pufferfishes of the Family Tetraodontidae are the most speciose group in the Order Tetraodontiformes and mainly inhabit coastal waters along continents. Although no members of other tetraodontiform families have fully discarded their marine lives, approximately 30 tetraodontid species spend their entire lives in freshwaters in disjunct tropical regions of South America, Central Africa, and Southeast Asia. To investigate the interrelationships of tetraodontid pufferfishes and thereby elucidate the evolutionary origins of their freshwater habitats, we performed phylogenetic analysis based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences from 50 tetraodontid species and closely related species (including 31 newly determined sequences). The resulting phylogenies reveal that the family is composed of four major lineages and that freshwater species from the different continents are independently nested in two of the four lineages. A monophyletic origin of the use of freshwater habitats was statistically rejected, and ancestral habitat reconstruction on the resulting tree demonstrates that tetraodontids independently entered freshwater habitats in different continents at least three times. Relaxed molecular-clock Bayesian divergence time estimation suggests that the timing of these invasions differs between continents, occurring at 0–10 million years ago (MA) in South America, 17–38 MA in Central Africa, and 48–78 MA in Southeast Asia. These timings are congruent with geological events that could facilitate adaptation to freshwater habitats in each continent. PMID:21364898

  11. Callionymus omanensis, a new species of dragonet from Oman, north-western Indian Ocean (Teleostei: Callionymidae).

    PubMed

    Fricke, R; Jawad, L A; Al-Mamry, J M

    2014-11-01

    A new species of deep-living dragonet Callionymus omanensis from Oman is described on the basis of a single male specimen collected in a trawl from 500 m depth off the coast of Oman. The new species is characterized within the subgenus Bathycallionymus by having a small branchial opening; head short (3·9 in proportion to standard length); eye large (2·4 in proportion to head length); preopercular spine with a long, upcurved main tip, with a small antrorse barb and a larger antrorse spine, and with a strong antrorse spine laterally at the preopercular-spine base, ventral margin smooth; first dorsal fin slightly higher than second dorsal fin (male); second dorsal fin distally straight; 17 pectoral fin rays; distal end of caudal fin slightly pointed, with two median unbranched rays bearing short filaments; first dorsal fin with basal black spot reaching from first to fourth membranes, third membrane with an ocellated distal black blotch; second dorsal fin with vertical dark grey bars; distal three-fourths of anal fin black; upper half of caudal fin with oblique dark grey bars; pelvic fin dark grey, second ray basally with a black blotch. The new species is compared with similar species. Revised keys to callionymid species of the western Indian Ocean and the Red Sea, as well as species of the subgenus Bathycallionymus, are presented. PMID:25098471

  12. Multi-locus fossil-calibrated phylogeny of Atheriniformes (Teleostei, Ovalentaria).

    PubMed

    Campanella, Daniela; Hughes, Lily C; Unmack, Peter J; Bloom, Devin D; Piller, Kyle R; Ortí, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among families within the order Atheriniformes have been difficult to resolve on the basis of morphological evidence. Molecular studies so far have been fragmentary and based on a small number taxa and loci. In this study, we provide a new phylogenetic hypothesis based on sequence data collected for eight molecular markers for a representative sample of 103 atheriniform species, covering 2/3 of the genera in this order. The phylogeny is calibrated with six carefully chosen fossil taxa to provide an explicit timeframe for the diversification of this group. Our results support the subdivision of Atheriniformes into two suborders (Atherinopsoidei and Atherinoidei), the nesting of Notocheirinae within Atherinopsidae, and the monophyly of tribe Menidiini, among others. We propose taxonomic changes for Atherinopsoidei, but a few weakly supported nodes in our phylogeny suggests that further study is necessary to support a revised taxonomy of Atherinoidei. The time-calibrated phylogeny was used to infer ancestral habitat reconstructions to explain the current distribution of marine and freshwater taxa. Based on these results, the current distribution of Atheriniformes is likely due to widespread marine dispersal along the margins of continents, infrequent trans-oceanic dispersal, and repeated invasion of freshwater habitats. This conclusion is supported by post-Gondwanan divergence times among families within the order, and a high probability of a marine ancestral habitat. PMID:25769409

  13. Phylogeny of moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae), with a revised classification of true eels (Teleostei: Elopomorpha: Anguilliformes).

    PubMed

    Tang, Kevin L; Fielitz, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    The family Muraenidae is one of the largest and most recognizable eel groups. Moray eels are key components of marine ecosystems but their relationships remain poorly understood. The phylogenetic relationships of the morays are examined herein using mitochondrial 12S and 16S sequence data, totaling 1673 bp for 139 taxa. The results of our analyses found support for a monophyletic family Muraenidae that is part of a monophyletic suborder Muraenoidei, which is revised to include the anguilliform families Heterenchelyidae and Myrocongridae, and to exclude the family Chlopsidae. The muraenids form two monophyletic subfamilies, Muraeninae and Uropterygiinae. Of the genera that had multiple species included for analysis, only the type genus of the family, Muraena, is found to be monophyletic. In the subfamily Uropterygiinae, Uropterygius is not recovered as a monophyletic genus. In the subfamily Muraeninae, the species-rich piscivorous genera, Enchelycore and Gymnothorax, and the durophagous genus, Echidna, are demonstrably not monophyletic. The monotypic Gymnomuraena is the sister group to all other muraenine species. The relationships within Muraenidae require much additional study and its genera remain in urgent need of revision. The order Anguilliformes is revised herein to include four suborders: Anguilloidei, Congroidei, Muraenoidei, and Synaphobranchoidei. All four families of the order Saccopharyngiformes are nested within Anguilliformes, recovered as part of a clade that includes Anguillidae; the saccopharyngiform families are referred to the suborder Anguilloidei sensu novum. PMID:22967094

  14. Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting

    E-print Network

    Parise-Maltempi, Patrícia P.; da Silva, Edson L.; Rens, Willem; Dearden, Frances; O’Brien, Patricia C. M.; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.

    2013-07-03

    solution (35 mL 1x PBS and 5 mL trypsin) for 30 seconds, washed again in 1x PBS and stained with Giemsa 1% in PBS. The microdissection was performed using an Eppendorf TransferMan NK2 (Eppendorf) coupled to a Zeiss Axiovert 40 CFL microscope, with glass... and sex-linked genes. Berlin: Springer; 1967. 2. Charlesworth D, Charlesworth B, Marais G: Steps in the evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Heredity 2005, 95:118–128. 3. Vyskot B, Hobza R: Gender in plants: sex chromosomes are emerging from the fog...

  15. Two new species of shovel-jaw carp Onychostoma (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) from southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Huy Duc; Pham, Hung Manh; Tran, Ngan Trong

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of large shovel-jaw carps in the genus Onychostoma are described from the upper Krong No and middle Dong Nai drainages of the Langbiang Plateau in southern Vietnam. These new species are known from streams in montane mixed pine and evergreen forests between 140 and 1112 m. Their populations are isolated in the headwaters of the upper Sre Pok River of the Mekong basin and in the middle of the Dong Nai basin. Both species are differentiated from their congeners by a combination of the following characters: transverse mouth opening width greater than head width, 14-17 predorsal scales, caudal-peduncle length 3.9-4.2 times in SL, no barbels in adults and juveniles, a strong serrated last simple ray of the dorsal fin, and small eye diameter (20.3-21.5% HL). Onychostoma krongnoensis sp. nov. is differentiated from Onychostoma dongnaiensis sp. nov. by body depth (4.0 vs. 3.2 times in SL), predorsal scale number (14-17 vs. 14-15), dorsal-fin length (4.5 vs. 4.2 times in SL), caudal-peduncle length (3.9 vs. 4.2 times in SL), colour in life (dark vs. bright), and by mitochondrial DNA (0.2% sequence divergence). Molecular evidence indicates that both species are members of Onychostoma and are distinct from all congeners sampled (uncorrected sequence divergences at the 16S rRNA gene of >2.0% for all Onychostoma for which homologous 16S rRNA sequences are available). PMID:26249380

  16. Gonad morphology, gametogenesis, and reproductive modes in fishes of the tribe Starksiini (Teleostei, Blenniiformes).

    PubMed

    Fishelson, Lev; Baldwin, Carole C; Hastings, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    A comparative study of the reproductive organs in 17 of the 30 species of the tribe Starksiini (Labrisomidae, Blenniiformes) and related labrisomids reveals the major traits of gamete form and production and likely reproductive modes. The testes are of the lobular type and have a testicular gland and sperm ducts. Isodiametric sperm (aquasperm) with a globular head or anisodiametric sperm (introsperm) with an elongate head, or both, were observed in the studied species. Both types have either one or two flagella in the sperm tail. Ovaries of the Starksiini are bilobed and exhibit synchronous or asynchronous egg production. Although viviparity or "ovoviviparity" reportedly characterizes the group, our study revealed evidence of both internal and external fertilization and three modes of reproduction. External fertilization or ovuliparity is suggested for the Starksia atlantica and S. lepicoelia species complexes by the presence in males of a short genital papilla that is not reinforced through adhesion with the first anal-fin spine and by the absence of sperm within the ovaries. Internal fertilization and zygoparity is indicated for most species by the presence of an intromittent papilla in males that is adhered to the first anal-fin spine, "nests" of sperm within the ovaries, absence of embryos within the ovarian lamellae and usually thick egg envelopes bearing dense covers of adhesive filaments. Internal fertilization and embryoparity is indicated for starksia fulva and Xenomedea rhodopyga by an intromittent papilla that is adhered to the first anal-fin spine of males, anisodiametric sperm in males, delicate egg envelopes without adhesive filaments and developing embryos within follicular envelopes or within the follicle in females. Although many of these features are seen in the internally fertilizing clinid blennies, starksiins differ in retaining the testicular gland typical of labrisomids and in lacking sperm packaging typical of other internally fertilizing teleosts. PMID:23293058

  17. Sexual Ornaments, Body Morphology, and Swimming Performance in Naturally Hybridizing Swordtails (Teleostei: Xiphophorus)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James B.; Macedo, Danielle C.; Passow, Courtney N.; Rosenthal, Gil G.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the costs of sexual ornaments is complicated by the fact that ornaments are often integrated with other, non-sexual traits, making it difficult to dissect the effect of ornaments independent of other aspects of the phenotype. Hybridization can produce reduced phenotypic integration, allowing one to evaluate performance across a broad range of multivariate trait values. Here we assess the relationship between morphology and performance in the swordtails Xiphophorus malinche and X. birchmanni, two naturally-hybridizing fish species that differ extensively in non-sexual as well as sexual traits. We took advantage of novel trait variation in hybrids to determine if sexual ornaments incur a cost in terms of locomotor ability. For both fast-start and endurance swimming, hybrids performed at least as well as the two parental species. The sexually-dimorphic sword did not impair swimming performance per se. Rather, the sword negatively affected performance only when paired with a sub-optimal body shape. Studies seeking to quantify the costs of ornaments should consider that covariance with non-sexual traits may create the spurious appearance of costs. PMID:25329558

  18. Relationships of the temperate Australasian labrid fish tribe Odacini (Perciformes; Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Clements, Kendall D; Alfaro, Michael E; Fessler, Jennifer L; Westneat, Mark W

    2004-08-01

    The labrid tribe Odacini comprises four genera and 12 species of fishes that inhabit shallow kelp forest and seagrass areas in temperate waters of Australia and New Zealand. Odacines are morphologically disparate, but share synapomorphies in fin structure and fusion of teeth into a beak-like oral jaw. A phylogenetic analysis of odacines was conducted to investigate their relationships to other labrid fishes, the relationships of species within the tribe, and the evolution of herbivory within the group. Fragments from two mitochondrial genes, 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA, and two nuclear genes, Tmo4C4 and RAG2, were sequenced for seven odacine species (representing all four genera), eight species representing the other major labrid lineages, and three outgroup species. Maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony analyses on the resulting 2338 bp of DNA sequence produced nearly identical topologies differing only in the placement of a clade containing the cheiline Cheilinus fasciatus and the scarine Cryptotomus roseus. The remaining clades received strong bootstrap support under maximum parsimony, and all clades in the maximum likelihood analysis received high bootstrap proportions and high posterior probabilities. The hypsigenyine labrid Choerodon anchorago formed the sister group to the odacines. Within the odacines, Odax cyanoallix+Odax pullus formed the sister to the remaining odacines, with Odax acroptilus, Odax cyanomelas, and Siphonognathus argyrophanes forming successively closer sister groups to the clade Haletta semifasciatus+Neoodax balteatus. Either herbivory evolved twice in the odacines, or herbivory evolved once with two reversions to carnivory. The latter hypothesis appears more likely in the light of odacine feeding biology. PMID:15223039

  19. Skin toxins in coral-associated Gobiodon species (Teleostei: Gobiidae) affect predator preference and prey survival

    PubMed Central

    Gratzer, Barbara; Millesi, Eva; Walzl, Manfred; Herler, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Predation risk is high for the many small coral reef fishes, requiring successful sheltering or other predator defence mechanisms. Coral-dwelling gobies of the genus Gobiodon live in close association with scleractinian corals of the genus Acropora. Earlier studies indicated that the low movement frequency of adult fishes and the development of skin toxins (crinotoxicity) are predation avoidance mechanisms. Although past experiments showed that predators refuse food prepared with goby skin mucus, direct predator–prey interactions have not been studied. The present study compares the toxicity levels of two crinotoxic coral gobies – Gobiodon histrio, representative of a conspicuously coloured species, and Gobiodon sp.3 with cryptic coloration – using a standard bioassay method. The results show that toxin levels of both species differ significantly shortly after mucus release but become similar over time. Predator preferences were tested experimentally in an aquarium in which the two gobies and a juvenile damselfish Chromis viridis were exposed to the small grouper Epinephelus fasciatus. Video-analysis revealed that although coral gobies are potential prey, E. fasciatus clearly preferred the non-toxic control fish (C. viridis) over Gobiodon. When targeting a goby, the predator did not prefer one species over the other. Contrary to our expectations that toxic gobies are generally avoided, gobies were often captured, but they were expelled quickly, repeatedly and alive. This unusual post-capture avoidance confirms that these gobies have a very good chance of surviving attacks in the field due to their skin toxins. Nonetheless, some gobies were consumed: the coral shelter may therefore also provide additional protection, with toxins protecting them mainly during movement between corals. In summary, chemical deterrence by crinotoxic fishes seems to be far more efficient in predation avoidance than in physical deterrence involving body squamation and/or strong fin spines. PMID:26074654

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the smallscale yellowfin, Plagiognathops microlepis (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Xiong; Zhou, Qiao; Song, Yong; Chen, Da-Qing; Li, Yun

    2015-06-01

    The smallscale yellowfin, Plagiognathops microlepis is the only one species in the genus Plagiognathops. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the P. microlepis. The complete mitogenome was 16,623?bp in size, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and 1 control region. It has the typical circular molecule structure of vertebrate's mitochondrial genome. The whole base composition was estimated to be 30.60% A, 25.19% T, 27.32% C and 16.89% G with AT bias of 55.79%. The complete mitogenome of P. microlepis provides the basis for preservation of genetic resources and genetic breeding studies on this species. PMID:24059855

  1. Cytogenetic study of heptapterids (Teleostei, Siluriformes) with particular respect to the Nemuroglanis subclade

    PubMed Central

    Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; Moreira Peres, Wellington Adriano; Moreira-Filho, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The catfish family Heptapteridae (order Siluriformes) is endemic to the Neotropics and is one of the most common of the fish families in small bodies of water. Although over 200 species have been identified in this family, very few have been characterized cytogenetically. Here, we analyze the chromosome genomes of four species of Heptapteridae: Cetopsorhamdia iheringi (Schubart & Gomes, 1959), 2n = 58, comprising 28 metacentric (m) + 26 submetacentric (sm) + 4 subtelomeric (st) chromosomes; Pimelodella vittata (Lütken, 1874), 2n = 46, comprising 16m + 22sm + 8st; Rhamdia prope quelen (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), 2n = 58 comprising 26m + 16sm + 14st + 2 acrocentric; and Rhamdiopsis prope microcephala (Lütken, 1874), 2n = 56, comprising 12m + 30sm + 14st. The nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located in a single chromosome pair in all species. The two species that belonged to the subclade Nemuroglanis, Cetopsorhamdia iheringi and Rhamdia prope quelen, had a diploid chromosome number of 58 and an interstitial NOR adjacent to a C+ block located on one of the larger chromosome pairs in the complement. Our results from conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with FISH using 18S and 5S rDNA probes corroborated the taxonomical hypothesis for the formation of the Nemuroglanis subclade. PMID:25893072

  2. Parasites as biological tags for Eleginops maclovinus (Teleostei: Eleginopidae) around the Falkland Islands.

    PubMed

    Brickle, Paul; Mackenzie, Ken

    2007-06-01

    This is the first study of the parasite fauna of Eleginops maclovinus in the Falkland Islands. It was undertaken to catalogue the parasite fauna of E. maclovinus in order to provide a baseline for future studies and to determine whether parasites might be used as biological tags. Between 21 January and 17 March 2002 samples were taken from three stations, Teal Creek (30 fish), Port Louis (30 fish) and Camilla Creek (10 fish), all in East Falkland, and examined for protozoan and metazoan parasites. Twenty-four parasite taxa were recorded, of which three were possible new species, two new host records and five new geographical records. Because of the small number of fish in the Camilla Creek sample it was excluded from further analyses. E. maclovinus is a protandrous hermaphrodite and all fish greater than 53 cm total length were found to be female, so these too were excluded from further analyses. The parasite data from the remaining fish were analysed by an agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis using an average linkage and a Jaccard measure of similarity, followed by a linear discriminant function analysis (LDA). Both analyses misclassified only one fish from Port Louis as being from Teal Creek, with the LDA giving an overall correct classification of 97.5% (39/40). The results support mechanical tagging data in suggesting that smaller male E. maclovinus are resident in the creeks in which they are caught, and that at this stage of their lives they tend not to migrate over long distances. PMID:17578595

  3. Discovering Hidden Diversity of Characins (Teleostei: Characiformes) in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Camacho, Daniel; Barriga, Ramiro; Ron, Santiago R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management and conservation of biodiversity requires adequate species inventories. The Yasuní National Park is one of the most diverse regions on Earth and recent studies of terrestrial vertebrates, based on genetic evidence, have shown high levels of cryptic and undescribed diversity. Few genetic studies have been carried out in freshwater fishes from western Amazonia. Thus, in contrast with terrestrial vertebrates, their content of cryptic diversity remains unknown. In this study, we carried out genetic and morphological analyses on characin fishes at Yasuní National Park, in eastern Ecuador. Our goal was to identify cryptic diversity among one of the most speciose fish families in the Amazon region. This is the first time that genetic evidence has been used to assess the species content of the Napo Basin, one of the richest regions in vertebrate diversity. Results Phylogenetic analyses of partial mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (?600 pb) DNA sequences from 232 specimens of the family Characidae and its closest groups revealed eight candidate new species among 33 species sampled, representing a 24% increase in species number. Analyses of external morphology allowed us to confirm the species status of six of the candidate species. Conclusions Our results show high levels of cryptic diversity in Amazonian characins. If this group is representative of other Amazonian fish, our results would imply that the species richness of the Amazonian ichthyofauna is highly underestimated. Molecular methods are a necessary tool to obtain more realistic inventories of Neotropical freshwater fishes. PMID:26275041

  4. Length variation and sequence divergence in mitochondrial control region of Schizothoracine (Teleostei: Cyperinidae) species.

    PubMed

    Syed, Mudasir Ahmad; Bhat, Farooz Ahmad; Balkhi, Masood-Ul Hassan; Bhat, Bilal Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    Schizothoracine fish commonly called snow trouts inhibit the entire network of snow and spring fed cool waters of Kashmir, India. Over 10 species reported earlier, only five species have been found, these include Schizothorax niger, Schizothorax esocinus, Schizothorax plagiostomus, Schizothorax curvifrons and Schizothorax labiatus. The relationship between these species is contradicting. To understand the evolutionary relation of these species, we examined the sequence information of mitochondrial D-loop of 25 individuals representing five species. Sequence alignment showed D-loop region highly variable and length variation was observed in di-nucleotide (TA)n microsatellite between and within species. Interestingly, all these species have (TA)n microsatellite not associated with longer tandem repeats at the 3' end of the mitochondrial control region and do not show heteroplasmy. Our analysis also indicates the presence of four conserved sequence blocks (CSB), CSB-D, CSB-1, CSB-II and CSB-III, four (Termination Associated Sequence) TAS motifs and 15bp pyrimidine block within the mitochondrial control region, that are highly conserved within genus Schizothorax when compared with other species. The phylogenetic analysis carried by Maximum likelihood (ML), Neighbor Joining (NJ) and Bayesian inference (BI) generated almost identical results. The resultant BI tree showed a close genetic relationship of all the five species and supports two distinct grouping of S. esocinus species. Besides the species relation, the presence of length variation in tandem repeats is attributed to differences in predicting the stability of secondary structures. The role of CSBs and TASs, reported so far as main regulatory signals, would explain the conservation of these elements in evolution. PMID:25109626

  5. Muscular system in the pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Teleostei: Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Nakae, Masanori; Sasaki, Kunio; Shinohara, Gento; Okada, Tokihiko; Matsuura, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    The muscular system in the Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis is studied in detail. For the first time, a complete description of the muscular anatomy of a thunnid is provided here. Eighty-two elements including subdivisions of components of the muscular system are identified. This is less than found in a basal perciform and two other investigated scombrid species, owing mainly to the absence or fusion of pectoral, pelvic and caudal fin muscles. The absence of elements of the basal perciform pattern was most prominent in the caudal fin, which includes only the flexor dorsalis, flexor ventralis, hypochordal longitudinalis, and interradialis. In the caudal fin, the medial fan-shaped ray was identified as the first dorsal ray, judging from myological and neuroanatomical characters. The highly developed gill filament muscles in Thunnus orientalis and sheet-like rectus communis control gill ventilation. Long body muscle tendons reduce the metabolic energy needed during rapid and continuous swimming. These characters are interpreted as adaptations in the context of the oceanic life style of the species. PMID:24186153

  6. Allopolyploidization is not so simple: evidence from the origin of the tribe Cyprinini (Teleostei: Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Zhu, Z-H; Bi, X-Y; Murphy, R W; Wang, S-Y; Gao, Y; Xiao, H; Zhang, Y-P; Luo, J

    2014-01-01

    The identification of allopolyploidization events benefits from molecular dating and divergence assessments of progenitor genomes. Information on gene duplications only, either orthologs or paralogs, provides incomplete information. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA yield insights into matrilineal history, which may differ from patrilineal evolution. Two important food and pet fishes, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and goldfish (Carassius sp.), appear to have experienced allotetraploidization sometime from 12 to 20 million years ago (Ma). However, much work is necessary to detail the initial polyploidization event. Herein, we use this group of fishes as a model system to investigate competing scenarios for allopolyploidization. We analyze both the nuclear genes encoding growth hormone (GH), recombination activating protein 1 (RAG1) and HOXA2B gene, and the maternal heredited 12 concatenated mitochondrial protein-coding gene in 19 species of cyprinids and use two species in Balitoridae as outgroup taxa. Our analyses clarify the phylogenetic position of the paternal and maternal ancestors for the common carp and goldfish. The estimation of matrilineal divergence (10.71-12.42 Ma) is significantly younger than the dates of the parental ancestor divergedthat obtained by nuclear genes (16.62-19.64 Ma). Analyses of both genomes date the allopolyploidization event of the common ancestor of Cy. carpio and Ca sp. to about 10.71-12.42 Ma, which is most likely represented by maternal divergent time. The divergence of the two copies of the nuclear genes which was more ancient than the maternal markers might have been included the divergence of the progenitors' genome divergence when the allopolyploidization event occurred. Thus, the scenarios of allopolyploidzation for this group of fish can be suggested as the following: the matrilineal common ancestor of species in tribe Cyprinini might have doubled its genome by mating with a paternal ancestor in the subfamily Cyprininae, which was a sister-group that diverged around 4.20-8.93 Ma. Our work provides new evidence for the divergence dates of allopolyploidization within the Cyprinini, and documents the necessity of considering both matrilineal and patrilineal histories when investigating allopolyploidization. PMID:25470283

  7. The impacts of stress on sodium metabolism and copper accumulation in a freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Harley, Rachel A; Glover, Chris N

    2014-02-01

    In freshwater fish, stress can often result in significant modifications to Na(+) metabolism and may be an important aspect to consider in conservation efforts; as maintaining ion balance is critical to survival and ion transport is also a key determinant of metal toxicity. In order to better quantify the response of stress, Na(+) influx, Na(+) efflux, and copper accumulation were measured as a result of handling stress in inanga (Galaxias maculatus). This species is a culturally and economically important fish in New Zealand as one of the major species in the local 'whitebait' fishery. Na(+) influx rates in inanga were found to be 2-3 times greater after handling than in 'recovered' fish, and Na(+) efflux rates increased in the range of 5-6 times. Both influx and efflux rates quickly returned to resting levels within 24h. Increases in Na(+) efflux were strongly correlated with opercular beat frequency. This suggests an increas in ventilation, and subsequent enhanced diffusive loss of Na(+), as the mechanism of increased Na(+) efflux. Total body copper levels were also measured under similar treatments. Fish had significantly higher levels of copper directly after handling than following a 24h recovery; likely due to a shared Na(+)/copper uptake pathway. As accumulation is linked to toxicity, fish exposed to elevated copper levels in stressful environments will consequently be more at risk to metal toxicity. In a natural environment, stress can come from many different sources; among which, anthropogenic disturbances can often be a cause. Given that inanga must migrate through metal-contaminated coastal regions to reach breeding habitats, they will be exposed to toxicants under conditions where perfusion and ventilation of the gill is increased. As such, ion loss would be exacerbated, leading to an enhanced compensatory ion uptake and an increase in accumulation of ion-mimicking toxicants such as copper, exacerbating toxicity. This is a concern as conservation efforts in more disruptive environments may not be adequately protected. PMID:24374847

  8. Mercury in the biotic compartments of Northwest Patagonia lakes, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A; Arcagni, M; Arribére, M A; Bubach, D; Guevara, S Ribeiro

    2011-06-01

    We report on total mercury (THg) concentrations in the principal components of food webs of selected Northern Patagonia Andean Range ultraoligotrophic lakes, Argentina. The THg contents were determined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in muscle and liver of four fish species occupying the higher trophic positions (the introduced Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salvelinus fontinalis, and the native Percichthys trucha) accounted for eight lakes belonging to Nahuel Huapi and Los Alerces National Parks. We studied the food web components of both the West and East branches of Lake Moreno, including benthic primary producers such as biofilm, mosses, and macrophytes, three plankton fractions, fish, riparian tree leaves, and benthic invertebrates, namely decapods, molluscs, insect larvae, leeches, oligochaetes, and amphipods. Mercury concentrations in fish muscle varied in a wide range, from less than 0.05 to 4 ?g g(-1) dry weight (DW), without a distribution pattern among species but showing higher values for P. trucha and S. fontinalis, particularly in Lake Moreno. The THg contents of the food web components of Lake Moreno varied within 4 orders of magnitude, with the lower values ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 ?g g(-1) DW in tree leaves, some macrophytes, juvenile salmonids or benthic macroinvertebrates, and reaching concentrations over 200 ?g g(-1) DW in the plankton. Juvenile Galaxias maculatus caught in the pelagic area presented the highest THg contents of all fish sampled, reaching 10 ?g g(-1) DW, contents that could be associated with the high THg concentrations in plankton since it is their main food source. Although Lake Moreno is a system without local point sources of contamination, situated in a protected area, some benthic organisms presented high THg contents when compared with those from polluted ecosystems. PMID:21421254

  9. Separating natural responses from experimental artefacts: habitat selection by a diadromous fish species using odours from conspecifics and natural stream water.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robin; Swearer, Stephen E; Downes, Barbara J

    2009-03-01

    Animals use sensory stimuli to assess and select habitats, mates and food as well as to communicate with other individuals. One way they do this is to use olfaction, whereby they identify and respond to chemical cues. All organisms release odours, which mix with other chemical substances and ambient environmental conditions. The result is that animals are frequently immersed in a complex, highly dynamic sensory environment where they must identify and respond to only some of the potential stimuli they encounter in the face of significant levels of background noise. Understanding how organisms respond to different chemical cues is therefore dependent on knowing how these responses might be influenced by potential interactions with other stimuli. To test this, we examined whether the diadromous fish Galaxias maculatus was attracted to conspecific odours and whether this response differed when cues were offered in an artificial environment lacking other potential chemical stimuli (tap water) or a more natural background environment (stream water). We found that (1) fish responded to both natural stream water odours and those from conspecifics but the response to the latter was stronger; (2) the attraction to conspecific odours was stronger in tap water than in stream water, which indicates the importance of these odours may be overestimated when they are offered in artificial media. We also conducted a brief literature review, which confirmed that artificial media are commonly used in experiments and that the background environment is often not considered. Our results show that future research testing the responses of organisms to auditory, olfactory and visual cues should carefully consider the context in which cues are presented. Without doing so, such studies may inaccurately assess the importance of sensory cues in natural situations in the wild. PMID:19139923

  10. Modeling prey consumption by native and non-native piscivorous fishes: implications for competition and impacts on shared prey in an ultraoligotrophic lake in Patagonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juncos, Romina; Beauchamp, David A.; Viglianoc, Pablo H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined trophic interactions of the nonnative salmonids Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalisand the main native predator Creole Perch Percichthys trucha in Lake Nahuel Huapi (Patagonia, Argentina) to determine the relative impact of each predator on their forage base and to evaluate the potential vulnerability of each predator to competitive impacts by the others. Using bioenergetics simulations, we demonstrated the overall importance of galaxiids and decapods to the energy budgets of nonnative salmonids and Creole Perch. Introduced salmonids, especially Rainbow Trout, exerted considerably heavier predatory demands on shared resources than did the native Creole Perch on both a per capita basis and in terms of relative population impacts. Rainbow Trout consumed higher quantities and a wider size range of Small Puyen (also known as Inanga) Galaxias maculatus than the other predators, including early pelagic life stages of that prey; as such, this represents an additional source of mortality for the vulnerable early life stages of Small Puyen before and during their transition from pelagic to benthic habitats. All predators were generally feeding at high feeding rates (above 40% of their maximum physiological rates), suggesting that competition for prey does not currently limit either Creole Perch or the salmonids in this lake. This study highlights the importance of keystone prey for the coexistence of native species with nonnative top predators. It provides new quantitative and qualitative evidence of the high predation pressure exerted on Small Puyen, the keystone prey species, during the larval to juvenile transition from pelagic to littoral-benthic habitat in Patagonian lakes. This study also emphasizes the importance of monitoring salmonid and Creole Perch population dynamics in order to detect signs of potential impacts through competition and shows the need to carefully consider the rationale behind any additional trout stocking.

  11. Population sinks resulting from degraded habitats of an obligate life-history pathway.

    PubMed

    Hickford, Michael J H; Schiel, David R

    2011-05-01

    Many species traverse multiple habitats across ecosystems to complete their life histories. Degradation of critical, life stage-specific habitats can therefore lead to population bottlenecks and demographic deficits in sub-populations. The riparian zone of waterways is one of the most impacted areas of the coastal zone because of urbanisation, deforestation, farming and livestock grazing. We hypothesised that sink populations can result from alterations of habitats critical to the early life stages of diadromous fish that use this zone, and tested this with field-based sampling and experiments. We found that for Galaxias maculatus, one of the most widely distributed fishes of the southern hemisphere, obligate riparian spawning habitat was very limited and highly vulnerable to disturbance across 14 rivers in New Zealand. Eggs were laid only during spring tides, in the highest tidally influenced vegetation of waterways. Egg survival increased to >90% when laid in three riparian plant species and where stem densities were great enough to prevent desiccation, compared to no survival where vegetation was comprised of other species or was less dense. Experimental exclusion of livestock, one of the major sources of riparian degradation in rural waterways, resulted in quick regeneration, a tenfold increase in egg laying by fish and a threefold increase in survival, compared to adjacent controls. Overall, there was an inverse relationship between river size and egg production. Some of the largest rivers had little or no spawning habitat and very little egg production, effectively becoming sink populations despite supporting large adult populations, whereas some of the smallest pristine streams produced millions of eggs. We demonstrate that even a wide-ranging species with many robust adult populations can be compromised if a stage-specific habitat required to complete a life history is degraded by localised or more diffuse impacts. PMID:21076966

  12. Synergistic Interactions within Disturbed Habitats between Temperature, Relative Humidity and UVB Radiation on Egg Survival in a Diadromous Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hickford, Michael J. H.; Schiel, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts, including urbanization, deforestation, farming, and livestock grazing have altered riparian margins worldwide. One effect of changes to riparian vegetation is that the ground-level light, temperature, and humidity environment has also been altered. Galaxias maculatus, one of the most widely distributed fishes of the southern hemisphere, lays eggs almost exclusively beneath riparian vegetation in tidally influenced reaches of rivers. We hypothesized that the survival of these eggs is greatly affected by the micro-environment afforded by vegetation, particularly relating to temperature, humidity and UVB radiation. We experimentally reduced riparian vegetation height and altered shading characteristics, tracked egg survival, and used small ground-level temperature, humidity and UVB sensors to relate survival to ground-level effects around egg masses. The ground-level physical environment was markedly different from the surrounding ambient conditions. Tall dense riparian vegetation modified ambient conditions to produce a buffered temperature regime with constant high relative humidity, generally above 90%, and negligible UVB radiation at ground-level. Where vegetation height was reduced, frequent high temperatures, low humidity, and high UVB irradiances reduced egg survival by up to 95%. Temperature effects on egg survival were probably indirect, through reduced humidity, because developing eggs are known to survive in a wide range of temperatures. In this study, it was remarkable how such small variations in relatively small sites could have such a large effect on egg survival. It appears that modifications to riparian vegetation and the associated changes in the physical conditions of egg laying sites are major mechanisms affecting egg survival. The impacts associated with vegetational changes through human-induced disturbances are complex yet potentially devastating. These effects are particularly important because they affect a very small portion of habitat that is required to complete the life history of a species, despite the wide distribution of adults and juveniles across aquatic and marine environments. PMID:21931680

  13. Review of the crevalle jacks, Caranx hippos complex (Teleostei: Carangidae), with a description of a new species from West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, W.F.; Carpenter, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    The Caranx hippos species complex comprises three extant species: crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) (Linnaeus, 1766) from both the western and eastern Atlantic oceans; Pacific crevalle jack (Caranx caninus) Gu??nther, 1868 from the eastern Pacific Ocean; and longfin crevalle jack (Caranx fischeri) new species, from the eastern Atlantic, including the Mediterranean Sea and Ascension Island. Adults of all three species are superficially similar with a black blotch on the lower half of the pectoral fin, a black spot on the upper margin of opercle, one or two pairs of enlarged symphyseal canines on the lower jaw, and a similar pattern of breast squamation. Each species has a different pattern of hyperostotic bone development and anal-fin color. The two sympatric eastern Atlantic species also differ from each other in number of dorsal- and anal-fin rays, and in large adults of C. fischeri the lobes of these fins are longer and the body is deeper. Caranx hippos from opposite sides of the Atlantic are virtually indistinguishable externally but differ consistently in the expression of hyperostosis of the first dorsal-fin pterygiophore. The fossil species Caranx carangopsis Steindachner 1859 appears to have been based on composite material of Trachurus sp. and a fourth species of the Caranx hippos complex. Patterns of hyperostotic bone development are compared in the nine (of 15 total) species of Caranx sensu stricto that exhibit hyperostosis.

  14. Pseudorhabdosynochus regius n. sp. (Monogenea, Diplectanidae) from the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra (Teleostei) in the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Chaabane, Amira; Neifar, Lassad; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Pseudorhabdosynochus regius n. sp. is described from the gills of the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra caught off Senegal, Tunisia and Libya (type-locality: off Dakar, Senegal). The species is distinguished from its congeners by the structure of its sclerotised vagina (length 26-35 ?m), which exhibits a trumpet in continuity with the primary canal, a straight primary canal, and primary and secondary chambers included in a common sclerotised mass along the primary canal. The species is also characterised by small squamodiscs (length 20-40 ?m) with 10-11 rows of rodlets. Its closest relatives (based on the structure of the sclerotised vagina) are species mostly found in the Mediterranean Sea and parasites on species of Mycteroperca. A second species of Pseudorhabdosynochus Yamaguti, 1958 is reported from the same host and localities but not described. A list of diplectanids from groupers in the Mediterranean Sea is provided. We point out that a recent article was not compliant with the new Article 8.5.3 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature; for this reason, three species, P. nhatrangensis Dang, Bristow, Schander & Berland, 2013, P. vietnamensis Dang et al., 2013 and P. brunei Dang et al., 2013, are invalid. PMID:25674913

  15. Local ecological knowledge of the artisanal fishers on Epinephelus itajara (Lichtenstein, 1822) (Teleostei: Epinephelidae) on Ilhéus coast – Bahia State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK) of traditional fishermen may be the only source of information regarding the conservation of the marine ecosystem and its endangered species. One of these species is Epinephelus itajara, which can exceed 2 m in length and 400 kg weight, is classified by the IUCN as a critically endangered. In Brazil, there is currently a moratorium that prohibits the capture of this specie, and in the northeastern coast, a Marine Protected Area was recently established properly justified by the existence a one spawning aggregation. The scope of the present study was the analysis the LEK of fishers with the goal of contributing to the conservation of E. Itajara. Methods The Knowledge of 24 “experts” was recorded through semi-structured interviews with fishermen selected based on their expertise. LEK regarding some aspects of the life history of E. itajara, such as its morphology, spatial distribution, feeding, breeding and conservation, was systematized. The interviews were conducted in synchronic and diachronic situations. The data analysis followed the model of unity of the various individual skills, while the consistency of the analysis was tested using a matrix of methods employed in comparative cognitive science. Potential reproductive aggregation sites were identified by experts through projective interviews conducted based on a cartographic database and transferred to a geographic information system (GIS). Results The LEK of these specialists in relation to the biological and ecological characteristics of E. itajara showed a high level of detail and a high agreement with the scientific literature. Projective interviews are presented as a promising tool allowing spatialization of the information generated through the registration of LEK. Therefore, the visualization of information from the fishermen, as well as its analysis and comparison with other databases, is simplified, thereby contributing to the decision-making process concerning the conservation of marine ecosystem in Brazil. Conclusions Integration of LEK with scientific knowledge is an efficient strategy for the conservation of endangered species, as it provides important additional biological information that can be used in the process of participative and sustainable management of marine resources. PMID:24965849

  16. Glyptothorax mibangi, a new species of catfish (Teleostei: Sisoridae) from the Tisa River, Arunachal Pradesh, northeast India.

    PubMed

    Darshan, Achom; Dutta, Rashmi; Kachari, Akash; Gogoi, Budhin; Das, Debangshu Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Glyptothorax mibangi, a new sisorid catfish, is described from the Tisa River of Arunachal Pradesh, India. The new species can be distinguished from its congeners in the Ganga-Brahmaputra and Barak-Surma-Meghna basins by the following combination of characters: an obtuse leaf-shaped thoracic adhesive apparatus with a spindle-shaped median depression, skin ridges present over the entire apparatus including the depressed region; ventral surface of pectoral spine and first pelvic-fin ray non-plaited; slender body with depth of 10.4-13.5% SL; caudal peduncle shallow with depth 6.8-8.3% SL; snout long with length 52.9-58.6% HL; and 2+7 gill rakers on the first branchial arch. PMID:26249379

  17. Renaming of three recently described eels of the genus Neenchelys (Teleostei: Anguilliformes: Ophichthidae) from the western Pacific.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mccosker, John E; Smith, David G

    2015-01-01

    In our earlier paper (Ho et al., 2013), we described three new species of the eel genus Neenchelys Bamber, 1915. Unfortunately, the critical step of registering the work in ZooBank was omitted, thus rendering the names unavailable. In this paper, we present abbreviated descriptions of the new species in order to make these names available in accordance with the amended Article 8.5 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. PMID:26701589

  18. Ontogenic retinal changes in three ecologically distinct elopomorph fishes (Elopomorpha:Teleostei) correlate with light environment and behavior.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Scott M; Loew, Ellis R; Grace, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the mammalian retina, the teleost fish retina undergoes persistent neurogenesis from intrinsic stem cells. In marine teleosts, most cone photoreceptor genesis occurs early in the embryonic and larval stages, and rods are added primarily during and after metamorphosis. This study demonstrates a developmental paradigm in elopomorph fishes in which retinas are rod-dominated in larvae, but undergo periods of later cone genesis. Retinal characteristics were compared at different developmental stages among three ecologically distinct elopomorph fishes-ladyfish (Elops saurus), bonefish (Albula vulpes), and speckled worm eel (Myrophis punctatus). The objectives were to improve our understanding of (1) the developmental strategy in the elopomorph retina, (2) the functional architecture of the retina as it relates to ecology, and (3) how the light environment influences photoreceptor genesis. Photoreceptor morphologies, distributions, and spectral absorption were studied at larval, juvenile, and adult stages. Premetamorphic retinas in all three species are rod-dominated, but the retinas of these species undergo dramatic change over the course of development, resulting in juvenile and adult retinal characteristics that correlate closely with ecology. Adult E. saurus has high rod densities, grouped photoreceptors, a reflective tapetum, and longer-wavelength photopigments, supporting vision in turbid, low-light conditions. Adult A. vulpes has high cone densities, low rod densities, and shorter-wavelength photopigments, supporting diurnal vision in shallow, clear water. M. punctatus loses cones during metamorphosis, develops new cones after settlement, and maintains high rod but low cone densities, supporting primarily nocturnal vision. M. punctatus secondary cone genesis occurs rapidly throughout the retina, suggesting a novel mechanism of vertebrate photoreceptor genesis. Finally, in postsettlement M. punctatus, the continuous presence or absence of visible light modulates rod distribution but does not affect secondary cone genesis, suggesting some degree of developmental plasticity influenced by the light environment. PMID:26241034

  19. Molecular phylogeny of Percomorpha resolves Trichonotus as the sister lineage to Gobioidei (Teleostei: Gobiiformes) and confirms the polyphyly of Trachinoidei.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Christine E; Satoh, Takashi P; Katayama, Eri; Harrington, Richard C; Eytan, Ron I; Near, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    The percomorph fish clade Gobiiformes is a worldwide, tropical and temperate radiation with species occupying nearly all aquatic, and some semi-terrestrial, habitats. Early molecular phylogenetic studies led to the discovery of Gobiiformes, which contains Gobioidei, the gobies and sleepers, and a clade (Apogonoidei) consisting of Apogonidae and Kurtus, the cardinalfishes and nurseryfishes. Gobioidei is consistently resolved as monophyletic in molecular studies, and includes eight families whose members range from waterfall climbing stream gobies to several prominent lineages inhabiting coral reefs. The sister taxon to Gobioidei is also reliably resolved as Apogonoidei. Despite the consistent support for gobiiform monophyly in molecular studies, it is not known if percomorph lineages unsampled in molecular phylogenetic studies are closely related to Gobioidei or Apogonoidei. Here we assemble a large dataset of DNA sequence from ten protein-coding genes, sampling widely across Acanthomorpha and Percomorpha, including Gobioidei, Apogonidae, and Kurtus, along with representatives of all twelve families comprising the former Trachinoidei. The phylogenies inferred from the nuclear gene sequences show that Trachinoidei is polyphyletic, with constituent lineages spread widely among several major percomorph clades. Most notably, the sanddivers (Trichonotus) are resolved as the sister lineage of Gobioidei. This study clarifies the phylogenetic relationships of lineages previously classified in Trachinoidei, identifies Trichonotus as the sister lineage of gobies, provides a molecular phylogeny of the major lineages of Gobioidei, and offers suggested changes to percomorph classification. PMID:26265255

  20. Concerted Evolution of Duplicate Control Regions in the Mitochondria of Species of the Flatfish Family Bothidae (Teleostei: Pleuronectiformes).

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-He; Shi, Wei; Munroe, Thomas A; Gong, Li; Kong, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mitogenomes of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) exhibit the greatest diversity of gene rear-rangements in teleostean fishes. Duplicate control regions (CRs) have been found in the mito-genomes of two flatfishes, Samariscus latus (Samaridae) and Laeops lanceolata (Bothidae), which is rare in teleosts. It has been reported that duplicate CRs have evolved in a concerted fashion in fishes and other animals, however, whether concerted evo-lution exists in flatfishes remains unknown. In this study, based on five newly sequenced and six previously reported mitogenomes of lefteye flounders in the Bothidae, we explored whether duplicate CRs and concerted evolution exist in these species. Results based on the present study and previous reports show that four out of eleven bothid species examined have duplicate CRs of their mitogenomes. The core regions of the duplicate CRs of mitogenomes in the same species have identical, or nearly identical, sequences when compared to each other. This pattern fits the typical characteristics of concerted evolution. Additionally, phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis also provided evidence to support the hypothesis that duplicate CRs evolved concertedly. The core region of concerted evolution is situated at the conserved domains of the CR of the mitogenome from the termination associated sequences (TASs) to the conserved sequence blocks (CSBs). Commonly, this region is con-sidered to regulate mitochondrial replication and transcription. Thus, we hypothesize that the cause of concerted evolution of the duplicate CRs in the mtDNAs of these four bothids may be related to some function of the conserved sequences of the CRs during mitochondrial rep-lication and transcription. We hope our results will provide fresh insight into the molecular mechanisms related to replication and evolution of mitogenomes. PMID:26237419

  1. A new Pseudophoxinus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) species from Southwestern Anatolia, with remarks on the distribution of the genus in western Anatolia

    PubMed Central

    Küçük, Fahrettin; Gülle, ?skender; Güçlü, S. Serkan; Çiftçi, Y?lmaz; Erdo?an, Ömer

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pseudophoxinus burduricus sp. n. is described from drainages of Salda and Burdur lakes, southwestern Turkey. It is distinguished from other Anatolian Pseudophoxinus by a combination of characters: lateral line incomplete, with 21–39 (commonly 26–37) perforated scales and 47–57+1-2 scales in lateral series; 10½–12½ scale rows between lateral line and dorsal fin origin, 3–4(5) scale rows between lateral line and the pelvic fin origin; dorsal fin commonly with 7½ branched rays; anal fin commonly with 6½ branched rays; 7–8(9) gill rakers on the first branchial arch; a faint and diffuse epidermal black stripe from eye to caudal fin base in alive and preserved individuals; mouth slightly subterminal, tip of mouth cleft on about level of lower margin of eye; snout rounded, its length greater than eye diameter. Comparison is given with all Pseudophoxinus species from western Anatolia. PMID:23950681

  2. A new Pseudophoxinus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) species from Southwestern Anatolia, with remarks on the distribution of the genus in western Anatolia.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Fahrettin; Gülle, Iskender; Güçlü, S Serkan; Ciftçi, Y?lmaz; Erdo?an, Omer

    2013-01-01

    Pseudophoxinus burduricus sp. n. is described from drainages of Salda and Burdur lakes, southwestern Turkey. It is distinguished from other Anatolian Pseudophoxinus by a combination of characters: lateral line incomplete, with 21-39 (commonly 26-37) perforated scales and 47-57+1-2 scales in lateral series; 10½-12½ scale rows between lateral line and dorsal fin origin, 3-4(5) scale rows between lateral line and the pelvic fin origin; dorsal fin commonly with 7½ branched rays; anal fin commonly with 6½ branched rays; 7-8(9) gill rakers on the first branchial arch; a faint and diffuse epidermal black stripe from eye to caudal fin base in alive and preserved individuals; mouth slightly subterminal, tip of mouth cleft on about level of lower margin of eye; snout rounded, its length greater than eye diameter. Comparison is given with all Pseudophoxinus species from western Anatolia. PMID:23950681

  3. Species-level phylogeny of 'Satan's perches' based on discordant gene trees (Teleostei: Cichlidae: Satanoperca Günther 1862).

    PubMed

    Willis, Stuart C; López-Fernández, Hernán; Montaña, Carmen G; Farias, Izeni P; Ortí, Guillermo

    2012-06-01

    Neotropical rivers are home to the largest assemblage of freshwater fishes, but little is known about the phylogeny of these fishes at the species level using multi-locus molecular markers. Here, we present a phylogeny for all known species of the genus Satanoperca, a widespread group of Neotropical cichlid fishes, based on analysis of six unlinked genetic loci. To test nominal and proposed species limits for this group, we surveyed mtDNA sequence variation among 320 individuals representing all know species. Most nominal species were supported by this approach but we determined that populations in the Xingu, Tapajós, and Araguaia+Paraná Rivers are likely undescribed species, while S. jurupari and S. mapiritensis did not show clear genetic distinction. To infer a phylogeny of these putative species, we conducted maximum likelihood and Bayesian non-clock and relaxed clock analyses of concatenated data from three genes (one mitochondrial, two nuclear). We also used a multi-species coalescent model to estimate a species tree from six unlinked loci (one mitochondrial, five nuclear). The topologies obtained were congruent with other results, but showed only minimal to moderate support for some nodes, suggesting that more loci will be needed to satisfactorily estimate the distribution of coalescent histories within Satanoperca. We determined that this variation results from topological discordance among separate gene trees, likely due to differential sorting of ancestral polymorphisms. PMID:22406409

  4. Description of three new species of Moenkhausia (Teleostei, Characiformes, Characidae) with the definition of the Moenkhausia jamesi species complex.

    PubMed

    Petrolli, Marina G; Benine, Ricardo C

    2015-01-01

    From the examination of extensive comparative material currently identified as M. jamesi we verified that there are, at least, three new species under this name. These, along with M. jamesi and M. justae, form what we herein called the M. jamesi species complex, by sharing the following group of characters: a short maxilla, with its distal margin not exceeding anterior third of the second infraorbital; first through third teeth of the inner row of premaxilla and first and second dentary teeth with cusps arranged in a pronounced arch, humeral spot positioned between the fourth and seventh scales of the lateral line and extending up to four scale rows above the lateral line and one scale row below the lateral line, and a vertically oval to round spot at the base of the caudal fin rays. Moenkhausia ischyognatha sp. n., from Rio Xingu basin, differs from the other species of the complex by its lower head depth. Moenkhausia alesis sp. n., from the river system Tocantins-Araguaia, differs from M. jamesi, M. ischyognatha, and M. sthenosthoma by the number of scale rows above the lateral line. Moenkhausia sthenosthoma sp. n., from the Rio Madeira basin, differs from M. jamesi by the number of scale rows between the lateral line and the midventral scale series. Moenkhausia justae can be diagnosed from the other species of the complex by having a tri to pentacuspidate tooth on the maxilla. PMID:26250196

  5. Taxonomical and morphological notes on two species of mudskippers, Periophthalmus walailakae and Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from Singapore.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Zeehan; Lim, Kelvin K P; Chou, Loke Ming

    2006-11-01

    The mudskipper Periophthalmus walailakae is recorded from Singapore, where it was previously misidentified as Periophthalmodon schlosseri, with which it is syntopic. Periophthalmus walailakae is distinguished from its congeners by the following combination of characters: pelvic fins completely united and shaped like a disk, and first dorsal fin dark brown or black, with a rounded posterior edge and a white distal margin. This species most closely resembles Pn. schlosseri but has one row of teeth on the upper jaw, scales on the isthmus, and a different upper lip and jaw morphology. Contrary to an earlier report, scales are present on the snout, interorbital, and isthmus of Ps. walailakae. The two species can also be distinguished by size, external morphology, and body color patterns. PMID:17189918

  6. Phylogenetic relationships within the speciose family Characidae (Teleostei: Ostariophysi: Characiformes) based on multilocus analysis and extensive ingroup sampling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With nearly 1,100 species, the fish family Characidae represents more than half of the species of Characiformes, and is a key component of Neotropical freshwater ecosystems. The composition, phylogeny, and classification of Characidae is currently uncertain, despite significant efforts based on analysis of morphological and molecular data. No consensus about the monophyly of this group or its position within the order Characiformes has been reached, challenged by the fact that many key studies to date have non-overlapping taxonomic representation and focus only on subsets of this diversity. Results In the present study we propose a new definition of the family Characidae and a hypothesis of relationships for the Characiformes based on phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes (4,680 base pairs). The sequences were obtained from 211 samples representing 166 genera distributed among all 18 recognized families in the order Characiformes, all 14 recognized subfamilies in the Characidae, plus 56 of the genera so far considered incertae sedis in the Characidae. The phylogeny obtained is robust, with most lineages significantly supported by posterior probabilities in Bayesian analysis, and high bootstrap values from maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses. Conclusion A monophyletic assemblage strongly supported in all our phylogenetic analysis is herein defined as the Characidae and includes the characiform species lacking a supraorbital bone and with a derived position of the emergence of the hyoid artery from the anterior ceratohyal. To recognize this and several other monophyletic groups within characiforms we propose changes in the limits of several families to facilitate future studies in the Characiformes and particularly the Characidae. This work presents a new phylogenetic framework for a speciose and morphologically diverse group of freshwater fishes of significant ecological and evolutionary importance across the Neotropics and portions of Africa. PMID:21943181

  7. Experimentally induced pigment changes in small African 'Barbus' (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): Synonymy of 'Barbus' amphigramma and 'Barbus' taitensis with 'Barbus' paludinosus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farm, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    Pigmentation in fishes is known to be variable both among individuals of a species and within individuals over time. Use of pigment characters for taxonomic diagnoses must, therefore, be carefully considered. I present experimental evidence showing that pigment characters previously considered diagnostic for three small African 'Barbus' species may differ between living and preserved specimens and that lasting changes in these characters can be induced experimentally by placing fishes in a different, less turbid environment. Lateral line pigmentation and presence of a spot on the caudal peduncle showed significant changes that resulted in different species identifications before and after the experiment. These pigment patterns are thereby shown to be labile, nontrenchant characters having little or no diagnostic utility. 'Barbus' amphigramma Boulenger, 1903, and 'Barbus' taitensis Gu??nther, 1894, are thus shown to be junior synonyms of 'Barbus' paludinosus Peters, 1852.

  8. Further evidence for the invasion and establishment of Pterois volitans (Teleostei: Scorpaenidae) along the Atlantic Coast of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, H.S.; Wyanski, D.M.; Loefer, J.K.; Ross, S.W.; Quattrini, A.M.; Sulak, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We document the continued population expansion of red lionfish, Pterois volitans, the first documented successful introduction of an invasive marine fish species from the western Pacific to Atlantic coastal waters of the United States. Red lionfish are indigenous to the Indo-Pacific and have apparently established one or more breeding populations on reefs off the southeastern United States. Fifty-nine specimens, most presumably adult red lionfish, were documented or collected on live-bottom reefs off North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida, and on a manmade structure off Georgia. Observation/collection depths and bottom water temperatures for these fish ranged from 40-99 m and 13.8-24.4??C, respectively. Eleven juvenile lionfish, believed to be expatriated from southeastern waters, were collected in estuaries along the coast of Long Island, NY, at depths of 0-5 m and water temperatures ranging from 13.8-16.5??C. Twelve of the total 70 specimens collected or observed were positively identified as red lionfish. Based on histological assessment of gonad tissue, two reproductively-active males and one immature female were collected. The life history of red lionfish, especially their reproductive biology and food habits, should be investigated along the east coast of the US to determine the potential impacts of this species on ecosystems they have invaded.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships and biogeographical patterns in Circum-Mediterranean subfamily Leuciscinae (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) inferred from both mitochondrial and nuclear data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leuciscinae is a subfamily belonging to the Cyprinidae fish family that is widely distributed in Circum-Mediterranean region. Many efforts have been carried out to deciphering the evolutionary history of this group. Thus, different biogeographical scenarios have tried to explain the colonization of Europe and Mediterranean area by cyprinids, such as the "north dispersal" or the "Lago Mare dispersal" models. Most recently, Pleistocene glaciations influenced the distribution of leuciscins, especially in North and Central Europe. Weighing up these biogeographical scenarios, this paper constitutes not only the first attempt at deciphering the mitochondrial and nuclear relationships of Mediterranean leuciscins but also a test of biogeographical hypotheses that could have determined the current distribution of Circum-Mediterranean leuciscins. Results A total of 4439 characters (mitochondrial + nuclear) from 321 individuals of 176 leuciscine species rendered a well-supported phylogeny, showing fourteen main lineages. Analyses of independent mitochondrial and nuclear markers supported the same main lineages, but basal relationships were not concordant. Moreover, some incongruence was found among independent mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenies. The monophyly of some poorly known genera such as Pseudophoxinus and Petroleuciscus was rejected. Representatives of both genera belong to different evolutionary lineages. Timing of cladogenetic events among the main leuciscine lineages was gained using mitochondrial and all genes data set. Conclusions Adaptations to a predatory lifestyle or miniaturization have superimposed the morphology of some species. These species have been separated into different genera, which are not supported by a phylogenetic framework. Such is the case of the genera Pseudophoxinus and Petroleuciscus, which real taxonomy is not well known. The diversification of leuciscine lineages has been determined by intense vicariant events following the paleoclimatological and hydrogeological history of Mediterranean region. We propose different colonization models of Mediterranean region during the early Oligocene. Later vicariance events promoted Leuciscinae diversification during Oligocene and Miocene periods. Our data corroborate the presence of leuciscins in North Africa before the Messinian salinity crisis. Indeed, Messinian period appears as a stage of gradually Leuciscinae diversification. The rise of humidity at the beginning of the Pliocene promoted the colonization and posterior isolation of newly established freshwater populations. Finally, Pleistocene glaciations determined the current European distribution of some leuciscine species. PMID:20807419

  10. Nematocharax costai Bragança, Barbosa & Mattos a junior synonym of Nematocharax venustus Weitzman, Menezes & Britski (Teleostei: Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Menezes, Naércio A; Zanata, Angela M; Camelier, Priscila

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of morphometric and meristic data from specimens obtained from various river basins along the distribution of Nematocharax venustus revealed intraspecific variation among geographically isolated populations. A comparative analysis of these data with data from the original description of N. costai, in addition to data obtained from the holotype and topotypes of the species, showed broad overlap and absence of morphological features supporting the recognition of two species within Nematocharax. Characters previously used to distinguish N. costai from N. venustus, such as presence of hooks or spinules on dorsal and pelvic fins, number of hooks on anal-fin rays, occurrence of a pink horizontal mark on the caudal peduncle, number of supraneurals, and coloration of the pelvic-fin filament, are not useful to distinguish the two putative species. Thus, N. costai is considered herein as a junior synonym of N. venustus. Presence of a complete lateral line and length of fin-filaments of N. venustus are briefly discussed and a current overview of the distribution of the species is given. In view of the proposed synonymy of a so recently described species and aiming to avoid problems of similar nature in the future, we also take the opportunity to reinforce herein the importance of the examination of large population samples and of intraspecific variation of secondary sexual features. PMID:25781260

  11. Ontogeny and homology of the skeletal elements that form the sucking disc of remoras (Teleostei, Echeneoidei, Echeneidae).

    PubMed

    Britz, Ralf; Johnson, G David

    2012-12-01

    The sucking disc of the sharksuckers of the family Echeneidae is one of the most remarkable and most highly modified skeletal structures among vertebrates. We studied the development of the sucking disc based on a series of larval, juvenile, and adult echeneids ranging from 9.3 mm to 175 mm standard length. We revisited the question of the homology of the different skeletal parts that form the disc using an ontogenetic approach. We compared the initial stages of development of the disc with early developmental stages of the spinous dorsal fin in a representative of the morphologically basal percomorph Morone. We demonstrate that the "interneural rays" of echeneids are homologous with the proximal-middle radials of Morone and other teleosts and that the "intercalary bones" of sharksuckers are homologous with the distal radials of Morone and other teleosts. The "intercalary bones" or distal radials develop a pair of large wing-like lateral extensions in echeneids, not present in this form in any other teleost. Finally the "pectinated lamellae" are homologous with the fin spines of Morone and other acanthomorphs. The main part of each pectinated lamella is formed by bilateral extensions of the base of the fin spine just above its proximal tip, each of which develops a row of spinous projections, or spinules, along its posterior margin. The number of rows and the number of spinules increase with size, and they become autogenous from the body of the lamellae. We also provide a historical review of previous studies on the homology of the echeneid sucking disc and demonstrate that the most recent hypotheses, published in 2002, 2005 and 2006, are erroneous. PMID:22833478

  12. Pseudorhabdosynochus regius n. sp. (Monogenea, Diplectanidae) from the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra (Teleostei) in the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Chaabane, Amira; Neifar, Lassad; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Pseudorhabdosynochus regius n. sp. is described from the gills of the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra caught off Senegal, Tunisia and Libya (type-locality: off Dakar, Senegal). The species is distinguished from its congeners by the structure of its sclerotised vagina (length 26–35 ?m), which exhibits a trumpet in continuity with the primary canal, a straight primary canal, and primary and secondary chambers included in a common sclerotised mass along the primary canal. The species is also characterised by small squamodiscs (length 20–40 ?m) with 10–11 rows of rodlets. Its closest relatives (based on the structure of the sclerotised vagina) are species mostly found in the Mediterranean Sea and parasites on species of Mycteroperca. A second species of Pseudorhabdosynochus Yamaguti, 1958 is reported from the same host and localities but not described. A list of diplectanids from groupers in the Mediterranean Sea is provided. We point out that a recent article was not compliant with the new Article 8.5.3 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature; for this reason, three species, P. nhatrangensis Dang, Bristow, Schander & Berland, 2013, P. vietnamensis Dang et al., 2013 and P. brunei Dang et al., 2013, are invalid. PMID:25674913

  13. DNA barcoding at riverscape scales: assessing biodiversity among fishes of the genus Cottus (Teleostei) in northern Rocky Mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael K; McKelvey, Kevin S; Pilgrim, Kristine L; Schwartz, Michael K

    2013-07-01

    There is growing interest in broad-scale biodiversity assessments that can serve as benchmarks for identifying ecological change. Genetic tools have been used for such assessments for decades, but spatial sampling considerations have largely been ignored. Here, we demonstrate how intensive sampling efforts across a large geographical scale can influence identification of taxonomic units. We used sequences of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and cytochrome b, analysed with maximum parsimony networks, maximum-likelihood trees and genetic distance thresholds, as indicators of biodiversity and species identity among the taxonomically challenging fishes of the genus Cottus in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Analyses of concatenated sequences from fish collected in all major watersheds of this area revealed eight groups with species-level differences that were also geographically circumscribed. Only two of these groups, however, were assigned to recognized species, and these two assignments resulted in intraspecific genetic variation (>2.0%) regarded as atypical for individual species. An incomplete inventory of individuals from throughout the geographical ranges of many species represented in public databases, as well as sample misidentification and a poorly developed taxonomy, may have hampered species assignment and discovery. We suspect that genetic assessments based on spatially robust sampling designs will reveal previously unrecognized biodiversity in many other taxa. PMID:23496857

  14. Postglacial recolonization of eastern Blacknose Dace,Rhinichthys atratulus(Teleostei: Cyprinidae), through the gateway of New England

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Michelle L; Gignoux-Wolfsohn, Sarah; Stonebraker, Phoebe; Chernoff, Barry

    2011-01-01

    During the last ice age, much of North America far south as 40°N was covered by glaciers (Hewitt 2000). About 20,000 years ago, as the glaciers retreated, the hydrologic landscape changed dramatically creating waterways for fish dispersal. The number of populations responsible for recolonization and the regions from which they recolonized are unknown for many freshwater fishes living in New England and southeastern Canada. The Blacknose Dace,Rhinichthys atratulus, is one of the freshwater fish species that recolonized this region. We hypothesize that the earliest deglaciated region, modern-day Connecticut, was recolonized byR. atratulusvia a single founding event by a single population. In this paper, we test this hypothesis phylogenetically with regard to the major drainage basins within Connecticut. The mitochondrial DNA exhibits low nucleotide diversity, high haplotype diversity, and a dominant haplotype found across the state. A small percentage of individuals in the Housatonic drainage basin, however, share a haplotype with populations in New York drainage basins, a haplotype not found elsewhere in Connecticut's drainage basins. We calculated a range for the rate of divergence for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (nd2) and control region (ctr) of 4.43–6.76% and 3.84–8.48% per million years (my), respectively. While this range is higher than the commonly accepted rate of 2% for mitochondrial DNA, these results join a growing list of publications finding high rates of divergence for various taxa (Peterson and Masel 2009). The data support the conclusion that Connecticut as a whole was recolonized initially by a single founding event that came from a single refugium. Subsequently, the Housatonic basin alone experienced a secondary recolonization event. PMID:22393505

  15. Biochemical responses over time in common carp Cyprinus carpio (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) during fed supplementation with ?-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Enamorado, Alain D; Martins, Atila C; Flores, Juliana A; Tesser, Marcelo Borges; Caldas, Sergiane S; Primel, Ednei G; Monserrat, José Maria

    2015-10-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the influence of lipoic acid (LA) supplementation (439.84±6.71 mg LA/kg feed) on antioxidants responses throughout the time in intestine, liver and muscle of juvenile common carp Cyprinus carpio. Two experimental groups were fed during four weeks with a diet with or without LA. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were evaluated in these organs. Also, a technique to measure protein disulfide bonds and sulfhydryl groups was optimized for intestine samples. GST activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in intestine after two weeks of supplementation. GSH content was also significantly higher (p<0.05) in intestine, liver and muscle of fish fed with LA after two and three weeks, respectively. Total capacity antioxidant against peroxyl radicals was significantly increased (p<0.05) in the muscle of animals fed with LA after the fourth week. Concentration of disulfide bonds was higher in the intestine of fish fed with LA but this group also showed higher concentration of sulfhydryl groups (p<0.05). It is concluded that supplementation with LA is a safe strategy to induce antioxidant responses and improves the antioxidant status in different organs of common carp. Two week of supplementation are required to induce antioxidant responses in intestine and liver and three week for muscle. PMID:26037328

  16. A New Species of Ligophorus (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) from the gills of the Flathead Mullet Mugil cephalus (Teleostei: Mugilidae) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Abril; Míguez-Lozano, Raúl; Llopis-Belenguer, Cristina; Balbuena, Juan Antonio

    2015-12-01

    A new monogenean species, Ligophorus yucatanensis n. sp. from the gills of the flathead mullet Mugil cephalus from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, is described. The new species can be differentiated from all other species of Ligophorus by the morphology of the accessory piece of the copulatory organ. Its main lobe is cylindrical, tunnelled expanded distally, slightly bowed with a characteristic membranous opening at level of medial bifurcation of the accessory piece, forming a thick-walled bulbshaped expansion that ends in a round labium. The secondary lobe is spatulate, straight, and shorter than the main lobe. In addition, the new species can be distinguished from other species by the morphology of the haptoral ventral bar, and the distal end of the vaginal duct. Furthermore the ventral anchors are shorter than those of all other species of Ligophorus reported in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. In addition, the zoogeographical records of Ligophorus spp. on the M. cephalus species complex are briefly reviewed and updated. PMID:26408603

  17. Cytological mechanisms of gynogenesis and sperm incorporation in unreduced diploid eggs of the clonal loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Itono, Masaki; Okabayashi, Naoki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    The loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus comprises diploid clonal, triploid and diploid-triploid mosaic individuals in a wild population on Hokkaido island, Japan. When diploid eggs of clonal loaches are fertilized by haploid sperm of normal bisexual loaches, both diploid clonal and non-diploid aclonal individuals occur in the progeny. Flow cytometry and microsatellite analyses revealed that the occurrence of triploid, diploid-triploid and other progeny was essentially due to the genetic incorporation of sperm to diploid clonal genomes of unreduced eggs. In this study, we examined the influence of water temperature from fertilization to early embryogenesis on frequencies of diploid clonal and other progeny and observed that progeny of three out of four clonal females examined exhibited approximately constant rates of diploid clonal individuals (54.2-68.9%) at hatching stage. Thus, no drastic increase of non-diploid progeny was detected. However, the 28 degrees C group of the fourth clonal female gave significantly lower rate (28.1%) of diploid clonal progeny, suggesting that this temperature might be a critical or a borderline temperature inducing sperm incorporation. We also examined the cytological process by which diploid clonal and other aclonal progeny develop after fertilization. In some fertilized eggs, the sperm nucleus remained condensed throughout fertilization and early embryogenesis and never fused with the female pronucleus. This cytological observation concludes that clonal eggs develop by the mechanism of gynogenesis. However, some other eggs showed the cytological process of syngamy between the female pronucleus and an accidentally formed male nucleus, suggesting the formation of triploid progeny. The syngamy between an accidentally activated sperm nucleus with a male pronucleus-like structure and nucleus of a blastomere of gynogenetically developing clonal diploid embryo might produce a diploid-triploid mosaic individual. PMID:17094112

  18. Cryptic clonal lineages and genetic diversity in the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae) inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Kagayaki; Nakamura-Shiokawa, Yuka; Bando, Etsuko; Li, Ya-Juan; Boro?, Alicja; Khan, Md Mukhlesur Rahman; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2008-02-01

    In the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, the asexual lineage, which produces unreduced clonal diploid eggs, has been identified. Among 833 specimens collected from 54 localities in Japan and two localities in China, 82 candidates of other lineage(s) of cryptic clones were screened by examining RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism)-PCR haplotypes in the control region of mtDNA. This analysis was performed because triploid loaches arise from the accidental incorporation of the sperm nucleus into unreduced diploid eggs of a clone. The categorization of members belonging to three newly identified lineages (clones 2-4) and the previously identified clonal lineage (clone 1) was verified by evaluating the genetic identity between two or more individuals from each clonal lineage based on RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA)-PCR and multilocus DNA fingerprints. We detected 75 haplotypes by observing the nucleotide status at variable sites from the control region of mtDNA. Phylogenic trees constructed from such sequences showed two highly diversified clades, A and B, that were beyond the level common for interspecific genetic differentiation. That result suggests that M. anguillicaudatus in Japan is not a single species entity. Two clone-specific mtDNA sequences were included in clade A, and the loaches with such sequences may be the maternal origin of the clones. PMID:17578669

  19. Pluvial Drainage Patterns and Holocene Desiccation Influenced the Genetic Architecture of Relict Dace, Relictus solitarius (Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Derek D.; Evans, R. Paul; Shiozawa, Dennis K.

    2015-01-01

    Changing drainage patterns have played a significant role in the evolution of western North American aquatic taxa. Relict dace, Relictus solitarius, is a Great Basin endemic cyprinid with a native range that is restricted to four valleys in eastern Nevada. Relictus solitarius now occupies spring systems that are the remnants of Pleistocene-era pluvial lakes, although it may have occurred in the area for much longer. Here we use mitochondrial DNA sequence data to assess range-wide genetic diversity of R. solitarius, and to estimate divergence times to determine whether pluvial drainages played an important role in shaping intraspecific genetic diversity. Genetic diversification within R. solitarius began during the early to mid-Pleistocene, separating populations within two sets of valleys (Butte/Ruby and Goshute/Steptoe). Additional diversification in each of the two sets of valleys occurred more recently, in the mid- to late-Pleistocene. Holocene desiccation has further isolated populations, and each population sampled contains unique mtDNA haplotypes. Pluvial drainage patterns did contribute to the genetic structure observed within R. solitarius, but most of the intraspecific diversification does not appear to be associated with the Last Glacial Maximum. Holocene desiccation has also contributed to the observed genetic structure. The relict dace populations we sampled are all unique, and we recommend that future management efforts should strive to preserve as much of the genetic diversity as possible. PMID:26394395

  20. Reproductive biology of Ilisha elongata (Teleostei: Pristigasteridae) in Ariake Sound, Japan: Implications for estuarine fish conservation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Takita, Toru; Zhang, Chunguang

    2009-01-01

    Elongate ilisha ( Ilisha enlongata) is a commercially important species that contributes to clupeoid fisheries in Asian countries. In the present study, the reproductive biology of I. elongata in Ariake Sound, Japan is determined for the first time. Six maturity stages were described using ovarian and testicular histology throughout the annual cycle. The spawning season in Ariake Sound lasts from May to July, with peak spawning activity in May and June. Age at first maturity was estimated to be 2 years, with a few exceptions of 1 year in well-developed males. Ovaries that contained both tertiary yolk oocytes and postovulatory follicles occurred from late May to late July, indicating that I. elongata is a multiple spawner. The size-frequency distribution of oocytes provided evidence for its multiple spawning and accuracy of the fecundity estimates. The batch fecundity of this species was estimated at between 22,200 and 270,900 eggs per individual, increasing with age between two and six years. The present findings on the reproductive strategy of I. elongata in Ariake Sound are generally consistent with those in temperate or subtropical populations, but quite different from those of tropical population where first maturation occurs around 200 days and life spans are shorter, with a maximum age less than 3 years. The conservation implications of this reproductive strategy in a harsh, variable environment in Asian countries are also discussed.

  1. A complex of species related to Paradiscogaster glebulae (Digenea: Faustulidae) in chaetodontid fishes (Teleostei: Perciformes) of the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Pablo E; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C; Ward, Selina; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    A total of 1523 individuals of 34 species of chaetodontids from the Great Barrier Reef were examined for faustulid trematodes. Specimens resembling Paradiscogaster glebulae Bray, Cribb & Barker, 1994 were found in nine chaetodontid species at three localities. These specimens are shown, on the basis of combined morphological and molecular analyses, to comprise a complex of morphologically similar and partly cryptic species. The complex may comprise as many as six distinct species of which three are resolved here. The true P. glebulae is identified in Chaetodon ornatissimus Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon aureofasciatus Macleay, 1878, Chaetodon plebeius Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon rainfordi McCulloch, 1923 and Chaetodon speculum Cuvier, 1831. Two new species are described, Paradiscogaster munozae n. sp. from Heniochus varius (Cuvier, 1829), Heniochus chrysostomus Cuvier, 1831 and Chaetodon citrinellus Cuvier, 1831 and Paradiscogaster melendezi n. sp. from Chaetodon kleinii Bloch, 1790. In terms of morphology the three species differ most clearly in the development of the appendages on the ventral sucker. The three species differ at 3-6consistent bp of ITS2 rDNA. The host-specificity of the three species differs strikingly. P. melendezi n. sp. infects just one fish species, P. glebulae infects species of only one clade of Chaetodon, and P. munozae n. sp. infects quite unrelated species. The basis of this unusual pattern of host-specificity requires further exploration. Two of the species recognised here, P. glebulae and P. munozae n. sp., showed apparent intra-individual variation in the ITS2 rDNA sequences as demonstrated by clear, replicated double peaks in the electropherograms. PMID:26096311

  2. Helicometrina nimia Linton, 1910 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) in dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834) (Teleostei: Serranidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Roumbedakis, K; Marchiori, N C; Garcia, P; Pereira Junior, J; Castro, L A S; Martins, M L

    2014-05-01

    Helicometrina nimia (Opecoelidae) is a digenean with wide distribution. Fish families most commonly used as hosts for H. nimia are Serranidae, Pomodasydae, Scorpaenidae and Clinidae. In the present study, a new host and a new host locality are presented for the species. A description of the studied specimens, besides comments concerning its taxonomic status and biometrically compared tables of H. nimia reports are given. The taxonomic status of members of Helicometrina has been questionable. The greatest controversy for the genus seems to be related to the validity of diagnostic features, especially in regard to the number of testes. In the present study, all studied specimens presented a permanent and steady number of testes (n=9) and therefore its use as a diagnostic character is supported by the present authors. Epinephelus marginatus is considered a new host for Helicometrina nimia, and São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil, a new locality for the species. PMID:25166333

  3. Danio annulosus, a new species of chain Danio from the Shuvolong Falls in Bangladesh (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae).

    PubMed

    Kullander, Sven O; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Norén, Michael; Mollah, Abdur Rob

    2015-01-01

    Danio annulosus, new species, is described from a small pool below the Shuvolong Falls in the Kaptai Lake system in Bangladesh. It shares with chain danios (D. assamila, D. dangila, D. catenatus, D. concatenatus, and D. sysphigmatus) a colour pattern consisting of series of dark rings with light interspaces along the side, complete lateral line, 14 circumpeduncular scales, a produced first ray in the pectoral fin, and a black humeral spot. It differs from other chain danios in possessing much shorter pectoral and pelvic fins, and a humeral spot that is slightly wider than deep instead of round or deeper than wide. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence separates D. annulosus from the most similar species, D. catenatus by a p-distance of 3.4%. Although recorded from only a single locality, Danio annulosus is expected to have a wider distribution in the Karnafuli River drainage. PMID:26250259

  4. The eels of the genus Nettenchelys, with description of a new species from Taiwan (Teleostei: Anguilliformes: Nettastomatidae).

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; Lin, James; Chen, Hong-Ming; Pogonoski, John J

    2015-01-01

    The species of the genus Nettenchelys are summarized. Nine species are recognized on the basis of adult specimens: Nettenchelys dionisi Brito, N. erroriensis Karmovskaya, N. exoria Böhlke & Smith, N. gephyra Castle & Smith, N. inion Smith & Böhlke, N. paxtoni Karmovskaya, N. proxima new species, N. pygmaea Smith & Böhlke, and N. taylori Alcock. Another species, N. bellottii (D'Ancona) is based on a larva. Nettenchelys gephyra is redescribed on the basis of additional specimens from northeastern Taiwan, Indonesia and Australia. Nettenchelys proxima new species is described from a specimen from southwestern Taiwan. Nettenchelys sp. reported by Uyeno & Sasaki (1983) is found to be a specimen of Facciolella. Information on larvae is updated based on new knowledge of the genus. PMID:26701595

  5. Pluvial Drainage Patterns and Holocene Desiccation Influenced the Genetic Architecture of Relict Dace, Relictus solitarius (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Houston, Derek D; Evans, R Paul; Shiozawa, Dennis K

    2015-01-01

    Changing drainage patterns have played a significant role in the evolution of western North American aquatic taxa. Relict dace, Relictus solitarius, is a Great Basin endemic cyprinid with a native range that is restricted to four valleys in eastern Nevada. Relictus solitarius now occupies spring systems that are the remnants of Pleistocene-era pluvial lakes, although it may have occurred in the area for much longer. Here we use mitochondrial DNA sequence data to assess range-wide genetic diversity of R. solitarius, and to estimate divergence times to determine whether pluvial drainages played an important role in shaping intraspecific genetic diversity. Genetic diversification within R. solitarius began during the early to mid-Pleistocene, separating populations within two sets of valleys (Butte/Ruby and Goshute/Steptoe). Additional diversification in each of the two sets of valleys occurred more recently, in the mid- to late-Pleistocene. Holocene desiccation has further isolated populations, and each population sampled contains unique mtDNA haplotypes. Pluvial drainage patterns did contribute to the genetic structure observed within R. solitarius, but most of the intraspecific diversification does not appear to be associated with the Last Glacial Maximum. Holocene desiccation has also contributed to the observed genetic structure. The relict dace populations we sampled are all unique, and we recommend that future management efforts should strive to preserve as much of the genetic diversity as possible. PMID:26394395

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the gnomefish Scombrops boops (Teleostei, Perciformes, Scombropidae) from the Pacific Ocean off the Japanese Islands.

    PubMed

    Tsunashima, Tadasuke; Itoi, Shiro; Abe, Koko; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Satoshi; Kozen, Takahiro; Ono, Naoto; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Nakai, Shizuko; Takai, Noriyuki; Huang, Ming-Chih; Sugita, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the gnomefish Scombrops boops was determined by a PCR-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was 16,517?bp, including 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and one control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the gnomefish mtDNA was identical to those of typical teleosts. This is the first report of the complete mitochondrial genome of a member of the Scombropidae family and will be useful for the development of molecular tools for ecological research. PMID:25484172

  7. Fishery of the Goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara (Teleostei: Epinephelidae) based on local ecological knowledge and fishery records in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Perera, Alfonso; González-Salas, Carlos; Tuz-Sulub, Armin; Villegas-Hernández, Harold

    2009-09-01

    The Goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara, a large-bodied (approximately 2.5 m TL, > 400 kg) and critically endangered fish (Epinephelidae), is highly vulnerable to overfishing. Although protected from fishing in many countries, its exploitation in Mexico is unregulated; a situation that puts its populations at risk. Fishery records of E. itajara are scarce, which prevents determination of its fishery status. This work aimed to elucidate the E. itajara fishery in the northern Yucatan Peninsula by 1) analyzing available catch records and 2) interviewing veteran fishermen (local ecological knowledge) from two traditional landing sites: Dzilam de Bravo and Puerto Progreso. Historic fishery records from two fishing cooperatives were analyzed in order to elucidate the current situation and offer viable alternatives for conservation and management. Catches have decreased severely. Local knowledge obtained from fishermen represented a very important source of information for reconstructing the fisheries history of this species. Conservation measures that incorporate regional and international regulations on critically endangered fish species are suggested. PMID:19928454

  8. The involvement of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in the ovulatory dysfunction of the potamodromous Salminus hilarii (Teleostei: Characidae) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Renata Guimarães; Honji, Renato Massaaki; Melo, Renato Garcia; de Moraes Narcizo, Amanda; Amaral, Juliane Suzuki; de Carvalho Araújo, Ronaldo; Hilsdorf, Alexandre Wagner Silva

    2015-12-01

    Potamodromous teleosts that require migration to reproduce show dysfunctions that block ovulation and spawning while in captivity. To understand the physiological basis of these reproductive dysfunctions, follicle-stimulating hormone b subunit (fshb) and luteinizing hormone b subunit (lhb) gene expression analyses by real-time quantitative PCR, together with measurements of estradiol (E 2), 17?-hydroxyprogesterone (17?-OHP) and 17?,20?-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17?,20?-DHP) levels, were carried out throughout the reproductive cycle of the potamodromous Salminus hilarii. The following reproductive stages were evaluated in captive and wild females: previtellogenic (PV), advanced maturation/mature (AM) and regression/spent (REG/SPENT). In the wild females, fshb expression decreased from the PV to the AM stage, and the opposite pattern was detected for E 2, which increased from the PV to the AM stage. fshb was expressed at lower levels in captive than in wild females, and this difference did not change during the reproductive cycle. lhb expression also increased from the PV to the AM stage in both groups, but the wild females at the AM and REG/SPENT stages showed higher lhb expression levels than the captive females. The concentrations of 17?-OHP did not change during the reproductive cycle, and the levels were higher in the captive than in the wild females at all reproductive stages. 17?,20?-DHP levels did not change between wild and captive females. However, in captive females, the transition from PV to AM stage was followed by an increase in 17?,20?-DHP levels. These data indicate that dysfunctions in the gonadotropins and steroids synthesis pathways cause the ovulation failure in captive S. hilarii. PMID:26183262

  9. Species Flock in the North American Great Lakes: Molecular Ecology of Lake Nipigon Ciscoes (Teleostei: Coregonidae: Coregonus)

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    Species Flock in the North American Great Lakes: Molecular Ecology of Lake Nipigon Ciscoes #12;SPECIES FLOCK IN THE NORTH AMERICAN GREAT LAKES: MOLECULAR ECOLOGY OF LAKE NIPIGON CISCOES poly~norphismsobserved among the North American Great Lakes ciscoes suggest that this fish group has

  10. Growth of striated muscle fibres in the M. lateralis of the European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.) (Pisces, Teleostei).

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, J J; van den Berg, P G

    1978-01-01

    Diameters of red and white muscle fibres were measured in the M. lateralis of eels cultured under laboratory circumstances over a period of 2 years, starting from the glass eel stage. The red fibres of eels less than 10 cm are unique in that their growth involves increase in diameter only. Growth of the red fibres in eels greater than 10 cm, and of the white fibres in eels at all lengths considered, is characterized by an increase in number as well as diameter, the relative importance of these two methods of growth being related to factors other than the length of the animal. Satellite cells may play an important part in the addition of new, small muscle fibres. Images Fig. 8 PMID:640952

  11. Neoplecostomus doceensis: a new loricariid species (Teleostei, Siluriformes) from the rio Doce basin and comments about its putative origin

    PubMed Central

    Roxo, Fábio F.; Silva, Gabriel S. C.; Zawadzki, Cláudio H.; Oliveira, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Neoplecostomus is described from the rio Doce basin representing the first species of this genus in the basin. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by having enlarged, fleshy folds between dentaries, two or three series of developed papillae anterior to premaxillary teeth and a adipose-fin membrane present, and by lacking enlarged odontodes along snout lateral margins in mature males, a well-developed dorsal-fin spinelet wider than dorsal-fin spine base, lower number of lateral-line figs and developed membrane on the dorsal portion of the first, second and third pelvic-fin branched rays. Additionally, we present a brief discussion of biogeographic scenarios that may explain the distribution of the new species in the rio Doce basin. We suggested that the ancestral lineage of the new species reached the rio Doce from the upper portions of rio Paraná drainages about 3.5 Mya (95% HPD: 1.6–5.5) indicating a colonization route of the N. doceensis ancestral lineage from the south end of Serra do Espinhaço, probably as a result of headwater capture processes between the upper rio Paraná and rio Doce basins. PMID:25317064

  12. Concerted Evolution of Duplicate Control Regions in the Mitochondria of Species of the Flatfish Family Bothidae (Teleostei: Pleuronectiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Thomas A.; Gong, Li; Kong, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mitogenomes of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) exhibit the greatest diversity of gene rear-rangements in teleostean fishes. Duplicate control regions (CRs) have been found in the mito-genomes of two flatfishes, Samariscus latus (Samaridae) and Laeops lanceolata (Bothidae), which is rare in teleosts. It has been reported that duplicate CRs have evolved in a concerted fashion in fishes and other animals, however, whether concerted evo-lution exists in flatfishes remains unknown. In this study, based on five newly sequenced and six previously reported mitogenomes of lefteye flounders in the Bothidae, we explored whether duplicate CRs and concerted evolution exist in these species. Results based on the present study and previous reports show that four out of eleven bothid species examined have duplicate CRs of their mitogenomes. The core regions of the duplicate CRs of mitogenomes in the same species have identical, or nearly identical, sequences when compared to each other. This pattern fits the typical characteristics of concerted evolution. Additionally, phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis also provided evidence to support the hypothesis that duplicate CRs evolved concertedly. The core region of concerted evolution is situated at the conserved domains of the CR of the mitogenome from the termination associated sequences (TASs) to the conserved sequence blocks (CSBs). Commonly, this region is con-sidered to regulate mitochondrial replication and transcription. Thus, we hypothesize that the cause of concerted evolution of the duplicate CRs in the mtDNAs of these four bothids may be related to some function of the conserved sequences of the CRs during mitochondrial rep-lication and transcription. We hope our results will provide fresh insight into the molecular mechanisms related to replication and evolution of mitogenomes. PMID:26237419

  13. Addressing gene tree discordance and non-stationarity to resolve a multi-locus phylogeny of the flatfishes (Teleostei: Pleuronectiformes).

    PubMed

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Li, Chenhong; Munroe, Thomas A; Ballesteros, Jesus A; Ortí, Guillermo

    2013-09-01

    Non-homogeneous processes and, in particular, base compositional non-stationarity have long been recognized as a critical source of systematic error. But only a small fraction of current molecular systematic studies methodically examine and effectively account for the potentially confounding effect of non-stationarity. The problem is especially overlooked in multi-locus or phylogenomic scale analyses, in part because no efficient tools exist to accommodate base composition heterogeneity in large data sets. We present a detailed analysis of a data set with 20 genes and 214 taxa to study the phylogeny of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) and their position among percomorphs. Most genes vary significantly in base composition among taxa and fail to resolve flatfish monophyly and other emblematic groups, suggesting that non-stationarity may be causing systematic error. We show a strong association between base compositional bias and topological discordance among individual gene partitions and their inferred trees. Phylogenetic methods applying non-homogeneous models to accommodate non-stationarity have relatively minor effect to reduce gene tree discordance, suggesting that available computer programs applying these methods do not scale up efficiently to the data set of modest size analysed in this study. By comparing phylogenetic trees obtained with species tree (STAR) and concatenation approaches, we show that gene tree discordance in our data set is most likely due to base compositional biases than to incomplete lineage sorting. Multi-locus analyses suggest that the combined phylogenetic signal from all loci in a concatenated data set overcomes systematic biases induced by non-stationarity at each partition. Finally, relationships among flatfishes and their relatives are discussed in the light of these results. We find support for the monophyly of flatfishes and confirm findings from previous molecular phylogenetic studies suggesting their close affinity with several carangimorph groups (i.e., jack and allies, barracuda, archerfish, billfish and swordfish, threadfin, moonfish, beach salmon, and snook and barramundi). PMID:23749787

  14. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) from the emerald rock cod, Trematomus bernacchii (Teleostei: Perciformes) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Cipriani, Paolo; Pankov, Plamen; Lawton, Scott P

    2015-10-01

    Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. is described from the gill blood vessels of the emerald rock cod Trematomus bernacchii in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. It is distinguished from all other species of Aporocotyle by its body tegument showing single conical spines, spinous buccal capsule, and genital atrium positioned medially; all congeners described to date are characterized by clusters of tegumental spines, unspined buccal capsule and genital atrium located in the lateral part of the body. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. clearly differs from A. notothenia (the only other species of Aporocotyle found in a perciform fish) in its shape and arrangement of tegumental spines, buccal capsule features, location of genital atrium, body size, ratio of esophagus/body length, anterior caeca/posterior caeca ratio, number of testes, cirrus sac and ovary size and shape, and host. The new species is easily distinguished from A. argentinensis (the species that most closely resembles A. michaudi) by the shape and arrangement of tegumental spines, buccal capsule features, genital atrium location, left anterior caecum longer than right, esophagus/body length ratio, number of testes, cirrus sac size and shape, host and molecular analyses. Phylogenetic analyses of partial 28S rDNA genetic data showed that sequences representing the new species form a distinct clade with all other sequences for species of Aporocotyle and appear basal within the genus. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. represents the only species of genus described in Antarctica. PMID:25979611

  15. Goblet Cells and Mucus Types in the Digestive Intestine and Respiratory Intestine in Bronze Corydoras (Callichthyidae: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Leknes, I L

    2015-10-01

    The structure and histochemical properties of the intestine in bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus), a stomach-containing teleost, are described, with emphasis on goblet cells and mucin types. The proximal intestine displayed a normal structure for teleosts, whereas the distal intestine was wide, translucent, thin-walled, richly vascularized and constantly filled with air, suggesting an important respiratory role. Goblet cells were common throughout the entire intestine and displayed a variable, but mainly faint metachromatic colour after toluidine blue. They were moderately coloured by alcian blue at both pH 2.5 and 0.2 and displayed no colour after periodic acid followed by Schiff's solution (PAS), but a distinct purple-brown colour after high iron diamine followed by alcian blue (pH 2.5). Together, these results suggest that the mucin in the intestine goblet cells consists mainly of sulphated proteoglycans. Further, the results from the present lectin and neuraminidase tests suggest that these mucins contain much N-acetylglucoseamines and some N-acetylgalactosamines and sialic acid, but seem to lack glucose and mannose. They also contain some galactose-N-acetylgalactosamines sequences, normally hidden by sialic acid. The distinct brush border and mucus layer on the epithelial cells in the respiratory intestine may indicate some digestive roles, such as absorption of water, ions and simple carbohydrates. As sulphated proteoglycans are tough and attract much water, this mucus may play important roles in the protection against mechanical and chemical damages and in the defence against micro-organisms throughout the entire intestine, but in the respiratory intestine it may impede significantly the oxygen uptake. However, as this part of the intestine usually contains no digesta, but is completely filled with air, frequently renewed by dry air from the atmosphere, and the main function of the mucus may be to protect the respiratory epithelium against a destroying and dangerous desiccation. PMID:25142839

  16. Crystallaria cincotta, a new species of darter (Teleostei: Percidae) from the Elk River of the Ohio River drainage, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Wood, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    A new species of percid, Crystallaria cincotta, is described from the Cumberland, Elk, Green, and Muskingum river drainages of the Ohio River basin, USA. It differs from populations of Crystallaria asprella of the Gulf Coast, lower Mississippi River, middle Mississippi River, upper Mississippi River, and Wabash River drainages by having a reduced number of cheek scale rows restricted to the post-orbital region, a falcate margin on the pelvic fins, a preorbital blotch distinctly separate from the anterior orbital rim, and a wide mouth gape. The Elk River population is also divergent genetically from populations of the Gulf Coast, lower Mississippi River, and upper Mississippi River drainages. Crystallaria cincotta, discovered in the Elk River of the Ohio River drainage in 1980, is a rare species with the only extant population represented by 12 individuals collected from 1980-2005 from the lower 36 km section of the Elk River, West Virginia. Copyright ?? 2008 Magnolia Press.

  17. Characterization of hepatic growth hormone binding sites in two fish species, Gillichthys mirabilis (Teleostei) and Acipenser transmontanus (Chondrostei).

    PubMed

    Tarpey, J F; Nicoll, C S

    1985-10-01

    To obtain information on the presence of growth hormone (GH) receptors in liver of nonmammalian vertebrates the specific binding of 125I-bovine growth hormone (bGH) to liver membranes of seven species representing the major groups was studied by radioreceptor assay. A substantial degree of specific binding was detected with sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) liver membranes and a much lower amount was detected on hepatic membranes of Gillichthys mirabilis. No significant specific binding was detected on liver membranes of pigeon, turtle, bullfrog, tilapia, or leopard shark. Gillichthys and sturgeon liver membranes were further characterized and compared with hepatic membranes from male rabbits. The sturgeon and Gillichthys membranes showed binding that was dependent upon time, temperature, pH, and membrane concentration. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-bGH to sturgeon and rabbit membranes revealed both high and low affinity binding sites. The high affinity sites had KA values of 3.1 X 10(11) and 1.0 X 10(11) M-1, and capacities of 12 and 50 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Membranes from Gillichthys liver contained only a single class of binding sites with a KA of 6.7 X 10(9) M-1 and a binding capacity of 49 fmol/mg. Hormonal specificity of the sturgeon and Gillichthys hepatic binding sites was studied using methionyl-human GH (met-hGH), ovine prolactin (oPRL), and a crude preparation of sturgeon (st)GH. The met-hGH and stGH inhibited the binding of 125I-bGH to sturgeon liver membranes while only met-hGH displaced labeled bGH from Gillichthys liver membranes. One microgram of oPRL did not significantly inhibit 125I-bGH binding in either membrane assay. Based on these studies, sturgeon hepatic GH receptors seem to be more like those of nonprimate mammals than those of teleosts. Our results, in conjunction with the data of J. N. Fryer (Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 39, 123-130 (1979)), indicate that considerable evolutionary divergence has occurred among teleost hepatic GH receptors. Thus, vertebrate GH receptors seem to have undergone at least as much evolution as has the hormone itself. PMID:2996975

  18. Evolutionary history of Otophysi (Teleostei), a major clade of the modern freshwater fishes: Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Freshwater harbors approximately 12,000 fish species accounting for 43% of the diversity of all modern fish. A single ancestral lineage evolved into about two-thirds of this enormous biodiversity (? 7900 spp.) and is currently distributed throughout the world's continents except Antarctica. Despite such remarkable species diversity and ubiquity, the evolutionary history of this major freshwater fish clade, Otophysi, remains largely unexplored. To gain insight into the history of otophysan diversification, we constructed a timetree based on whole mitogenome sequences across 110 species representing 55 of the 64 families. Results Partitioned maximum likelihood analysis based on unambiguously aligned sequences (9923 bp) confidently recovered the monophyly of Otophysi and the two constituent subgroups (Cypriniformes and Characiphysi). The latter clade comprised three orders (Gymnotiformes, Characiformes, Siluriformes), and Gymnotiformes was sister to the latter two groups. One of the two suborders in Characiformes (Characoidei) was more closely related to Siluriformes than to its own suborder (Citharinoidei), rendering the characiforms paraphyletic. Although this novel relationship did not receive strong statistical support, it was supported by analyzing independent nuclear markers. A relaxed molecular clock Bayesian analysis of the divergence times and reconstruction of ancestral habitats on the timetree suggest a Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation of otophysans. Conclusions The present timetree demonstrates that survival of the ancestral lineages through the two consecutive mass extinctions on Pangaea, and subsequent radiations during the Jurassic through early Cretaceous shaped the modern familial diversity of otophysans. This evolutionary scenario is consistent with recent arguments based on biogeographic inferences and molecular divergence time estimates. No fossil otophysan, however, has been recorded before the Albian, the early Cretaceous 100-112 Ma, creating an over 100 million year time span without fossil evidence. This formidable ghost range partially reflects a genuine difference between the estimated ages of stem group origin (molecular divergence time) and crown group morphological diversification (fossil divergence time); the ghost range, however, would be filled with discoveries of older fossils that can be used as more reasonable time constraints as well as with developments of more realistic models that capture the rates of molecular sequences accurately. PMID:21693066

  19. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500 Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300 Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior. PMID:20430090

  20. Isolation and characterization of 13 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Hypostomus ancistroides (Teleostei, Loricariidae) and cross-amplification in related species.

    PubMed

    Galindo, B A; Ferreira, D G; Almeida, F S; Carlsson, J; Sofia, S H

    2015-06-01

    This study details 13 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci in the armoured catfish Hypostomus ancistroides, and assesses their utility for population genetic studies. The analysis of 30 individuals revealed a total of 99 different alleles (ranging from two to 15 alleles per locus), with an average of 7·62 alleles per locus, with observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0·103 to 0·931 and from 0·102 to 0·906, respectively. One of the 13 loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, probably due to the presence of null alleles, inferred from the excess of homozygotes. PMID:25912318

  1. Two new species of myxosporean parasites (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) from gall bladders of Macruronus magellanicus Lönnberg, 1907 (Teleostei: Merlucciidae).

    PubMed

    Kalavati, Chaganti; Mackenzie, Ken; Collins, Catherine; Hemmingsen, Willy; Brickle, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of myxosporeans are described from the gall bladders of hoki, Macruronus magellanicus Lönnberg, 1907, caught in the Southeast Pacific off Chile and in the Southwest Atlantic off the Falkland Islands. Pseudalataspora kovalevae n. sp. is described morphologically and genetically. Of the 12 species of Pseudalataspora previously described from the gall bladders of marine fish, P. kovalevae is most similar in morphology to P. umbraculiformis Gaevskaya and Kovaleva, 1984. The 18S rRNA gene sequence from P. kovalevae is the first for a member of the genus Pseudalataspora. Based on currently available myxosporean 18S rRNA gene sequence data, P. kovalevae shares greatest sequence identity with species of the genus Ceratomyxa (C. anko and C. pantherini). Palliatus magellanicus n. sp. is described morphologically only; it differs considerably in morphology, host species and locality from the five other Palliatus species described from marine fishes. A third species from the gall bladder is also described morphologically and genetically. On the basis of its morphology it is tentatively identified as Myxidium baueri Kovaleva and Gaevskaya, 1982, for which M. magellanicus is a new host record. Molecular analysis indicates that, of those species for which data are available, M. baueri is most closely related to Myxidium coryphaenoideum Noble, 1966 based on 18S rRNA gene sequence data, though support for a phylogenetic grouping is low. PMID:26295127

  2. Embryonic and larval developmental stages of African giant catfish Heterobranchus bidorsalis (Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, 1809) (Teleostei, Clariidae).

    PubMed

    Olaniyi, Wasiu Adekunle; Omitogun, Ofelia Galman

    2014-01-01

    The dearth of African giant catfish Heterobranchus bidorsalis seeds poses great threat to its aquaculture and biodiversity, hence detailed knowledge and understanding of its embryology is indispensable for its artificial propagation and conservation programmes. Photomicrographs of extruded oocyte through all developmental cell stages of live embryo to larval stage are documented with the aid of a light microscope. The optical transparency of the developing embryo enabled us to describe its deep structures, distinctive features and characterize the stages pictorially. Extruded oocyte had a mean diameter of 1?±?0.1 mm, ~20% increase when hydrated, and bounded by double thin perivitelline membranes. The first mitotic cleavage occurred at 69 min post-fertilization (pf) resulting in 2, 4 (2?×?2 array of cells), 8 (2?×?4), 16 (4?×?4), 32 (4?×?8), 64 (2?×?4?×?8) blastomeres, then developed to morula, blastula and gastrula stages. Blastula was featured by formation of enveloping layer and yolk syncytial layer. Onset of epiboly at 3 h 57 min depicted the commencement of gastrula while closure of blastopore at 11 h 8 min marked its completion. Neurulation period was distinct from segmentation where organogenesis was fully active. Embryo sudden muscular contraction was noticed at ~17 h pf, increased prior to hatching with caudal locomotion firstly at 42 s interval. Heartbeat of embryo commenced at ~1 h before its unique eclosion at average of 72 beats/min while first larva emerged at 21 h at a controlled temperature of 28.5?±?0.5°C. Mean total length (TL) of larvae and their pouch thickness were 5?±?1 mm and 0.05?±?0.02 mm respectively. 1 -day old larvae revealed 8 distinctive neuromeres and by day 3, epicanthus folds of the eyes were fully uncovered; and thereafter commenced exogenous feeding. At day 4, larvae recorded mean TL of 9?±?1 mm and 15 caudal fin rays. The fin bifurcation to dorsal and adipose fins was observed at third and half weeks post-hatchability with the dorsal fin length to adipose fin was 1.7:1. This study, for the first time, presents significant morpho-sequential developmental stages of H. bidorsalis and registers its unique form of eclosion. PMID:25512884

  3. The Inner Ear and its Coupling to the Swim Bladder in the Deep-Sea Fish Antimora rostrata (Teleostei: Moridae)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaohong; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Popper, Arthur N.

    2011-01-01

    The inner ear structure of Antimora rostrata and its coupling to the swim bladder were analyzed and compared with the inner ears of several shallow-water species that also have similar coupling. The inner ear of Antimora has a long saccular otolith and sensory epithelium as compared to many other fishes. Some parts of the membranous labyrinth are thick and rigid, while other parts are thinner but attached tightly to the bony capsule. The partially rigid membranous labyrinth, along with its intimate connection to the swim bladder, may help the inner ear follow the sound oscillations from the swim bladder with better precision than would occur in a less rigid inner ear. In addition, the saccular sensory epithelium has an elaborate structure and an anterior enlargement that may be correlated with increased hearing sensitivity. Some of the features in the inner ear of Antimora may reflect the functional specialization of deep-water living and support the hypothesis that there is enhanced inner ear sensitivity in some deep-sea fishes. PMID:21532967

  4. Longitudinal monitoring of plasma and fecal androgens in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) and the spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus).

    PubMed

    Hesterman, H; Jones, S M

    2009-06-01

    Improved knowledge of the breeding biology of carnivorous marsupials is warranted given their heightened conservation status. Past studies have focused on smaller dasyurids and little is known of male reproductive physiology in the larger species. This study aimed to characterize the pattern of androgen concentrations in male devils and spotted-tailed quolls and to evaluate fecal steroid measurement as a practical, alternative technique for monitoring reproductive activity. Blood and fecal samples were collected from captive adult devils (n=6) and adult quolls (n=8). Plasma and fecal androgen concentrations were significantly positively correlated. In both species there was a significant effect of season on androgen concentrations; and the annual increase preceded female estrus activity. For devils, fecal androgens were elevated during the austral summer: peak concentrations were observed in January-February, and copulation occurred from late February-late May. In quolls, fecal androgen concentrations were highest during austral autumn/winter: the annual increase began in April and copulation occurred from mid-May to early October. The lengthy period of elevated plasma and fecal androgens and protracted annual period of mating activity implies a period of extended spermatogenesis in both species. PMID:18602773

  5. Species profiles: Life history and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida): King mackerel and Spanish mackerel. [Scomberomorus cavalla; Scomberomorus maculatus

    SciTech Connect

    Godcharles, M.F.; Murphy, M.D.

    1986-06-01

    This Species Profile on king and Spanish mackerel summarizes the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, fishery descriptions, ecological role, and environmental requirements of these coastal pelagic fish to assist environmental impact assessment. King and Spanish mackerel support major commercial and sport fisheries in south Florida. In 1974 to 1983, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic commercial landings of king mackerel declined from 10.4 to 4.3 million lb.; Spanish mackerel have fluctuated between 4.9 to 17.4 million lb. Both inhabit coastal waters, but Spanish mackerel are generally found closer to beaches and in outer estuarine waters. Both species feed principally on estuarine-dependent species. They are highly migratory, exhibiting seasonal migrations to winter feeding grounds off south Florida and summer spawning/feeding grounds in the northern Gulf of Mexico and off the Atlantic coast of the Southeastern US. Spawning occurs from March/April through September/October between the middle and Outer Continental Shelf (35 to 183 mi) for king mackerel and the inner shelf (12 to 34 mi) for Spanish mackerel. King mackerel reach sexual maturity in their 3rd and 4th years and Spanish, between their 2nd and 3rd. Female king mackerel live longer and grow larger and faster than males. Spanish mackerel live to 8 years; females also grow faster than males. King and Spanish mackerel feed principally on schooling fishes. Larvae and juveniles of both species are prey to little tunny and dolphin; adults are prey for sharks and bottlenose dolphin. Temperature and salinity are important factors regulating mackerel distribution.

  6. Trophic Apparatus in Cyprinodontiform Fishes: Functional Specializations for Picking and

    E-print Network

    Gibb, Alice C.

    (Teleostei) are generally considered to be a group of generalized ``midwater omnivores'' feeding on small and mechanisms found within the group. Though some cyprinodontiform fishes are indeed mid-water omnivores (e

  7. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 118 Pictorial Guide to the Groupers

    E-print Network

    NOAA Technical Report NMFS 118 Pictorial Guide to the Groupers (Teleostei: Serranidae A. Schmitten Assistant Administrator for Fisheries The NOAA Technical Report NMFS (ISSN 0892- tion Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. NOAA Technical Reports NMFS Technical

  8. 484 Fishery Bulletin 106(4) Fishery Bulletin Index

    E-print Network

    (Jordan and Evermann, 1898) (Teleostei: Scorpaeniformes), by James W. Orr and Sharon Hawkins 135 coelestis), by Michael J. Kingsford, Heather M. Patterson, and Matthew J. Flood 143 Seasonal, diel, by Kyle W. Shertzer, Michael H. Prager

  9. Variation in thermal tolerance and routine metabolism among spring- and stream-dwelling freshwater sculpins (Teleostei: Cottidae) of the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, S.J.; Haney, D.C.; Timmerman, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that some aquatic organisms may adapt by directional selection to limiting physical environmental conditions, yet empirical data are conflicting. We sought to test the assumption that sculpins (family Cottidae) inhabiting thermally stable springs of the southeastern United States differ in temperature tolerance and metabolism from populations inhabiting more thermally labile stream habitats. Spring populations of pygmy sculpins (Coitus pygmaeus) and Ozark sculpins (C. hypselurus) differed interspecifically in thermal tolerance from populations of stream-dwelling mottled (C. bairdi) and Tallapoosa sculpins (C. tallapoosae), and both stream and spring populations of banded sculpins (C. carolinae). No intra- or interspecific differences in thermal tolerance were found among populations of C. bairdi, C. tallapoosae, or C. carolinae. Coitus pygmaeus acclimated to 15??C differed intraspecifically in routine metabolism from fish acclimated to 20?? and 25??C. Cottus pygmaeus and stream-dwelling C. bairdi and C. carolinae acclimated to temperatures of 20?? and 25??C showed no interspecific differences in routine metabolism. Our results suggest that some spring-adapted populations or species may be more stenothermal than stream-dwelling congeners, but a greater understanding of the interactions of other physical and biological factors is required to better explain micro- and macrohabitat distributions of eastern North American sculpins.

  10. Sequence and expression of an ?-amylase gene in four related species of prickleback fishes (Teleostei: Stichaeidae): ontogenetic, dietary, and species-level effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kelly H; Horn, Michael H; Sosa, Abraham E; German, Donovan P

    2014-02-01

    Partial ?-amylase gene sequences were determined and ?-amylase gene expression was quantified in four species of carnivorous, omnivorous, and herbivorous prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) to assess the effects of ontogeny, diet, and species on expression of this gene. Pairwise comparison of ?-amylase nucleotide sequences revealed 96-98 % identity, and comparison of amino acid portions revealed 93-95 % similarity among the four prickleback species. Expression was determined using in situ hybridization and intensity of expression quantified using image analysis. Alpha-amylase expression level was compared in three feeding categories of the four species: (1) small, wild-caught carnivorous juveniles; (2) larger, wild-caught juveniles of the carnivorous species and the three that had shifted to herbivory or omnivory; and (3) larger, juveniles produced by feeding a low-starch artificial diet to small juveniles until they reached the size of the larger wild-caught juveniles. The results showed no dietary effect in any species but significant ontogenetic and species-level effects in Cebidichthys violaceus, as well as in the sister species Xiphister mucosus and X. atropurpureus. Based on a phylogeny for the Stichaeidae produced for this study using two mtDNA genes and one nuclear gene, the ontogenetic dietary shifts to herbivory/omnivory evolved independently in C. violaceus and in the clade containing the two species of Xiphister. All three of these species increased ?-amylase gene expression with increase in size and had higher expression than Anoplarchus purpurescens, which is a member of a third, stichaeid clade comprising carnivores. These results show the importance of ?-amylase in the herbivores and omnivores. PMID:24136006

  11. Next generation sequencing yields the complete mitochondrial genome of the Endangered Chilean silverside Basilichthys microlepidotus (Jenyns, 1841) (Teleostei, Atherinopsidae), validated with RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Véliz, David; Vega-Retter, Caren; Quezada-Romegialli, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome for the Chilean silverside Basilichthys microlepidotus is reported for the first time. The entire mitochondrial genome was 16,544?bp in length (GenBank accession no. KM245937); gene composition and arrangement was conformed to that reported for most fishes and contained the typical structure of 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and a non-coding region. The assembled mitogenome was validated against sequences of COI and Control Region previously sequenced in our lab, functional genes from RNA-Seq data for the same species and the mitogenome of two other atherinopsid species available in Genbank. PMID:25187350

  12. Structures and immunolocalization of Na+, K+ -ATPase, Na+ /H+ exchanger 3 and vacuolar-type H+ -ATPase in the gills of blennies (Teleostei: Blenniidae) inhabiting rocky intertidal areas.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M; Komiyama, M; Yoshizawa, H; Shimizu, N; Konno, N; Matsuda, K

    2012-05-01

    The structure and immunolocalization of the ion transporters Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase (NKA), Na(+) /H(+) exchanger (NHE3) and vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPase (VHA) were examined in the gills of teleosts of the family Blenniidae, which inhabit rocky shores with vertical zonation in subtropical seas. These features were compared among the following species with different ecologies: the amphibious rockskipper blenny Andamia tetradactylus, the intertidal white-finned blenny Praealticus tanegasimae and the purely marine yaeyama blenny Ecsenius yaeyamaensis. Light and electron microscopic observations indicated that thick gill filaments were arranged close to each other and alternately on two hemibranches of a gill arch in the opercular space of A. tetradactylus. Many mucous cells (MC) and mitochondrion-rich cells (MRC) were present in the interlamellar regions of the gill filament. An immunohistochemical study demonstrated that numerous NKA, NHE3 and some VHA were located predominantly on presumed MRCs of gill filaments and at the base of the lamellae. Analyses using serial (mirror image) sections of the gills indicated that only a few NKA immunoreactive cells (IRC) were colocalized with VHA on some MRCs in the filaments. In the gills of P. tanegasimae, NKA- and NHE3-IRCs were observed in the interlamellar region of the filaments and at the base of the lamellae. VHA-IRCs were located sparsely on the lamellae and filaments. In the gills of E. yaeyamaensis, the lamellae and filaments were thin and straight, respectively. MCs were located at the tip as well as found scattered in the interlamellar region of gill filaments. NKA-, NHE3- and VHA-IRCs were moderately frequently observed in the filaments and rarely on the lamellae. This study shows that the structure and distribution of ion transporters in the gills differ among the three blennid species, presumably reflecting their different ecologies. PMID:22551179

  13. Leis' conundrum: homology of the clavus of the ocean sunfishes. 1. Ontogeny of the median fins and axial skeleton of Monotrete leiurus (Teleostei, Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodontidae).

    PubMed

    Britz, Ralf; Johnson, G David

    2005-10-01

    We describe the ontogeny of the axial skeleton and median fins of the Southeast Asian freshwater puffer Monotrete leiurus, based on a reared developmental series. Most elements of the axial skeleton in M. leiurus arise in membrane bone. Only the base of the anterior three neural arches, the base of the hemal arches of the third preural centrum, the neural and hemal arches and spines of the second preural centrum, the parhypural, the two hypural plates, and the single epural are preformed in cartilage. In contrast to most teleosts, the proximal-middle radials of the dorsal and anal fins are upright and symmetrical and their distal tips coalesce during development to form a deep band of cartilage, from which the spherical distal radials are spatially separated. PMID:15549688

  14. Comparisons of the genetic structure of Squalius populations (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) from rivers with contrasting histories, drainage areas and climatic conditions based on two molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Almada, V; Sousa-Santos, C

    2010-11-01

    The genetic structure of Squalius populations from Portuguese Atlantic- and Mediterranean-type streams (assigned to six distinct morphoclimatic regions) was compared using sequences of the cytb and beta-actin genes. The drainage area was significantly correlated to all the genetic diversity indices, pointing to the need to control for this effect in comparing populations with different histories and paleoecologies. A significant correlation was also found between genetic diversity and the morphoclimatic regions to which the rivers were assigned, with the highest diversity in warmer, lower latitude, Mediterranean-type streams. This relationship was not due to idiosyncratic characteristics of the clades compared. When the drainage area and phylogenetic effects were removed, the southern Mediterranean streams harboured significantly more genetic diversity even when compared with much larger northern streams. It is argued that these results are likely caused both by the metapopulation structure of the Mediterranean streams and by the severe reduction or local extinction of populations in the northern rivers during glaciations. PMID:20736072

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of molecular and morphological data highlights uncertainty in the relationships of fossil and living species of Elopomorpha (Actinopterygii: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Dornburg, Alex; Friedman, Matt; Near, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Elopomorpha is one of the three main clades of living teleost fishes and includes a range of disparate lineages including eels, tarpons, bonefishes, and halosaurs. Elopomorphs were among the first groups of fishes investigated using Hennigian phylogenetic methods and continue to be the object of intense phylogenetic scrutiny due to their economic significance, diversity, and crucial evolutionary status as the sister group of all other teleosts. While portions of the phylogenetic backbone for Elopomorpha are consistent between studies, the relationships among Albula, Pterothrissus, Notacanthiformes, and Anguilliformes remain contentious and difficult to evaluate. This lack of phylogenetic resolution is problematic as fossil lineages are often described and placed taxonomically based on an assumed sister group relationship between Albula and Pterothrissus. In addition, phylogenetic studies using morphological data that sample elopomorph fossil lineages often do not include notacanthiform or anguilliform lineages, potentially introducing a bias toward interpreting fossils as members of the common stem of Pterothrissus and Albula. Here we provide a phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences sampled from multiple nuclear genes that include representative taxa from Albula, Pterothrissus, Notacanthiformes and Anguilliformes. We integrate our molecular dataset with a morphological character matrix that spans both living and fossil elopomorph lineages. Our results reveal substantial uncertainty in the placement of Pterothrissus as well as all sampled fossil lineages, questioning the stability of the taxonomy of fossil Elopomorpha. However, despite topological uncertainty, our integration of fossil lineages into a Bayesian time calibrated framework provides divergence time estimates for the clade that are consistent with previously published age estimates based on the elopomorph fossil record and molecular estimates resulting from traditional node-dating methods. PMID:25899306

  16. Ortholinea saudii sp. nov. (Myxosporea: Ortholineidae) in the kidney of the marine fish Siganus rivulatus (Teleostei) from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Soliman, Hatem; Saleh, Mona; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-02-10

    Myxozoans, a diverse group of microscopic obligate endoparasites, can cause diseases in a number of economically important fish, including the marbled spinefoot Siganus rivulatus. To date, only 1 myxozoan, Zschokkella helmii, has been reported to infect S. rivulatus. Here we describe another myxozoan detected in S. rivulatus. Investigations of 40 marbled spinefoot fish caught from the Red Sea coast, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, revealed clusters of parasitic spores in the kidney. Light microscope examination of the native spores revealed sub-spherical, mature spores with smooth shell valves. The 2 polar capsules were equal in size, and the polar filament was perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the polar capsules. Histopathological examinations of the infected kidneys demonstrated the presence of both spores and developmental stages in the lumen of the renal tubules without any pathological effect. Electron microscopy investigations showed maturing spores composed of 2 valvogenic cells, each with a prominent nucleus. The valvogenic cells enclosed 2 polar capsules containing 3 filament coils as well as a binucleated sporoplasm cell filling the space between and beneath the 2 polar capsules. BLAST search analysis of the amplified sequence from the detected parasite indicated a high percent of identity to the 18S rDNA genes of different myxosporean species. Phylogenetic analysis placed the detected parasite within a clade of Ortholinea sp. (AL-2006). Based on the results of the light and electron microscopy, histopathological, and molecular investigations, the detected parasite was identified as a myxosporean parasite belonging to the genus Ortholinea and designated as O. saudii sp. nov. PMID:25667333

  17. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii), with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1) and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes. PMID:25755920

  18. A new species of Ituglanis from the Rio Xingu Basin, Brazil, and the evolution of pelvic fin loss in trichomycterid catfishes (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Trichomycteridae).

    PubMed

    Datovo, Aléssio

    2014-01-01

    A new species of the trichomycterid catfish genus Ituglanis is described from the Rio Curuá, Rio Xingu basin, Rio Amazonas drainage, Brazil. Ituglanis apteryx, new species, is promptly distinguished from congeners, except some specimens of I. parahybae (Eigenmann), by the absence of pelvic fins, girdle, and muscles. The new species differs from I. parahybae in the pattern of the cephalic laterosensory system; the absence of a posterior cranial fontanel; the presence of an epural; and the number of branchiostegal rays, ribs, and vertebrae. Ituglanis apteryx is one among the several trichomycterids lacking pelvic fins. Analysis reveals that pelvic fin loss independently evolved several times during the trichomycterid radiation. PMID:24869879

  19. Life-history traits of temperate and thermophilic barracudas (Teleostei: Sphyraenidae) in the context of sea warming in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Hernández, H; Muñoz, M; Lloret, J

    2014-06-01

    This study indicated that the life-history traits of European barracuda Sphyraena sphyraena are apparently better suited to their environmental conditions compared to the more physically restricted life-history traits of the yellow-mouth barracuda Sphyraena viridensis, which co-habit the north-western Mediterranean Sea. The latter thermophilic species has a considerably higher reproductive potential as it invests its energy reserves in larger numbers of hydrated eggs per spawning batch. This would favour its population growth rates within the study area, especially if sea warming continues, in which case it is likely that the spawning phenology of this species would give it an advantage. PMID:24890410

  20. Repeatability of clades as a criterion of reliability: a case study for molecular phylogeny of Acanthomorpha (Teleostei) with larger number of taxa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Bonillo, Céline; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-02-01

    Although much progress has been made recently in teleostean phylogeny, relationships among the main lineages of the higher teleosts (Acanthomorpha), containing more than 60% of all fish species, remain poorly defined. This study represents the most extensive taxonomic sampling effort to date to collect new molecular characters for phylogenetic analysis of acanthomorph fishes. We compiled and analyzed three independent data sets, including: (i) mitochondrial ribosomal fragments from 12S and 16s (814bp for 97 taxa); (ii) nuclear ribosomal 28S sequences (847bp for 74 taxa); and (iii) a nuclear protein-coding gene, rhodopsin (759bp for 86 taxa). Detailed analyses were conducted on each data set separately and the principle of taxonomic congruence without consensus trees was used to assess confidence in the results as follows. Repeatability of clades from separate analyses was considered the primary criterion to establish reliability, rather than bootstrap proportions from a single combined (total evidence) data matrix. The new and reliable clades emerging from this study of the acanthomorph radiation were: Gadiformes (cods) with Zeioids (dories); Beloniformes (needlefishes) with Atheriniformes (silversides); blenioids (blennies) with Gobiesocoidei (clingfishes); Channoidei (snakeheads) with Anabantoidei (climbing gouramies); Mastacembeloidei (spiny eels) with Synbranchioidei (swamp-eels); the last two pairs of taxa grouping together, Syngnathoidei (aulostomids, macroramphosids) with Dactylopteridae (flying gurnards); Scombroidei (mackerels) plus Stromatoidei plus Chiasmodontidae; Ammodytidae (sand lances) with Cheimarrhichthyidae (torrentfish); Zoarcoidei (eelpouts) with Cottoidei; Percidae (perches) with Notothenioidei (Antarctic fishes); and a clade grouping Carangidae (jacks), Echeneidae (remoras), Sphyraenidae (barracudas), Menidae (moonfish), Polynemidae (threadfins), Centropomidae (snooks), and Pleuronectiformes (flatfishes). PMID:12565036

  1. De novo assembly and characterization of the skeletal muscle and electric organ transcriptomes of the African weakly electric fish Campylomormyrus compressirostris (Mormyridae, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Francesco; Kirschbaum, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    African weakly electric fishes (Mormyridae) underwent an outstanding adaptive radiation (about 200 species), putatively owing to their ability to communicate through species-specific weak electric signals. The electric organ discharge (EOD) is produced by muscle-derived electrocytes organized in piles to form an electric organ. Despite the importance of this trait as a prezygotic isolation mechanism, genomic resources remained limited. We present here a first draft of the skeletal muscle and electric organ transcriptomes from the weakly electric fish species Campylomormyrus compressirostris, obtained using the Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing technology. Approximately 6.8 Gbp of cDNA sequence data were produced from both tissues, resulting in 57,268,109 raw reads for the skeletal muscle and 46,934,923 for the electric organ, and assembled de novo into 46,143 and 89,270 contigs, respectively. About 50% of both transcriptomes were annotated after protein databases search. The two transcriptomes show similar profiles in terms of Gene Ontology categories composition. We identified several candidate genes which are likely to play a central role in the production and evolution of the electric signal. For most of these genes, and for many other housekeeping genes, we were able to obtain the complete or partial coding DNA sequences (CDS), which can be used for the development of primers to be utilized in qRT-PCR experiments. We present also the complete mitochondrial genome and compare it to those available from other weakly electric fish species. Additionally, we located 1671 SSR-containing regions with their flanking sites and designed the relative primers. This study establishes a first step in the development of genomic tools aimed at understanding the role of electric communication during speciation. PMID:24690394

  2. The Gyrodactylus (Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae) parasite fauna of freshwater sand gobies (Teleostei, Gobioidei) in their centre of endemism, with description of seven new species.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Economou, Alcibiades N; Zogaris, Stamatis; Giakoumi, Sofia; Zanella, Davor; Volckaert, Filip A M; Huyse, Tine

    2014-02-01

    While Gobioidei comprises showcases of (adaptive) radiation, the scientific interest they yielded did not ensure full understanding of goby biodiversity. Even in a well-studied region like Europe, wide knowledge gaps remain. Sand gobies represent one of the few clades whose monogenean parasites have been thoroughly studied. However, in the Balkans, part of the sand gobies' centre of endemism, these parasites were unstudied. We focus on Greek and Croatian freshwater gobies. From five sand goby species, the first parasites are reported, describing seven new Gyrodactylus species. Economidichthys pygmaeus harbours Gyrodactylus benedeni sp. n. and Gyrodactylus dorlodoti sp. n. Its congener E. trichonis hosts G. meelkopae sp. n. Knipowitschia milleri was found to host G. charon sp. n., K. thessala is infected by G. bios sp. n., and K. croatica by G. douglasadamsi sp. n. and G. hellemansi sp. n. Gyrodactylus bubyri was found on its type host K. caucasica. A diverse parasite fauna is expected for a region known for its biodiversity and endemism. The contribution of parasites to species richness in such hotspots is overlooked. The observed species richness per host is rather low compared to the better-studied eastern Atlantic sand gobies. Host vicariance is considered to mediate parasite specificity in this fauna. Some new flatworm species display unique morphological features, such as the remarkable size of the marginal hook sickle proper compared to its foot in the Economidichthys parasites, or a characteristically kinked marginal hook sickle in G. douglasadamsi sp. n. These features reflect their hosts' endemism in the Balkans. PMID:24288050

  3. Phylogeography of Rhinichthys cataractae (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): pre-glacial colonization across the Great Continental Divide and Pleistocene diversification within the Rio Grande drainage 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Dae Min

    2013-09-16

    three subspecies of R. cataractae, including R. c. cataractae (referred to as the ?eastern subspecies?), R. c. dulcis (?western subspecies?), and R. c. smithi (?Banff longnose dace?). Rhinichthys c. cataractae and R. c. smithi occur to the east..., 1856; Baxter and Simon, 1970; Lindsey and McPhail, 1986). Rhinichthys c. smithi was known only from small hot springs in the Banff National Park in Canada (Saskatchewan River drainage in the Hudson Bay slope) and has been considered extinct since...

  4. Two new species of Haliotrema Johnston & Tiegs, 1922 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) from Acanthurus nigrofuscus (Forsskål) and A. triostegus (Linnaeus) (Teleostei: Acanthuridae) in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Yang, Chaopin; Yang, Tingbao

    2015-07-01

    Haliotrema nanhaiense n. sp. and Haliotrema triostegum n. sp. are described respectively from the gills of Acanthurus nigrofuscus (Forsskål) and Acanthurus triostegus (Linnaeus) in the South China Sea. Haliotrema nanhaiense n. sp. differs from other existing congeneric species by its male copulatory complex, comprising a C-shaped copulatory tube, a saucer-shaped base and a sickle-shaped accessory piece. Haliotrema triostegum n. sp. can be differentiated from all other members of Haliotrema by having a unique copulatory complex, a cup-shaped base, inverted L-shaped copulatory tube with a small sclerotised piece arising from its distal portion, and a large accessory piece from the proximal portion of copulatory tube. PMID:26063302

  5. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the crucian carp, Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae), using chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Spoz, Aneta; Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Karolewska, Monika; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech; Juchno, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) is a species with restricted and decreasing distribution in Europe. Six males and six females of the species from the Baltic Sea basin in Poland were examined to show sequentially CMA3/AgNO3 staining pattern, DAPI staining, and, for the first time in literature, molecular cytogenetic analysis using double-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 28S and 5S rDNA probes. The karyotype consisted of 20 m, 36 sm and 44 sta chromosomes, NF=156. The AgNO3 stained NORs were most frequently located terminally in the short arms of two sm and two sta elements, and CMA3-positive sites were also observed suggesting abundant GC-rich repetitive DNA in the regions. Other CMA3-positive sites in the short arms of six to ten sm and sta chromosomes were detected. The results based on 28S rDNA FISH confirmed the location of rDNA sites. DAPI-negative staining of NORs suggested the scarcity of AT-rich DNA in the regions. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed 8–14 loci (ten and 12 in respectively 49 and 29% of metaphases). They were located in two sm and eight to ten sta chromosomes and six of them were larger than others. Simultaneously, mapping of the two rDNA families on the chromosomes of C. carassius revealed that both 28S and 5S rDNA probes were located in different chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic data of C. carassius presented here for the first time give an important insight into the structure of chromosomes of this polyploid and declining species and may be useful in its systematics. PMID:25349674

  6. Salinity tolerance of non-native Asian swamp eels (Teleostei: Synbranchidae) in Florida, USA: Comparison of three populations and implications for dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, P.J.; Nico, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Three populations of non-native Asian swamp eels are established in peninsular Florida (USA), and comprise two different genetic lineages. To assess potential for these fish to penetrate estuarine habitats or use coastal waters as dispersal routes, we determined their salinity tolerances. Swamp eels from the three Florida populations were tested by gradual (chronic) salinity increases; additionally, individuals from the Miami population were tested by abrupt (acute) salinity increases. Results showed significant tolerance by all populations to mesohaline waters: Mean survival time at 14 ppt was 63 days. The Homestead population, a genetically distinct lineage, exhibited greater tolerance to higher salinity than Tampa and Miami populations. Acute experiments indicated that swamp eels were capable of tolerating abrupt shifts from 0 to 16 ppt, with little mortality over 10 days. The broad salinity tolerance demonstrated by these experiments provides evidence that swamp eels are physiologically capable of infiltrating estuarine environments and using coastal waters to invade new freshwater systems. ?? 2009 US Government.

  7. Schistura megalodon species nova, a new river loach from the Irra-waddy basin in Dehong, Yunnan, China (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Nemacheilidae).

    PubMed

    Endruweit, Marco

    2014-09-01

    A new species of river loach, Schistura megalodon sp. nov., is described from the Irrawaddy basin in Yingjiang County, Dehong Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province, China. The following combination of diagnostic characters serve to distinguish it from all other congeners in the given zoogeographical region: a large processus dentiformes in the upper jaw, a short pre-anus length of 65.4%-66.3% of SL, long paired fins (pectoral: 20.8%-24.2% of SL; pelvic: 17.9%-20.6% of SL), a wide body of 9.7%-11.3% of SL at anal fin origin, an incomplete lateral line, the absence of an orbital lobe, and a oad and distinct basicaudal bar with forward extensions. PMID:25297074

  8. A revision of the Rutilus complex from Mediterranean Europe with description of a new genus, Sarmarutilus, and a new species, Rutilus stoumboudae (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Bianco, Pier Giorgio; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    By combining morphology, ecology, biology, and biogeography with the available molecular (sequence variation of the entire mitochondrial cytochrome b gene; cyt-b) and karyology data, the taxonomy of several species of the Rutilus complex inhabiting southern Europe is revised. Rutilus stoumboudae, new species, is described from Lake Volvi, Greece. It differs from Rutilus rutilus in possessing more total GR and less branched rays in both dorsal and anal fins and in its placement in the cyt-b based phylogeny of the genus. The resurrected genus Leucos Heckel, 1843 (type species Leucos aula, Bonaparte, 1841), which according to molecular data diverged from Rutilus more than 5 million years ago, during the Messinian salinity crisis, includes five species of small size, without spinous tubercles on scales and head in reproductive males, pharyngeal teeth formula 5-5, and all show a preference for still waters. Leucos aula is the Italian species endemic in the Padany-Venetian district: L. basak is widespread in Croatia, Albania, Montenegro and former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM); L. albus, recently described from Lake Skadar, Montenegro, is also found in rivers Moraca and Zeta (Montenegro). L. albus differs from L. basak, its closest relative, in having more scales on the LL and less anal-fin rays; L. panosi is endemic to the western-Greece district, and L. ylikiensis is endemic to lakes Yliki and Paralimni in eastern Greece (introduced in Lake Volvi). Among the nominal species examined, Rutilus karamani, R. ohridanus, R. prespensis and R. prespensis vukovici are all junior synonyms of Leucos basak. Rutilus vegariticus is definitively regarded as junior synonym for R. rutilus. Sarmarutilus n.gen. is a monotypic genus, with Sarmarutilus rubilio as the type species. According to phylogenetic data, Sarmarutilus rubilio is basal to a cluster of species that includes Leucos basak, L. albus, L. aula, L. panosi and L. ylikiensis. Sarmarutilus possibly evolved in pre-Messinian time, in the Lago Mare, entered the Mediterranean area during the Messinian Lago Mare phase of the Mediterranean Sea and survived only in the Tuscany- Latium district. This genus differs from Leucos in having large pearl organs on the central part of head and body scales in mature males and for the habitat preference, being a riverine-adapted species. It differs from Rutilus in pharyngeal teeth formula (5-5 in Sarmarutilus and 6-5 in Rutilus), size (small in Sarmarutilus and large in Rutilus) and for the preferential habitat (riverine vs. still water). Finally, lectotypes for Leucos basak, Leucos aula, and Sarmarutilus rubilio are designated. PMID:25082046

  9. Micronucleus test in erythrocytes of Barbus plebejus (Teleostei, Pisces) from two natural environments: a bioassay for the in situ detection of mutagens in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Minissi, S; Ciccotti, E; Rizzoni, M

    1996-04-01

    Erythrocyte micronucleus frequencies in wild fish from two riverine environments and in fish reproduced and reared under controlled conditions (control group) were compared, with the aim to evaluate the suitability of the MN test for the in situ detection of mutagens in freshwaters. Fish were caught in different months in two rivers of central Italy which have different pollution levels. As indicator species, the barbel (Barbus plebejus) was chosen because of its ecological significance. Blood samplings were performed on wild fish immediately after capture and repeated at different time intervals on the same individuals, which were maintained in controlled conditions after capture. A total of 10,000 erythrocytes per specimen were scored. No significant differences in micronucleus frequencies were observed between the control group and fish from the unpolluted river (Mignone). A significantly higher frequency of micronuclei was observed in fish caught in the polluted river (Tiber), in comparison to both the controls and the Mignone river fish. No significant seasonal differences were observed. Barbels examined 50 and 100 days after capture presented a remarkable decrease in micronucleus frequency in comparison with the frequency observed in barbels at capture. The micronucleus test in fish erythrocytes was shown to be a sensitive bioassay for detecting mutagenic pollution in fresh water environments. PMID:8628332

  10. A new, mesophotic Coryphopterus goby (Teleostei, Gobiidae) from the southern Caribbean, with comments on relationships and depth distributions within the genus

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carole C.; Robertson, D. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of western Atlantic Coryphopterus is described from mesophotic depths off Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Coryphopterus curasub sp. n., is similar to Coryphopterus dicrus in, among other features, having two prominent pigment spots of roughly equal intensity on the pectoral-fin base, the pelvic fins fused to form a disk, and no pelvic frenum. The two species can be differentiated by body depth (shallower in Coryphopterus curasub at origin of dorsal fin and caudal peduncle); differences in the pigmentation on the head, trunk, and basicaudal region; and usually by total number of rays (spinous plus soft) in the second dorsal fin (10–11, usually 11, in Coryphopterus curasub, 10 in Coryphopterus dicrus). Coryphopterus curasub differs from other Coryphopterus species that have a prominent pigment spot on the lower portion of the pectoral-fin base (Coryphopterus punctipectophorus and Coryphopterus venezuelae) in, among other features, lacking a pelvic frenum. Coryphopterus curasub was collected between 70 and 80 m, the deepest depth range known for the genus. Collections of Coryphopterus venezuelae at depths of 65–69 m extend the depth range of that species by approximately 50 m. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) data corroborate the recognition of Coryphopterus curasub as a distinct species but do not rigorously resolve its relationships within the genus. A revised key to the western Atlantic species of Coryphopterus is presented. PMID:26257572

  11. Ancyrocephalidae (Monogenea) of Lake Tanganyika: III: Cichlidogyrus infecting the world's biggest cichlid and the non-endemic tribes Haplochromini, Oreochromini and Tylochromini (Teleostei, Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Muterezi Bukinga, Fidel; Vanhove, Maarten P M; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Pariselle, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the deepest and oldest African Great Lake and of economic importance. While the diversity of its endemic cichlid radiations yielded scientific interest, a number of cichlid tribes have few representatives in the lake. Some of those, namely Oreochromini (ex-Tilapiini), Haplochromini and Tylochromini, reach higher species numbers in riverine systems. Conversely, the phylogenetic position of the monospecific and endemic Boulengerochromini is unclear. The oreochromines Oreochromis tanganicae and Oreochromis niloticus, the haplochromine Astatotilapia burtoni, the tylochromine Tylochromis polylepis and the boulengerochromine Boulengerochromis microlepis, the largest cichlid species worldwide, were surveyed for ancyrocephalid monogenean gill parasites. Five new species are proposed. Cichlidogyrus gillardinae sp. n. is described from A. burtoni, Cichlidogyrus mbirizei sp. n. from O. tanganicae and Cichlidogyrus nshomboi sp. n. from B. microlepis. T. polylepis harbours Cichlidogyrus mulimbwai sp. n., Cichlidogyrus muzumanii sp. n. and a third, presently undescribed species. Four species known from outside the Tanganyika Basin were retrieved on the oreochromines. The host species are scientific models or important in the sectors of fisheries or ornamental fish trade. Moreover, their phylogenetic positions render them well-suited to help elucidate the historic relationships between riverine and lacustrine African cichlids. In this framework, their Cichlidogyrus fauna is compared to congeners known from African rivers and to the few Tanganyika representatives described. While the parasites of Oreochromis, A. burtoni and T. polylepis are reminiscent of those infecting related hosts throughout Africa, B. microlepis hosts a Cichlidogyrus morphotype typical of Lake Tanganyika. This supports its placement within an endemic cichlid radiation. PMID:22983218

  12. The Afro-Asian labeonine genus Garra Hamilton, 1822 (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) in the Pliocene of Central Armenia: Palaeoecological and palaeobiogeographical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Davit; Carnevale, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Fossil skeletal remains of the Afro-Asian labeonine genus Garra are described on the basis of more than 300 specimens from the Pliocene diatomites of Jradzor, Central Armenia. Extant species of the genus Garra exhibit a wide distribution ranging from China, South Asia, and Borneo, through Middle East, the Arabian Peninsula, and Africa, where these fishes inhabit a variety of freshwater biotopes. The Pliocene fossils from the Jradzor site provide the first evidence of Garra in the fossil record. The inadequate preservation of the available material did not allow a detailed taxonomic attribution at the species level. Remains of Garra sp. were found associated to a moderately diverse assemblage, which includes also remains of additional freshwater fishes (Capoeta sp., Leuciscus cf. souffia, Leuciscus sp.), amphibians (Pelophylax cf. ridibundus), and large mammals (Rhinocerotidae indet.), as well as of monocotyledon plants. According to the diatom flora, the diatomites of Jradzor can be assigned to the Pliocene and were deposited in a freshwater lacustrine setting that was characterized by high productivity, eutrophic conditions, and standing macrophyte vegetation along the littoral zone. The presence of abundant resorptive pharyngeal teeth suggests that the Pliocene palaeolake of Jradzor was characterized by resident populations of Garra. Extant species of this genus are currently absent in the freshwaters of Armenia. The record of the genus Garra from Jradzor suggests that the Araks-Kura River drainage was connected, at least in part, with the Euphrates and Tigris River drainage during the Pliocene. The extinction of Garra (and other thermophilous taxa) from Araks and Kura River drainage was probably due to Plio-Pleistocene tectonic uplift of the Armenian Highland and consequent progressive climate cooling.

  13. Pethia aurea (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), a new species of barb from West Bengal, India, with redescription of P. gelius and P. canius.

    PubMed

    Knight, J D Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Fishes currently assigned to Pethia gelius Hamilton from West Bengal are shown to belong to a closely-related group of three species: P gelius, its erstwhile synonym P canius Hamilton and a new species, P aurea. The three species are distinguished from all other species of Pethia by having the lateral line incomplete, with 3-4 pored scales; 20-26 scales in lateral series on body; ½4-5/l/2-3½ scales in transverse line on body; 8-9 predorsal scales; barbels absent and by a unique colour pattern consisting of two or three black blotches on the body (which, however, fade on preservation), the first behind the opercle, the second beneath the origin of the dorsal fin, extending to the mid-lateral region, and the third above the origin of the anal fin. A black spot is also present at the base of the dorsal and anal fins. Additionally, P gelius is distinguished by having the last unbranched dorsal-fin ray thick, straight, serrated, with 20-25 serrae on its posterior margin; a snout length of 6.1-8.4% standard length (SL); a body depth of 32.6-37.7% SL; and a dorsal-fin height of 19.4-22.8% SL. Pethia canius is additionally distinguished by having a snout length of 8.9-11.8% SL; a body depth of 28.1-32.2% SL; and dorsal-fin height of 26.9-32.8% SL. Pethia aurea, new species, is additionally distinguished from all its congeners by having ½5/1/3-3½ scales in transverse line on body; 9 pre-dorsal scales; and last unbranched dorsal-fin ray slender, serrated, with 19-22 serrae on posterior margin. PMID:26106720

  14. Redescription of Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) golvani Salgado-Maldonado, 1978 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) and description of a new species from freshwater cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2013-05-01

    A redescription of Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) golvani Salgado-Maldonado (An Inst Biol Univ Nal Autón Méx, Ser Zool 49:35-47, 1978) is presented, based on adult specimens collected from the type host Paraneetroplus fenestratus from the type location, the Lago de Catemaco lake, Veracruz state, Mexico, and its presence is recorded in other cichlids. Detailed studies of N. (N.) golvani using light microscopy revealed some taxonomically important, previously unreported features, such as the size and shape of fully developed adult males and females, and the structure of the eggs. Morphological variability in N. (N.) golvani is described. Based on these data, the geographic distribution of this species is documented. Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) panucensis n. sp. is described from Herichthys labridens (Pellegrin), Amatitlania nigrofasciata (Günther), and Herichthys cyanoguttatus Baird and Girard (all of them Cichlidae), collected in the Río Atlapexco, a tributary to the upper Río Panuco basin, Hidalgo State, Mexico. This new species stand up alone because of its minute proboscis (? 50?×?60, ? 42-55 (48.5)?×?48-63 (57.7)) and anterior hooks (? 27-30 (28.8)?×?3-5 (4), ? 28-32 (30)?×?5 (5)). A key to the species of Neoechinorhynchus recorded from freshwater fishes in Central and South America is included. PMID:23532542

  15. Two deep evolutionary lineages in the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus (Teleostei, Priacanthidae) with admixture in the south-western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gaither, M R; Bernal, M A; Fernandez-Silva, I; Mwale, M; Jones, S A; Rocha, C; Rocha, L A

    2015-09-01

    A phylogeographic study of the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus was conducted. Molecular analyses indicate two mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coI) lineages that are 10·4% divergent: one in the western Atlantic (Caribbean) and another that was detected across the Indo-Pacific. A fixed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected at a nuclear locus (S7 ribosomal protein) and is consistent with this finding. There is evidence of recent dispersal from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean with individuals of mixed lineages detected in South Africa and the Mozambique Channel. Using coalescent analyses of the mitochondrial dataset, time of divergence between lineages was estimated to be c. 15·3 million years. The deep divergence between these two lineages indicates distinct evolutionary units, however, due to the lack of morphological differences and evidence of hybridization between lineages, taxonomic revision is not suggested at this time. PMID:26333139

  16. Involvement of pituitary gonadotropins, gonadal steroids and breeding season in sex change of protogynous dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), induced by a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Eduardo de O; Araújo, Bruno C; Mello, Paulo H; Narcizo, Amanda de M; Rodrigues-Filho, Jandyr A; Medrado, Andreone T; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Two experiments were performed using the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (100mg/kg) to promote sex change, from female-to-male, in protogynous dusky grouper. One experiment was performed during the breeding season (spring) and the other at the end of the breeding season (summer). During the spring, AI promoted sex change after 9 weeks and the sperm produced was able to fertilize grouper oocytes. During the summer, the sex change was incomplete; intersex individuals were present and sperm was not released by any of the animals. Sex changed gonads had a lamellar architecture; cysts of spermatocytes and spermatozoa in the lumen of the germinal compartment. In the spring, after 4 weeks, 11ketotestosterone (11KT) levels were higher in the AI than in control fish, and after 9 weeks, coincident with semen release, testosterone levels increased in the AI group, while 11KT returned to the initial levels. Estradiol (E2) levels remained unchanged during the experimental period. Instead of decreasing throughout the period, as in control group, 17 ?-OH progesterone levels did not change in the AI-treated fish, resulting in higher values after 9 weeks when compared with control fish. fsh? and lh? gene expression in the AI animals were lower compared with control fish after 9 weeks. The use of AI was effective to obtain functional males during the breeding season. The increase in androgens, modulated by gonadotropins, triggered the sex change, enabling the development of male germ cells, whereas a decrease in E2 levels was not required to change sex in dusky grouper. PMID:23792264

  17. Phylogeography of Pteronotropis signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus Complex (Teleostei: Cypriniformes), with Comments on Diversity and History of the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Streams

    PubMed Central

    Mayden, Richard L.; Allen, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The cyprinid genus Pteronotropis is endemic to southeastern Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean of North America. Never before has the genus been demonstrated to be monophyletic. We investigate both the phylogenetic relationships and the phylogeography of some species in the genus using mitochondrial ND2 sequences. In no analysis is the genus resolved as monophyletic if Notropis harperi is not included in the genus. Biogeographic and phylogeographic evaluations are conducted with Pteronotropis, including P. signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus complex. Patterns of relationships and population genetic analyses support divergences within multiple clades both at the species level and within species that are tied to abiotic changes in the region. Replicated patterns across clades are observed, as well as patterns previously found in other taxa. Pteronotropis hypselopterus is likely not a natural grouping as populations from some drainages form clades more closely related to other species of the genus. The general patterns of relationships indicate likely cryptic species not currently recognized. Finally, the patterns of species relationships and clades and population structuring within species serve as another example of replicated divergences in the biodiversity east and west of the Mobile Bay. PMID:26114110

  18. Production of fertile unreduced sperm by hybrid males of the Rutilus alburnoides complex (Teleostei, cyprinidae). An alternative route to genome tetraploidization in unisexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M J; Coelho, M M; Próspero, M I; Collares-Pereira, M J

    1999-01-01

    The hybrid minnow Rutilus alburnoides comprises diploid and polyploid females and males. Previous studies revealed that diploid and triploid females exhibit altered oogenesis that does not involve random segregation and recombination of the genomes of the two ancestors, constituting unisexual lineages. In the present study, we investigated the reproductive mode of hybrid males from the Tejo basin, using experimental crosses and flow cytometric analysis of blood and sperm. The results suggest that diploid hybrids produced fertile unreduced sperm, transmitting their hybrid genome intact to offspring. Triploid hybrids also produced unreduced sperm, but it was not possible to obtain data concerning their fertility. Finally, tetraploid hybrids produced fertile diploid sperm, which exhibited Mendelian segregation. Tetraploid R. alburnoides may reestablish biparental reproduction, as individuals of both sexes with the appropriate constitution for normal meiosis (two haploid genomes from each parental species) are likely to occur in natural populations. Tetraploids probably have arisen from syngamy of diploid eggs and diploid sperm produced by diploid hybrid males. Diploid hybrid males may therefore play a significant role in the dynamics of the complex, starting the evolutionary process that may ultimately lead to a new sexually reproducing species. PMID:9872966

  19. Karyotype, C-banding and AgNORs of two endemic leuciscine fish, Pseudophoxinus crassus (Ladiges, 1960) and P. hittitorum Freyhof & Özulug, 2010 (Teleostei, Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Sevgi; Gaffaro?lu, Muhammet; Ayata, Muradiye Karasu; Yüksel, E?ref

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Pseudophoxinus Bleeker, 1860 is found in a wide range of habitats in central Anatolia, but it is not well known from a cytogenetic aspect. In this study the first karyotypic description of the spring minnows Pseudophoxinus crassus (Ladiges, 1960) and Pseudophoxinus hittitorum Freyhof & Özulug, 2010 by means of conventional methods (Giemsa staining, C-banding, silver nitrate impregnation (Ag-NORs)) was performed. Both species are endemic and have restricted distributions in Central Anatolia. Pseudophoxinus crassus and Pseudophoxinus hittitorum have the same diploid chromosome number, 2n = 50, patterns of distribution of constitutive heterochromatin (CH), and localization of nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), but differ in their karyotypic formulae (KFs). The C-banding technique revealed clear pericentromeric blocks of CH in many chromosomes; Ag-NORs treatment revealed consistent positive signals at the end of the short arms of a submetacentric chromosome pair, likely homologous in both species. The karyotypic differences found between these species can be used for their taxonomical study. PMID:25610540

  20. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii), with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar

    2015-01-01

    The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1) and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes. PMID:25755920

  1. Modifications of the falciform process in the eye of beloniformes (Teleostei: Atherinomorpha): evolution of a curtain-like septum in the eye.

    PubMed

    Reckel, Frank; Melzer, Roland R

    2004-04-01

    In order to comparatively analyze curtain-like septa in the eyes of visually orientated "close-to-surface-predators" among atherinomorph teleosts, we examined the eyes of 24 atherinomorph species under a binocular microscope with regard to the falciform process and related structures in the vitreous cavity. Additionally, falciform process samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. All the studied representatives of the Cyprinodontiformes and Atheriniformes, and of one of the beloniform suborder, Adrianichthyioidei, possess a "typical" processus falciformis. In the eyes of the representatives of the other beloniform suborder, Belonoidei, however, pigmented structures that originate in the region of the optic disc and protrude into the vitreous cavity were noted. In the Hemiramphidae (halfbeaks) and Exocoetidae (flying fishes) these pigmented structures have a more cone-like shape, whereas in the Belonidae (needlefishes) and Scomberesocidae (sauries) horizontally oriented heavily pigmented curtain-like septa occur that divide the vitreous cavity dorsoventrally. It is suggested that the "typical" processus falciformis represents a plesiomorphic feature within the Atherinomorpha, whereas the pigmented modifications of the falciform process must be seen as a synapomorphic character state of the Belonoidei. The curtain-like septum of the Belonidae and Scomberesocidae might have evolved from the cone-like structures that are found in the Exocoetoidea. The functional significance of the pigmented structures in the eye is as yet not clear, except for the curtain-like septum found in Belonidae. It might play a role in visual orientation near the water surface at Snell's window. PMID:15052593

  2. Two new species of Euryhaliotrema Kritsky et Boeger, 2002 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) from Lutjanus russellii (Bleeker) and L. argentimaculatus (Forsskål) (Teleostei: Lutjanidae) in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Yang, Tingbao

    2015-01-01

    Euryhaliotrema russellum sp. n. and Euryhaliotrema tenuiaccessorium sp. n. are described from the gills of Lutjanus russellii (Bleeker) and L. argentimaculatus (Forsskål), respectively, in the South China Sea. Euryhaliotrema russellum sp. n. differs from all other members of Euryhaliotrema Kritsky et Boeger, 2002 by its unique male copulatory organ, a straight tube with a bulbous base and without an accessory piece. Euryhaliotrema tenuiaccessorium sp. n. differs from its congeners by having a copulatory organ with a bulbous base, a meandering copulatory tube with clockwise coil having less than one complete ring, and a slender accessory piece along the middle length of the copulatory tube. All species of Euryhaliotrema are listed and divided to three groups based on morpholgy of the male copulatory organ. PMID:26278378

  3. Garra mondica, a new species from the Mond River drainage with remarks on the genus Garra from the Persian Gulf basin in Iran (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Sayyadzadeh, Golnaz; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Freyhof, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Garra mondica, new species, from the Mond River drainage in Iran is distinguished from its congeners by having 7½ branched dorsal-fin rays; the breast, belly and back in front of the dorsal-fin origin naked and 9+8 branched caudal-fin rays. Garra mondica is also distinguished from all other congeners in the Persian Gulf basin, except an unidentified species from the Kol River, by having two fixed, diagnostic nucleotide substitutions in the mtDNA COI barcode region. The identity of G. gymnothorax, a nominal species from the Karun River drainage, and G. crenulata, a nominal species from Central Iran, are discussed. Garra populations examined from the Karun have a unique mtDNA COI barcode sequence, but their diagnostic characters are not consistent with the description and syntypes of G. gymnothorax. G. crenulata is considered as a synonym of G. rufa. Two populations of Garra from the Kol River have a sequence of the COI barcode region very similar to G. mondica, but cannot be identified as G. mondica and their identity cannot be resolved here. PMID:26624737

  4. Omanicotyle heterospina n. gen. et n. comb. (Monogenea: Microcotylidae) from the gills of Argyrops spinifer (Forsskål) (Teleostei: Sparidae) from the Sea of Oman

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Sultanate of Oman’s aquaculture industry is expanding with an on-going assessment of potential new fish species for culture. The king soldier bream, Argyrops spinifer (Forsskål) (Sparidae), is one such species that is under consideration. During a routine health assessment of specimens caught in the Sea of Oman throughout the period November 2009 to March 2011, a number of gill polyopisthocotylean monogeneans were recovered. Methods A subsequent study of the monogeneans using a range of morphology-based approaches indicated that these were Bivagina heterospina Mamaev et Parukhin, 1974. In the absence of pre-existing molecular data, an expanded description of this species is provided, including a differential diagnosis with other species and genera belonging to the subfamily Microcotylinae Monticelli, 1892 with the subsequent movement of this species to a new genus to accommodate it. Results The polyopisthocotyleans collected from the gills of A. spinifer appear to be unique within the family Microcotylidae Taschenberg, 1879 in that, morphologically, they possess a pair of large, muscular vaginae each armed with a full crown of 16–18 robust spines and a unique dorsal region of folded tegument, which permits their discrimination from species of Bivagina Yamaguti, 1963. Sequencing of the SSU rDNA (complete 1968 bp) and LSU rDNA (partial 949 bp) places the specimens collected during this study within the subfamily Microcotylinae, but the LSU rDNA sequence differs from Bivagina and also from other microcotylid genera. Morphological features of B. heterospina sensu Mamaev et Parukhin, 1974 and the specimens collected from the current study are consistent with one another and represent a single species. The vaginal armature of these worms is unique and differs from all other genera within the Microcotylinae, including Bivagina, and its movement to Omanicotyle n. gen. to accommodate this species is proposed. Conclusions A new genus, Omanicotyle n. gen., is erected to accommodate Omanicotyle [Bivagina] heterospina n. comb. which represents the first monogenean to be described from Omani marine waters. Given the pathogenic potential of microcotylids on captive held fish stocks, a full assessment of Omanicotyle heterospina n. gen. et n. comb. is now required before large-scale production commences. PMID:23758894

  5. A new species of Comephoronema (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) from the stomach of the abyssal halosaur Halosauropsis macrochir (Teleostei) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Klimpel, Sven

    2007-08-01

    A new species of parasitic nematode Comephoronema macrochiri n. sp. (Cystidicolidae), is described from the stomach of the marine deep-sea fish Halosauropsis macrochir (abyssal halosaur) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The new species, studied with both light and scanning electron microscopy, is characterized mainly by 6 pairs of preanal papillae, by which it principally differs from members of Ascarophis; the spicules are 297-375 microm and 99-120 microm long and fully developed eggs possess 2 long filaments on 1 pole. Rhabdochona beatriceinsleyae is transferred to Comephoronema as C. beatriceinsleyae (Holloway and Klewer, 1969) n. comb. Comephoronema macrochiri differs from all other congeners mainly in having eggs with filaments on 1 pole only, and from individual species by some additional features such as the number of preanal papillae, the shape of pseudolabial projections, and the body and organ measurements. PMID:17918373

  6. Delimiting species by reproductive isolation: the genetic structure of epigean and hypogean Trichomycterus spp. (Teleostei, Siluriformes) in the restricted area of Torotoro (Upper Amazon, Bolivia).

    PubMed

    Renno, Jean-François; Gazel, Claude; Miranda, Guido; Pouilly, Marc; Berrebi, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Genetic variability of Trichomycterus from the region of Torotoro (Bolivia, Upper Amazon), distributed in the same watershed where the habitat is structured by waterfalls, canyons and a cave, was studied by allozyme (twelve putative loci) and RFLP-mtDNA (DLoop and cytochrome b) analyses. Alloenzymatic variation studied by Correspondence Analysis and Maximum Likelihood Analysis revealed a four-group structure, which was largely congruent with the distribution of the 14 mtDNA haplotypes. Two of these four clusters (I and II) were differentiated by two diagnostic loci (IDH and G3PDH), two semi-diagnostic loci (PGM and 6PGDH) and consequently a very high F(st )value (estimator theta = 0.77). Therefore, clusters I and II are reproductively isolated. The distribution limit of these two (sibling) species does not correspond to those of the morphological species of Trichomycterus identified in this region: the epigean T. cf. barbouri and the hypogean T. chaberti. However, hypogean fish exhibited two mtDNA haplotypes, a private one and another shared with the epigean Trichomycterus from upstream reaches. PMID:17957496

  7. Observing Sites in NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, H.

    En esta comunicacion se propone revisar la importancia que los grandes relevamientos de galaxias y los diferentes catalogos que de ellos se derivan, tienen en los estudios sobre estructura y evolucion del Universo.

  8. MEXUS-Gulf Coastal Pelagic Fish Research, 1977-84 Introduction

    E-print Network

    on Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, and king mackerel, S. cavalla, fished by both Mexico. Mackerel Tagging Marking, or tagging, fish has long been a practical method of determining movements-Gulf, 1977-84. Species Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus King mackerel, S. cavalla Little tunny

  9. Cynthia M. Jones Applied Marine Research Laboratory. Old Dominion University

    E-print Network

    of William &Mary Gloucester Point. Virginia 23062 Spatial and temporal occurrence of Spanish mackerel Scomberomorus maculatus in Chesapeake Bay* The Spanish mackerel Scombero- morus maculatus is a pelagic. warm years, Spanish mackerel have again be- come abundant in Chesapeake Bay (Chittenden et a1. In review

  10. AGE AND GROwtH OF SPANISH MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS MACULAroS,

    E-print Network

    AGE AND GROwtH OF SPANISH MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS MACULAroS, FROM FLORIDA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, were used to estimate age and growth rates of this species from Florida.731, where I = fork length (mm) and t = years. Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, are found

  11. David J. Schmidt 1725 Signal Pt. Rd.. Charleston, South Carolina 29412

    E-print Network

    : petersj®cofc.edu Daily age and growth of larval and early juvenile Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus mackerel, Scomberomorus maculatus, were deter- mined by examining increments of daily growth-539 0997). The Spanish mackerel, Scombero- morus maculatus (Mitchim, is an inhabitant ofthe Gulfof

  12. Hair Cell Heterogeneity in the Goldfish Saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saidel, William M.; Lanford, Pamela J.; Yan, Hong Y.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    A set of cytological studies performed in the utricle and saccule of Astronotus ocellatus (Teleostei, Percomorphi, Cichlidae) identified two basic types of hair cells and others with some intermediate characteristics. This paper reports on applying the same techniques to the saccule of Carassius auratus (Teleostei, Otophysi, Cyprinidae) and demonstrates similar types of hair cells to those found in Astronotus. Since Carassius and Astronous are species of extreme taxonomic distance within the Euteteostei, two classes of mechanoreceptive hair cells are likely to represent the primitive condition for sensory receptors in the euteleost inner ear and perhaps in all bony fish ears.

  13. Insect resistance management for stored product pests: a case study of cowpea weevil (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Koo; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Onstad, David W

    2013-12-01

    The cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), can cause up to 100% yield loss of stored cowpea seeds in a few months in West Africa. Genes expressing toxins delaying insect maturation (MDTs) are available for genetic engineering. A simulation model was used to investigate the possible use of MDTs for managing C. maculatus. Specifically, we studied the effect of transgenic cowpea expressing an MDT, an insecticide, or both, on the evolution of resistance by C. maculatus at constant temperature. Transgenic cowpea expressing only a nonlethal MDT causing 50-100% maturation delay did not control C. maculatus well. Mortality caused by a maturation delay improved the efficacy of transgenic cowpea expressing only a lethal MDT, but significantly reduced the durability of transgenic cowpea Transgenic cowpea expressing only a lethal MDT causing 50% maturation delay and 90% mortality controlled C. maculatus better than one expressing only a nonlethal MDT, but its durability was only 2 yr. We concluded that transgenic cowpea expressing only an MDT has little value for managing C. maculatus. The resistance by C. maculatus to transgenic cowpea expressing only an insecticide rapidly evolved. Stacking a gene expressing a nonlethal MDT and a gene expressing an insecticide in transgenic cowpea did not significantly improve the durability of an insecticide, but stacking a gene expressing a lethal MDT and a gene expressing an insecticide in transgenic cowpea significantly improved the durability of an insecticide and an MDT. We also discussed this approach within the idea of using transgenic RNAi in pest control strategies. PMID:24498750

  14. Professor Martin Grosell and colleagues have made a fascinating discovery about the contribution of fish to the marine inorganic carbon cycle and the potential impact they may have on future ocean acidification

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    of our oceans is critical for predictions of ocean acidification as environmental CO2 levels rise. Our of fish to the marine inorganic carbon cycle and the potential impact they may have on future ocean acidification Calcium carbonate contributors First, can you outline what defines teleostei and explain the links

  15. DIET OF THE SHORTFIN MAKO ISURUS OXYRINCHUS AND THE BLUE SHARK PRIONACE GLAUCA IN THE NORTHEASTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-print Network

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    dominated by teleosts (mainly Scomberesox saurus) and cephalopods (mainly Histioteuthis sp.), respectively. Keywords: Diet, Elasmobranchii, Teleostei, Cephalopods, Gulf of Cadiz 1 1 2 1 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 Introduction and cetaceans) and the beak characteristics (cephalopods) [3, 4]. Frequency of occurrence (%O) is the percentage

  16. Accepted by A. Gill: 31 Jan. 2007; published: 15 Mar. 2007 45 ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Michael S.

    .mapress.com/zootaxa/ Two new species of Elacatinus (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from the Mexican coast of the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Veracruz, Mexico in the south- western Gulf of Mexico. Elacatinus jarocho sp. nov the southwestern Gulf of Mexico from reefs within the Veracruz Marine Park off the coast of Veracruz, Mexico. Key

  17. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 43 (2007) 91110 www.elsevier.com/locate/ympev

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2007-01-01

    and biogeography of 91 species of heroine cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) based on sequences of the cytochrome b tribe of Neotropical cichlids and show their greatest diversity in Mesoamerica. Although heroine species did not support the monophyly of heroines because the genus Pterophyllum was placed as the sister

  18. The genus Sebastes, containing the live-bearing rockfishes, is the most

    E-print Network

    - Genetic and morphological differences between Sebastes vulpes and S. zonatus (Teleostei: Scorpaeniformes the position of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. Abstract--The taxonomic status of Sebastes vulpes completely into two genetically distinct groups that cor- responded to S. vulpes and S. zonatus according

  19. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  20. Descriptions of four species of grenadier fishes of the genera Hymenocephalus and Hymenogadus (Teleostei, Gadiformes, Macrouridae) from the New Zealand region and Tasman Sea, including two new species of Hymenocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mcmillan, Peter; Iwamoto, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Hymenocephalus are described from the New Zealand region and Tasman Sea. Hymenocephalus fuscus sp. n. has 11-12 pelvic fin rays, is darkly pigmented, with enlarged bony ridges on the dorsal aspects of head, lacks a chin barbel, has few (16-19) gill rakers on inner side of first arch and is similar to other species in the H. aterrimus species group. Hymenocephalus maculicaudus sp. n. has 8 pelvic fin rays, a mid-lateral line of melanophores on body and tail that extends about a head length posterior to anal fin origin, a short (7-16 % HL) chin barbel and is similar to other species in the H. megalops species group. Hymenocephalus nascens has 12-14 pelvic fin rays, lacks a chin barbel, has a mid-lateral stripe of silvery (fresh) or brownish (preserved) pigment running along trunk and tail. Hymenogadus gracilis has a serrated (weak, near tip) first dorsal fin spine, 7-9 pelvic fin rays, long (20-30% HL) chin barbel, and one row of enlarged melanophores along lateral mid-line of the tail. Hymenocephalus nascens and Hymenogadus gracilis are recorded for the first time from the New Zealand region. A key to the known New Zealand species of Hymenocephalus and Hymenogadus is provided.  PMID:25284648

  1. Lamellodiscus (Monogenea: Diplectanidae) parasites of Dentex macrophthalmus (Teleostei: Sparidae) from the North Atlantic coast of Africa, with a redescription of L. dentexi Aljoshkina, 1984, and description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Diamanka, Arfang; Neifar, Lassâd; Pariselle, Antoine; Euzet, Louis

    2011-03-01

    Lamellodiscus dentexi Aljoshkina, 1984, a gill parasite of Dentex macrophthalmus (Bloch), is redescribed based on new material from the northwest coast of Africa (Senegal and Morocco). Three new species of Lamellodiscus Johnston et Tiegs, 1922 from D. macrophthalmus are described, Lamellodiscus toguebayei sp. n., L. vicinus sp. n., and L. triacies sp. n., all belonging to the "ignoratus" group. They can be distinguished from all other species of this group by the size and shape of male copulatory organ and sclerotised parts of the haptor. Considering the peculiar morphology of the male copulatory organ (long and thin tube) we propose to put together L. dentexi, L. virgula Euzet et Oliver, 1967 and L. obeliae Oliver, 1973 to form the "elongatus" type within the "elegans" group. PMID:21539135

  2. COMPARISONS OF CATCHES OF FIS~ES J1N GILL NETS IN RELATION TO WEBBING MATERIAL,\\TIAE OF DAY, AND

    E-print Network

    of king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, and Spanish mackerel,S. maculatus, between monofilament and multi entrance into St. Andrew Bay. Depths at the net locations at mean low tide were 0.7-1.1 m (shallow), 2

  3. The genus Conocephalus Thunberg (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) in Hainan, China with description of one new species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fu-Ming; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports four species of the genus Conocephalus from Hainan, China, including Conocephalus (Xiphidion) hainanensis sp. nov. and two new records: C. (Anisoptera) maculatus (Le Guillou, 1841) and C. (Conocephalus) bambusanus Ingrisch, 1990. PMID:26250265

  4. Trazando la materia oscura con cúmulos globulares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J. C.

    Se describe la estrategia adoptada para mapear la distribución de materia oscura y bariónica en galaxias elípticas cuyos cúmulos globulares están siendo observados con los telescopios VLT y Gemini. Se ejemplifican los resultados con los datos obtenidos en el cúmulo de Fornax.

  5. Copyright2011:InstitutodeAstronoma,UniversidadNacionalAutnomadeMxico Revista Mexicana de Astronomia y Astrofisica, 47, 401407 (2011)

    E-print Network

    Maciel, Walter Junqueira

    2011-01-01

    Se determina la distribuci´on de edades de las estrellas centrales de nebulosas planetarias (CSPN de rotaci´on de las nebulosas esperadas a partir de sus distancias galactoc´entricas con los valores de nebulosas planetarias en nuestra galaxia. Los resultados son similares para ambas, y muestran que

  6. The Jaw Adductor Muscle Complex in Teleostean Fishes: Evolution, Homologies and Revised Nomenclature (Osteichthyes: Actinopterygii)

    PubMed Central

    Datovo, Aléssio; Vari, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The infraclass Teleostei is a highly diversified group of bony fishes that encompasses 96% of all species of living fishes and almost half of extant vertebrates. Evolution of various morphological complexes in teleosts, particularly those involving soft anatomy, remains poorly understood. Notable among these problematic complexes is the adductor mandibulae, the muscle that provides the primary force for jaw adduction and mouth closure and whose architecture varies from a simple arrangement of two segments to an intricate complex of up to ten discrete subdivisions. The present study analyzed multiple morphological attributes of the adductor mandibulae in representatives of 53 of the 55 extant teleostean orders, as well as significant information from the literature in order to elucidate the homologies of the main subdivisions of this muscle. The traditional alphanumeric terminology applied to the four main divisions of the adductor mandibulae – A1, A2, A3, and A? – patently fails to reflect homologous components of that muscle across the expanse of the Teleostei. Some features traditionally used as landmarks for identification of some divisions of the adductor mandibulae proved highly variable across the Teleostei; notably the insertion on the maxilla and the position of muscle components relative to the path of the ramus mandibularis trigeminus nerve. The evolutionary model of gain and loss of sections of the adductor mandibulae most commonly adopted under the alphanumeric system additionally proved ontogenetically incongruent and less parsimonious than a model of subdivision and coalescence of facial muscle sections. Results of the analysis demonstrate the impossibility of adapting the alphanumeric terminology so as to reflect homologous entities across the spectrum of teleosts. A new nomenclatural scheme is proposed in order to achieve congruence between homology and nomenclature of the adductor mandibulae components across the entire Teleostei. PMID:23565279

  7. Temporal Patterns of Diversification across Global Cichlid Biodiversity (Acanthomorpha: Cichlidae)

    E-print Network

    MacMahan, Caleb D.; Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Sparks, John S.; Smith, William Leo; Davis, Matthew P.

    2013-08-19

    reliable dating of teleostean divergences. BMC Evol Biol 8: 215. 27. Miya M, Pietsch TW, Orr JW, Arnold RJ, Satoh TP, et al. (2010) Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evol Biol 10: 58. 28. Murray... of Eocene terrestrial environments in sub-Sahara Africa. Z Deut Gesells Geowissenschaf 157: 99– 120. 30. Arratia G, Cione AL (1996) The record of fossil fishes of southern South America. Mu¨nchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen (A) 30: 9–72. 31. Malabarba...

  8. Effects of E-64, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor, on cowpea weevil growth, development, and fecundity

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, L.L.; Shade, R.E.; Pomeroy, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    E-64, a specific inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, was incorporated into artificial seeds at low levels (0.01-0.25% by weight). It prolonged developmental time and increased mortality of the larval cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), in direct proportion to its concentration in the artificial seeds. The fecundity of females emerging from the artificial seeds was significantly decreased by E-64 concentrations of 0.06% and higher. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the midgut cysteine proteinase in C. maculatus is essential for normal growth and development.

  9. Voluntary emergence and water detection in a newly recognized amphibious fish.

    PubMed

    Magellan, K

    2015-06-01

    Galaxias 'nebula', a small fish which has adaptations for air-breathing but is not known to be amphibious, voluntarily emerged from water and, in an unfamiliar environment, moved preferentially towards an alternative water source. Nebula may thus be considered one of the few truly amphibious fishes, and their ability to detect water provides a selective advantage which aids their survival in unpredictable natural environments. PMID:25924804

  10. Curvas de rotación - Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, C.

    Se está elaborando un atlas con imágenes y datos publicados en las revistas principales por diversos autores, de las curvas de rotación en galaxias observadas en diferentes frecuencias. Las curvas de rotación constituyen uno de los medios más apropiados para el estudio de las diferencias cinemáticas entre los diversos componentes y quizá la mejor prueba observacional de la existencia de materia oscura en el universo. Este atlas tiene el propósito de servir como una guía cualitativa y cuantitativa para estos estudios.

  11. Evolutionary Drivers of Diversification and Distribution of a Southern Temperate Stream Fish Assemblage: Testing the Role of Historical Isolation and Spatial Range Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chakona, Albert; Swartz, Ernst R.; Gouws, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    This study used phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences to investigate genetic diversity within three broadly co-distributed freshwater fish genera (Galaxias, Pseudobarbus and Sandelia) to shed some light on the processes that promoted lineage diversification and shaped geographical distribution patterns. A total of 205 sequences of Galaxias, 177 sequences of Pseudobarbus and 98 sequences of Sandelia from 146 localities across nine river systems in the south-western Cape Floristic Region (South Africa) were used. The data were analysed using phylogenetic and haplotype network methods and divergence times for the clades retrieved were estimated using *BEAST. Nine extremely divergent (3.5–25.3%) lineages were found within Galaxias. Similarly, deep phylogeographic divergence was evident within Pseudobarbus, with four markedly distinct (3.8–10.0%) phylogroups identified. Sandelia had two deeply divergent (5.5–5.9%) lineages, but seven minor lineages with strong geographical congruence were also identified. The Miocene-Pliocene major sea-level transgression and the resultant isolation of populations in upland refugia appear to have driven widespread allopatric divergence within the three genera. Subsequent coalescence of rivers during the Pleistocene major sea-level regression as well as intermittent drainage connections during wet periods are proposed to have facilitated range expansion of lineages that currently occur across isolated river systems. The high degree of genetic differentiation recovered from the present and previous studies suggest that freshwater fish diversity within the south-western CFR may be vastly underestimated, and taxonomic revisions are required. PMID:23951050

  12. Historical abiotic events or human-aided dispersal: inferring the evolutionary history of a newly discovered galaxiid fish

    PubMed Central

    Chakona, Gamuchirai; Swartz, Ernst R; Chakona, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Range expansion of obligate freshwater fishes in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of South Africa has mostly been attributed to river capture events and confluence of rivers following sea-level regression. The role of low drainage divides and interbasin water transfers has received less attention. This study analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences to assess the processes that could have influenced the phylogeographic patterns of a newly discovered lineage of Galaxias zebratus (hereafter Galaxias zebratus “Joubertina”) that occurs across two currently isolated river systems close to the Joubertina area in the eastern CFR. Results from both analyses revealed that observed genetic differentiation cannot be explained by isolation between the two river systems. No genetic differentiation was found between the Krom River system and a population from one of the Gamtoos tributaries. Shallow genetic differentiation was found between the Krom and the other Gamtoos populations. Historical river capture events and sea-level changes do not explain the present distribution of Galaxias zebratus “Joubertina” across the Krom and Gamtoos River systems. Interbasin dispersal during pluvial periods, recent river capture, or recent human-mediated translocation seems to be the most plausible explanations. PMID:25897377

  13. OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH,

    E-print Network

    OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH, S. MACULATUS. MACKERELS IN COMMERCIAL-lYPE SHRIMP TRAWLS ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST OF THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES1 King mackerel (September- October 1986). Tongue nets, also known as bib, falcon, cobra, or mongoose trawl nets, have become

  14. SCOMBEROMORUS BRASILIENSIS, A NEW SPECIES OF SPANISH MACKEREL FROM THE WESTERN ATLANTIC

    E-print Network

    Scomberomorus-the king mackerel, S. cavalla (Cuvier), Spanish mackerel, S. maculatus (Mitchill); and cero, S of Natural History, Washington, DC 20560. "Department of Biological Sciences, George Washington Uni- versity. Statistical tests were performed on the IBM 370-148 compu- ter4 at the George Washington University using

  15. Inquiry-based Investigation in Biology Laboratories: Does Neem Provide Bioprotection against Bean Beetles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Amy R.; Sale, Amanda Lovelace; Srivatsan, Malathi; Beck, Christopher W.; Blumer, Lawrence S.; Grippo, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    We developed an inquiry-based biology laboratory exercise in which undergraduate students designed experiments addressing whether material from the neem tree ("Azadirachta indica") altered bean beetle ("Callosobruchus maculatus") movements and oviposition. Students were introduced to the bean beetle life cycle, experimental…

  16. Radio Frequency Heat Treatments to Disinfest Dried Pulses of Cowpea Weevil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore the potential of radio frequency (RF) heat treatments as an alternative to chemical fumigants for disinfestation of dried pulses, the relative heat tolerance and dielectric properties of different stages of the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) was determined. Among the immature st...

  17. Copeia,1999(2), pp. 376-381 New Snake (Tropidophis)from Western Cuba

    E-print Network

    Hedges, Blair

    Copeia,1999(2), pp. 376-381 New Snake (Tropidophis)from Western Cuba S. BLAIRHEDGES Province,westernCuba.It is tanandhas tworowsof prominent,darkbrowndorsal spots and a pale neck band. It most closely resembles another species from western Cuba, T. maculatus, in having a high number

  18. Development of Transgenics in Chickpea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important food crop in much of the developing world and ranks third in production among food legumes. Chickpea production is limited worldwide by drought, insect damage from Helicoverpa armigera, Callosobruchus maculatus and C. chinensis and disease pressure from ...

  19. Acrux Issue 1 

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    The number of stocks of king (Scomberomorus cavalla) and Spanish mackerel (S. maculatus) that exist in the Gulf of Mexico is unknown. Presently, both species are each treated as two stocks, an Atlantic migratory group and a Gulf of Mexico migratory...

  20. Inbreeding depression in two seed-feeding beetles, Callosobruchus

    E-print Network

    Fox, Charles W.

    Inbreeding depression in two seed-feeding beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus and Stator limbatus, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0091, USA Abstract Inbreeding depression is well documented in insects but the degree to which inbreeding depression varies among populations within species, and among

  1. New species and records of Goeldichironomus Fittkau, 1965 from Brazil (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Amora, Gizelle; Hamada, Neusa; Pinho, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    One new species named Goeldichironomus adhaerens sp. n. is described from urban area in Manaus, Brazilian Amazon, based on male adult, pupa and larva. New records of G. neopictus Trivinho-Strixino & Strixino, G. maculatus Trivinho-Strixino & Strixino, G. pictus Reiss and G. fluctuans Reiss are also provided. PMID:26701570

  2. GRAVIMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING STAGE OF OBLIGATE INTERNALLY FEEDING STORED-PRODUCT INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted two experiments to develop a gravimetric method for determining the stadia of Callosobruchus maculatus developing in cowpeas. An important step was to develop regression equations for predicting weight changes in uninfested cowpeas in order to correct for changes that occur in weight as...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Rapid Evolution of Lifespan in a Novel Environment: Sex-Specific

    E-print Network

    Fox, Charles W.

    replicate lines of Calloso- bruchus maculatus (F.) were switched to a new host plant (cowpea), and each, the evolution of lifespan differed between the sexes; female lifespan was reduced by *11% in all cowpea varied among replicates. Reduced lifespan in lines swit- ched to cowpea mirrored the shorter lifespan

  4. Stored Grain Department of Entomology

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    E-262-W Stored Grain Department of Entomology PURDUE IMPROVED COWPEA STORAGE (PICS) TECHNOLOGY D. Lafayette, USA; 2 INRAN, Maradi, Niger; and 3 IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria. Life cycle of the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) Cowpea Storage: What Is The Problem? Cowpea grain stored after harvest is the favorite

  5. New species of Elaphidiini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Galileo, Maria Helena M; Martins, Ubirajara R; Santos-Silva, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Five new Elaphidiini species are described from Bolivia including Anelaphus maculatus sp. nov. from Tarija and Mephritus bonasoi sp. nov., M. meyeri, sp. nov., M. punctulatus sp. nov. and M. eleandroi sp. nov. from Santa Cruz. A revised key to all 22 South American Mephritus species is provided. PMID:25543785

  6. WILLIAM A. FABLE, Jr., HAROLD A. BRUSHER, LEE TRENT, and JOE FINNEGAN, Jr.

    E-print Network

    Effects on Charter Boat Catches of King Mackerel and Other Coastal Pelagic Species in North\\Nest Florida are caught: King mack- erel, Scomberomorus cavalla; Spanish mackerel, S. maculatus; bluefish, Poma- tomus dependent on catches of king mackerel (Irby, 1974; Brusher et aI., 1978; Fisher, 1978). Sutherland and Fable

  7. Guided-Inquiry Labs Using Bean Beetles for Teaching the Scientific Method & Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlueter, Mark A.; D'Costa, Allison R.

    2013-01-01

    Guided-inquiry lab activities with bean beetles ("Callosobruchus maculatus") teach students how to develop hypotheses, design experiments, identify experimental variables, collect and interpret data, and formulate conclusions. These activities provide students with real hands-on experiences and skills that reinforce their understanding of the…

  8. Sensory epithelia of the fish inner ear in 3D: studied with high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While a number of studies have illustrated and analyzed 3D models of inner ears in higher vertebrates, inner ears in fishes have rarely been investigated in 3D, especially with regard to the sensory epithelia of the end organs, the maculae. It has been suggested that the 3D curvature of these maculae may also play an important role in hearing abilities in fishes. We therefore set out to develop a fast and reliable approach for detailed 3D visualization of whole inner ears as well as maculae. Results High-resolution microCT imaging of black mollies Poecilia sp. (Poeciliidae, Teleostei) and Steatocranus tinanti (Cichlidae, Teleostei) stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) resulted in good tissue contrast, enabling us to perform a reliable 3D reconstruction of all three sensory maculae of the inner ears. Comparison with maculae that have been 3D reconstructed based on histological serial sections and phalloidin-stained maculae showed high congruence in overall shape of the maculae studied here. Conclusions PTA staining and subsequent high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT imaging is a powerful method to obtain 3D models of fish inner ears and maculae in a fast and more reliable manner. Future studies investigating functional morphology, phylogenetic potential of inner ear features, or evolution of hearing and inner ear specialization in fishes may benefit from the use of 3D models of inner ears and maculae. PMID:24160754

  9. Bichir microRNA repertoire suggests a ray-finned fish affinity of Polypteriforme.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liandong; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2015-07-25

    The phylogenetic position of Polypteriforme (bichirs) remains elusive, despite extensive research both on morphological and molecular datasets. Unfortunately morphological cladistic analyses and molecular phylogenetic analyses had reached conflicting conclusions, as Polypteriformes were either grouped with lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) or ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii), or even classified as their own group, the Brachiopterygii. In this study, we applied a third independent source of datasets, the presence versus absence of microRNAs, to re-investigate the phylogenetic relationship of bichirs. Through deep sequencing of small RNA library, we showed that bichirs should be grouped into ray-finned fishes rather than lobe-finned fishes. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that bichirs were placed as the most basal member of the ray-finned fishes. Bichirs shared five unique microRNA families with teleostei, which were not found in any other species investigated to date. Bichirs have also retained three of five microRNAs that were previously deemed to be lost exclusively in teleostei. Furthermore, we report more than one hundred novel microRNAs that are unique to bichir. The identification of microRNAs in bichir provides overwhelming evidence for their affinity of ray-finned fishes. The sarcopterygian-like characteristics such as lobed fins, paired ventral lungs, and external gills in juveniles should not be considered as derived traits shared with those of sarcopterygians. PMID:25917619

  10. Efficient Transmission of an Introduced Pathogen Via an Ancient Insect-Fungus Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, A.; Roques, A.; Colombari, F.; Frigimelica, G.; Guido, M.

    In Cupressus sempervirens the association between seed insects and tree pathogens has resulted in optimal exploitation of the cones. A fungus-infected cone can be inhabited by the nymphs of a true seed bug (Orsillus maculatus), the adults of which may carry a heavy spore load at emergence. Cones are infected when eggs are laid within the cone, most frequently via the emergence holes of a seed wasp (Megastigmus wachtli). This symbiotic association evolved with the nonaggressive fungus Pestalotiopsis funerea within the natural range of the cypress. When the aggressive cypress canker disease (Seiridium cardinale) was introduced into Europe, it was transmitted by O. maculatus to cones usually colonized by Pestalotiopsis funerea, with disastrous consequences for the regeneration and survival of C. sempervirens in the entire Mediterranean area.

  11. Optical Emission in Some Luminous IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, C.; Lipari, S.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Comunicamos observaciones de algunas galaxias IRAS luminosas. Diagramas de diagn6stico de las lineas de emisi6n fueron utilizados para clasificar los objetos. Comparamos estos resultados con los obtenidos por medio del diagrama infrarojo color-color. ABSTRACT: We report observations on some luminous IRAS galaxies. In this preliminar analysis, we use intensity ratios of optical emission- lines plotted in diagnostic-diagrams to classify the objects. Comparisons are made with results obtained from infrared colour-colour diagrams. Key words: GALAXIES-SEYFERT - INTERSTELLAR MATTER

  12. Cortisol release in response to UVB exposure in Xiphophorus fish.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Adam J; Boswell, Mikki; Downs, Kevin P; Pasquali, Amanda; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-06-01

    Xiphophorus fishes are comprised of 26 known species. Interspecies hybridization between select species has been utilized to produce experimental models to study melanoma development. Xiphophorus melanoma induction protocols utilize ultraviolet light (UVB) to induce DNA damage and associated downstream tumorigenesis. However, the impact of induced stress caused by the UVB treatment of the experimental animals undergoing tumor induction protocols has not been assessed. Stress is an adaptive physiological response to excessive or unpredictable environmental stimuli. The stress response in fishes may be measured by an assay of cortisol released into the water. Here, we present results from investigations of stress response during an experimental treatment and UVB exposure in Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B, Xiphophorus couchianus, and F1 interspecies hybrids produced from the mating X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus. Overall, cortisol release rates for males and females after UVB exposure showed no statistical differences. At lower UVB doses (8 and 16kJ/m(2)), X. couchianus exhibited 2 fold higher levels of DNA damage then either X. maculatus or the F1 hybrid. However, based on the cortisol release rates, none of the fish types tested induced a primary stress response at the UVB lower doses (8 and 16kJ/m(2)). In contrast, at a very high UVB dose (32kJ/m(2)) both X. maculatus and the F1 hybrid showed a 5 fold increase in the cortisol release rate. To determine the effect of pigmentation on UVB induced stress, wild type and albino Xiphophorus hellerii were exposed to UVB (32kJ/m(2)). Albino X. hellerii exhibited 3.7 fold increase in the cortisol release while wild type X. hellerii did not exhibit a significant cortisol response to UVB. Overall, the data suggest the rather low UVB doses often employed in tumor induction protocols do not induce a primary stress response in Xiphophorus fishes. PMID:24625568

  13. Are accessory hearing structures linked to inner ear morphology? Insights from 3D orientation patterns of ciliary bundles in three cichlid species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes show considerable diversity in swim bladder morphology. In members of the subfamily Etroplinae, the connection between anterior swim bladder extensions and the inner ears enhances sound transmission and translates into an improved hearing ability. We tested the hypothesis that those swim bladder modifications coincide with differences in inner ear morphology and thus compared Steatocranus tinanti (vestigial swim bladder), Hemichromis guttatus (large swim bladder without extensions), and Etroplus maculatus (intimate connection between swim bladder and inner ears). Methodology and results We applied immunostaining together with confocal imaging and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of sensory epithelia, and high-resolution, contrast-enhanced microCT imaging for characterizing inner ears in 3D, and evaluated otolith dimensions. Compared to S. tinanti and H. guttatus, inner ears of E. maculatus showed an enlargement of all three maculae, and a particularly large lacinia of the macula utriculi. While our analysis of orientation patterns of ciliary bundles on the three macula types using artificially flattened maculae uncovered rather similar orientation patterns of ciliary bundles, interspecific differences became apparent when illustrating the orientation patterns on the 3D models of the maculae: differences in the shape and curvature of the lacinia of the macula utriculi, and the anterior arm of the macula lagenae resulted in an altered arrangement of ciliary bundles. Conclusions Our results imply that improved audition in E. maculatus is associated not only with swim bladder modifications but also with altered inner ear morphology. However, not all modifications in E. maculatus could be connected to enhanced auditory abilities, and so a potential improvement of the vestibular sense, among others, also needs to be considered. Our study highlights the value of analyzing orientation patterns of ciliary bundles in their intact 3D context in studies of inner ear morphology and physiology. PMID:24645675

  14. Genetic analysis of susceptibility to spontaneous and UV-induced carcinogenesis in Xiphophorus hybrid fish.

    PubMed

    Nairn, R S; Kazianis, S; Della Coletta, L; Trono, D; Butler, A P; Walter, R B; Morizot, D C

    2001-06-01

    Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids provide genetically controlled models of tumor formation. Spontaneous melanomas form in first-generation backcross (BC(1)) hybrids produced from backcrossing F(1) hybrids derived from the platyfish X. maculatus Jp 163 A and the swordtail X. helleri to the X. helleri parental strain (the Gordon-Kosswig hybrid cross). Nodular melanomas originate in the dorsal fin from cells constituting the spotted dorsal (Sd) pigment pattern. A parallel genetic cross, with X. maculatus Jp 163 B, exhibits the spotted side (Sp) pigment pattern instead of Sd, and produces BC(1) hybrids exhibiting a much lower frequency of spontaneous melanoma formation. These hybrids are susceptible to melanoma development if irradiated with UV light as fry. Other hybrids involving these two strains of X. maculatus and different swordtail and platyfish backcross parents also have been investigated as potential tumor models, and show differing susceptibilities to UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas. Genotyping of individual BC(1) hybrids from several Xiphophorus crosses has implicated a locus, CDKN2X (a Xiphophorus homologue of the mammalian CDKN2 gene family, residing on Xiphophorus linkage group V), in enhancing pigmentation and the susceptibility to spontaneous and UV-induced melanoma formation in BC(1) hybrids from some crosses, but not others. Homozygosity for X. helleri and X. couchianus CDKN2X alleles in BC(1) hybrids can predispose individuals to melanoma, but this susceptibility is modified in other crosses depending both on the contributing sex-linked pigment pattern locus from X. maculatus (Sd or Sp), and the genetic constitution of the backcross parent. Xiphophorus BC(1) hybrids constitute unique genetic models offering the potential to analyze the contributions of specific genes to spontaneous and induced tumor formation in different, but comparable genetic backgrounds. PMID:14961297

  15. Diversity of Anopheles species and trophic behavior of putative malaria vectors in two malaria endemic areas of northwestern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tainchum, Krajana; Ritthison, Wanapa; Chuaycharoensuk, Thipwara; Bangs, Michael J; Manguin, Sylvie; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2014-12-01

    We determined the species diversity, blood-feeding behavior, and host preference of Anopheles mosquitoes in two malaria endemic areas of Tak (Mae Sot District) and Mae Hong Son (Sop Moei District) Provinces, located along the Thai border with Myanmar, during a consecutive two-year period. Anopheline mosquitoes were collected using indoor and outdoor human-landing captures and outdoor cow-baited collections. Mosquitoes were initially identified using morphological characters, followed by the appropriate multiplex AS-PCR assay for the identification of sibling species within Anopheles (Cellia) complexes and groups present. Real-time PCR was performed for parasite-specific detection in mosquitoes (Plasmodium spp. and Wuchereria bancrofti). A total of 7,129 Anopheles females were captured, 3,939 from Mae Sot and 3,190 from Sop Moei, with 58.6% and 37% of all anophelines identified as An. minimus, respectively. All three malaria vector complexes were detected in both areas. One species within the Minimus Complex (An. minimus) was present along with two related species in the Funestus Group, (An. aconitus, An. varuna), two species within the Dirus Complex (An. dirus, An. baimaii), and four species within the Maculatus Group (An. maculatus, An. sawadwongporni, An. pseudowillmori, and An. dravidicus). The trophic behavior of An. minimus, An. dirus, An. baimaii, An. maculatus, and An. sawadwongporni are described herein. The highest An. minimus densities were detected from February through April of both years. One specimen of An. minimus from Mae Sot was found positive for Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25424272

  16. Resistance of ?AI-1 transgenic chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) dry grains to bruchid beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Christoph; Alvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Ehlers, Jeffrey D; Higgins, Thomas J V; Romeis, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Dry grain legume seeds possessing ?AI-1, an ?-amylase inhibitor from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), under the control of a cotyledon-specific promoter have been shown to be highly resistant to several important bruchid pest species. One transgenic chickpea and four cowpea lines expressing ?AI-1, their respective controls, as well as nine conventional chickpea cultivars were assessed for their resistance to the bruchids Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say), Callosobruchus chinensis L. and Callosobruchus maculatus F. All transgenic lines were highly resistant to both Callosobruchus species. A. obtectus, known to be tolerant to ?AI-1, was able to develop in all transgenic lines. While the cotyledons of all non-transgenic cultivars were highly susceptible to all bruchids, C. chinensis and C. maculatus larvae suffered from significantly increased mortality rates inside transgenic seeds. The main factor responsible for the partial resistance in the non-transgenic cultivars was deduced to reside in the seed coat. The ?AI-1 present in seeds of transgenic chickpea and cowpea lines significantly increases their resistance to two important bruchid pest species (C. chinensis and C. maculatus) essentially to immunity. To control ?AI-1 tolerant bruchid species such as A. obtectus and to avoid the development of resistance to ?AI-1, varieties carrying this transgene should be protected with additional control measures. PMID:23458831

  17. Species composition and pyrethroid susceptibility status of Anopheles mosquitoes from two different locations in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ho, L Y; Zairi, J

    2013-03-01

    A 14-months survey was carried out to identify the species composition of Anopheles mosquitoes from Kampung Bongor, Grik, Perak. Adding to that, a preliminary one month mosquito population screening was done at Kampung Tepin, Serian, Sarawak. Consequently, the insecticide susceptibility status of a pyrethroid was tested against two selected species of Anopheles collected from these two locations in Malaysia. A total of 4,497 Anopheles from 11 species were identified from collections in Kampung Bongor, whereas 2,654 An. letifer were collected from Kampung Tepin. The An. maculatus of Kampung Bongor and An. letifer of Kampung Tepin were then selected and tested using WHO standard diagnostic test kits and impregnated papers with 0.75% permethrin. The response values of KT50 and KT95 for An. maculatus were recorded at 28.09 minutes and 62.98 minutes respectively. Anopheles letifer recorded much slower response values of KT50 and KT95, which was at 35.09 minutes and 73.03 minutes respectively. Both An. maculatus and An. letifer showed 100% mortality after 24 hours holding period. The results indicate that both species were still susceptible to the tested pyrethroid. For effective vector control and resistance management, accurate and periodic insecticide resistance monitoring should be undertaken especially in rural areas with agricultural usage of insecticides. PMID:23665718

  18. Identification of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Pterodon pubescens with ability to inhibit cowpea weevil digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Diogo P; Casado-Filho, Erivaldo L; Corrêa, Andréa S R; Farias, Luciana R; Bloch, Carlos; de Sa, Maria F Grossi; Mendes, Paulo A M; Quirino, Betania F; Noronha, Eliane F; Franco, Octavio L

    2007-05-30

    Cowpea seeds (Vigna ungiculata) are widely cultivated by poor farmers in Latin America and Africa and are often severely damaged by the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus. A proteinaceous inhibitor of cowpea weevil digestive enzymes, PpAI, was purified from white sucupira seeds (Pterodon pubescens) and biochemically characterized in this study. Proteins were extracted from seeds and precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 100% saturation. This fraction was applied onto a Red-sepharose CL-6B column, and the retained peak showed 70% inhibitory activity toward larval C. maculatus digestive alpha-amylases. The retained peak was then purified using an analytical reversed-phase HPLC column. Purified PpAI showed 65% inhibitory activity against larval C. maculatus enzymes. Enzymatic assays also showed that the purified P. pubescens inhibitor was unable to reduce the activity of mammalian alpha-amylases, suggesting specificity toward insect enzymes. Moreover, artificial seeds containing PpAI were able to reduce larval weight by 36% and cause 55% mortality. Mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE analyses indicated that PpAI showed a molecular mass of approximately 5.0 kDa. This alpha-amylase inhibitor, coming from a native Cerrado plant, could be used to construct a genetically engineered cowpea with enhanced resistance against weevil pests. PMID:17488029

  19. Gram-negative intestinal indigenous microbiota from two Siluriform fishes in a tropical reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Silvana; Silva, Flávia Cristina de Paula e; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Araújo, Francisco Gerson

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of Hypostomus auroguttatus and Pimelodus maculatus, a detritivorous and an omnivorous fish species, respectively, were compared between fishes from the reservoir and the stretch of the river below the dam of the Funil hydroelectric plant, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Four selective culture media were used under aerobic and two under anaerobic conditions. The omnivorous species had microbiota with higher population levels compared to the detritivorous species. The number of morphotypes and population levels of total bacteria, vibrio and Bacteroides tended to be higher in summer and autumn in the reservoir, and not different in the river. The number of morphotypes of enterobacteria and total bacteria were higher in the lotic environment compared with the lentic one. The bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides and the obligate anaerobic Fusobacterium mortiferum were the most frequently identified microorganisms in the intestine of both H. auroguttatus and P. maculatus. Both season and habitat influenced the Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of H. auroguttatus and P. maculatus. Environmental factors influenced the Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of both species with possible impact on the interrelationship between the fishes and their digestive ecosystem, although the gut microbiota composition of fishes may result from host-specific selective pressures within the gut. PMID:25763032

  20. Hearing in Cichlid Fishes under Noise Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ladich, Friedrich; Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Background Hearing thresholds of fishes are typically acquired under laboratory conditions. This does not reflect the situation in natural habitats, where ambient noise may mask their hearing sensitivities. In the current study we investigate hearing in terms of sound pressure (SPL) and particle acceleration levels (PAL) of two cichlid species within the naturally occurring range of noise levels. This enabled us to determine whether species with and without hearing specializations are differently affected by noise. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated auditory sensitivities in the orange chromide Etroplus maculatus, which possesses anterior swim bladder extensions, and the slender lionhead cichlid Steatocranus tinanti, in which the swim bladder is much smaller and lacks extensions. E. maculatus was tested between 0.2 and 3kHz and S. tinanti between 0.1 and 0.5 kHz using the auditory evoked potential (AEP) recording technique. In both species, SPL and PAL audiograms were determined in the presence of quiet laboratory conditions (baseline) and continuous white noise of 110 and 130 dB RMS. Baseline thresholds showed greatest hearing sensitivity around 0.5 kHz (SPL) and 0.2 kHz (PAL) in E. maculatus and 0.2 kHz in S. tinanti. White noise of 110 dB elevated the thresholds by 0–11 dB (SPL) and 7–11 dB (PAL) in E. maculatus and by 1–2 dB (SPL) and by 1–4 dB (PAL) in S. tinanti. White noise of 130 dB elevated hearing thresholds by 13–29 dB (SPL) and 26–32 dB (PAL) in E. maculatus and 6–16 dB (SPL) and 6–19 dB (PAL) in S. tinanti. Conclusions Our data showed for the first time for SPL and PAL thresholds that the specialized species was masked by different noise regimes at almost all frequencies, whereas the non-specialized species was much less affected. This indicates that noise can limit sound detection and acoustic orientation differently within a single fish family. PMID:23469032

  1. ALHAMBRA-survey: a new tool for photo-z calibrations in absence of spec-z information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molino Benito, A.; Benitez Lozano, N.; The Alhambra-Team

    2013-05-01

    La estimación de los desplazamientos al rojo (redshift) de las galaxias, derivados mediante fotometría multi-banda, se conoce con el nombre de photometric redshifts (photo-z). Es bien sabido que la precisión alcanzable por estas técnicas puede verse incrementada si se dispone de una muestra espectroscópica de galaxias (cuyos redshifts (spec-z) sean conocidos) con la que re-calibrar los puntos cero fotométricos. (Coe et al. 2006, Ilbert et al. 2008, Molino et al. 2012 in prep). ALHAMBRA-survey, que es un cartografiado extragaláctico (de ˜4 grados cuadrados) dedicado a la realización de un estudio de la evolución de las propiedades y contenido del Universo (Moles et al. 2005, 2008), presenta solapamientos parciales con otros cartografiados espectroscópicos ya existentes con el objetivo de validar y mejorar la precisión de sus photo-z. Sin embargo, dada la variabilidad fotométrica entre sus campos, resulta ineficiente extrapolar las correcciones de punto cero, introduciendo sesgos de inhomogeneidad en la precisión de los resultados. En este trabajo se presenta una nueva metodología que permite mejorar la calibración de los puntos cero fotométricos mediante la utilización de la información estadística proporcionada por los propios photo-z. Mediante esta técnica resulta posible no sólo mejorar la precisión de las estimaciones sino, además, soslayar la necesidad de obtener grandes muestras espectroscópicas.

  2. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  3. Stocking density influences brain arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) levels in males and females of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Kleszczy?ska, Agnieszka; Kulczykowska, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) are fish neurohormones produced in separate parvocellular and magnocellular preoptic neurons of Teleostei. Apart from well-established peripheral action as hormones they are important neurotransmitters in central nervous system in fish. In the present study, we examined an influence of stocking density on whole brain AVT and IT concentrations in males and females of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). In males, the highest AVT levels have been found at stocking densities of 10 and 30 individuals per 30-l tank. On the other hand, in females, AVT concentration was significantly higher in those kept alone. Brain IT concentrations significantly increased along with stocking density only in females and did not change in males. The sex-dependent responses indicate a different stimulation of AVT and IT neurons in males and females. Consequently, roles of the neurohormones in males and females exposed to stress of overcrowding must be different. PMID:23262273

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Easten hulafish, Trachinops taeniatus (Perciformes: Plesiopidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Rong; Fu, Cuizhang

    2015-10-01

    The first complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Plesiopidae (Teleostei: Perciformes) was determined using the Eastern hulafish Trachinops taeniatus as a representative species of the family. The mitogenome was 16,821?bp in length, including 13 typical vertebrate protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 control region. The gene arrangement was similar to other fishes except for the reversal position of tRNA(Ala) and tRNA(Asn). The overall base composition was 27.4% for A, 27.5% for C, 27.4% for T and 17.7% for G. This mitogenome should contribute to resolving phylogenetic position of Plesiopidae. PMID:24460171

  5. A genomic view of the NOD-like receptor family in teleost fish: Identification of a novel NLR subfamily in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Winton, J.R.; Hansen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Background. A large multigene family of NOD-like receptor (NLR) molecules have been described in mammals and implicated in immunity and apoptosis. Little information, however, exists concerning this gene family in non-mammalian taxa. This current study, therefore, provides an in-depth investigation of this gene family in lower vertebrates including extensive phylogenetic comparison of zebrafish NLRs with orthologs in tetrapods, and analysis of their tissue-specific expression. Results. Three distinct NLR subfamilies were identified by mining genome databases of various non-mammalian vertebrates; the first subfamily (NLR-A) resembles mammalian NODs, the second (NLR-B) resembles mammalian NALPs, while the third (NLR-C) appears to be unique to teleost fish. In zebrafish, NLR-A and NLR-B subfamilies contain five and six genes respectively. The third subfamily is large, containing several hundred NLR-C genes, many of which are predicted to encode a C-terminal B30.2 domain. This subfamily most likely evolved from a NOD3-like molecule. Gene predictions for zebrafish NLRs were verified using sequence derived from ESTs or direct sequencing of cDNA. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed expression of representative genes from each subfamily in selected tissues. Conclusion. Our findings confirm the presence of multiple NLR gene orthologs, which form a large multigene family in teleostei. Although the functional significance of the three major NLR subfamilies is unclear, we speculate that conservation and abundance of NLR molecules in all teleostei genomes, reflects an essential role in cellular control, apoptosis or immunity throughout bony fish. ?? 2008 Laing et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Comparative field evaluation of residual-sprayed deltamethrin WG and deltamethrin WP for the control of malaria in Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rohani, Ahmad; Zamree, Ismail; Lim, Lee Han; Rahini, Hassan; David, Luben; Kamilan, Demin

    2006-11-01

    The bioefficacy of indoor residual-sprayed deltamethrin wettable granule (WG) formulation at 25 mg a.i./m2 and 20 mg a.i./m2 for the control of malaria was compared with the current dose of 20 mg/m2 deltamethrin wettable powder (WP) in aboriginal settlements in Kuala Lipis, Pahang, Malaysia. The malaria vector has been previously identified as Anopheles maculatus. The assessment period for the 20 mg/m2 dosage was six months, but for the 25 mg/m2 dosage, the period was 9 months. Collections of mosquitoes using the bare-leg techniques were carried out indoors and outdoors from 7:00 PM to 7:00 AM. All mosquitoes were dissected for sporozoites and parity. Larval collections were carried out at various locations to assess the extent and distribution of breeding of vectors. A high incidence of human feeds was detected during May 2005 and a low incidence during January 2005 for all the study areas. Our study showed that deltamethrin WG at 25 mg/m2 suppressed An. maculatus biting activity. More An. maculatus were caught in outdoor landing catches than indoor landing catches for all the study areas. The results indicate that 25 mg/m2 WG is good for controlling malaria for up to 9 months. Where residual spraying is envisaged, the usual two spraying cycles per year with 20 mg/m2 deltamethrin may be replaced with 25 mg/m2 deltamethrin WG every 9 months. PMID:17333767

  7. Is There a Risk of Suburban Transmission of Malaria in Selangor, Malaysia?

    PubMed Central

    Braima, Kamil A.; Sum, Jia-Siang; Ghazali, Amir-Ridhwan M.; Muslimin, Mustakiza; Jeffery, John; Lee, Wenn-Chyau; Shaker, Mohammed R.; Elamin, Alaa-Eldeen M.; Jamaiah, Ibrahim; Lau, Yee-Ling; Rohela, Mahmud; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Sitam, Frankie; Mohd-Noh, Rosnida; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The suburban transmission of malaria in Selangor, Malaysia’s most developed and populous state still remains a concern for public health in this region. Despite much successful control efforts directed at its reduction, sporadic cases, mostly brought in by foreigners have continued to occur. In addition, cases of simian malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, some with fatal outcome have caused grave concern to health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of local malaria transmission in suburban regions of Selangor, which are adjacent to secondary rainforests. Findings A malaria survey spanning 7 years (2006 - 2012) was conducted in Selangor. A total of 1623 laboratory confirmed malaria cases were reported from Selangor’s nine districts. While 72.6% of these cases (1178/1623) were attributed to imported malaria (cases originating from other countries), 25.5% (414/1623) were local cases and 1.9% (31/1623) were considered as relapse and unclassified cases combined. In this study, the most prevalent infection was P. vivax (1239 cases, prevalence 76.3%) followed by P. falciparum (211, 13.0%), P. knowlesi (75, 4.6%), P. malariae (71, 4.4%) and P. ovale (1, 0.06%). Mixed infections comprising of P. vivax and P. falciparum were confirmed (26, 1.6%). Entomological surveys targeting the residences of malaria patients’ showed that the most commonly trapped Anopheles species was An. maculatus. No oocysts or sporozoites were found in the An. maculatus collected. Nevertheless, the possibility of An. maculatus being the malaria vector in the investigated locations was high due to its persistent occurrence in these areas. Conclusions Malaria cases reported in this study were mostly imported cases. However the co-existence of local cases and potential Plasmodium spp. vectors should be cause for concern. The results of this survey reflect the need of maintaining closely monitored malaria control programs and continuous extensive malaria surveillance in Peninsula Malaysia. PMID:24194901

  8. A new species of ocellated Xanthias Rathbun, 1897 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Xanthidae) from the Bohol Sea, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jose Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    A new species of xanthid crab (Brachyura: Xanthidae) is described from the Bohol Sea in the central Philippines. Xanthias joanneae sp. nov. is most similar in morphology to X. maculatus Sakai, 1961 (type locality: Sagami Bay, Japan), particularly in the presence of distinctive ocelli on the carapace and pereopods. It can be separated from this species by the greater number of ocelli on the dorsal surface of the carapace, wider teeth separated by narrow notches on the carapace anterolateral margin, absence of longitudinal ridges on the external surface of the chelar palm, shorter and stouter ambulatory legs, narrower male anterior thoracic sternum, and stouter G 1. PMID:26042298

  9. The larvae of European Ascalaphidae (Neuroptera).

    PubMed

    Badano, Davide; Pantaleoni, Roberto Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The larvae of all the European genera of Ascalaphidae are compared for the first time, highlighting the differential characters for identification purposes. The larva of the genus Ascalaphus is described for the first time while those of Puer, Bubopsis and Deleproctophylla are deeply revised. Actually, the larvae of Ascalaphus festivus (Rambur), Puer maculatus (Olivier), Bubopsis agrionoides (Rambur), Deleproctophylla australis (Rambur), Libelloides latinus (Lefebvre), Libelloides corsicus (Rambur) and Libelloides siculus (Angelini) are described or accurately depicted for the first time. The known larvae of the genus Libelloides are reviewed. PMID:24870677

  10. In situ assessment of the paraguay river water, in Brazilian Pantanal, by means of micronucleus assay with fish and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Vânia Maria Sartini Dutra; da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Nepomuceno, Júlio César; Pavanin, Luiz Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this research was to assess water quality in a stretch of the Paraguay River within the Brazilian Pantanal by means of a micronucleus assay with fish, and by water and sediment physicochemical analysis. Significant increases (p >0.05) in the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and micronucleated cells (MNC) occurred in erythrocytes of Pimelodus maculatus and Leporinus friderici at two river sites in the town of Caceres relative to an upstream reference site. The results demonstrate that the Paraguay River water near Caceres has been receiving genotoxic effluents, which may be associated with the presence of chromium, sulfides, oil and grease, and/or other chemicals. PMID:23283532

  11. Abundance of biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicoides spp.) on cattle farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Chung, Joon-Yee; Kwon, Mee-Soon; Kim, Toh-Kyung; Lee, Tae-Uk; Bae, You-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges were collected on three cattle farms weekly using light traps overnight from May to October between 2010 and 2011 in the southern part of Korea. The seasonal and geographical abundance of Culicodes spp. were measured. A total of 16,538 biting midges were collected from 2010 to 2011, including seven species of Culicoides, four of which represented 98.42% of the collected specimens. These four species were Culicodes (C.) punctatus (n = 14,413), C. arakawae (n = 1,120), C. oxystoma (n = 427), and C. maculatus (n = 318). C. punctatus was the predominant species (87.15%). PMID:23388441

  12. Taxonomical notes on selected freshwater fish species described from northern and central Vietnam (Cypriniformes: Balitoridae, Cobitidae, Cyprinidae, Nemacheilidae; Perciformes: Channidae, Osphronemidae; Synbranchiformes: Mastacembelidae).

    PubMed

    Endruweit, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Selected, little known taxa of northern and central Vietnamese freshwater fish species are reviewed. Nomenclatural acts are taken: Hemibarbus lehoai is placed in synonymy of H. maculatus, Paracobitis hagiangensis in synonymy of Schistura caudofurca. A neotype of Micronemacheilus bacmeensis is assigned. The name Channa hanamensis is treated as a nomen nudum. Two labeonine species described from China are nomenclaturally affected: Garra findolabium is transferred to Vinagarra and its specific epithet is treated as a noun in apposition; the specific epithet of Sinigarra napoense is corrected to napoensis. PMID:24668657

  13. Alpha-amylase inhibitors from Ficus sp. seeds and their activities towards coleoptera insect pests.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Ingrid W L; Teixeira, Fabiano M; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Araújo, Carina L; Leite, Edda L; Queiroz, Karla C S; Sales, Maurício P

    2004-04-01

    Alpha-amylase Inhibitors were isolated from Ficus sp. (Gameleira) seeds by acetone fractionation and Sephadex G-50. Two inhibitors (alpha-PPAI and alpha-ZSAI) were tested against alpha-amylases from coleopteran larvae. alpha-PPAI was active to alpha-amylases of Callosobruchus maculatus (52%) and Zabrotes subfasciatus (53%). alpha-ZSAI was strongly active to Z. subfasciatus (100%) of and Mimosestes mimosae (98%). The alpha-ZSAI is a glycoprotein of approximately 50 kDa with an IC50 value of 0.074 microg microl(-1). PMID:15078207

  14. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 December 2011-31 January 2012.

    PubMed

    Arias, M C; Arnoux, E; Bell, James J; Bernadou, Abel; Bino, Giorgia; Blatrix, R; Bourguet, Denis; Carrea, Cecilia; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Cunha, Haydée A; d'Alençon, E; Ding, Yi; Djieto-Lordon, C; Dubois, M P; Dumas, P; Eraud, C; Faivre, B; Francisco, F O; Françoso, E; Garcia, M; Gardner, Jonathan P A; Garnier, S; Gimenez, S; Gold, John R; Harris, D J; He, Guangcun; Hellemans, B; Hollenbeck, Christopher M; Jing, Shengli; Kergoat, G J; Liu, Bingfang; McDowell, Jan R; McKey, D; Miller, Terrence L; Newton, Erica; Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Papetti, Chiara; Paterson, Ian; Peccoud, J; Peng, Xinxin; Piatscheck, F; Ponsard, Sergine; Reece, Kimberly S; Reisser, Céline M O; Renshaw, Mark A; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Sauve, M; Shields, Jeffrey D; Solé-Cava, Antonio; Souche, E L; Van Houdt, J K J; Vasconcellos, Anderson; Volckaert, F A M; Wang, Shuzhen; Xiao, Jie; Yu, Hangjin; Zane, Lorenzo; Zannato, Barbara; Zemlak, Tyler S; Zhang, Chunxiao; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Xi; Zhu, Lili

    2012-05-01

    This article documents the addition of 473 microsatellite marker loci and 71 pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Barteria fistulosa, Bombus morio, Galaxias platei, Hematodinium perezi, Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (a.k.a. M. abdominalis Fab., M. grandii Goidanich or M. gifuensis Ashmead), Micropogonias furnieri, Nerita melanotragus, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, Sciaenops ocellatus, Scomber scombrus, Spodoptera frugiperda and Turdus lherminieri. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barteria dewevrei, Barteria nigritana, Barteria solida, Cynoscion acoupa, Cynoscion jamaicensis, Cynoscion leiarchus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion striatus, Cynoscion virescens, Macrodon ancylodon, Menticirrhus americanus, Nilaparvata muiri and Umbrina canosai. This article also documents the addition of 116 sequencing primer pairs for Dicentrarchus labrax. PMID:22448966

  15. Across the Southern Alps by river capture? Freshwater fish phylogeography in South Island, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Waters, J M; Wallis, G P

    2000-10-01

    We used DNA analysis of galaxiid fish to test a hypothesis of localized headwater capture in South Island, New Zealand. The restricted western, but widespread eastern, distributions of three nonmigratory freshwater fish species suggest that part of the east-flowing Waiau River has been captured by the west-flowing Buller River. However, mitochondrial control region (Kimura 2-parameter distance = 4.1-5.4%) and microsatellite flanking sequences do not support a relationship between Waiau (N = 4 fish sequences) and western populations (N = 8) of Galaxias vulgaris. Instead, the point of capture is probably to the north-east, perhaps the Nelson lakes region. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that western populations, along with populations in the north-east (N = 18), represent a previously unidentified monophyletic Evolutionarily Significant Unit, possibly a cryptic species. We suggest a general caveat for zoogeographic conclusions based on distributional data alone. PMID:11050552

  16. Global biodiversity assessment and hyper-cryptic species complexes: more than one species of elephant in the room?

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark; Raadik, Tarmo A; Burridge, Christopher P; Georges, Arthur

    2014-07-01

    Several recent estimates of global biodiversity have concluded that the total number of species on Earth lies near the lower end of the wide range touted in previous decades. However, none of these recent estimates formally explore the real "elephant in the room", namely, what proportion of species are taxonomically invisible to conventional assessments, and thus, as undiagnosed cryptic species, remain uncountable until revealed by multi-gene molecular assessments. Here we explore the significance and extent of so-called "hyper-cryptic" species complexes, using the Australian freshwater fish Galaxias olidus as a proxy for any organism whose taxonomy ought to be largely finalized when compared to those in little-studied or morphologically undifferentiated groups. Our comprehensive allozyme (838 fish for 54 putative loci), mtDNA (557 fish for 605 bp of cytb), and morphological (1963-3389 vouchers for 17-58 characters) assessment of this species across its broad geographic range revealed a 1500% increase in species-level biodiversity, and suggested that additional taxa may remain undiscovered. Importantly, while all 15 candidate species were morphologically diagnosable a posteriori from one another, single-gene DNA barcoding proved largely unsuccessful as an a priori method for species identification. These results lead us to draw two strong inferences of relevance to estimates of global biodiversity. First, hyper-cryptic complexes are likely to be common in many organismal groups. Second, no assessment of species numbers can be considered "best practice" in the molecular age unless it explicitly includes estimates of the extent of cryptic and hyper-cryptic biodiversity. [Galaxiidae; global estimates; hyper-diverse; mountain galaxias; species counts; species richness.]. PMID:24627185

  17. Virtual Reconstruction and Prey Size Preference in the Mid Cenozoic Thylacinid, Nimbacinus dicksoni (Thylacinidae, Marsupialia)

    PubMed Central

    Attard, Marie R. G.; Parr, William C. H.; Wilson, Laura A. B.; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J.; Rogers, Tracey L.; Wroe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Thylacinidae is an extinct family of Australian and New Guinean marsupial carnivores, comprizing 12 known species, the oldest of which are late Oligocene (?24 Ma) in age. Except for the recently extinct thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), most are known from fragmentary craniodental material only, limiting the scope of biomechanical and ecological studies. However, a particularly well-preserved skull of the fossil species Nimbacinus dicksoni, has been recovered from middle Miocene (?16-11.6 Ma) deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. Here, we ask whether N. dicksoni was more similar to its recently extinct relative or to several large living marsupials in a key aspect of feeding ecology, i.e., was N. dicksoni a relatively small or large prey specialist. To address this question we have digitally reconstructed its skull and applied three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis to compare its mechanical performance with that of three extant marsupial carnivores and T. cynocephalus. Under loadings adjusted for differences in size that simulated forces generated by both jaw closing musculature and struggling prey, we found that stress distributions and magnitudes in the skull of N. dicksoni were more similar to those of the living spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus) than to its recently extinct relative. Considering the Finite Element Analysis results and dental morphology, we predict that N. dicksoni likely occupied a broadly similar ecological niche to that of D. maculatus, and was likely capable of hunting vertebrate prey that may have exceeded its own body mass. PMID:24718109

  18. Virtual reconstruction and prey size preference in the mid Cenozoic thylacinid, Nimbacinus dicksoni (Thylacinidae, Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Attard, Marie R G; Parr, William C H; Wilson, Laura A B; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J; Rogers, Tracey L; Wroe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Thylacinidae is an extinct family of Australian and New Guinean marsupial carnivores, comprizing 12 known species, the oldest of which are late Oligocene (?24 Ma) in age. Except for the recently extinct thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), most are known from fragmentary craniodental material only, limiting the scope of biomechanical and ecological studies. However, a particularly well-preserved skull of the fossil species Nimbacinus dicksoni, has been recovered from middle Miocene (?16-11.6 Ma) deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. Here, we ask whether N. dicksoni was more similar to its recently extinct relative or to several large living marsupials in a key aspect of feeding ecology, i.e., was N. dicksoni a relatively small or large prey specialist. To address this question we have digitally reconstructed its skull and applied three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis to compare its mechanical performance with that of three extant marsupial carnivores and T. cynocephalus. Under loadings adjusted for differences in size that simulated forces generated by both jaw closing musculature and struggling prey, we found that stress distributions and magnitudes in the skull of N. dicksoni were more similar to those of the living spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus) than to its recently extinct relative. Considering the Finite Element Analysis results and dental morphology, we predict that N. dicksoni likely occupied a broadly similar ecological niche to that of D. maculatus, and was likely capable of hunting vertebrate prey that may have exceeded its own body mass. PMID:24718109

  19. Comparative application of direct sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and cytogenetic markers in the genetic characterization of Pimelodus (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae) species: possible implications for fish conservation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M; Bressane, K C O; Moresco, A R C; Moreira-Filho, O; Almeida-Toledo, L F; Garcia, C

    2014-01-01

    Pimelodus (Pimelodidae) is a genus comprising a group of South American species with complex taxonomic relationships. Cytogenetics, polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and sequencing data of mitochondrial genes were analyzed to characterize 4 Pimelodus species: P. fur, P. heraldoi, P. maculatus, and Pimelodus sp. All populations presented 2n=56 chromosomes and distinct karyotypic formulae. The heterochromatin distribution pattern and the number and location of 5S and 18S rDNA sites are discussed. The application of PCR-RFLP markers and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA genes provided species-specific haplotypes, which allowed us to differentiate the species studied. The mitochondrial gene sequences presented nucleotide mutations in the restriction sites and throughout the sequences, and they were mostly related to synonymous substitutions in the coded proteins; however, they did not affect the protein and its function. Comparing the data obtained using these 3 methodologies, the existence of a species complex in P. maculatus along the basins studied might be inferred, showing that cytogenetics is an important tool in studies focusing on the conservation or management of both natural and captive populations of these fishes. PMID:25036358

  20. Characterization and differential expression of CPD and 6-4 DNA photolyases in Xiphophorus species and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Walter, Dylan J; Boswell, Mikki; Volk de García, Sara M; Walter, Sean M; Breitenfeldt, Erik W; Boswell, William; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-06-01

    Among the many Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid tumor models are those that exhibit ultraviolet light (UVB) induced melanoma. In previous studies, assessment of UVB induced DNA damage and nucleotide excision DNA repair has been performed in parental lines and interspecies hybrids. Species and hybrid specific differences in the levels of DNA damage induced and the dark repair rates for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidine photoproducts (6-4PPs) have been reported. However, UVB induced DNA lesions in Xiphophorus fishes are thought to primarily be repaired via light dependent CPD and 6-4PP specific photolyases. Photolyases are of evolutionary interest since they are ancient and presumably function solely to ameliorate the deleterious effects of UVB exposure. Herein, we report results from detailed studies of CPD and 6-4PP photolyase gene expression within several Xiphophorus tissues. We determined photolyase gene expression patterns before and after exposure to fluorescent light in X. maculatus, X. couchianus, and for F1 interspecies hybrids produced from crossing these two parental lines (X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus). We present novel results showing these two photolyase genes exhibit species, tissue, and hybrid-specific differences in basal and light induced gene expression. PMID:24496042

  1. Female germ cell renewal during the annual reproductive cycle in Ostariophysians fish.

    PubMed

    Wildner, Daniel Dantas; Grier, Harry; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to characterize female germ cell renewal during the annual reproductive cycle in two species of ostariophysian fish with distinct reproductive strategies: a siluriform, Pimelodus maculatus, in which oocyte development is group synchronous and the annual reproductive period is short; and a characiform, Serrasalmus maculatus, with asynchronous oocyte development and a prolonged reproductive period. These reproductive strategies result in fish determinate and indeterminate fecundity, respectively. Annual reproductive phases were determined by biometric and histologic analysis of gonads and interpreted according to new proposals for phase classification and stages of oocyte development (with special attention to germinal epithelium activity). Histologically, there were two types of oogonia in the germinal epithelium: single oogonia and those in mitotic proliferation. Oogonial proliferation and their entry into meiosis resulted in formation of cell nests (clusters of cells in the ovarian lamellae). Morphometric analysis was used to estimate germ cell renewal. Based on numbers of single oogonia in the lamellar epithelium, and nests with proliferating oogonia or early prophase oocytes throughout the annual reproductive cycle, oogonial proliferation and entrance into meiosis were more intense during the regenerating phase and developing phase, but decreased sharply (P < 0.05) during the spawning-capable phase. Oogonial proliferation gradually recovered during the regressing phase. We concluded that, independent of species or features of the reproductive cycle, germ cell renewal occurred during the regenerating phase, ensuring availability of eggs for the spawning event. PMID:23317762

  2. Male seminal fluid substances affect sperm competition success and female reproductive behavior in a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Goenaga, Julieta; Rönn, Johanna Liljestrand; Arnqvist, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Male seminal fluid proteins are known to affect female reproductive behavior and physiology by reducing mating receptivity and by increasing egg production rates. Such substances are also though to increase the competitive fertilization success of males, but the empirical foundation for this tenet is restricted. Here, we examined the effects of injections of size-fractioned protein extracts from male reproductive organs on both male competitive fertilization success (i.e., P2 in double mating experiments) and female reproduction in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We found that extracts of male seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 1 day after the females' initial mating, while extracts from accessory glands and testes increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 2 days after the females' initial mating. Moreover, different size fractions of seminal fluid proteins had distinct and partly antagonistic effects on male competitive fertilization success. Collectively, our experiments show that several different seminal fluid proteins, deriving from different parts in the male reproductive tract and of different molecular weight, affect male competitive fertilization success in C. maculatus. Our results highlight the diverse effects of seminal fluid proteins and show that the function of such proteins can be contingent upon female mating status. We also document effects of different size fractions on female mating receptivity and egg laying rates, which can serve as a basis for future efforts to identify the molecular identity of seminal fluid proteins and their function in this model species. PMID:25893888

  3. A three year study on distribution and ecology of Anophelines in Thenzawl, Mizoram, India.

    PubMed

    Zomuanpuii, Rita; Guruswami, Gurusubramanian; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A systematic survey on Anopheline species abundance, bionomics and habitat preference was conducted for three years in Thenzawl, Mizoram. A scoop-net method was employed for larval collection and a local made killing-jar for adults. A total of 10 species Anopheles campestris (25.8%), An. nivipes (24.0%), An. vagus (20.6%), An. jamesii (15.1%), An. jeyporiensis (11.4%), An. maculatus (1.7%), An. philippinensis (0.7%), An. annularis (0.26%), An. sinensis (0.23%) and An. peditaeniatus (0.22%) were collected. The survey site having thick tall grasses, numerous rural-huts as residents, small to relatively larger ponds and very slow running water bodies well shaded from sunlight with floating aquatic plants provided the largest area for Anopheles larvae breeding and accounted for 40% of all Anopheles larva and 25.4% total Anopheles spp. collected. An. campestris (NSK01), maculatus (NSK04), philippinensis (NSK06), nivipes (NSK10) and jeyporiensis (NSK09) were strongly anthropogenic and endophagic while vagus (NSK18) and jamesii (NSK03) were found to be highly zoophilic and exophilic and An. peditaeniatus (NSK02), annularis (NSK07) and sinensis (NSK15) were found to be highly zoophilic. Because of its abundance and bionomics, An. campestris, jeyporiensis and nivipes may have played a role in malarial transmission throughout the year. This is the first study reported on Anopheline distribution and abundance in Thenzawl, Mizoram. PMID:24665764

  4. Male Seminal Fluid Substances Affect Sperm Competition Success and Female Reproductive Behavior in a Seed Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Takashi; Goenaga, Julieta; Rönn, Johanna Liljestrand; Arnqvist, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Male seminal fluid proteins are known to affect female reproductive behavior and physiology by reducing mating receptivity and by increasing egg production rates. Such substances are also though to increase the competitive fertilization success of males, but the empirical foundation for this tenet is restricted. Here, we examined the effects of injections of size-fractioned protein extracts from male reproductive organs on both male competitive fertilization success (i.e., P2 in double mating experiments) and female reproduction in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We found that extracts of male seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 1 day after the females’ initial mating, while extracts from accessory glands and testes increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 2 days after the females’ initial mating. Moreover, different size fractions of seminal fluid proteins had distinct and partly antagonistic effects on male competitive fertilization success. Collectively, our experiments show that several different seminal fluid proteins, deriving from different parts in the male reproductive tract and of different molecular weight, affect male competitive fertilization success in C. maculatus. Our results highlight the diverse effects of seminal fluid proteins and show that the function of such proteins can be contingent upon female mating status. We also document effects of different size fractions on female mating receptivity and egg laying rates, which can serve as a basis for future efforts to identify the molecular identity of seminal fluid proteins and their function in this model species. PMID:25893888

  5. Fumigant Toxicity and Oviposition Deterrency of the Essential Oil from Cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum, Against Three Stored—product Insects

    PubMed Central

    Abbasipour, Habib; Mahmoudvand, Mohammad; Rastegar, Fahimeh; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Use of insecticides can have disruptive effects on the environment. Replacing the chemical compounds in these insecticides with plant materials, however, can be a safe method with low environmental risk. In the current study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum L. (Maton) (Zingiberales: Zingiberaceae) on the adults of three stored product pests was investigated. Results indicated that essential oil of E. cardamomum toxic to the bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Adults of E. kuehniella were more sensitive than the Coleoptera. Also, the highest mortality of these insects was seen after 12 hours. Results of the LT50 tests showed that the lethal time of mortality occurred between 10–20 hours in various test concentrations. Essential oil of E. cardamomum had a good efficacy on oviposition deterrence of C. maculatus females, too. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. The major constituents of cardamom were identified as 1,8-cineol, ?-terpinyl acetate, terpinene and fenchyl alcohol. These results suggest that essential oil of E. cardamomum is a good choice for control of stored product pests. PMID:22242564

  6. Fumigant toxicity and oviposition deterrency of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum, against three stored–product insects.

    PubMed

    Abbasipour, Habib; Mahmoudvand, Mohammad; Rastegar, Fahimeh; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Use of insecticides can have disruptive effects on the environment. Replacing the chemical compounds in these insecticides with plant materials, however, can be a safe method with low environmental risk. In the current study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum L. (Maton) (Zingiberales: Zingiberaceae) on the adults of three stored product pests was investigated. Results indicated that essential oil of E. cardamomum toxic to the bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Adults of E. kuehniella were more sensitive than the Coleoptera. Also, the highest mortality of these insects was seen after 12 hours. Results of the LT?? tests showed that the lethal time of mortality occurred between 10-20 hours in various test concentrations. Essential oil of E. cardamomum had a good efficacy on oviposition deterrence of C. maculatus females, too. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituents of cardamom were identified as 1,8-cineol, ?-terpinyl acetate, terpinene and fenchyl alcohol. These results suggest that essential oil of E. cardamomum is a good choice for control of stored product pests. PMID:22242564

  7. Biological activity of the shrubBoscia senegalensis (PERS.) LAM. ex Poir. (Capparaceae) on stored grain insects.

    PubMed

    Seck, D; Lognay, G; Haubruge, E; Wathelet, J P; Marlier, M; Gaspar, C; Severin, M

    1993-02-01

    Biological activity of leaves, fruits and extract of the African shrubBoscia senegalensis (PERS.) LAM. ex Poir. was evaluated against five stored-grain insects. When added to cowpeas at 2-4% (w/w), fresh ground fruits and leaves caused 80-100% mortality inCallosobruchus maculants (F.) adults and significantly reduced both emergence and damage of the F1 progeny. Acetone fruit extract exhibited a potent fumigant effect onProstephanus truncatus HORN, C.maculatus, andSitotroga cerealella OLIV.; with LT50 values of 3.8, 2.3, and below 1.5 hr, respectively. LC50 determination forB. senegalensis fruits and leaves as well as pure methylisothiocyanate (MITC) onTribolium castaneum HERBST,Sitophilus zeamais MOTSCH. andC. maculatus showed a differential response of the insects to plant parts or MITC. Quantitative dosage ofBoscia active components and LC50 values obtained for the plant tissues, compared to those of pure molecules, indicate that the biological activity ofB. senegalensis is due to the liberation of MITC from a glucosinolate precursor glucocapparin contained inBoscia fruits and leaves. PMID:24248882

  8. Isolation, cDNA cloning, and growth promoting activity of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus) growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Ayson, F G; de Jesus, E G; Amemiya, Y; Moriyama, S; Hirano, T; Kawauchi, H

    2000-02-01

    We report the isolation, cDNA cloning, and growth promoting activity of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus; Teleostei; Perciformes; Siganidae) growth hormone (GH). Rabbitfish GH was extracted from pituitary glands under alkaline conditions, fractionated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100, and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The fractions containing GH were identified by immunoblotting with bonito GH antiserum. Under nonreducing conditions, the molecular weight of rabbitfish GH is about 19 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The purified hormone was potent in promoting growth in rabbitfish fry. Weekly intraperitoneal injections of the hormone significantly accelerated growth. This was evident 3 weeks after the start of the treatment, and its effect was still significant 2 weeks after the treatment was terminated. Rabbitfish GH cDNA was cloned to determine its nucleotide sequence. Excluding the poly (A) tail, rabbitfish GH cDNA is 860 base pairs (bp) long. It contained untranslated regions of 94 and 175 bp in the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. It has an open reading frame of 588 bp coding for a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a mature protein of 178 amino acid residues. Rabbitfish GH has 4 cysteine residues. On the amino acid level, rabbitfish GH shows high identity (71-74%) with GHs of other perciforms, such as tuna, sea bass, yellow tail, bonito, and tilapia, and less (47-49%) identity with salmonid and carp GHs. PMID:10642447

  9. Molecular evolution of GPCRs: Ghrelin/ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery in 1996 of the GH secretagogue-receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) as an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, many research groups attempted to identify the endogenous ligand. Finally, Kojima and colleagues successfully isolated the peptide ligand from rat stomach extracts, determined its structure, and named it ghrelin. The GHS-R1a is now accepted to be the ghrelin receptor. The existence of the ghrelin system has been demonstrated in many animal classes through biochemical and molecular biological strategies as well as through genome projects. Our work, focused on identifying the ghrelin receptor and its ligand ghrelin in laboratory animals, particularly nonmammalian vertebrates, has provided new insights into the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor. In mammals, it is assumed that the ghrelin receptor evolution is in line with the plate tectonics theory. In contrast, the evolution of the ghrelin receptor in nonmammalian vertebrates differs from that of mammals: multiplicity of the ghrelin receptor isoforms is observed in nonmammalian vertebrates only. This multiplicity is due to genome duplication and polyploidization events that particularly occurred in Teleostei. Furthermore, it is likely that the evolution of the ghrelin receptor is distinct from that of its ligand, ghrelin, because only one ghrelin isoform has been detected in all species examined so far. In this review, we summarize current knowledge related to the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:24353285

  10. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-?, IFN-? and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. PMID:25747793

  11. Hybrid origin of gynogenetic clones and the introgression of their mitochondrial genome into sexual diploids through meiotic hybridogenesis in the loach, Misgurnus anguillicuadatus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Aya; Kodo, Yukihiro; Murakami, Masaru; Kuroda, Masamichi; Aoki, Takao; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-11-01

    In a few Japanese populations of the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae), clonal diploid lineages produce unreduced diploid eggs that normally undergo gynogenetic reproduction; however the origin of these clones remains elusive. Here, we show the presence of two diverse clades, A and B, within this loach species from sequence analyses of two nuclear genes RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and IRBP2 (interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, 2) and then demonstrate heterozygous genotypes fixed at the two loci as the evidence of the hybrid nature of clonal lineages. All the clonal individuals were identified by clone-specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, microsatellite genotypes, and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints; they commonly showed two alleles, one from clade A and another from clade B, whereas other wild-type diploids possessed alleles from either clade A or B. However, we also found wild-type diploids with clone-specific mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes from clade B. One possible explanation is an introgression of a clone-specific mitochondrial genome from clonal to these wild-type loaches. These individuals likely arose by a cross between haploid sperm from bisexual B clade males and haploid eggs with clone-specific mtDNA and clade B nuclear genome, produced by meiotic hybridogenesis (elimination of unmatched A genome followed by meiosis after preferential pairing between two matched B genomes) in clone-origin triploid individual (ABB). J. Exp. Zool. 323A: 593-606, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26173834

  12. Identification, structural analysis and function of hyaluronan in developing fish larvae (leptocephali).

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Edward; Toyoda, Hidenao; Williams, Michael D; Nieman, Ronald A

    2002-06-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been identified as the principal glycosaminoglycan (CAG) in the highly hydrated, extracellular body matrix of the larval stage (leptocephalus) of seven species of true eels (Teleostei: Elopomorpha: Anguilliformes) and the ladyfish Elops saurus (Elopiformes), and was found as a minor GAG component in the bonefish Albula sp. (Albuliformes). Identification was based on: (1) HPLC separation of unsaturated disaccharides derived from chondroitinase ABC digests of whole-body GAG extracts; (2) 1H NMR analyses of native GAG polymers; and (3) degradation of GAG extracts by Streptomyces hyaluronan lyase. The unsaturated disaccharide 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(beta-D-gluco-4-enepyranosyluronic acid)-D-glucose (DeltaDi-HA) accounted for 92.4-99.8% of the total disaccharides in chondroitinase digests. Trace amounts of unsaturated disaccharides of chondroitin sulfate were also present. Two-dimensional gCOSY spectra of the native HA polymer were similar for all species. Proton assignments for the HA disaccharide repeat (GlcAbeta1-3GlcNAcbeta1-4) in D(2)O, based on gCOSY, DQF-COSY and TOCSY analyses for the eel Ahlia egmontis, were concordant with published chemical shifts for HA oligosaccharides. In addition to its presumed role in maintaining the structural integrity and hydration of the gelatinous body of the leptocephalus, HA is postulated to function as a storage polysaccharide in those species in which it is the predominant GAG. PMID:12031471

  13. Plasticity of gene expression according to salinity in the testis of broodstock and F1 black-chinned tilapia, Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii

    PubMed Central

    Guinand, Bruno; Dugué, Rémi; Cosson, Jacky; Legendre, Marc; Panfili, Jacques; Durand, Jean-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The black-chinned tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii Rüppell 1852 (Teleostei, Cichlidae) displays remarkable acclimation capacities. When exposed to drastic changes of salinity, which can be the case in its natural habitat, it develops quick physiological responses and keeps reproducing. The present study focused on the physiological impact of salinity on male reproductive capacities, using gene expression as a proxy of acclimation process. Two series of experimental fish were investigated: the first one was composed of fish maintained in freshwater for several generations and newly acclimated to salinities of 35 and 70, whereas the second one consisted of the descendants of the latter born and were raised under their native salinity. Expression patterns of 43 candidate genes previously identified from the testes of wild males was investigated in the three salinities and two generations. Twenty of them showed significant expression differences between salinities, and their predicted function revealed that most of them are involved in the osmotic tolerance of sperm cells and/or in the maintenance of sperm motility. A high level of expression variation was evidenced, especially for fish maintained in freshwater. In spite of this, gene expression patterns allowed the differentiation between fish raised in freshwater and those maintained in hypersaline water in both generations. Altogether, the results presented here suggest that this high variability of expression is likely to ensure the reproductive success of this species under varying salinities. PMID:25548735

  14. Otolithic apparatus of tetrapods after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychakov, Dmitri

    In vertebrates the otolithic membrane is formed of three components: the gelatinous layer, the subcupular meshwork and the otolithic apparatus (Fermin et al., 1998; Lim, 1974; Lindeman, 1969; Lychakov, 1988, 2002). The otolithic apparatus consists of a set of small crystalline otoconia (Tetrapoda), or a single large crystalline otolith (Teleostei). Despite similar functions, the otoconia (Tetrapoda) and otolith otolithic apparatus differ significantly in their embryogenesis, postembryonic growth, chemical composition, etc. It may be suggested that the gravitational challenges may have different effects on otoconia or otoliths. Unfortunately, we have only a few quantitative data on structural adaptation of tetrapod otolithic apparatus to microgravity (Lychakov, 2002; Lychakov, Lavrova,1985; Wiederhold et al., 1997). The BION-M1 provides an opportunity for a quantitative morphological analysis of otolithic apparatus of adult mice exposed to 30 days in a biosatellite on orbit. We expect to analyse otoconia of utriculus and sacculus. Our principal aims are to investigate the morphological characteristics of otoconia. We expect to get novel insights in microgravity induced otoconia adaptation of tetrapods. This work was partly supported by Russian grant RFFI 14-04-00601.

  15. MicroRNA in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bizuayehu, Teshome Tilahun; Babiak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators involved in nearly all known biological processes in distant eukaryotic clades. Their discovery and functional characterization have broadened our understanding of biological regulatory mechanisms in animals and plants. They show both evolutionary conserved and unique features across Metazoa. Here, we present the current status of the knowledge about the role of miRNA in development, growth, and physiology of teleost fishes, in comparison to other vertebrates. Infraclass Teleostei is the most abundant group among vertebrate lineage. Fish are an important component of aquatic ecosystems and human life, being the prolific source of animal proteins worldwide and a vertebrate model for biomedical research. We review miRNA biogenesis, regulation, modifications, and mechanisms of action. Specific sections are devoted to the role of miRNA in teleost development, organogenesis, tissue differentiation, growth, regeneration, reproduction, endocrine system, and responses to environmental stimuli. Each section discusses gaps in the current knowledge and pinpoints the future directions of research on miRNA in teleosts. PMID:25053657

  16. Sperm morphology, motility, and velocity in naturally occurring polyploid European weatherfish (Misgurnus fossilis L.).

    PubMed

    Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Drozd, Bo?ek; Hatef, Azadeh; Flajšhans, Martin

    2013-07-15

    Spontaneous polyploidy has been frequently documented in various fish species. This process may lead to disruption in testicular development and function. In the present study, sperm morphology and motility, elements critical to male fertility, were characterized in the naturally occurring triploid (3n) and tetraploid (4n) European weatherfish, Misgurnus fossilis L. (Teleostei, Cobitidae) inhabiting the upper reaches of the Lužnice River in the Czech Republic. Sperm with smaller heads, shorter flagella, and a lower number of mitochondria was observed in 3n specimens compared with 4n, but no differences were observed in size of midpiece or ultrastructure of sperm. Similar to most teleosts, the European weatherfish spermatozoon lacked an acrosome and consisted of a head (containing DNA), a midpiece (containing mitochondria and proximal and distal centrioles), and a flagellum with 9 + 2 microtubular structure. Sperm velocity was significantly lower in individuals with 4n compared with 3n, whereas no difference in sperm motility was observed. The stepwise linear regression reported significant negative correlations between sperm velocity and length of sperm head (r = -0.92, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the data reported no effect of polyploidy on sperm ultrastructure and motility in the European weatherfish, although it can affect sperm velocity, possibly through differences in head size and the number of mitochondria, which provide ATP for sperm movement. PMID:23664795

  17. Sequencing, de novo annotation and analysis of the first Anguilla anguilla transcriptome: EeelBase opens new perspectives for the study of the critically endangered european eel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Once highly abundant, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.; Anguillidae; Teleostei) is considered to be critically endangered and on the verge of extinction, as the stock has declined by 90-99% since the 1980s. Yet, the species is poorly characterized at molecular level with little sequence information available in public databases. Results The first European eel transcriptome was obtained by 454 FLX Titanium sequencing of a normalized cDNA library, produced from a pool of 18 glass eels (juveniles) from the French Atlantic coast and two sites in the Mediterranean coast. Over 310,000 reads were assembled in a total of 19,631 transcribed contigs, with an average length of 531 nucleotides. Overall 36% of the contigs were annotated to known protein/nucleotide sequences and 35 putative miRNA identified. Conclusions This study represents the first transcriptome analysis for a critically endangered species. EeelBase, a dedicated database of annotated transcriptome sequences of the European eel is freely available at http://compgen.bio.unipd.it/eeelbase. Considering the multiple factors potentially involved in the decline of the European eel, including anthropogenic factors such as pollution and human-introduced diseases, our results will provide a rich source of data to discover and identify new genes, characterize gene expression, as well as for identification of genetic markers scattered across the genome to be used in various applications. PMID:21080939

  18. On the status of the Serranid fish genus Epinephelus: evidence for paraphyly based upon 16S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Craig, M T; Pondella, D J; Franck, J P; Hafner, J C

    2001-04-01

    Historically, attempts to elucidate evolutionary relationships among members of the genus Epinephelus (Teleostei: Serranidae), commonly known as groupers, have been hindered by the overwhelming number of species (98, sensu stricto), a pan global distribution, and the lack of morphological specializations traditionally used in ichthyological classification. To date, no comprehensive phylogenetic study, morphological or molecular, to evaluate the monophyly of this genus has been presented. In this study, previous hypotheses regarding the relationships among the American grouper species and the allied genera were evaluated by examination of mitochondrial DNA sequences of the 16S ribosomal DNA region. A 590-bp region of the 16S rDNA gene was amplified using a universal primer pair for 42 serranid species, including members of the genera Epinephelus, Mycteroperca, and Paranthias from the New World and selected Indo-Pacific congeners. Maximum-parsimony criteria and neighbor-joining analysis dispute the monophyly of the American Epinephelus species as previously hypothesized. The data support the monophyly of Cephalopholis only with the inclusion of the morphologically distinct Paranthias and the monophyly of Mycteroperca with the inclusion of the Indo-Pacific Anyperodon leucogrammicus. PMID:11286497

  19. Advances in genomics of bony fish

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Hans J.; Dirks, Ron P.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances of genomic technologies applied to studies of fish species belonging to the superclass of Osteichthyes (bony fish) with a major emphasis on the infraclass of Teleostei, also called teleosts. This superclass that represents more than 50% of all known vertebrate species has gained considerable attention from genome researchers in the last decade. We discuss many examples that demonstrate that this highly deserved attention is currently leading to new opportunities for answering important biological questions on gene function and evolutionary processes. In addition to giving an overview of the technologies that have been applied for studying various fish species we put the recent advances in genome research on the model species zebrafish and medaka in the context of its impact for studies of all fish of the superclass of Osteichthyes. We thereby want to illustrate how the combined value of research on model species together with a broad angle perspective on all bony fish species will have a huge impact on research in all fields of fundamental science and will speed up applications in many societally important areas such as the development of new medicines, toxicology test systems, environmental sensing systems and sustainable aquaculture strategies. PMID:24291769

  20. A new stem-neopterygian fish from the Middle Triassic of China shows the earliest over-water gliding strategy of the vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Gao, Ke-Qin; Wu, Fei-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Flying fishes are extraordinary aquatic vertebrates capable of gliding great distances over water by exploiting their enlarged pectoral fins and asymmetrical caudal fin. Some 50 species of extant flying fishes are classified in the Exocoetidae (Neopterygii: Teleostei), which have a fossil record no older than the Eocene. The Thoracopteridae is the only pre-Cenozoic group of non-teleosts that shows an array of features associated with the capability of over-water gliding. Until recently, however, the fossil record of the Thoracopteridae has been limited to the Upper Triassic of Austria and Italy. Here, we report the discovery of exceptionally well-preserved fossils of a new thoracopterid flying fish from the Middle Triassic of China, which represents the earliest evidence of an over-water gliding strategy in vertebrates. The results of a phylogenetic analysis resolve the Thoracopteridae as a stem-group of the Neopterygii that is more crown-ward than the Peltopleuriformes, yet more basal than the Luganoiiformes. As the first record of the Thoracopteride in Asia, this new discovery extends the geographical distribution of this group from the western to eastern rim of the Palaeotethys Ocean, providing new evidence to support the Triassic biological exchanges between Europe and southern China. Additionally, the Middle Triassic date of the new thoracopterid supports the hypothesis that the re-establishment of marine ecosystems after end-Permian mass extinction is more rapid than previously thought. PMID:23118437

  1. Diets and trophic-guild structure of a diverse fish assemblage in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Buchheister, A; Latour, R J

    2015-03-01

    Dietary habits and trophic-guild structure were examined in a fish assemblage (47 species) of the Chesapeake Bay estuary, U.S.A., using 10 years of data from >25 000 fish stomachs. The assemblage was comprised of 10 statistically significant trophic guilds that were principally differentiated by the relative amounts of Mysida, Bivalvia, Polychaeta, Teleostei and other Crustacea in the diets. These guilds were broadly aggregated into five trophic categories: piscivores, zooplanktivores, benthivores, crustacivores and miscellaneous consumers. Food web structure was largely dictated by gradients in habitat (benthic to pelagic) and prey size. Size classes within piscivorous species were more likely to be classified into different guilds, reflecting stronger dietary changes through ontogeny relative to benthivores and other guilds. Relative to predator species and predator size, the month of sampling had negligible effects on dietary differences within the assemblage. A majority of sampled fishes derived most of their nutrition from non-pelagic prey sources, suggesting a strong coupling of fish production to benthic and demersal food resources. Mysida (predominantly the opossum shrimp Neomysis americana) contributed substantially to the diets of over 25% of the sampled predator groups, indicating that this species is a critical, but underappreciated, node in the Chesapeake Bay food web. PMID:25627041

  2. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected. PMID:20535520

  3. Reliable micro-measurement of strontium is the key to cracking the life-history code in the fish otolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, A.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.; Trompetter, W. J.; Dioses, T.; Gauldie, R. W.

    2000-05-01

    The fish otolith is a calcium carbonate (usually aragonite) crystal that grows continuously by accretion over the life of the fish and unlike bone is not continuously re-metabolised. Consequently, the otolith has long been regarded as a potential store of information about the life history of an individual fish, and this information is encoded in the deposition pattern of trace elements in the otolith. The code has been difficult to crack. However, recent developments have show that: (1) Sr is one of the few non-mobile trace elements in the otolith; and (2) the pattern of Sr deposition summarises the effects of environment changes that affect the growth rate of the otolith crystal. The remaining difficulties in cracking the chemical code in the otolith have hinged about making reliable micro-measurements of the stable Sr content at spatial resolutions of 10 ?m or less; this interval represents about 4-6 days of otolith growth in most species of fish. This paper describes high beam resolution 2 ?m linear measurements, and 6 ?m square measurements over narrow windows of about 300 ?m square, and links these micro-measures to macro-measures of 2D maps of the entire surface of sections of otoliths up to 5 mm square at beam resolutions of 25 ?m square. The otoliths used in this study are from the Jurel, or Peruvian Jack mackerel, Trachurus murphyi (Carangidae: Teleostei).

  4. Duality of gonadotropins in gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Quérat, B; Tonnerre-Doncarli, C; Géniès, F; Salmon, C

    2001-12-01

    The glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit and two beta subunits were cloned from the ventral lobe of the pituitary gland of an elasmobranch fish, Scyliorhinus canicula. The mature alpha subunit was 96 amino acids long and showed 64-76 amino acid residues in common with alpha subunit sequences of representatives of sarcopterygians (tetrapods and dipnoi) and actinopterigyans (chondrostei and teleostei). The Scyliorhinus beta 1 subunit was 115 amino acid long and had characteristics specific to FSH beta subunits and, in particular, the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in conserved positions. The beta 2 sequence was 112 amino acids long. The Scyliorhinus beta 2 subunit had only one potential N-linked glycosylation site at the same position as that in LH. None of the two beta subunits from Scyliorhinus displayed the two amino acid insertions shared by TSH beta subunit sequences between the fifth and the sixth cysteines as compared to actinopterygian and sarcopterygian gonadotropins. These data indicate that Scyliorhinus beta 1 and beta 2 subunits are orthologous to FSH and LH beta subunits, respectively. It is concluded that the two FSH and LH lineages were already individualized at the emergence of chondrichthyans. PMID:11742514

  5. Beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera) associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, W E; Alves, A C F; Creão-Duarte, A J

    2014-08-01

    The species richness, abundance and seasonality of Coleoptera fauna associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area were examined. Tray, pitfall and modified Shannon traps were settled together to collect these insects during two seasons (dry and rainy). 4,851 beetles were collected, belonging to 19 families and 88 species. Staphylinidae (2,184) and Histeridae (1,264) were the most abundant families and accounted for 71.1% of the specimens collected. Scarabaeidae (15) showed the highest species richness. The most abundant species were Atheta iheringi Bernhauer, 1908 (Staphylinidae) (1,685), Euspilotus sp. (Histeridae) (461), Stelidota geminata (Say, 1825) (Nitidulidae) (394), Xerosaprinus diptychus (Marseul, 1855) (Histeridae) (331) and Dermestes maculatus De Geer, 1774 (Dermestidae). Amongst these species, X. diptychus showed to be strongly influenced by seasonality, since 96.1% of the specimens were collected during the dry season. PMID:25296214

  6. Osteology and ontogeny of the wrymouths, genus Cryptacanthodes (Cottiformes: Zoarcoidei: Cryptacanthodidae).

    PubMed

    Schnell, Nalani K; Hilton, Eric J

    2015-02-01

    The four species included in the family Cryptacanthodidae are eel-like, burrowing fishes distributed in the cold-temperate coastal waters of the North Pacific and the western North Atlantic. This study describes the osteology and aspects of the ontogenetic skeletal development of two species, Cryptacanthodes maculatus from the western North Atlantic and C. aleutensis from the eastern North Pacific. We discuss the relationships of Cryptacanthodidae among other zoarcoid families. The Cryptacanthodidae have been previously included in the Stichaeidae, but removed and classified as a separate family based on the skull, pectoral radial, and cephalic lateral-line morphology. Our observations (similarities in gill arch and pectoral girdle morphology; specifically, a thin sheet-like flange of bone from the posterior margin of the supracleithrum) suggest a close relationship to at least some of the members of the family Stichaeidae. PMID:25327966

  7. Permanent genetic resources added to molecular ecology resources database 1 December 2012-31 January 2013.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Silvia E; Avarre, Jean-Christophe; Balasundaram, Chellam; Bouza, Carmen; Calcaterra, Nora B; Cezilly, Frank; Chen, Shi-long; Cipriani, Guido; Cruz, V P; D'Esposito, D; Daniel, Carla; Dejean, Alain; Dharaneedharan, Subramanian; Díaz, Juan; Du, Man; Durand, Jean-Dominique; Dziadek, Jaros?aw; Foresti, F; Peng-cheng, Fu; Gao, Qing-bo; García, Graciela; Gauffre-Autelin, Pauline; Giovino, Antonio; Goswami, Mukunda; Guarino, Carmine; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Verónica; Harris, D J; Heo, Moon-Soo; Khan, Gulzar; Kim, Mija; Lakra, Wazir S; Lauth, Jérémie; Leclercq, Pierre; Lee, Jeonghwa; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soohyung; Lee, Theresa; Li, Yin-hu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Shufang; Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Mandhan, Rishi Pal; Martinez, Paulino; Mayer, Veronika E; Mendel, Jan; Mendes, N J; Mendonça, F F; Minias, Alina; Minias, Piotr; Oh, Kyeong-Suk; Oliveira, C; Orivel, Jérôme; Orsini, L; Pardo, Belén G; Perera, A; Procaccini, G; Rato, C; Ríos, Néstor; Scibetta, Silvia; Sharma, Bhagwati S; Sierens, Tim; Singh, Akhilesh; Terer, Taita; Triest, Ludwig; Urbánková, So?a; Vera, Manuel; Villanova, Gabriela V; Voglmayr, Hermann; Vysko?ilová, Martina; Wang, Hongying; Wang, Jiu-li; Wattier, Rémi A; Xing, Rui; Yadav, Kamalendra; Yin, Guibo; Yuan, Yanjiao; Yun, Jong-Chul; Zhang, Fa-qi; Zhang, Jing-hua; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2013-05-01

    This article documents the addition of 268 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alburnoides bipunctatus, Chamaerops humilis, Chlidonias hybrida, Cyperus papyrus, Fusarium graminearum, Loxigilla barbadensis, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Odontesthes bonariensis, Pelteobagrus vachelli, Posidonia oceanica, Potamotrygon motoro, Rhamdia quelen, Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii, Sibiraea angustata, Takifugu rubripes, Tarentola mauritanica, Trimmatostroma sp. and Wallago attu. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Alburnoides fasciatus, Alburnoides kubanicus, Alburnoides maculatus, Alburnoides ohridanus, Alburnoides prespensis, Alburnoides rossicus, Alburnoides strymonicus, Alburnoides thessalicus, Alburnoides tzanevi, Carassius carassius, Fusarium asiaticum, Leucaspius delineatus, Loxigilla noctis dominica, Pelecus cultratus, Phoenix canariensis, Potamotrygon falkneri, Trachycarpus fortune and Vimba vimba. PMID:23521844

  8. Biochemical characteristics of four marine fish skins in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Kwon; Jin, Young-Guk; Rha, Sung-Ju; Kim, Seon-Jae; Hwang, Jae-Ho

    2014-09-15

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the fish skins of four industrial species: olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli), sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) and red sea bream (Pagrus major). There is high domestic demand in Korea for farming of these fish for human consumption. Crude protein contents in the skin of these fish ranged from 73% to 94% by dry weight; this was in part due to a high content of the structural protein, collagen. Among the four species, olive flounder had the thickest dermal and epidermal layers in the dorsal skin. This species was also associated with the highest extraction ratio of acid-soluble collagen. We also examined whether fish skin could be a cost-effective alternative to current fish meal sources. Our analysis indicates that, when supplemented with additional fish oils and essential amino acids, fish skin is a viable alternative for fish meal formulations. PMID:24767045

  9. Transcriptomic response of cowpea bruchids to N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hua; Chi, Yong Hun; Guo, Feng-Guang; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Balfe, Susan; Fang, Ji-Chao; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2015-02-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) are N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins. Previous studies demonstrated that they have anti-insect activity, a property potentially useful in pest control. To gain some insight into the insect response to dietary lectins, we performed transcriptomic analysis using the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) midgut microarray platform we built. Compared to the nonnutritional cellulose treatment, dietary lectins induced more profound changes in gene expression. Ingestion of relatively high doses of lectins for 24 h resulted in alteration of gene expression involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, transport, development, defense, and stress tolerance. Metabolic genes were largely downregulated. Moreover, we observed disorganized microvilli resulting from ingestion of WGA. This morphological change is consistent with the lectin-induced changes in genes related to midgut epithelial cell repair. In addition, suboptimal nutrient conditions may serve as a stress signal to trigger senescence processes, leading to growth arrest and developmental delay. PMID:24446316

  10. Highly variable insect control efficacy of Tephrosia vogelii chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Belmain, Steven R; Amoah, Barbara A; Nyirenda, Stephen P; Kamanula, John F; Stevenson, Philip C

    2012-10-10

    Tephrosia vogelii has been used for generations as a pest control material in Africa. Recently, two chemotypes have been reported based on the occurrence (chemotype 1) or absence (chemotype 2) of rotenoids. This could have an impact on the efficacy and reliability of this material for pest control. We report that chemotype 2 has no pesticidal activity against Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (family Chrysomelidae) and that this is associated with the absence of rotenoids. We present a first report of the comparative biological activity of deguelin, tephrosin, ?-toxicarol, and sarcolobine and show that not all rotenoids are equally effective. Tephrosin was less toxic than deguelin which was less active than rotenone, while obovatin 5-methyl ether, the major flavonoid in chemotype 2 was inactive. We also report that in chemotype 1 the occurrence of rotenoids shows substantial seasonal variation. PMID:22970736

  11. Global genetic differentiation in a cosmopolitan pest of stored beans: effects of geography, host-plant usage and anthropogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Tuda, Midori; Kagoshima, Kumiko; Toquenaga, Yukihiko; Arnqvist, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Genetic differentiation can be promoted allopatrically by geographic isolation of populations due to limited dispersal ability and diversification over time or sympatrically through, for example, host-race formation. In crop pests, the trading of crops across the world can lead to intermixing of genetically distinct pest populations. However, our understanding of the importance of allopatric and sympatric genetic differentiation in the face of anthropogenic genetic intermixing is limited. Here, we examined global sequence variation in two mitochondrial and one nuclear genes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus that uses different legumes as hosts. We analyzed 180 samples from 42 populations of this stored bean pest from tropical and subtropical continents and archipelagos: Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, Oceania and South America. For the mitochondrial genes, there was weak but significant genetic differentiation across continents/archipelagos. Further, we found pronounced differentiation among subregions within continents/archipelagos both globally and within Africa but not within Asia. We suggest that multiple introductions into Asia and subsequent intermixing within Asia have generated this pattern. The isolation by distance hypothesis was supported globally (with or without continents controlled) but not when host species was restricted to cowpeas Vigna unguiculata, the ancestral host of C. maculatus. We also document significant among-host differentiation both globally and within Asia, but not within Africa. We failed to reject a scenario of a constant population size in the recent past combined with selective neutrality for the mitochondrial genes. We conclude that mitochondrial DNA differentiation is primarily due to geographic isolation within Africa and to multiple invasions by different alleles, followed by host shifts, within Asia. The weak inter-continental differentiation is most likely due to frequent inter-continental gene flow mediated by human crop trade. PMID:25180499

  12. Adaptation to a novel host by a seed beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae): effect of source population.

    PubMed

    Messina, Frank J; Durham, Susan L

    2013-08-01

    Geographic populations of a widespread species can differ in their ability to adapt to a novel environment because they possess different amounts of the requisite genetic variation. We compared responses to the same novel host in ecologically and genetically divergent populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). Populations from Africa and Asia had been derived from and maintained on different legume hosts. In preselection assays, both populations exhibited lower survival, slower development, and smaller size on a third host (adzuki bean), and the difference in performance between the ancestral and novel hosts was especially high for the African population. Replicate lines of each population were switched to adzuki bean or maintained on the ancestral host, and beetle performance was measured on both hosts after 12 generations. Survival on adzuki bean increased substantially in the adzuki-bean lines of the African population, but improved only slightly in the Asian lines. Similarly, only the African adzuki-bean lines exhibited significantly faster development on adzuki bean. Improved performance on adzuki bean did not simultaneously reduce performance on the ancestral host. Together with previous studies, these results confirm that populations of C. maculatus often possess sufficient standing genetic variation for rapid adaptation to a novel host, but the magnitude of the response may depend on the source population. Although international trade in grain legumes can expand beetle host ranges and produce unusual biotypes, the consistent absence of strong genetic trade-offs in larval performance or adult oviposition across hosts makes it unlikely that this insect would form distinct host races. PMID:23905736

  13. Organochlorines and metals induce changes in the mitochondria-rich cells of fish gills: an integrative field study involving chemical, biochemical and morphological analyses.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M N; Paulino, M G; Sakuragui, M M; Ramos, C A; Pereira, C D S; Sadauskas-Henrique, H

    2013-01-15

    Through integrating chemical, biochemical and morphological analyses, this study investigated the effects of multiple pollutants on the gill mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in two fish species, Astyanax fasciatus and Pimelodus maculatus, collected from five sites (FU10, FU20, FU30, FU40 and FU50) in the Furnas Hydroelectric Power Station reservoir. Water analyses revealed aluminum, iron and zinc as well as organochlorine (aldrin/dieldrin, endosulfan, heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide and metolachlor) contamination at all of the sites, with the exception of FU10. Copper, chrome, iron and zinc were detected in the gills of both species, and aldrin/dieldrin, endosulfan and heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide were detected in the gills of fish from all of the sites, with the exception of FU10. Fish collected at FU20, FU30 and FU50 exhibited numerous alterations in the surface architecture of their pavement cells and MRCs. The surface MRC density and MRC fractional area were lower in fish from FU20, FU30, FU40 and FU50 than in those from the reference site (FU10) in the winter, and some variability between the sites was observed in the summer. The organochlorine contamination at FU20 and FU50 was associated with variable changes in the MRCs and inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, especially in P. maculatus. At FU30, the alterations in the MRCs were associated with the contaminants present, especially metals. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a positive association between the biological responses of both species and environmental contamination, indicating that under realistic conditions, a mixture of organochlorines and metals affected the MRCs by inhibiting NKA activity and inducing morphological changes, which may cause an ionic imbalance. PMID:23220410

  14. Odour-Mediated Orientation of Beetles Is Influenced by Age, Sex and Morph

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Sarah E. J.; Stevenson, Philip C.; Belmain, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour of insects is dictated by a combination of factors and may vary considerably between individuals, but small insects are often considered en masse and thus these differences can be overlooked. For example, the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus F. exists naturally in two adult forms: the active (flight) form for dispersal, and the inactive (flightless), more fecund but shorter-lived form. Given that these morphs show dissimilar biology, it is possible that they differ in odour-mediated orientation and yet studies of this species frequently neglect to distinguish morph type, or are carried out only on the inactive morph. Along with sex and age of individual, adult morph could be an important variable determining the biology of this and similar species, informing studies on evolution, ecology and pest management. We used an olfactometer with motion-tracking to investigate whether the olfactory behaviour and orientation of C. maculatus towards infested and uninfested cowpeas and a plant-derived repellent compound, methyl salicylate, differed between morphs or sexes. We found significant differences between the behaviour of male and female beetles and beetles of different ages, as well as interactive effects of sex, morph and age, in response to both host and repellent odours. This study demonstrates that behavioural experiments on insects should control for sex and age, while also considering differences between adult morphs where present in insect species. This finding has broad implications for fundamental entomological research, particularly when exploring the relationships between physiology, behaviour and evolutionary biology, and the application of crop protection strategies. PMID:23145074

  15. Exposure to fluorescent light triggers down regulation of genes involved with mitotic progression in Xiphophorus skin.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ronald B; Walter, Dylan J; Boswell, William T; Caballero, Kaela L; Boswell, Mikki; Lu, Yuan; Chang, Jordan; Savage, Markita G

    2015-12-01

    We report RNA-Seq results from skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B after exposure to various doses of "cool white" fluorescent light (FL). We show that FL exposure incites a genetic transcriptional response in skin nearly as great as observed for UVB exposure; however, the gene sets modulated due to exposure to the two light sources are quite different. Known light responsive genes involved in maintaining circadian cycling (e.g., clock, cry2a, cry1b, per1b, per2, per3, and arntl1a) exhibited expected shifts in transcriptional expression upon FL exposure. Exposure to FL also resulted in down-regulated transcription of many genes involved with cell cycle progression (e.g., cdc20, cdc45, cdca7b, plk1, cdk1, ccnb-3, and cdca7a) and chromosome segregation (e.g., cenpe, cenpf, cenpi, cenpk, cenpo, cenpp, and cenpu; cep70; knstrm, kntc, mcm2, mcm5; smc2). In addition, several DNA replication and recombination repair genes (e.g., pola1, pole, rec52, rad54l, rpa1, and parpbp) exhibit reduced expression in FL exposed X. maculatus skin. Some genes down modulated by FL are known to be associated with DNA repair and human diseases (e.g., atm2, brip1, fanc1, fancl, and xrcc4). The overall suppression of genes involved with mitotic progression in the skin of adult fish is consistent with entry into the light phase of the circadian cycle. Current efforts are aimed at determining specific wavelengths that may lead to differential expression among the many genes affected by fluorescent light exposure. PMID:26334372

  16. Geology shapes biogeography: Quaternary river-capture explains New Zealand's biologically 'composite' Taieri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Jonathan M.; Wallis, Graham P.; Burridge, Christopher P.; Craw, Dave

    2015-07-01

    Geological processes are hypothesised to strongly affect species distributions. In particular, a combination of geological and biological data has suggested that tectonic processes can drive vicariant isolation and speciation in freshwater-limited taxa. Here we synthesise geological and biological evidence to demonstrate a composite geological and biological history for New Zealand's 290-km long Taieri River. Specifically, we assess evidence from structural geology and petrology, combined with phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of galaxiid fishes, to show that the modern Taieri River was formed via capture of the ancestral Kye Burn during the mid-late Quaternary. Molecular dating analyses support a late-Quaternary timeframe for the geologically-mediated divergence between formerly-connected sister taxa Galaxias depressiceps and G. 'teviot'. Fish biogeography lends further support to the geological hypothesis, as there is a substantial biogeographic disjunction between the lower- (ancestral) and upper (captured) portions of the Taieri River. Geological and biological data are assessed independently yet yield consilient patterns and timeframes for the evolutionary events inferred. Broadly, this study highlights the interplay between physical and biological processes in a geologically dynamic setting.

  17. New cluster members and halo stars of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Colin A.; Martell, Sarah L.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 1851 is an intriguing Galactic globular cluster, with multiple stellar evolutionary sequences, light and heavy element abundance variations and indications of a surrounding stellar halo. We present the first results of a spectroscopic study of red giant stars within and outside of the tidal radius of this cluster. Our results identify nine probable new cluster members (inside the tidal radius) with heliocentric radial velocities consistent with that of NGC 1851. We also identify, based on their radial velocities, four probable extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜3.1 times the tidal radius, which are supportive of previous findings that NGC 1851 is surrounded by an extended stellar halo. Proper motions were available for 12 of these 13 stars and all are consistent with that of NGC 1851. Apart from the cluster members and cluster halo stars, our observed radial velocity distribution agrees with the expected distribution from a Besançon disc/N-body stellar halo Milky Way model generated by the GALAXIA code, suggesting that no other structures at different radial velocities are present in our field. The metallicities of these stars are estimated using equivalent width measurements of the near-infrared calcium triplet absorption lines and are found, within the limitations of this method, to be consistent with that of NGC 1851. In addition we recover 110 red giant cluster members from previous studies based on their radial velocities and identify three stars with unusually high radial velocities.

  18. CCD UBVRI photometry of NGC 6811

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Bostanc?, Z. F.; Ak, T.; Karaali, S.; Güver, T.; Ak, S.; Duran, ?.; Paunzen, E.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of CCD UBVRI observations of the open cluster NGC 6811 obtained on 18th July 2012 with the 1 m telescope at the TÜB?TAK National Observatory (TUG). Using these photometric results, we determine the structural and astrophysical parameters of the cluster. The mean photometric uncertainties are better than 0.02 mag in the V magnitude and B- V, V- R, and V- I colour indices to about 0.03 mag for U- B among stars brighter than magnitude V=18. Cluster member stars were separated from the field stars using the Galaxia model of Sharma et al. (2011) together with other techniques. The core radius of the cluster is found to be r c =3.60 arcmin. The astrophysical parameters were determined simultaneously via Bayesian statistics using the colour-magnitude diagrams V versus B- V, V versus V- I, V versus V- R, and V versus R- I of the cluster. The resulting most likely parameters were further confirmed using independent methods, removing any possible degeneracies. The colour excess, distance modulus, metallicity and the age of the cluster are determined simultaneously as E( B- V)=0.05±0.01 mag, ?=10.06±0.08 mag, [ M/ H]=-0.10±0.01 dex and t=1.00±0.05 Gyr, respectively. Distances of five red clump stars which were found to be members of the cluster further confirm our distance estimation.

  19. Novel vocal repertoire and paired swimbladders of the three-spined toadfish, Batrachomoeus trispinosus: insights into the diversity of the Batrachoididae

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Aaron N.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Toadfishes (Teleostei: Batrachoididae) are one of the best-studied groups for understanding vocal communication in fishes. However, sounds have only been recorded from a low proportion of taxa within the family. Here, we used quantitative bioacoustic, morphological and phylogenetic methods to characterize vocal behavior and mechanisms in the three-spined toadfish, Batrachomoeus trispinosus. B. trispinosus produced two types of sound: long-duration `hoots' and short-duration `grunts' that were multiharmonic, amplitude and frequency modulated, with a dominant frequency below 1 kHz. Grunts and hoots formed four major classes of calls. Hoots were typically produced in succession as trains, while grunts occurred either singly or as grunt trains. Aside from hoot trains, grunts and grunt trains, a fourth class of calls consisted of single grunts with acoustic beats, apparently not previously reported for individuals from any teleost taxon. Beats typically had a predominant frequency around 2 kHz with a beat frequency around 300 Hz. Vocalizations also exhibited diel and lunar periodicities. Spectrographic cross-correlation and principal coordinates analysis of hoots from five other toadfish species revealed that B. trispinosus hoots were distinct. Unlike any other reported fish, B. trispinosus had a bilaterally divided swimbladder, forming two separate swimbladders. Phylogenetic analysis suggested B. trispinosus was a relatively basal batrachoidid, and the swimbladder and acoustic beats were independently derived. The swimbladder in B. trispinosus demonstrates that toadfishes have undergone a diversification of peripheral sonic mechanisms, which may be responsible for the concomitant innovations in vocal communication, namely the individual production of acoustic beats as reported in some tetrapods. PMID:19376959

  20. Feeding habits of the bluemouth, Helicolenus dactylopterus dactylopterus (Delaroche, 1809) (Pisces: Sebastidae) in the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Ana; Sequeira, Vera; Paiva, Rafaela Barros; Vieira, Ana Rita; Gordo, Leonel Serrano

    2012-06-01

    In order to investigate the feeding habits of Helicolenus dactylopterus dactylopterus along the continental Portuguese coast, a total of 619 individuals were sampled of which 60% contained food in their stomach and 35% had more than one prey item. Among the 81 prey items that were identified in the stomachs, benthic and benthopelagic prey prevail on this species diet. Acantephyra sp, Pasiphaea sp, mysidacea, and teleostei n.i. were the prey with the higher percent index of relative importance (%IRI) value. Three length groups (5-20 cm, 21-27 cm, and 28-48 cm) were defined through cluster analysis of the mean abundance of prey items. A permutational MANOVA detected significant differences in the diet and stomach fullness index for TLG, season, and maturation stage. Smaller fishes had a generalized diet, feeding mainly on mysidacea changing their diet above 20 cm TL, where a major consumption of natantia was found. The larger individuals, >28 cm TL, present a less generalized diet with pisces as dominant prey group. Seasonally, natantia and pisces were the principal prey groups during spring and winter, respectively, while mysidacea and other crustaceans were predominant during the rest of the year. Mysidacea were also the main prey group for immature individuals while natantia and pisces were the principal prey groups to the other maturity stages. The results of this study indicate that H. d. dactylopterus has a diverse diet focused on small crustaceans such as misyds and as specimens grow shrimps and fishes become more consumed, with larger specimens having a more specialized diet. The different nutritional needs during spawning season also seemed to influence the feeding habits of H. d. dactylopterus.

  1. Molecular evidence for the existence of species complexes within Macvicaria Gibson & Bray, 1982 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) in the western Mediterranean, with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Antar, Rym; Georgieva, Simona; Gargouri, Lamia; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2015-07-01

    Morphological and molecular characterisation of specimens of Macvicaria spp. (Digenea: Opecoelidae) from five species of Mediterranean sparids (Teleostei: Sparidae) sampled in the Bizerte Lagoon and the Bay of Bizerte (Tunisia) revealed the presence of two species complexes designated as "obovata" and "crassigula" groups. Detailed comparative morphological and phylogenetic analyses revealed that two of the specimen sets, one from each complex, represent species new to science. M. maamouriae n. sp. from Sparus aurata L. and Lithognathus mormyrus (L.) appeared genetically similar to M. obovata (Molin, 1859) but differs in having a much larger ventral sucker relative to body width, a cirrus-sac extending dorsally to the posterior margin of the ventral sucker or more posterior, vitelline fields comprising distinctly more abundant vitelline follicles, reaching the level of the pharynx both ventrally and dorsally and confluent dorsally in the forebody, and an ovary contiguous with the anterior testis. Macvicaria bartolii n. sp. from Diplodus annularis (L.) and Spondyliosoma cantharus (L.) belongs to the "crassigula" group and is characterised by having almost exclusively dorsal vitelline follicles forming two non-confluent fields in the forebody. Additional morphological data are provided for Macvicaria dubia (Stossich, 1905), a poorly known parasite of Oblada melanura (L.). Morphological descriptions are associated with ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S rDNA sequences for the three Mediterranean species of Macvicaria Gibson & Bray, 1982. The results of our study suggest that further exploration of the species diversity within this genus should be based on both morphological and molecular data. PMID:26063299

  2. The European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax genome puzzle: comparative BAC-mapping and low coverage shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Food supply from the ocean is constrained by the shortage of domesticated and selected fish. Development of genomic models of economically important fishes should assist with the removal of this bottleneck. European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. (Moronidae, Perciformes, Teleostei) is one of the most important fishes in European marine aquaculture; growing genomic resources put it on its way to serve as an economic model. Results End sequencing of a sea bass genomic BAC-library enabled the comparative mapping of the sea bass genome using the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus genome as a reference. BAC-end sequences (102,690) were aligned to the stickleback genome. The number of mappable BACs was improved using a two-fold coverage WGS dataset of sea bass resulting in a comparative BAC-map covering 87% of stickleback chromosomes with 588 BAC-contigs. The minimum size of 83 contigs covering 50% of the reference was 1.2 Mbp; the largest BAC-contig comprised 8.86 Mbp. More than 22,000 BAC-clones aligned with both ends to the reference genome. Intra-chromosomal rearrangements between sea bass and stickleback were identified. Size distributions of mapped BACs were used to calculate that the genome of sea bass may be only 1.3 fold larger than the 460 Mbp stickleback genome. Conclusions The BAC map is used for sequencing single BACs or BAC-pools covering defined genomic entities by second generation sequencing technologies. Together with the WGS dataset it initiates a sea bass genome sequencing project. This will allow the quantification of polymorphisms through resequencing, which is important for selecting highly performing domesticated fish. PMID:20105308

  3. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1) in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP) family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH) subtype 1G (Ush1g), both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s) of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways. PMID:21261979

  4. Bipteria vetusta n. sp. – an old parasite in an old host: tracing the origin of myxosporean parasitism in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kodádková, Alena; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Holzer, Astrid S; Fiala, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Myxosporea (Myxozoa), a group of parasitic Cnidaria, use mostly bony fishes (Teleostei) as intermediate hosts; however, they can also parasitize other vertebrates such as cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes). Molecular data of myxosporeans from sharks and rays (Elasmobranchii) revealed these parasites to be one of the most basal representatives in the myxosporean phylogenetic tree, suggesting their ancient evolutionary history. A new myxosporean species, Bipteria vetusta n. sp., was found in the gall bladder of rabbit fish, Chimaera monstrosa (Holocephali; Chondrichthyes), and ssrDNA-based phylogeny revealed its basal position within the marine myxosporean lineage. Molecular dating based on ssrDNA analysis suggested the origin of a stem lineage leading to the marine myxosporean lineage at the time of the origin of Chondrichthyes in the Silurian era. The two common lineages of Myxozoa, Myxosporea and Malacosporea, were estimated to have split from their common ancestor in the Cambrian era. Tracing the history of evolution of the "vertebrate host type" character in the context of molecular dating showed that cartilaginous fish represented an ancestral state for all myxosporeans. Teleosts were very likely subsequently parasitized by myxozoans four times, independently. Myxosporean radiation and diversification appear to correlate with intermediate host evolution. The first intermediate hosts of myxosporeans were cartilaginous fish. When bony fish evolved and radiated, myxosporeans switched and adapted to bony fish, and subsequently greatly diversified in this new host niche. We believe that the present study is the first attempt at molecular dating of myxozoan evolution based on an old myxosporean species – a living myxosporean fossil. PMID:25659495

  5. Comparative analysis of the gonadal transcriptomes of the all-female species Poecilia formosa and its maternal ancestor Poecilia mexicana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa (Teleostei: Poeciliinae) is an unisexual, all-female species. It evolved through the hybridisation of two closely related sexual species and exhibits clonal reproduction by sperm dependent parthenogenesis (or gynogenesis) where the sperm of a parental species is only used to activate embryogenesis of the apomictic, diploid eggs but does not contribute genetic material to the offspring. Here we provide and describe the first de novo assembled transcriptome of the Amazon molly in comparison with its maternal ancestor, the Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana. The transcriptome data were produced through sequencing of single end libraries (100 bp) with the Illumina sequencing technique. Results 83,504,382 reads for the Amazon molly and 81,625,840 for the Atlantic molly were assembled into 127,283 and 78,961 contigs for the Amazon molly and the Atlantic molly, respectively. 63% resp. 57% of the contigs could be annotated with gene ontology terms after sequence similarity comparisons. Furthermore, we were able to identify genes normally involved in reproduction and especially in meiosis also in the transcriptome dataset of the apomictic reproducing Amazon molly. Conclusions We assembled and annotated the transcriptome of a non-model organism, the Amazon molly, without a reference genome (de novo). The obtained dataset is a fundamental resource for future research in functional and expression analysis. Also, the presence of 30 meiosis-specific genes within a species where no meiosis is known to take place is remarkable and raises new questions for future research. PMID:24742317

  6. Influence of Host Origin on Host Choice of the Parasitoid Dinarmus basalis: Does Upbringing Influence Choices Later in Life?

    PubMed Central

    Sankara, F.; Dabiré, L. C. B.; Ilboudo, Z.; Dugravot, S.; Cortesero, A. M.; Sanon, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of volatile compounds from four secondary host plants on the ability of Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to locate, recognize, and parasitize its host, 4th instar larvae or pupae of Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). To examine this, strains of D. basalis were transferred from cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae)) to pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) and two varieties of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds. The ability of D. basalis females to recognize the volatile compounds emanating from their complex host plant was tested by using a Y-tube olfactometer and a three-dimensional device. The results suggest that when females have a choice between pure air and the air emanating from their complex host of origin, they are attracted to the air tainted by the volatile compounds they have become accustomed to. They spent significantly more time (p < 0.0001) in the branch of the tube leading to the odorous air than in the tube leading to the pure air. When females from pigeon pea seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4th instar larvae, the familiar odor of pigeon pea seeds were most attractive. When females from Bambara groundnut (white and striped) seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4th instar larvae, they were significantly attracted to the odour of cowpea seeds. In the three-dimensional system, the females from the four strains did not appear to have any preference for a given type of seed containing 4th instar larvae or pupae. The parasitism rate remained high on all four types of seeds used. These results show that the use of D. basalis as a biological control agent is possible in host changing situations where C. maculatus starts to attack other legumes. The results of this study also provide information supporting the behavioral plasticity of D. basalis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the adaptive phenomena of biological control agents is discussed in the context of the development of adequate methods of pest control. PMID:25373173

  7. Influence of host origin on host choice of the parasitoid Dinarmus basalis: does upbringing influence choices later in life?

    PubMed

    Sankara, F; Dabiré, L C B; Ilboudo, Z; Dugravot, S; Cortesero, A M; Sanon, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of volatile compounds from four secondary host plants on the ability of Dinarmus basalis Rond. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to locate, recognize, and parasitize its host, 4(th)instar larvae or pupae of Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). To examine this, strains of D. basalis were transferred from cow-pea seeds (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae)) to pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) and two varieties of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds. The ability of D. basalis females to recognize the volatile compounds emanating from their complex host plant was tested by using a Y-tube olfactometer and a three-dimensional device. The results suggest that when females have a choice between pure air and the air emanating from their complex host of origin, they are attracted to the air tainted by the volatile compounds they have become accustomed to. They spent significantly more time (p < 0.0001) in the branch of the tube leading to the odorous air than in the tube leading to the pure air. When females from pigeon pea seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4(th)instar larvae, the familiar odor of pigeon pea seeds were most attractive. When females from Bambara groundnut (white and striped) seed hosts were offered a choice between cowpea and pigeon pea seeds, all containing 4(th)instar larvae, they were significantly attracted to the odour of cowpea seeds. In the three-dimensional system, the females from the four strains did not appear to have any preference for a given type of seed containing 4(th)instar larvae or pupae. The parasitism rate remained high on all four types of seeds used. These results show that the use of D. basalis as a biological control agent is possible in host changing situations where C. maculatus starts to attack other legumes. The results of this study also provide information supporting the behavioral plasticity of D. basalis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the adaptive phenomena of biological control agents is discussed in the context of the development of adequate methods of pest control. PMID:25373173

  8. A unique swim bladder-inner ear connection in a teleost fish revealed by a combined high-resolution microtomographic and three-dimensional histological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In most modern bony fishes (teleosts) hearing improvement is often correlated with a close morphological relationship between the swim bladder or other gas-filled cavities and the saccule or more rarely with the utricle. A connection of an accessory hearing structure to the third end organ, the lagena, has not yet been reported. A recent study in the Asian cichlid Etroplus maculatus provided the first evidence that a swim bladder may come close to the lagena. Our study was designed to uncover the swim bladder-inner ear relationship in this species. We used a new approach by applying a combination of two high-resolution techniques, namely microtomographic (microCT) imaging and histological serial semithin sectioning, providing the basis for subsequent three-dimensional reconstructions. Prior to the morphological study, we additionally measured auditory evoked potentials at four frequencies (0.5, 1, 2, 3 kHz) to test the hearing abilities of the fish. Results E. maculatus revealed a complex swim bladder-inner ear connection in which a bipartite swim bladder extension contacts the upper as well as the lower parts of each inner ear, a condition not observed in any other teleost species studied so far. The gas-filled part of the extension is connected to the lagena via a thin bony lamella and is firmly attached to this bony lamella with connective material. The second part of the extension, a pad-like structure, approaches the posterior and horizontal semicircular canals and a recessus located posterior to the utricle. Conclusions Our study is the first detailed report of a link between the swim bladder and the lagena in a teleost species. We suggest that the lagena has an auditory function in this species because the most intimate contact exists between the swim bladder and this end organ. The specialized attachment of the saccule to the cranial bone and the close proximity of the swim bladder extension to the recessus located posterior to the utricle indicate that the saccule and the utricle also receive parallel inputs from the swim bladder extension. We further showed that a combination of non-destructive microCT imaging with histological analyses on the same specimen provides a powerful tool to decipher and interpret fine structures and to compensate for methodological artifacts. PMID:23826967

  9. Fish Predation by Semi-Aquatic Spiders: A Global Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Nyffeler, Martin; Pusey, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    More than 80 incidences of fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders – observed at the fringes of shallow freshwater streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, swamps, and fens – are reviewed. We provide evidence that fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders is geographically widespread, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Fish predation by spiders appears to be more common in warmer areas between 40° S and 40° N. The fish captured by spiders, usually ranging from 2–6 cm in length, are among the most common fish taxa occurring in their respective geographic area (e.g., mosquitofish [Gambusia spp.] in the southeastern USA, fish of the order Characiformes in the Neotropics, killifish [Aphyosemion spp.] in Central and West Africa, as well as Australian native fish of the genera Galaxias, Melanotaenia, and Pseudomugil). Naturally occurring fish predation has been witnessed in more than a dozen spider species from the superfamily Lycosoidea (families Pisauridae, Trechaleidae, and Lycosidae), in two species of the superfamily Ctenoidea (family Ctenidae), and in one species of the superfamily Corinnoidea (family Liocranidae). The majority of reports on fish predation by spiders referred to pisaurid spiders of the genera Dolomedes and Nilus (>75% of observed incidences). There is laboratory evidence that spiders from several more families (e.g., the water spider Argyroneta aquatica [Cybaeidae], the intertidal spider Desis marina [Desidae], and the ‘swimming’ huntsman spider Heteropoda natans [Sparassidae]) predate fish as well. Our finding of such a large diversity of spider families being engaged in fish predation is novel. Semi-aquatic spiders captured fish whose body length exceeded the spiders’ body length (the captured fish being, on average, 2.2 times as long as the spiders). Evidence suggests that fish prey might be an occasional prey item of substantial nutritional importance. PMID:24940885

  10. Fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders: a global pattern.

    PubMed

    Nyffeler, Martin; Pusey, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    More than 80 incidences of fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders--observed at the fringes of shallow freshwater streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, swamps, and fens--are reviewed. We provide evidence that fish predation by semi-aquatic spiders is geographically widespread, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Fish predation by spiders appears to be more common in warmer areas between 40° S and 40° N. The fish captured by spiders, usually ranging from 2-6 cm in length, are among the most common fish taxa occurring in their respective geographic area (e.g., mosquitofish [Gambusia spp.] in the southeastern USA, fish of the order Characiformes in the Neotropics, killifish [Aphyosemion spp.] in Central and West Africa, as well as Australian native fish of the genera Galaxias, Melanotaenia, and Pseudomugil). Naturally occurring fish predation has been witnessed in more than a dozen spider species from the superfamily Lycosoidea (families Pisauridae, Trechaleidae, and Lycosidae), in two species of the superfamily Ctenoidea (family Ctenidae), and in one species of the superfamily Corinnoidea (family Liocranidae). The majority of reports on fish predation by spiders referred to pisaurid spiders of the genera Dolomedes and Nilus (>75% of observed incidences). There is laboratory evidence that spiders from several more families (e.g., the water spider Argyroneta aquatica [Cybaeidae], the intertidal spider Desis marina [Desidae], and the 'swimming' huntsman spider Heteropoda natans [Sparassidae]) predate fish as well. Our finding of such a large diversity of spider families being engaged in fish predation is novel. Semi-aquatic spiders captured fish whose body length exceeded the spiders' body length (the captured fish being, on average, 2.2 times as long as the spiders). Evidence suggests that fish prey might be an occasional prey item of substantial nutritional importance. PMID:24940885

  11. Identification and characterization of a new IgE-binding protein in mackerel ( Scomber japonicus) by MALDI-TOF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bangping; Li, Zhenxing; Zheng, Lina; Liu, Yixuan; Lin, Hong

    2011-03-01

    As fish is one source of the `big eight' food allergens, the prevalence of fish allergy has increased over the past few years. In order to better understand fish allergy, it is necessary to identify fish allergens. Based on the sera from fish-allergenic patients, a 28 kDa protein from local mackerel ( Scomber japonicus), which has not been reported as a fish allergen, was found to be reactive with most of the patients' sera. The 28 kDa protein was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry). Mascot search in NCBI database (Date: 08/07/2010) showed that the top protein matched, i.e. triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) from Xiphophorus maculatus and Poecilia reticulata, had a mowse (molecular weight search) score of 98. In addition, TPI from Epinephelus coioides also matched this mackerel protein with a mowse score of 96. Because TPI is considered as an allergen in other non-fish organisms, such as lychee, wheat, latex, archaeopotamobius ( Archaeopotamobius sibiriensis) and crangon ( Crangon crangon), we consider that it may also be an allergen in mackerel.

  12. Bucephalidae (Digenea) from epinephelines (Serranidae: Perciformes) from the waters off New Caledonia, including Neidhartia lochepintade n. sp.

    PubMed

    Bray, Rodney A; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2013-01-01

    Many bucephalid species, mainly of the subfamily Prosorhynchinae, have been described from epinepheline serranids (groupers) throughout the World's Oceans. In this paper eight named prosorhynchine species are described and/or illustrated from epinepheline fishes from New Caledonia. Neidhartia lochepintade n. sp. in Epinephelus chlorostigma differs from other Neidhartia spp. in various combinations of distinct body-size, rhynchus size, previtelline and pre-mouth distance, post-testicular distance, cirrus-sac reach and egg-size. Other species are: Neidhartia haywardi Bott, Miller & Cribb, 2013 in Plectropomus leopardus; Neidhartia tyleri Bott, Miller & Cribb, 2013 in Plectropomus leopardus and Plectropomus laevis; Prosorhynchus freitasi Nagaty, 1937 in Plectropomus leopardus and Plectropomus laevis; Prosorhynchus robertsthomsoni Bott & Cribb, 2009 in Cephalopholis argus; Prosorhynchus longisaccatus Durio & Manter, 1968 in Cephalopholis urodeta, Epinephelus areolatus, Epinephelus cyanopodus and Epinephelus maculatus. Prosorhynchus luzonicus Velasquez, 1959 and Prosorhynchus sp. B. in Epinephelus coioides; Prosorhynchus serrani Durio & Manter, 1968 in Variola albimarginata and Variola louti; Prosorhynchus sp. A in Epinephelus morrhua; Prosorhynchus sp. immature in Epinephelus coeruleopunctatus. The new combination Neidhartia longivesicula (Bilqees, Khalil, Khan, Perveen & Muti-ur-Rehman, 2009) (Syn. Prosorhynchus longivesicula) is formed. Evidence from this paper and earlier molecular studies indicates that there are numerous morphologically similar prosorhynchine species in serranids, most of which show a high degree of host-specificity. PMID:24351242

  13. Bruchid (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) ovicidal phenylbutanoid from Zingiber purpureum.

    PubMed

    Bandara, K A Nimal P; Kumar, Vijaya; Saxena, Ramesh C; Ramdas, Puthenveetil K

    2005-08-01

    The larvicidal activity of the dichloromethane extract of Zingiber purpureum Roscoe (Zingiberaceae) rhizome against the second instar of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is shown to be due to 4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)buta-1,3-diene. The diene also showed ovicidal activity against the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Most of the eggs laid by bruchids on treated cowpea seeds were transparent, and very few of them contained developing embryos. The few larvae produced from these embryos were unable to penetrate the seed coat and enter the seed. Similar effects were seen when adults were exposed to the compound and then placed on untreated cowpea seeds, suggesting that a new type of maternally mediated ovicidal effect was involved. Coated and impregnated granular formulations of the extract were evaluated for use in the control of bruchid infestation of stored cowpea seeds. Coated granules showed activity similar to that of the crude extract but were found to lose activity rapidly. Impregnated granules were found to be less active than the crude extract. PMID:16156567

  14. Influence of seasonal, diel, lunar, and other environmental factors on upstream fish passage in the igarapava fish ladder, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bizzotto, P.M.; Godinho, Alexandre L.; Vono, V.; Kynard, B.; Godinho, Hugo P.

    2009-01-01

    Upstream fish passage was evaluated during 12 months in the vertical-slot Igarapava Fish Ladder constructed around Igarapava Dam, in the heavily dammed Grande River, Southeast Brazil. A video monitoring system was used to observe 61,621 fish that passed the ladder, of which 93.5% were identified to 15 taxa. Among the migratory species, the most abundant were Pimelodus maculatus (33.6% of all fish), Leporinus octofasciatus (31.4%), Leporinus friderici (4.5%), and Prochilodus lineatus (3.1%). Seven taxa were classified as nonmigratory, and of these taxa, the small Bryconamericus stramineus was the most abundant (12.7%) of all fishes. Passage of the 'nonmigratory' taxa upstream in the ladder shows they are migratory in this system and have a strong behavioural drive to move to upstream habitat. Passage of most taxa had a strong seasonal pattern. While some species passed primarily during the day, others showed a distinct nocturnal pattern. Lunar phase and water temperature also strongly affected passage of some taxa. Rainfall and dam discharge had a small or null influence on most taxa; perhaps due to the fairly small catchment area of the reservoir and the highly regulated discharge at Igarapava Dam. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against ?-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of ?-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus ?-amylases as well as serine proteinases. PMID:25750185

  16. Nutritional and antinutritional composition of the five species of aquatic edible insects consumed in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Shantibala, T; Lokeshwari, R K; Debaraj, H

    2014-01-01

    The people living in Manipur have a distinct identity, culture, and food habits. They have a prototype culture of eating insects. In our study, the nutritive contents of five potentially-edible aquatic insects, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae), Laccotrephes maculatus (F.) (Nepidae), Hydrophilus olivaceous (F.) (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), Cybister tripunctatus (Olivier), and Crocothemis servilia (Drury) (Odonata: Libellulidae), were analyzed to inform consumers about the nutritional quality of the insects and the suggested quantity of their intake. A good amount of protein content and high gross energy was recorded among the insects. The results showed high levels of sodium, calcium, and magnesium present in the insects, indicating that they are a good source of minerals. Antinutritional properties of these insects were below 0.52%, which is a non-toxic level. Aquatic insects, such as C. tripunctatus, also possesses strong antioxidant activity (110 µg/mL). Therefore, these insects can play a major role in food security, health, and environment management. It is essential to cultivate edible insects to maintain their population sustainability. PMID:25373161

  17. Nutritional and Antinutritional Composition of the Five Species of Aquatic Edible Insects Consumed in Manipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Shantibala, T.; Lokeshwari, R. K.; Debaraj, H.

    2014-01-01

    The people living in Manipur have a distinct identity, culture, and food habits. They have a prototype culture of eating insects. In our study, the nutritive contents of five potentially-edible aquatic insects, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae), Laccotrephes maculatus (F.) (Nepidae), Hydrophilus olivaceous (F.) (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), Cybister tripunctatus (Olivier), and Crocothemis servilia (Drury) (Odonata: Libellulidae), were analyzed to inform consumers about the nutritional quality of the insects and the suggested quantity of their intake. A good amount of protein content and high gross energy was recorded among the insects. The results showed high levels of sodium, calcium, and magnesium present in the insects, indicating that they are a good source of minerals. Antinutritional properties of these insects were below 0.52%, which is a non-toxic level. Aquatic insects, such as C. tripunctatus, also possesses strong antioxidant activity (110 µg/mL). Therefore, these insects can play a major role in food security, health, and environment management. It is essential to cultivate edible insects to maintain their population sustainability. PMID:25373161

  18. Fishborne Trematode Metacercariae in Freshwater Fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Keeseon S.; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Yang, Yichao; Li, Xueming

    2009-01-01

    A survey was performed to investigate the infection status of fishborne trematode (FBT) metacercariae in freshwater fish from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. A total of 307 freshwater fish of 31 species were collected from 5 administrative regions of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. They were examined by artificial digestion method from July 2003 to August 2004. No metacercariae were detected in fish from Fusui-xian. In fish from Mashan-xian and a market in Nanning, 3 species of metacercariae, Haplorchis taichui, Haplorchis pumilio, and Centrocestus formosanus, were mainly detected. Metacercariae (8 in number) of Clonorchis sinensis were found in 1 Chanodichthys dabryi purchased from a market in Nanning. In fish from Yangshuo, Metagonimus yokogawai metacercariae were detected from all 18 fish species examined. Total 13 C. sinensis metacercariae were found in 3 out of 10 Hemibarbus maculatus from Yangshuo. All 7 Zacco platypus from Yangshuo were infected with 8-112 Echinochasmus perfoliatus metacercariae. In fish from Binyang-xian, H. pumilo metacercariae were mainly detected in all 5 fish species examined, and only 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis was found in a Hemiculter leucisculus. From the above results, it was confirmed that some species of freshwater fish play a role of second intermediate hosts for FBT in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. In particular, 4 species of intestinal flukes, M. yokogawai, H. taichui, H. pumilio, and C. formosanus, were prevalent in fish hosts, whereas C. sinensis metacercariae were detected only in 3 fish species. PMID:19724698

  19. Infection experiments with Aphanomyces invadans in four species of estuarine fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.A.; Zabrecky, J.; Kiryu, Y.; Shields, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Along the eastern seaboard of the US, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, develop characteristic ulcerative lesions, a condition termed ulcerative mycosis. These lesions are identical to those seen across Asia in fish affected by epizootic ulcerative syndrome, a condition caused by the fungus-like oomycete Aphanomyces Invadans. Young-of-the-year menhaden inhabiting estuarine environments are the primary species affected in the USA and little is known about the factors involved in the initiation of the lesions, or why menhaden are predominantly infected. Atlantic menhaden, hogchoker, Trinectus maculatus, striped killifish, Fundulus majalis, and mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, were inoculated with A. invadans (80 zoospores per fish) to explore species differences in infection and lesion development. All four species developed lesions. Killifish developed frank lesions similar to those observed in menhaden but the gross lesions occurred later, approximately 5-10 days after those on menhaden. Hogchoker and mummichog did not develop gross skin ulcers; rather, their lesions appeared as reddened areas under the epidermis. Mummichogs also showed evidence of significant healing with a well-developed granuloma and significant myocyte regeneration. These experiments show that species barriers as well as ecological barriers can explain some of the factors involved in the development of lesions in, and specificity of the water mould for, menhaden.

  20. Molecular confirmation of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) in farmed and imported ornamental fish in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Peter G; Moody, Nicholas J G; Williams, Lynette M; Hoad, John; Cummins, David M; Davies, Kelly R; StJ Crane, Mark

    2015-10-16

    Viruses of the genus Megalocytivirus have not been detected in wild populations of fish in Australia but circulate in imported ornamental fish. In 2012, detection of a megalocytivirus in healthy platys Xiphophorus maculatus was reported from a farm in Australia during surveillance testing as part of a research project undertaken at the University of Sydney. Confirmatory testing of the original samples at the AAHL Fish Diseases Laboratory verified the presence of an infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV)-like virus. Additional sampling at the positive farm confirmed the persistence of the virus in the platys, with 39 of 265 (14.7%) samples testing positive. Comparison of 3 separate gene regions of the virus with those of ISKNV confirmed the detection of a virus indistinguishable from ISKNV. Subsequently, ISKNV was also detected in a range of imported ornamental fish from several countries between 2013 and 2014, by screening with real-time PCR and confirmation by conventional PCR and sequence analysis. Accordingly, the current importation of live ornamental fish acts as a potential perpetual source for the establishment of ISKNV viruses within Australia. The testing of the farmed and imported ornamental fish verified the utility of the probe-based real-time PCR assay for screening of ornamental fish for Megalocytivirus. PMID:26480913