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Sample records for galaxies nuga xii

  1. Atomic hydrogen properties of active galactic nuclei host galaxies: H I in 16 nuclei of galaxies (NUGA) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, Sebastian; Schinnerer, Eva; Mundell, Carole G.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Combes, Francoise E-mail: schinner@mpia.de E-mail: burillo@oan.es

    2008-01-01

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN), observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ∼20'', ∼5 km s{sup –1}) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei, and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA)—a spectrally and spatially resolved interferometric survey of gas dynamics in nearby galaxies designed to identify the fueling mechanisms of AGN and the relation to host galaxy evolution. Here we investigate the relationship between the H I properties of these galaxies, their environment, their stellar distribution, and their AGN type. The large-scale H I morphology of each galaxy is classified as ringed, spiral, or centrally concentrated; comparison of the resulting morphological classification with the AGN type reveals that ring structures are significantly more common in low-ionization narrow emission-line regions (LINER) than in Seyfert host galaxies, suggesting a time evolution of the AGN activity together with the redistribution of the neutral gas. Dynamically disturbed H I disks are also more prevalent in LINER host galaxies than in Seyfert host galaxies. While several galaxies are surrounded by companions (some with associated H I emission), there is no correlation between the presence of companions and the AGN type (Seyfert/LINER).

  2. ALMA-backed NIR high resolution integral field spectroscopy of the NUGA galaxy NGC 1433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajić, Semir; Moser, Lydia; Eckart, Andreas; Valencia-S., Mónica; Combes, Françoise; Horrobin, Matthew; García-Burillo, Santiago; García-Marín, Macarena; Fischer, Sebastian; Zuther, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H- and K-band European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1433. We investigate the central 500 pc of this nearby galaxy, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 1433 was selected from our extended NUGA(-south) sample, which was additionally observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). NGC 1433 is a ringed, spiral galaxy with a main stellar bar in roughly east-west direction (PA 94°) and a secondary bar in the nuclear region (PA 31°). Several dusty filaments are detected in the nuclear region with the Hubble Space Telescope. ALMA detects molecular CO emission coinciding with these filaments. The active galactic nucleus is not strong and the galaxy is also classified as a low-ionization emission-line region (LINER). Methods: The NIR is less affected by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy, allowing us to analyse several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 10″ × 10″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central kpc of NGC 1433. We detect a narrow Balmer line and several H2 lines. We find that the stellar continuum peaks in the optical and NIR in the same position, indicating that there is no covering of the center by a nuclear dust lane. A strong velocity gradient is detected in all emission lines at that position. The position angle of this gradient is at 155° whereas the galactic rotation is at a position angle of 201°. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation at the nucleus is caused by thermal excitation, i.e., shocks that can be associated with active galactic

  3. What produces the extended LINER-type emission in the NUGA galaxy NGC 5850?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, M.; Scharwächter, J.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; Zuther, J.; Combes, F.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Fischer, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The role of low ionization nuclear emission region (LINER) galaxies within the picture of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been controversial. It is still not clear whether they host an AGN in a low accretion mode or whether they are not active at all but are instead dominated by alternative ionization mechanisms, namely shocks, winds/outflows, or photoionization by a post-asymptotic giant branch (p-AGB) stellar population. The detection of extended LINER-like emission was often taken as evidence of ionization by stellar components, but this has not been undisputed. Aims: Using optical spectroscopy, we examine the possible ionization mechanisms responsible for the extended LINER-like emission in the central ~4 kpc of NGC 5850. Methods: We performed integral field spectroscopic observations using VIMOS at the VLT, which provides spatially-resolved spectra for the gas emission and the stellar continuum. We subtract the underlying stellar continuum from the galaxy spectra and fit the emission lines. With these methods, we derive and analyze emission line and kinematic maps. Emission line ratio maps are examined by means of diagnostic diagrams. Results: The central few kpc of NGC 5850 are dominated by extended LINER-like emission. The emission-line ratios that are sensitive to the ionization parameter increase with radial distance to the nucleus. The LINER-like region is surrounded by emission that is classed as "composite" in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Two star-forming (SF) regions are present in the 21″ × 19″ field of view. One of them is located approximately in the ring, surrounding the kinematically decoupled core. The second one is close to the nucleus and is the origin of a region of decreased emission line ratios oriented radially outwards. We find the interstellar gas to have a complex kinematic morphology and to have areas of steep velocity gradients. Conclusions: The extended LINER-like emission in NGC 5850 is dominated by ionization from

  4. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. The Luminosity Function of Globular Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; McLaughlin, Dean E.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Peng, Eric W.; Mei, Simona; Villegas, Daniela; Merritt, David; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the luminosity function of the globular clusters (GCs) belonging to the early-type galaxies observed in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We have obtained maximum likelihood estimates for a Gaussian representation of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) for 89 galaxies. We have also fit the luminosity functions with an ``evolved Schechter function'', which is meant to reflect the preferential depletion of low-mass GCs, primarily by evaporation due to two-body relaxation, from an initial Schechter mass function similar to that of young massive clusters in local starbursts and mergers. We find a highly significant trend of the GCLF dispersion σ with galaxy luminosity, in the sense that the GC systems in smaller galaxies have narrower luminosity functions. The GCLF dispersions of our Galaxy and M31 are quantitatively in keeping with this trend, and thus the correlation between σ and galaxy luminosity would seem more fundamental than older notions that the GCLF dispersion depends on Hubble type. We show that this narrowing of the GCLF in a Gaussian description is driven by a steepening of the cluster mass function above the classic turnover mass, as one moves to lower luminosity host galaxies. In a Schechter function description, this is reflected by a steady decrease in the value of the exponential cutoff mass scale. We argue that this behavior at the high-mass end of the GC mass function is most likely a consequence of systematic variations of the initial cluster mass function rather than long-term dynamical evolution. The GCLF turnover mass MTO is roughly constant, at MTO~=(2.2+/-0.4)×105 Msolar in bright galaxies, but it decreases slightly (by ~35% on average, with significant scatter) in dwarf galaxies with MB,gal>~-18. It could be important to allow for this effect when using the GCLF as a distance indicator. We show that part, although perhaps not all, of the variation could arise from the shorter dynamical friction timescales in less

  5. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. Stellar Populations and Kinematics of Compact, Low-mass Early-type Galaxies from Gemini GMOS-IFU Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérou, Adrien; Emsellem, Eric; McDermid, Richard M.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Peng, Eric W.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We present Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph integral-field unit (GMOS-IFU) data of eight compact, low-mass early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Virgo cluster. We analyze their stellar kinematics and stellar population and present two-dimensional maps of these properties covering the central 5″ × 7″ region. We find a large variety of kinematics, from nonrotating to highly rotating objects, often associated with underlying disky isophotes revealed by deep images from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. In half of our objects, we find a centrally concentrated younger and more metal-rich stellar population. We analyze the specific stellar angular momentum through the λR parameter and find six fast rotators and two slow rotators, one having a thin counterrotating disk. We compare the local galaxy density and stellar populations of our objects with those of 39 more extended low-mass Virgo ETGs from the SMAKCED survey and 260 massive (M > 1010 {{M}⊙ }) ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample. The compact low-mass ETGs in our sample are located in high-density regions, often close to a massive galaxy, and have, on average, older and more metal-rich stellar populations than less compact low-mass galaxies. We find that the stellar population parameters follow lines of constant velocity dispersion in the mass-size plane, smoothly extending the comparable trends found for massive ETGs. Our study supports a scenario where low-mass compact ETGs have experienced long-lived interactions with their environment, including ram-pressure stripping and gravitational tidal forces, that may be responsible for their compact nature.

  7. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  8. Division Xii: Union-Wide Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.; Andersen, Johannes; Aksnes, Kaare; Genova, Françoise; Gurshtein, Alexander A.; Johansson, Sveneric; Pasachoff, Jay M.; Smith, Malcolm G.

    2007-12-01

    Division XII consists of Commissions that formerly were organized under the Executive Committee, that concern astronomers across a wide range of scientific sub-disciplines and provide interactions with scientists in a wider community, including governmental organizations, outside the IAU.

  9. Division XII: Union-Wide Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm G.; Genova, Françoise; Andersen, Johannes; Federman, Steven R.; Gilmore, Alan C.; Nha, Il-Seong; Norris, Raymond P.; Robson, Ian E.; Stavinschi, Magda G.; Trimble, Virginia L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Christensen, Lars Lindberg

    Division XII consists of Commissions that formerly were organized under the Executive Committee, that concern astronomers across a wide range of scientific sub-disciplines and provide interactions with scientists in a wider community, including governmental organizations, outside the IAU.

  10. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  11. XII Tables for researchers on extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocca, Aldo Armando

    In the legal field, studies on extraterrestrial intelligence began four years before the leading article on interstellar communication was published. Even though discussion of the legal problems still lacks a juridical framework of universal acceptance, a few guidelines are suggested under the title of XII Tables (or Commandments). The XII Tables, which was the Romans' first code, also included provisions on international law and may be seen as a very important source of the law of nations. Their great merit was brevity, which allowed the progressive development of the law. These XII Tables have been divided into six to guide reactions in the event messages or signals are received, and six to determine the behavior of those responsible for answering if and when a communication attempt takes place. They were drafted on the basis of what is known as "ethics" and "law" in a way that any progress in this respect may be to the credit of our civilization and the human condition. For a wise and cautious analysis of the matter, the creation of a committee of representatives of governmental and non-governmental organizations is proposed.

  12. Pius XII and the Jews: A Bibliographical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Catherine

    1978-01-01

    Presents a brief biographical sketch of Pope Pius XII and samples literary treatment of Pius's actions with respect to Nazi atrocities against the Jewish people during World War II. Concludes that Pope Pius XII failed to show moral leadership. Materials reviewed include historical texts, studies of the Vatican, documents related to the war period,…

  13. [XII National Forum on Health Education].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In Guadalajara, on August 19, 20 and 21 was held the XII Foro Nacional de Educación en Salud, in line with the interest that both, the Dirección General and the Dirección de Prestaciones Médicas of the IMSS, have in training and updating the human resources for the care of the beneficiaries. The Unidad de Educación, Investigación y Políticas de Salud organized a meeting in which the actors of these tasks, the institutional staff and authorities from various universities worked together with the IMSS. PMID:26506481

  14. Mark XII, V-TO Physics Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, L.W.

    2002-08-09

    Uranium-233 has previously been produced in a 4:2 mixed lattice of Mark VX-C two tube drivers and 82 lb. Mark V-TO ThO2 targets. A subsequent campaign is planned that will use a 3:3 lattice of Mark XII-A three tube drivers with similar ThO2 target assemblies. This report documents a parametric study of this second campaign, presenting the production rates and reactivities of various combinations of driver and target design. The purpose of this study was to provide background material for design of a 233U producing lattice.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  16. Band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Jamal I.; Malone, Brad D.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-08-01

    Silicon has a rich phase diagram with a multitude of phases existing over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, in addition to the common cubic silicon (c-Si) phase. One such phase, Si-XII, was first observed less than 2 decades ago in diamond anvil experiments, and more recently as a product of nanoindentation. In some of these latter experiments, I-V measurements were performed to characterize the c-Si/Si-XII interface that results when Si-XII is formed in cubic silicon substrates. In this paper we describe calculations of the band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions. We find that the heterojunction is of Type I and that the band offsets are estimated to be ΔEv=0.3 eV and ΔEc=0.5 eV for the valence bands and conduction bands, respectively.

  17. Mitogenic effects of coagulation factor XII and factor XIIa on HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeidler-Sapiro, K.T.; Gordon, E.M. ); Ratnoff, O.D. )

    1991-05-15

    The structure of coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor), inferred from its DNA sequence, includes two epidermal growth factor (EGF)-homologous domains in its amino-terminal region. This suggests that factor XII may exhibit EGF-like activities. Reciprocal antigenic cross-reactivity between factor XII and EGF was shown by exposing purified human factor XII or mouse EGF to anti-mouse EGF or anti-human factor XII. Western blot analysis showed that anti-mouse EGF recognized intact factor XII at 80 kDa. Together, these results suggest that the EGF-homologous domains are accessible for anti-EGF binding in native factor XII. To determine whether factor XII has mitogenic activity, HepG2 or L cells (10{sup 4} cells per well) were grown in serum-free medium in the presence or absence of factor XII or kaolin-activated factor XII (factor XIIa). Both factors XII and XIIa (6.0 {mu}g/ml) enhanced cell proliferation. Various doses of factor XII enhanced cell proliferation, ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation in HepG2 cells cultured under the same conditions. These data indicate that factor XII, like EGF, is a mitogen for HepG2 cells and suggest a possible autocrine role in the liver.

  18. Atomic data for astrophysics: Ni XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-01-01

    We present new large-scale R-matrix (up to n = 4) scattering calculations for the electron collisional excitation of Cl-like Ni xii. We used the intermediate-coupling frame transformation method. We compare predicted and observed line intensities using laboratory and solar spectra, finding good agreement for all the main soft X-ray lines. With the exception of the three strongest transitions, large discrepancies with previous estimates are found, especially for the decays from the lowest 3s2 3p4 3d levels. This includes the forbidden UV lines. The atomic data for the n = 4 levels are the first to be calculated. We revise previous experimental energies, and suggest several new identifications. We point out the uncertainty in the wavelength of the 3s2 3p52P1/2-3s2 3p4 3d 2D3/2 transition, which is important for density diagnostics. The full dataset is available at our APAP website (http://www.apapnetwork.org) and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A118

  19. 77 FR 59669 - Comment Request for Information Collection; Unemployment Insurance (UI) Title XII Advances and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...) Title XII Advances and Voluntary Repayment Process; Extension Without Revisions AGENCY: Employment and... comments concerning the collection process for data on UI Title XII advances and voluntary repayments.... Gibbons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Title XII Section 1201 of the Social Security Act...

  20. Conclusions and comments for the XII ISCM.

    PubMed

    Karczmar, Alexander G

    2006-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanism (ISCM), organized by the late Edith Heilbronn, was held in Skokloster in 1970; Alicante's XII ISCM shows the exponential progress made in the cholinergic field in barely 30 years! Thus, Alzheimer's disease was not a topic at the first ISCM. The concept of homeostatic mechanisms regulating choline levels in the brain was not conceived of as yet. Three-dimensional pictures and the the protein structure of cholinergic receptors were not even thought of, as in 1970, we had only an "abstract" knowledge of receptors, based on SAR notions of Everhardus Ariens, Robert Furchgott, and Peter Pauling; in fact the Nobel Prize winner Furchgott stated in 1964 that "... with rare exceptions, we cannot ... identify the receptor as an individual chemical entity." Similarly, three-dimensional images of cholinesterases (ChEs) and the ChE "gorges" were unknown (Furchgott, 1964). The Whittakerian notion of synaptic vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh) was the only version of the mode of ACh release, and the unorthodox opinions of Yves Dunant, Maurice Israel, Bruno Ceccarelli and Jacopo Meldolesi were still to be promulgated. Little was known about cholinergic correlates of behaviors such as learning and aggression, and there was no notion of cholinergic aspects of self-awareness (consciousness), free will, and the active subconscious. And modern methodologies were unknown, including the measurements of ACh, such as the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) method, discovered by Israel Hanin, Don Jenden, and Bo Holmstedt in the 1950s, the chemiluminescence developed by Maurice Israel, Yves Dunant, and their associates (Israel et al., 1983), and crystallography and molecular biology techniques, such as the "knockout" (KO) mouse models. PMID:17192684

  1. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  2. New atomic data for the FeXII coronal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binello, A. M.; Mason, H. E.; Storey, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Various FeXII spectroscopic lines in the UV and EUV range have been proved to be ideal diagnostic tools for measuring electron temperature, density and iron abundance in the solar corona. In the framework of the ``IRON PROJECT'' we have provided improved theoretical calculations of the atomic data required to analyse the intensity of these lines and to apply the results to SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) observations. Extensive configuration interaction and relativistic effects have been allowed for in the atomic structure computations which have provided energy levels and an extensive set of radiative data. The e-FeXII collisional problem has been tackled with the multichannel R-matrix method, a close-coupling calculation for the determination of electron impact collision strengths. Final results are presented for FeXII thermally averaged collision strengths, for fine-structure forbidden transitions within the ground configuration.

  3. Activation of factor XII and prekallikrein with cholesterol sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Kato, H; Iwanaga, S; Iwamori, M; Nagai, Y

    1985-04-01

    Cholesterol sulfate was found to display a strong ability to trigger the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein in the presence of HMW kininogen. Other sulfate ester derivatives of testosterone, estrone, pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone and cholesterol tested did not show any effect on the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein. The activity of cholesterol acetate and sulfodeoxycholic acid was very weak. Cholesterol sulfate markedly shortened the partial thromboplastin time of normal human plasma, but not plasmas deficient in Factor XII, Factor XI and HMW kininogen. Upon prolonged incubation, the partial thromboplastin time of prekallikrein-deficient plasma was also shortened. Moreover, as well as kaolin and sulfatide, cholesterol sulfate shortened the partial thromboplastin time of plasmas from monkey, dog, rat, guinea pig, sheep, cow, hog and horse, but not from duck and chicken. Since cholesterol sulfate is distributed in erythrocytes, various organs and body fluids, it may play an important role in the activation of the intrinsic blood coagulation system. PMID:3847226

  4. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (∼0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ∼ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ∼24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ∼15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  5. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  6. The inheritance pattern of factor XII (Hageman) deficiency in domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Kier, A B; Bresnahan, J F; White, F J; Wagner, J E

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of coagulation factor XII levels in F1 progeny of a cat having factor XII deficiency revealed an autosomal recessive pattern similar to that reported in humans (Hageman trait). A study of the pedigree of the colony revealed that F1 kittens had approximately 50% factor XII activity while kittens produced by backcrossing with an F1 progeny possessed an average of 50% and a less than 2% factor XII activity in an approximate 1:1 ratio. Kittens having an average of 50% factor XII activity were postulated heterozygous for the trait while progeny with less than 2% activity were considered genetically homozygous. PMID:7427778

  7. Platelet surface-associated activation and secretion-mediated inhibition of coagulation factor XII.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Natalia V; Artemenko, Elena O; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  8. Platelet Surface-Associated Activation and Secretion-Mediated Inhibition of Coagulation Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Artemenko, Elena O.; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A.; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N.; Demina, Irina A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  9. Myosin XI-I is Mechanically and Enzymatically Unique Among Class-XI Myosins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Takeshi; Tominaga, Motoki; Nakano, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Ito, Kohji

    2016-08-01

    Arabidopsis possesses 13 genes encoding class-XI myosins. Among these, myosin XI-I is phylogenetically distant. To examine the molecular properties of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-I (At myosin XI-I), we performed in vitro mechanical and enzymatic analyses using recombinant constructs of At myosin XI-I. Unlike other biochemically studied class-XI myosins, At myosin XI-I showed extremely low actin-activated ATPase activity (Vmax = 3.7 Pi s(-1) head(-1)). The actin-sliding velocity of At myosin XI-I was 0.25 µm s(-1), >10 times lower than those of other class-XI myosins. The ADP dissociation rate from acto-At myosin XI-I was 17 s(-1), accounting for the low actin-sliding velocity. In contrast, the apparent affinity for actin in the presence of ATP, estimated from Kapp (0.61 µM) of actin-activated ATPase, was extremely high. The equilibrium dissociation constant for actin was very low in both the presence and absence of ATP, indicating a high affinity for actin. To examine At myosin XI-I motility in vivo, green fluorescent protein-fused full-length At myosin XI-I was expressed in cultured Arabidopsis cells. At myosin XI-I localized not only on the nuclear envelope but also on small dots moving slowly (0.23 µm s(-1)) along actin filaments. Our results show that the properties of At myosin XI-I differ from those of other Arabidopsis class-XI myosins. The data suggest that At myosin XI-I does not function as a driving force for cytoplasmic streaming but regulates the organelle velocity, supports processive organelle movement or acts as a tension generator. PMID:27273580

  10. THE MOLECULAR GAS DENSITY IN GALAXY CENTERS AND HOW IT CONNECTS TO BULGES

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, David B.; Bolatto, Alberto; Drory, Niv; Combes, Francoise; Blitz, Leo; Wong, Tony

    2013-02-20

    In this paper we present gas density, star formation rate (SFR), stellar masses, and bulge-disk decompositions for a sample of 60 galaxies. Our sample is the combined sample of the BIMA SONG, CARMA STING, and PdBI NUGA surveys. We study the effect of using CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors that depend on the CO surface brightness, and also that of correcting SFRs for diffuse emission from old stellar populations. We estimate that SFRs in bulges are typically lower by 20% when correcting for diffuse emission. Using the surface brightness dependent conversion factor, we find that over half of the galaxies in our sample have {Sigma}{sub mol} > 100 M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. Though our sample is not complete in any sense, our results are enough to rule out the assumption that bulges are uniformly gas-poor systems. We find a trend between gas density of bulges and bulge Sersic index; bulges with lower Sersic index have higher gas density. Those bulges with low Sersic index (pseudobulges) have gas fractions that are similar to that of disks. Conversely, the typical molecular gas fraction in classical bulges is more similar to that of an elliptical galaxy. We also find that there is a strong correlation between bulges with the highest gas surface density and the galaxy being barred. However, we also find that classical bulges with low gas surface density can be barred as well. Our results suggest that understanding the connection between the central surface density of gas in disk galaxies and the presence of bars should also take into account the total gas content of the galaxy. Finally, we show that when using the corrected SFRs and gas densities, the correlation between SFR surface density and gas surface density of bulges is similar to that of disks. This implies that at the scale of the bulges the timescale for converting gas into stars is comparable to those results found in disks.

  11. The Molecular Gas Density in Galaxy Centers and how it Connects to Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Bolatto, Alberto; Drory, Niv; Combes, Francoise; Blitz, Leo; Wong, Tony

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present gas density, star formation rate (SFR), stellar masses, and bulge-disk decompositions for a sample of 60 galaxies. Our sample is the combined sample of the BIMA SONG, CARMA STING, and PdBI NUGA surveys. We study the effect of using CO-to-H2 conversion factors that depend on the CO surface brightness, and also that of correcting SFRs for diffuse emission from old stellar populations. We estimate that SFRs in bulges are typically lower by 20% when correcting for diffuse emission. Using the surface brightness dependent conversion factor, we find that over half of the galaxies in our sample have Σmol > 100 M ⊙ pc-2. Though our sample is not complete in any sense, our results are enough to rule out the assumption that bulges are uniformly gas-poor systems. We find a trend between gas density of bulges and bulge Sérsic index; bulges with lower Sérsic index have higher gas density. Those bulges with low Sérsic index (pseudobulges) have gas fractions that are similar to that of disks. Conversely, the typical molecular gas fraction in classical bulges is more similar to that of an elliptical galaxy. We also find that there is a strong correlation between bulges with the highest gas surface density and the galaxy being barred. However, we also find that classical bulges with low gas surface density can be barred as well. Our results suggest that understanding the connection between the central surface density of gas in disk galaxies and the presence of bars should also take into account the total gas content of the galaxy. Finally, we show that when using the corrected SFRs and gas densities, the correlation between SFR surface density and gas surface density of bulges is similar to that of disks. This implies that at the scale of the bulges the timescale for converting gas into stars is comparable to those results found in disks.

  12. 76 FR 75563 - Notice for Delay of Payment of Title XII Interest for Three States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Notice for Delay of Payment of Title XII Interest for Three States... approval for delay of Title XII interest payment for three states. Section 1202(b)(3)(B) of the...

  13. 48 CFR Appendix F to Chapter 7 - Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities F Appendix F to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Ch. 7, App. F Appendix F to Chapter 7—Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities...

  14. 77 FR 13317 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII, BOST2, LLC, et al.; Notice Announcing Filing Priority for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII, BOST2, LLC, et al.; Notice Announcing Filing Priority for Preliminary Permit Applications Project No. Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII 14260-000 BOST2, LLC.... 2. BOST2, LLC: Project No. 14264-000. 3. Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII: Project No. 14260-000....

  15. In vivo activation and functions of the protease factor XII.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Jenny; Nickel, Katrin F; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Combinations of proinflammatory and procoagulant reactions are the unifying principle for a variety of disorders affecting the cardiovascular system. Factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) is a plasma protease that initiates the contact system. The biochemistry of the contact system in vitro is well understood; however, its in vivo functions are just beginning to emerge. The current review concentrates on activators and functions of the FXII-driven contact system in vivo. Elucidating its physiologic activities offers the exciting opportunity to develop strategies for the safe interference with both thrombotic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25187064

  16. Monoclonal antibodies raised against 167-180 aa sequence of human carbonic anhydrase XII inhibit its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zilnyte, Milda; Petrikaite, Vilma; Jogaite, Vaida; Matuliene, Jurgita; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Human carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII) is a single-pass transmembrane protein with an extracellular catalytic domain. This enzyme is being recognized as a potential biomarker for different tumours. The current study was aimed to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) neutralizing the enzymatic activity of CA XII. Bioinformatics analysis of CA XII structure revealed surface-exposed sequences located in a proximity of its catalytic centre. Two MAbs against the selected antigenic peptide spanning 167-180 aa sequence of CA XII were generated. The MAbs were reactive with recombinant catalytic domain of CA XII expressed either in E. coli or mammalian cells. Inhibitory activity of the MAbs was demonstrated by a stopped flow CO2 hydration assay. The study provides new data on the surface-exposed linear CA XII epitope that may serve as a target for inhibitory antibodies with a potential immunotherapeutic application. PMID:24400872

  17. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  18. The death of King Charles XII--the forensic verdict.

    PubMed

    Nordling, C O

    1998-09-28

    King Charles XII of Sweden was killed in 1718 during his siege of the Danish fortress of Fredriksten. For 276 years, it remained an open question whether the lethal bullet came from the enemy or from a Swedish assassin. Now, a treatise published by a Swedish historian finally proves that the King's death was a case of political murder. Ballistic circumstances and the Danish ammunition then available are incompatible with a random shot from enemy quarters. Major-general Carl Cronstedt possessed the expertise needed to make an assassination look like a war casualty. It appears that the King was shot with a makeshift jacketed bullet long before jacketed bullets came into common use. PMID:9854825

  19. Inhibition of Hageman factor (factor XII) by popcorn inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kambhu, S A; Ratnoff, O D; Everson, B

    1985-05-01

    A protein derived from sweet corn or popcorn inhibits the enzymatic activity of the carboxy-terminal fragment of Hageman factor (HFf) and of ellagic acid-activated Hageman factor (HF, factor XII). Not clarified is whether the inhibitor is directed at the active site of HF. Filtration of normal plasma or purified HF through columns of popcorn inhibitor bound to agarose gels demonstrated that HF was bound to these gels and could then be eluted by buffers containing 2.0 mol/L sodium chloride. The eluted HF was in the precursor form. Thus, popcorn inhibitor appeared to attach to a point on the carboxy-terminal HFf that was distinct from the enzymatically active site of this clotting factor. PMID:3989356

  20. Activation of factor XII-dependent pathways in human plasma by hematin and protoporphyrin.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, C G; Wagner, M; Kaplan, A P; Silverberg, M; Grady, R W; Liem, H; Muller-Eberhard, U

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous administration of hematin is effective in the treatment of acute exacerbations of the inducible porphyrias. In the course of such treatment, coagulopathies have occurred that are characterized by prolongation of prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and formation of fibrin split products. In experiments in vitro with normal human plasma, we observed that hematin and protoporphyrin activated Factor XII-dependent pathways of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and that they generated kallikrein activity. Incubation of protoporphyrin with purified Factor XII resulted in activation as measured by amidolysis of a chromogenic substrate. Neither coproporphyrin, uroporphyrin, delta-aminolevulinic acid, porphobilinogen, or bilirubin activated Factor XII-dependent pathways. Exposure of serum containing added uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, and protoporphyrin, but not hematin, to ultraviolet light (405 nm) resulted in activation of the classical pathway of the complement system. On the other hand, exposure of plasma containing uroporphyrin or coproporphyrin to ultraviolet light did not result in activation of Factor XII-dependent pathways. PMID:4031058

  1. Rapid and reversible regulation of collagen XII expression by changes in tensile stress.

    PubMed

    Trächslin, J; Koch, M; Chiquet, M

    1999-03-15

    We studied the expression of the fibril-associated collagen XII by fibroblasts cultured on attached (stretched) or floating (relaxed) collagen I gels. Accumulation of collagen XII in the medium as determined by semiquantitative immunoblotting was 8-16 times higher under stretched compared to relaxed conditions. Northern blot experiments showed that tensile stress controls collagen XII expression at the mRNA level. Tenascin-C mRNA levels were also influenced, whereas relative amounts of fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinase-2 mRNA were barely affected. The response to a change in tensile stress is rapid, since de novo biosynthesis of collagen XII was fully down-regulated 12 h after relaxation of a stretched culture. To demonstrate that the effect is also reversible, we mounted collagen gels with attached cells to movable polyethylene plugs. The cultures were relaxed or stretched at intervals of 24 and 48 h, and media samples were analyzed every 24 h. By ELISA, the amount of collagen XII secreted into the medium was found to increase or decrease in accordance with the tensile stress applied. This is evidence that the mechanical stimulus per se, rather than an indirect secondary effect, was responsible for the observed changes in collagen XII production. PMID:10066359

  2. Surface-Energy Dependent Contact Activation of Blood Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Golas, Avantika; Parhi, Purnendu; Dimachkie, Ziad O.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension τao=γlvocosθ in dyne/cm, where γlvo is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and θ is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties −36<τao<72 dyne/cm (0° ≤ θ < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20<τao<40 dyne/cm (55° < θ < 75°) range over which activation yield (putatively FXIIa) rises just above detection limits. Activation is very rapid upon contact with all activators tested and did not significantly vary over 30 minutes of continuous FXII-procoagulant contact. Results suggest that materials falling within the 20<τao<40 dyne/cm surface-energy range should exhibit minimal activation of blood-plasma coagulation through the intrinsic pathway. Surface chemistries falling within this range are, however, a perplexingly difficult target for surface engineering because of the critical balance that must be struck between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. Results are interpreted within the context of blood plasma coagulation and the role of water and proteins at procoagulant surfaces. PMID:19892397

  3. Division XII: Commission 46: Education & Development of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.; Hearnshaw, John; Stavinschi, Magda; Garcia, Beatriz; Gerbaldi, Michele; Greve, Jean-Pierre De; Guinan, Edward; Haubold, Hans; Jones, Barrie; Marshall, Laurence A.; Pasachoff, Jay

    2015-08-01

    C46 is a Commission of the Executive Committee of the IAU under Division XII Union-Wide Activities. Aiming at improvement of astronomy education and research at all levels worldwide (through the various projects it initiates),maintains, develops, as well as through the dissemination of information. C46 has 332 members and it was managed by the Organizing Committee, formed by the Commission President (Rosa M. Ros, from Spain), the Vice-Presiden (John Hearnshaw, from New Zealand), the Retiring President (Magda Stavinschi, from Romania), the Vice-President of the IAU (George Miley, from Netherland) and the PG chairs: • Worldwide Development of Astronomy WWDA: John Hearnshaw • Teaching Astronomy for Development TAD: Edward Guinan and Laurence A. Marshall • International Schools for Young Astronomers ISYA; chair: Jean-Pierre de Greve • Network for Astronomy School Education NASE: Rosa M. Ros and Beatriz Garcia • Public Understanding at the times of Solar Eclipses and transit Phenomena PUTSE: Jay Pasachoff • National Liaison and Newsletter: Barrie Jones • Collaborative Programs: Hans Haubold

  4. 77 FR 10741 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII, BOST2, LLC, Riverbank Hydro No. 21, LLC, FFP Project 96, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII, BOST2, LLC, Riverbank Hydro No. 21, LLC..., in Greene and Hale counties, Alabama. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XII...

  5. 75 FR 37456 - Green Retrofit Program of Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Green Retrofit Program of Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of... Lists the Following Information Title of Proposal: Green Retrofit Program of Title XII of the...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 86 - Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Heavy-Duty Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Heavy-Duty Vehicles, Including Light-Duty Trucks XII Appendix XII to... Appendix XII to Part 86—Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and...

  7. Rosai-Dorfman disease with factor XII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kasapoglu Gunal, Esen; Kamali, Sevil; Akdogan, Mehmet Fatih; Cimen, Arif Oguz; Ocal, Lale; Agan, Mehmet; Gul, Ahmet; Inanc, Murat; Konice, Meral; Aral, Orhan

    2009-06-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with chronic symmetrical oligoarthritis of both knees and ankles, xerostomia, xerophthalmia, multiple bilateral lymphadenopathies in the cervical region, and bilateral parotid enlargement with the histological finding of chronic sialoadenitis. She had been already given methotrexate, chloroquine, and corticosteroids with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before referral to our outpatient clinic. Because her complaints and the lumps did not remit and she could be classified as neither RA nor primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) according to 1987 ACR RA criteria or European preliminary criteria for SS, lymph node biopsy was repeated and revealed the diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) with the histological findings of histiocytes, phagocyting lymphocytes in enlarged sinuses, and mature plasma cells infiltrating the pulpa. All the medications were stopped after the pathological diagnosis of RDD and consulting with the Division of Hematology. She was reevaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, which showed dense infiltrative areas around knee and ankle joints, and computed tomography that showed a soft tissue mass surrounding the descending aorta and upper part of the abdominal aorta. Activated partial thromboplastin time was found to be prolonged in prebiopsy examinations, and factor XII deficiency was detected after detailed hematological evaluation. The symptoms of joint involvement were relieved with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. She has been followed-up without medication without obvious clinical or laboratory change. We herein report a patient with RDD mimicking RA and SS. We consider that RDD should be kept in mind especially in patients with resistant symptoms to conventional therapies, younger disease onset, and predominant parotid and lymph node enlargement. PMID:19326165

  8. NMDA-induced rhythmical activity in XII nerve of isolated CNS from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Katakura, N; Jia, L; Nakamura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We tried to induce rhythmical oro-facial motor activities in an isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats. Neural activities were monitored from the hypoglossal nerve (XII N) and the ventral roots of the cervical cord. Bath application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) as well as glutamate induced rhythmical burst activity in XII N distinct from and much faster than respiratory rhythm. This NMDA-induced rhythmical activity was blocked by simultaneous application of 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5). The results demonstrate that NMDA receptor activation can induce rhythmical XII N activity different from respiration in an isolated mammalian CNS. This preparation will be useful for the investigation of neural mechanisms underlying the central generation of food ingestive movements. PMID:7605909

  9. Enhanced specificity of immunoblotting using radiolabeled antigen overlay: studies of blood coagulation factor XII and prekallikrein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmle, B.; Berrettini, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoblotting of blood coagulation Factor XII and plasma prekallikrein in whole plasma was performed using radiolabeled antigen for detection. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of plasma and transfer to nitrocellulose sheets, the blots were first reacted with polyclonal goat anti-Factor XII or anti-prekallikrein antisera and then with /sup 125/I-Factor XII or /sup 125/I-prekallikrein, respectively. A major advantage of using radiolabeled antigen rather than radiolabeled secondary antibody was enhanced specificity of immunodetection of these antigens in plasma. This procedure was sensitive to approx.0.3 ng of either Factor XII or prekallikrein antigen and was useful for detection of Factor XII cleavage fragments in contact activated plasma. Radiolabeled antigen overlay may improve the specificity of immunoblotting of trace antigens in any complex mixtures.

  10. Collagens VI and XII form complexes mediating osteoblast interactions during osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izu, Yayoi; Ezura, Yoichi; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E; Noda, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Bone formation is precisely regulated by cell-cell communication in osteoblasts. We have previously demonstrated that genetic deletion of Col6a1 or Col12a1 impairs osteoblast connections and/or communication in mice, resulting in bone mass reduction and bone fragility. Mutations of the genes encoding collagen VI cause Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM), which have overlapping phenotypes involving connective tissue and muscle. Recent studies have identified COL12A1 gene mutations in patients with UCMD- and BM-like disorders harboring no COL6 mutations, indicating the shared functions of these collagens in connective tissue homeostasis. The purpose of this investigation has been to test the hypothesis that collagens VI and XII have coordinate regulatory role(s) during bone formation. We analyzed the localization of collagens VI and XII relative to primary osteoblasts during osteogenesis. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that collagens VI and XII colocalized in matrix bridges between adjacent cells during periods when osteoblasts were establishing cell-cell connections. Quantification of cells harboring collagen bridges demonstrated that matrix bridges were composed of collagens VI and XII but not collagen I. Interestingly, matrix bridge formation was impaired in osteoblasts deficient in either Col6a1 or Col12a1, suggesting that both collagens were indispensable for matrix bridge formation. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a functional relationship between collagens VI and XII during osteogenesis and indicate that a complex containing collagens VI and XII is essential for the formation of a communicating cellular network during bone formation. PMID:26753503

  11. OATYC Journal, Vol. XII, Nos. 1-2, Fall 1986-Spring 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullen, James, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    "OATYC Journal," published by the the Ohio Association of Two-Year Colleges, is designed as a forum for the exchange of concepts, methods, and findings relevant to the two-year college classroom. Along with commentaries and letters of reaction from the readership, the two issues of Volume XII present the following: (1) "Focus: Cincinnati Technical…

  12. Mechanical modulation of tenascin-C and collagen-XII expression during avian synovial joint formation.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Wong, M; Chiquet, M; Hunziker, E B

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how temporal and spatial patterns of characteristic extracellular matrix molecules are altered in the absence of normal functional skeletal muscle contractions during avian synovial joint development. By using in situ detection of protein and mRNA expression in developing avian feet and femorotibial joints from a wide range of developmental stages, we demonstrate that the morphological abnormalities that result from embryonic immobilization are associated with altered patterns of tenascin-C and collagen-XII expression within developing joint structures. As the joints fuse in immobilized embryos, the cells of the presumptive articular surface differentiate from flattened fibroblasts to more rounded chondrocytes and collagens XII and I are no longer detected at sites of complete joint fusion. Although the expression of collagen XII persists at normal levels elsewhere within the immobilized joint, tenascin-C expression is diminished within the chondroepiphysis, synovium, and tendons, as well as within the remains of the fibrous articular surface. This effect is most notable for the shortest tenascin variant (Tn190) within the chondroepiphysis and the largest variant (Tn230) within tendons, synovium, and the fibrous surface layer of the joint. This study thus provides in vivo support of previous in vitro work that suggests that tenascin expression is sensitive to external changes in mechanical loading environment. However, these data do not support a similar conclusion for collagen XII during early development. PMID:10937627

  13. 48 CFR 715.370-2 - Title XII selection procedure-collaborative assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Source Selection 715.370-2 Title XII selection procedure—collaborative assistance. (a) General. (48 CFR... as collaborative assistance because a continuing collaborative relationship between USAID, the host country, and the contractor is required from design through completion of the activity, and USAID,...

  14. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively. PMID:26408817

  15. 48 CFR Appendix F to Chapter 7 - Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... collaboration with eligible Title XII institutions and LDC counterparts for a problem-solving type activity to... much as a year or more. This stage recognizes the importance, for the problem-solving or ground..., 44 FR 56673; 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 435)...

  16. 48 CFR Appendix F to Chapter 7 - Use of Collaborative Assistance Method for Title XII Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... collaboration with eligible Title XII institutions and LDC counterparts for a problem-solving type activity to... much as a year or more. This stage recognizes the importance, for the problem-solving or ground..., 44 FR 56673; 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 435)...

  17. 48 CFR 715.370-2 - Title XII selection procedure-collaborative assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Source Selection 715.370-2 Title XII selection procedure—collaborative assistance. (a) General. (48 CFR... procedure-collaborative assistance. 715.370-2 Section 715.370-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... determined, in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, that use of the collaborative...

  18. 48 CFR 715.370-2 - Title XII selection procedure-collaborative assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Source Selection 715.370-2 Title XII selection procedure—collaborative assistance. (a) General. (48 CFR... procedure-collaborative assistance. 715.370-2 Section 715.370-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... determined, in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, that use of the collaborative...

  19. 48 CFR 715.370-2 - Title XII selection procedure-collaborative assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Source Selection 715.370-2 Title XII selection procedure—collaborative assistance. (a) General. (48 CFR... procedure-collaborative assistance. 715.370-2 Section 715.370-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... determined, in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, that use of the collaborative...

  20. 48 CFR 715.370-2 - Title XII selection procedure-collaborative assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Source Selection 715.370-2 Title XII selection procedure—collaborative assistance. (a) General. (48 CFR... procedure-collaborative assistance. 715.370-2 Section 715.370-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... determined, in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, that use of the collaborative...

  1. Rhyzodiastes (Temoana) xii sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Rhysodidae: Clinidiini),
    a new species from Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Rhyzodiastes (Temoana) xii sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Rhysodidae: Clinidiini) is described from Hainan Island, China. Important morphological characters of the new species are illustrated. An updated key to nine species of of the R. (T.) singularis species-group is compiled so as to include the new species. PMID:27395589

  2. Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Koch, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix toward the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  3. Factor XII mutations, estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Binkley, Karen E

    2010-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of the conditions known as estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, estrogen-associated angioedema, hereditary angioedema with normal C-1 inhibitor, type III angioedema, or factor XII angioedema are reviewed. Discussion emphasizes pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. PMID:20667119

  4. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school... SITUATIONS Student Instructional Evaluation § 36.32 Standard XII—Graduation requirements for a high school... be the measure for the issuance of a high school diploma. (b) To graduate, a student shall earn...

  5. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  6. Epidemiologic and clinical data linking factors XI and XII to thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Key, Nigel S

    2014-12-01

    Currently available evidence supports the contention that elevated levels of factor XI (fXI) are associated with a greater risk of venous thromboembolism and ischemic stroke, but, less convincingly, with myocardial infarction. Conversely, reduced plasma levels of fXI seem to offer some protection from venous thromboembolism and stroke, but not myocardial infarction. Factor XI-deficient patients are at risk for certain types of bleeding, particularly posttraumatic hemorrhage on mucosal surfaces where there is a high endogenous fibrinolytic activity. In contrast, the situation with fXII in human thrombosis remains enigmatic. Deficiency of fXII is clearly not associated with any bleeding risk, but neither does it seem to be protective against thrombosis. The longstanding debate as to whether partial fXII deficiency represents a risk factor for thrombosis remains unresolved, with seemingly conflicting results depending on study design, type of assay used, and analyte evaluated. The possibility that elevated fXII levels represent a risk factor for thrombosis is not borne out in the literature. PMID:25696836

  7. N-β-glycosyl sulfamides are selective inhibitors of the cancer associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Oscar M; Maresca, Alfonso; Témpera, Carlos A; Bravo, Rodolfo D; Colinas, Pedro A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-08-01

    The transmembrane isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (CA IX and XII) have been shown to be linked to carcinogenesis and their inhibition to arrest primary tumor and metastases growth. In this Letter, we present a series of peracetylated and deprotected N-β-glycosyl sulfamides that were tested for the inhibition of 4 carbonic anhydrase isoforms: the cytosolic hCA I and hCA II and transmembrane tumor-associated IX and XII. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 selectively target cancer-associated CAs (IX and XII) with K(I)s in the low nanomolar range. PMID:21723123

  8. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  9. Coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) Washington D.C.: inactive factor XIIa results from Cys-571----Ser substitution.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, T; Kawabata, S; Iwanaga, S; Takahashi, I; Alving, B; Saito, H

    1989-01-01

    Structural studies on a congenital abnormal coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor), factor XII Washington D.C., have been performed to identify the defect responsible for its lack of procoagulant activity. Amino acid sequence analysis of a tryptic peptide isolated from the abnormal factor XII indicated that Cys-571 (equivalent to Cys-220 in the chymotrypsin numbering system) had been replaced by serine. No other substitutions in the active-site triad--namely, His-393, Asp-442, and Ser-544--were found. We propose that the Cys-571----Ser replacement found in this factor XII variant destroys the formation of the disulfide linkage between Cys-540 and Cys-571, giving rise to an altered conformation of the active-site serine residue or the secondary substrate-binding site and, thus, leads to the loss of enzyme activity. PMID:2510163

  10. Novel sulfonamide bearing coumarin scaffolds as selective inhibitors of tumor associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Navneet; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Sharma, Pawan K

    2016-07-01

    Four novel scaffolds consisting of total 24 compounds (1a-1o, 2a-2c, 3a-3c and 4a-4c) bearing aromatic sulfonamide and coumarin moieties connected through various linkers were synthesized in order to synergize the inhibition potential of both the moieties against four selected human carbonic anhydrase isoforms (hCA I, II, IX & XII). All compounds were found to be potent inhibitors of tumor associated hCA IX & XII while at the same time required large amounts to inhibit off-targeted housekeeping hCA I & II. Selectivity was more pronounced against hCA II over I, and hCA XII over IX. Results were compared with antitumor drug acetazolamide. One derivative 2b of series 2 was found to be a better selective inhibitor of hCA IX and XII. PMID:27137360

  11. Galaxy masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courteau, Stéphane; Cappellari, Michele; de Jong, Roelof S.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Hoekstra, Henk; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mamon, Gary A.; Maraston, Claudia; Treu, Tommaso; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The different sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and gas-poor galaxies, with some attention paid to our Milky Way, and masses from weak and strong lensing methods all provide review material on galaxy masses in a self-consistent manner.

  12. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image is a Galaxy Evolution Explorer observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way. Andromeda is the nearest large galaxy to our own. The image is a mosaic of 10 separate Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken in September, 2003. The color image (with near ultraviolet shown by red and far ultraviolet shown by blue) shows blue regions of young, hot, high mass stars tracing out the spiral arms where star formation is occurring, and the central orange-white 'bulge' of old, cooler stars formed long ago. The star forming arms of Messier 31 are unusual in being quite circular rather than the usual spiral shape. Several companion galaxies can also be seen. These include Messier 32, a dwarf elliptical galaxy directly below the central bulge and just outside the spiral arms, and Messier 110 (M110), which is above and to the right of the center. M110 has an unusual far ultraviolet bright core in an otherwise 'red,' old star halo. Many other regions of star formation can be seen far outside the main body of the galaxy.

  13. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  14. LIMITS ON THE EMISSION FROM FE VIII-XII IN THE HOT LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J. J.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Theiler, J. P.; Johnson, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of the emitted power from an optically thin million degree plasma (such as the one thought to produce the soft xray background) originates in the EUV band at wavelengths longer than 170 degrees A. Lines from Fe VIII - Fe XII dominate the emission in this wavelength region. This paper describes work in progress on the analysis of three years of data from the ALEXIS mission in search of this flux.

  15. 5-Aryl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acids as selective inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Cvijetić, Ilija N; Tanç, Muhammet; Juranić, Ivan O; Verbić, Tatjana Ž; Supuran, Claudiu T; Drakulić, Branko J

    2015-08-01

    Inhibitory activity of a congeneric set of 23 phenyl-substituted 5-phenyl-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acids toward human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms I, II, IX and XII was evaluated by a stopped-flow CO2 hydrase assay. These compounds exerted a clear, selective inhibition of hCA IX and XII over hCAI and II, with Ki in two to one digit micromolar concentrations (4-50 μM). Derivatives bearing bulkier substituents in para-position of the phenyl ring inhibited hCA XII at one-digit micromolar concentrations, while derivatives having alkyl substituents in both ortho- and meta-positions inhibited hCA IX with Kis ranging between 5 and 25 μM. Results of docking experiments offered a rational explanation on the selectivity of these compounds toward CA IX and XII, as well as on the substitution patterns leading to best CA IX or CA XII inhibitors. By examining the active sites of these four isoforms with GRID generated molecular-interaction fields, striking differences between hCA XII and the other three isoforms were observed. The field of hydrophobic probe (DRY) appeared significantly different in CA XII active site, comparing to other three isoforms studied. To the best of our knowledge such an observation was not reported in literature so far. Considering the selectivity of these carboxylates towards membrane-associated over cytosolic CA isoforms, the title compounds could be useful for the development of isoform-specific non-sulfonamide CA inhibitors. PMID:26088336

  16. Les galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  17. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy is the closest SPIRAL GALAXY to the MILKY WAY, just visible to the naked eye on a dark night as a faint smudge of light in the constellation Andromeda. The earliest records of the Andromeda nebula, as it is still often referred to, date back to AD 964, to the `Book of the Fixed Stars' published by the Persian astronomer AL-SÛFI. The first European to officially note the Andro...

  18. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  4. Pyrazolylbenzo[d]imidazoles as new potent and selective inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms hCA IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Ceruso, Mariangela; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Supuran, Claudiu T; Sharma, Pawan K

    2016-07-01

    Novel pyrazolylbenzo[d]imidazole derivatives (2a-2f) were designed, synthesized and evaluated against four human carbonic anhydrase isoforms belonging to α family comprising of two cytosolic isoforms hCA I and II as well as two transmembrane tumor associated isoforms hCA IX and XII. Starting from these derivatives that showed high potency but low selectivity in favor of tumor associated isoforms hCA IX and XII, we investigated the impact of removing the sulfonamide group. Thus, analogs 3a-3f without sulfonamide moiety were synthesized and biological assay revealed a good activity as well as an excellent selectivity as inhibitors for tumor associated hCA IX and hCA XII and the same was analyzed by molecular docking studies. PMID:27166574

  5. Fe XII STALKS AND THE ORIGIN OF THE AXIAL FIELD IN FILAMENT CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil

    2013-06-10

    Employing Fe XII images and line-of-sight magnetograms, we deduce the direction of the axial field in high-latitude filament channels from the orientation of the adjacent stalklike structures. Throughout the rising phase of the current solar cycle 24, filament channels poleward of latitude 30 Degree-Sign overwhelmingly obeyed the hemispheric chirality rule, being dextral (sinistral) in the northern (southern) hemisphere, corresponding to negative (positive) helicity. During the deep minimum of 2007-2009, the orientation of the Fe XII stalks was often difficult to determine, but no obvious violations of the rule were found. Although the hemispheric trend was still present during the maximum and early declining phase of cycle 23 (2000-2003), several high-latitude exceptions were identified at that time. From the observation that dextral (sinistral) filament channels form through the decay of active regions whose Fe XII features show a counterclockwise (clockwise) whorl, we conclude that the axial field direction is determined by the intrinsic helicity of the active regions. In contrast, generation of the axial field component by the photospheric differential rotation is difficult to reconcile with the observed chirality of polar crown and circular filament channels, and with the presence of filament channels along the equator. The main role of differential rotation in filament channel formation is to expedite the cancellation of flux and thus the removal of the transverse field component. We propose further that, rather than being ejected into the heliosphere, the axial field is eventually resubmerged by flux cancellation as the adjacent unipolar regions become increasingly mixed.

  6. Magnetic reconnection driven by Gekko XII lasers with a Helmholtz capacitor-coil target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X. X.; Zhong, J. Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, K.; Wei, H. G.; Li, Y. T.; Li, Y. F.; Zhu, B. J.; Sano, T.; Hara, Y.; Kondo, S.; Fujioka, S.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Zhao, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel plasma device for magnetic reconnection, driven by Gekko XII lasers irradiating a double-turn Helmholtz capacitor-coil target. Optical probing revealed an accumulated plasma plume near the magnetic reconnection outflow. The background electron density and magnetic field were measured to be approximately 1018 cm-3 and 60 T by using Nomarski interferometry and the Faraday effect, respectively. In contrast with experiments on magnetic reconnection constructed by the Biermann battery effect, which produced high beta values, our beta value was much lower than one, which greatly extends the parameter regime of laser-driven magnetic reconnection and reveals its potential in astrophysical plasma applications.

  7. Geothermal Program Review XII: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the President's Climate Change Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    Geothermal Program Review XII, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of US Department of Energy, was held April 25--28, 1994, in San Francisco, California. This annual conference is designed to promote effective technology transfer by bringing together DOE-sponsored researchers; utility representatives; geothermal energy developers; suppliers of geothermal goods and services; representatives from federal, state, and local agencies; and others with an interest in geothermal energy. In-depth reviews of the latest technological advancements and research results are presented during the conference with emphasis on those topics considered to have the greatest potential to impact the near-term commercial development of geothermal energy.

  8. Structure and function of transmembrane segment XII in osmosensor and osmoprotectant transporter ProP of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Culham, Doreen E; Vernikovska, Yaroslava I; Keates, Robert A B; Boggs, Joan M; Wood, Janet M

    2007-05-15

    Escherichia coli transporter ProP acts as both an osmosensor and an osmoregulator. As medium osmolality rises, ProP is activated and mediates H+-coupled uptake of osmolytes like proline. A homology model of ProP with 12-transmembrane (TM) helices and cytoplasmic termini was created, and the protein's topology was substantiated experimentally. Residues 468-497, at the end of the C-terminal domain and linked to TM XII, form an intermolecular, homodimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil that tunes the transporter's response to osmolality. We aim to further define the structure and function of ProP residues Q415-E440, predicted to include TM XII. Each residue was replaced with cysteine (Cys) in a histidine-tagged, Cys-less ProP variant (ProP*). Cys at positions 415-418 and 438-440 were most reactive with Oregon Green Maleimide (OGM), suggesting that residues 419 through 437 are in the membrane. Except for V429-I433, reactivity of those Cys varied with helical periodicity. Cys predicted to face the interior of ProP were more reactive than Cys predicted to face the lipid. The former may be exposed to hydrated polar residues in the protein interior, particularly on the periplasmic side. Intermolecular cross-links formed when ProP* variants with Cys at positions 419, 420, 422, and 439 were treated with DTME. Thus TM XII can participate, along its entire length, in the dimer interface of ProP. Cys substitution E440C rendered ProP* inactive. All other variants retained more than 30% of the proline uptake activity of ProP* at high osmolality. Most variants with Cys substitutions in the periplasmic half of TM XII activated at lower osmolalities than ProP*. Variants with Cys substitutions on one face of the cytoplasmic half of TM XII required a higher osmolality to activate. They included elements of a GXXXG motif that are predicted to form the interface of TM XII with TM VII. These studies define the position of ProP TM XII within the membrane, further support the predicted

  9. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  10. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  11. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  12. Electron density-sensitive line ratios for Fe XII in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions from the ground 3s23p3 configuration to the excited 3s3p4 configuration in Fe XII are presented. These are calculated by transforming the K-matrices obtained in a nonrelativistic R-matrix method to K-matrices in intermediate coupling using term-coupling coefficients which take into account the effect of breakdown of target LS coupling. Extensive configuration-interaction wave functions are used to represent the target states. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the calculation. The relative level populations and emission-line strengths for Fe XII are calculated using the new atomic data presented in this paper and that published by Tayal, Henry, and Pradhan (1987) and Tayal and Henry (1986) over a wide range of electron densities and temperatures (1-2 x 10 to the 6th K). Present results for collision strengths and emission-line strengths are compared with the previous calculation of Flower (1977). Some significant differences are noted.

  13. Metallocene-based inhibitors of cancer-associated carbonic anhydrase enzymes IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Adam J; Williams, Michael L; Wu, Quoc K; Morizzi, Julia; Gregg, Daniel; Charman, Susan A; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2012-06-14

    In this study, 20 metallocene-based compounds comprising extensive structural diversity were synthesized and evaluated as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors. These compounds proved moderate to good CA inhibitors in vitro, with several compounds displaying selectivity for cancer-associated isozymes CA IX and CA XII compared to off-target CA I and CA II. Compound 6 was the most potent ferrocene-based inhibitor with K(i)s of 5.9 and 6.8 nM at CA IX and XII, respectively. A selection of key drug-like parameters comprising Log P, Log D, solubility, and in vitro metabolic stability and permeability were measured for two of the ferrocene-based compounds, regioisomers 1 and 5. Compounds 1 and 5 were found to have characteristics consistent with lipophilic compounds, however, our findings show that the lipophilicity of the ferrocene moiety is not well modeled by replacement with either a naphthyl or a phenyl moiety in software prediction tools. PMID:22540953

  14. Dbx1 precursor cells are a source of inspiratory XII premotoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Revill, Ann L; Vann, Nikolas C; Akins, Victoria T; Kottick, Andrew; Gray, Paul A; Del Negro, Christopher A; Funk, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    All behaviors require coordinated activation of motoneurons from central command and premotor networks. The genetic identities of premotoneurons providing behaviorally relevant excitation to any pool of respiratory motoneurons remain unknown. Recently, we established in vitro that Dbx1-derived pre-Bötzinger complex neurons are critical for rhythm generation and that a subpopulation serves a premotor function (Wang et al., 2014). Here, we further show that a subpopulation of Dbx1-derived intermediate reticular (IRt) neurons are rhythmically active during inspiration and project to the hypoglossal (XII) nucleus that contains motoneurons important for maintaining airway patency. Laser ablation of Dbx1 IRt neurons, 57% of which are glutamatergic, decreased ipsilateral inspiratory motor output without affecting frequency. We conclude that a subset of Dbx1 IRt neurons is a source of premotor excitatory drive, contributing to the inspiratory behavior of XII motoneurons, as well as a key component of the airway control network whose dysfunction contributes to sleep apnea. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12301.001 PMID:26687006

  15. Characterization and Sequencing of a Genotype XII Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Peacock (Pavo cristatus) in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Tataje-Lavanda, Luis; Figueroa, Aling; Segovia, Karen; Gonzalez, Rosa; Cribillero, Giovana; Montalvan, Angela; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete sequence and biological characterization of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a peacock in South America (NDV/peacock/Peru/2011). This isolate, classified as genotype XII in class II, highlights the need for increased surveillance of noncommercial avian species. PMID:26227592

  16. Characterization and Sequencing of a Genotype XII Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Peacock (Pavo cristatus) in Peru.

    PubMed

    Chumbe, Ana; Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Tataje-Lavanda, Luis; Figueroa, Aling; Segovia, Karen; Gonzalez, Rosa; Cribillero, Giovana; Montalvan, Angela; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete sequence and biological characterization of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a peacock in South America (NDV/peacock/Peru/2011). This isolate, classified as genotype XII in class II, highlights the need for increased surveillance of noncommercial avian species. PMID:26227592

  17. The polyphosphate/factor XII pathway in cancer-associated thrombosis: novel perspectives for safe anticoagulation in patients with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Katrin F; Labberton, Linda; Long, Andrew T; Langer, Florian; Fuchs, Tobias A; Stavrou, Evi X; Butler, Lynn M; Renné, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer. The incidence of cancer-related thrombosis is rising and is associated with worse outcomes. Despite our growing understanding on tumor-driven procoagulant mechanisms including cancer-released procoagulant proteases, expression of tissue factor on cancer cells and derived microvesicles, as well as alterations in the extracellular matrix of the cancer cell milieu, anticoagulation therapy in cancer patients has remained challenging. This review comments on a newly discovered cancer-associated procoagulant pathway. Experimental VTE models in mice and studies on patient cancer material revealed that prostate cancer cells and associated exosomes display the inorganic polymer polyphosphate on their plasma membrane. Polyphosphate activates blood coagulation factor XII and initiates thrombus formation via the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of factor XII activity protects mice from VTE and reduces thrombin coagulant activity in plasma of prostate cancer patients. Factor XII inhibitors provide thrombo-protection without impairing hemostatic mechanisms and thus, unlike currently used anticoagulants, do not increase bleeding risk. Interference with the polyphosphate/factor XII pathway may provide the novel opportunity for safe anticoagulation therapy in patients with malignancies. PMID:27207422

  18. Simulating Univariate and Multivariate Burr Type IIII and Type XII Distributions through the Method of L-Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pant, Mohan Dev

    2011-01-01

    The Burr families (Type III and Type XII) of distributions are traditionally used in the context of statistical modeling and for simulating non-normal distributions with moment-based parameters (e.g., Skew and Kurtosis). In educational and psychological studies, the Burr families of distributions can be used to simulate extremely asymmetrical and…

  19. Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

  20. Crashing galaxies, cosmic fireworks

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study of binary systems is reviewed. The history of the study of interacting galaxies, the behavior of gas in binary systems, studies to identify the processes that occur when galaxies interact, and the relationship of Seyfert galaxies and quasars to binary systems are discussed. The development of an atlas of peculiar galaxies (Arp, 1966) and methods for modeling galaxy interactions are examined.

  1. Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5galaxies from quiescent galaxies. Our method indicates that the inner stellar mass is the most correlated parameter of quenching, implying that the process that quenches galaxies must also buildup their inner structure. Second, we explore the relationship between galactic bars and their host galaxies with Galaxy Zoo 2 at z˜0. The correlations of bar properties and galaxy properties are consistent with simulations of bar formation and evolution, indicating that bars affect their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate whether bars can drive supermassive black hole growth with data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble at 0.2galaxies to a matched sample of inactive, control galaxies shows that there is no statistically significant excess of bars in active hosts. Our result shows that bars are not the primary fueling mechanism of supermassive black hole

  2. Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, A. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Universe was a more exciting place at moderate to high redshifts z˜3, after reionization took place, but before the present day galaxy properties were firmly established. From a wide variety of directions, we are gaining insight into the Universe at these epochs. Less gas was sequestered into stars and had been ejected into the interstellar medium as weakly emitting, slowly cooling debris, because a significant amount of star formation and supermassive blackhole growth in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was still to occur. Furthermore, the processes that shape today’s galaxies were at work, and can be seen in real time with the appropriate tools. The most active regions of galaxies at these redshifts are deeply obscured at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths by an opaque interstellar medium (ISM) that absorbs most of their radiation, and then re-emits at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths. This emission provides us with a very powerful probe of the regions within galaxies where the most intense activity takes place; both their total energy output, and from spectroscopy, about the physics and chemistry of the atomic and molecular gas that fuels, hides and surrounds these regions. This information is unique, but not complete: radio, mid- and near-IR, optical and X-ray observations each provide unique complementary views. Nevertheless, probing the obscured Universe, with the Atacama Large (Sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Herschel Space Observatory, Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and missions and telescopes that are not yet in construction, like an actively cooled sub-10-m class IR space telescope and a 25-m class ground-based submillimeter/THz telescope (CCAT) will provide a more complete picture of in which neighborhoods, by what means and how quickly the most vigorous bursts of activity take place.

  3. Lyman-alpha observations of Comet Kohoutek 1973 XII with Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Jenkins, E. B.; Bertaux, J. L.; Festou, M.; Keller, H. U.

    1976-01-01

    Comet Kohoutek 1973 XII was observed with a telescope-spectrometer on the Copernicus satellite on six occasions over a 1-month period starting on January 29, 1974. Positive detection of the cometary Ly-alpha emission profile was obtained on January 29 and February 2. Earlier observations of the geocoronal Ly-alpha emission profile allowed an instrumental intensity calibration and confirmation of the computed instrumental profile for an extended source at the Ly-alpha wavelength. After allowing for broadening by the instrument, a hydrogen-outflow velocity of about 10.6 km/s is derived from the width of the Ly-alpha emission on January 29. The intensity calibration combined with an appropriate cometary model led to cometary water-production rates for January 29 and February 2. Only upper limits were obtained for Ly-alpha on and after February 14. Searches for OH and D led to negative results.

  4. Unmelted Meteoritic Debris Collected from Eltanin Ejecta in Polarstern Cores from Expedition ANT XII/4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 1.7g of unmelted meteorite particles have been recovered from FS Polarstern piston cores collected on expedition ANT XII/4 that contain ejecta from the Eltanin impact event. Most of the mass (1.2 g) is a large, single specimen that is a polymict breccia, similar in mineralogy and chemistry to howardites or the silicate fraction of mesosiderites. Most of the remaining mass is in several large individual pieces (20-75mg each) that are polymict breccias, fragments dominated by pyroxene, and an igneous rock fragment. The latter has highly fractionated REE, similar to those reported in mafic clasts from mesosiderites. Other types of specimens identified include fragments dominated by maskelynite or olivine. These pieces of the projectile probably survived impact by being blown off the back surface of the Eltanin asteroid during its impact into the Bellingshausen Sea.

  5. Inhibition of expression of monocyte interleukin-1 by inhibitors of Hageman factor (factor XII).

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Voytus, J A; Toossi, Z

    1995-02-01

    In an earlier study, activated species of Hageman factor (factor XII) induced elaboration of interleukin-1 by human monocytes. These observations did not address whether Hageman factor participated in endotoxin-induced release of interleukin-1. To examine this question, the release of interleukin-1 by endotoxin-stimulated human mononuclear cells was measured in the presence of popcorn inhibitor, a specific inhibitor of Hageman factor. In the experiments herein described, popcorn inhibitor sharply decreased the release of interleukin-1 by human mononuclear cells that were incubated with endotoxin. This observation suggests that Hageman factor may play a role in the elaboration of interleukin-1 by human mononuclear cells. Conforming with this view, the addition of antiserum directed against Hageman factor inhibited the release of interleukin-1 from endotoxin-stimulated mononuclear cells. PMID:7844472

  6. Saccharin sulfonamides as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    PubMed

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Kairys, Visvaldas; Ivanova, Jekaterina; Trapencieris, Pēteris; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1-10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1-10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs. PMID:25276805

  7. Saccharin Sulfonamides as Inhibitors of Carbonic Anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII

    PubMed Central

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Trapencieris, Pēteris

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1–10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1–10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs. PMID:25276805

  8. Experimental electron-impact excitation rate coefficients for lithium-like Si XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, R.; Kolk, K.-H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1993-07-01

    Absolute excitation rate coefficients have been determined experimentally for all excited states up to 1s25f of the lithium-like ion Si XII using a well diagnosed theta-pinch plasma. A new method has been developed to determine the most crucial quantity of these measurements, the absolute concentration of the silicon ions in the plasma. For this we made use of the fact that sufficiently high lying levels are in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium (PLTE) with the ground state of the next higher ionization stage. A theoretical population model has been developed to study the influence of the different processes that might contribute to the population of the different levels at our plasma parameters. For most levels the theoretical excitation rate coefficients were found to be in fair agreement with the theoretical ones. The error of the experimentally determined excitation rate coefficients is of the order of ±50%.

  9. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  10. ELECTRON-ION RECOMBINATION OF Fe XII FORMING Fe XI: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, O.; Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.

    2012-07-01

    We have measured electron-ion recombination for Fe XII forming Fe XI using a merged-beam configuration at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The measured merged-beam recombination rate coefficient (MBRRC) for collision energies from 0 to 1500 eV is presented. This work uses a new method for determining the absolute MBRRC based on a comparison of the ion beam decay rate with and without the electron beam on. For energies below 75 eV, the spectrum is dominated by dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s {yields} 3p and 3p {yields} 3d core excitations. At higher energies, we observe contributions from 3 {yields} N' and 2 {yields} N' core excitation DR. We compare our experimental results to state-of-the-art multi-configuration Breit-Pauli (MCBP) calculations and find significant differences, both in resonance energies and strengths. We have extracted the DR contributions from the measured MBRRC data and transformed them into a plasma recombination rate coefficient (PRRC) for temperatures in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 7} K. We show that the previously recommended DR data for Fe XII significantly underestimate the PRRC at temperatures relevant for both photoionized plasmas (PPs) and collisionally ionized plasmas (CPs). This is contrasted with our MCBP PRRC results, which agree with the experiment to within 30% at PP temperatures and even better at CP temperatures. We find this agreement despite the disagreement shown by the detailed comparison between our MCBP and experimental MBRRC results. Last, we present a simple parameterized form of the experimentally derived PRRC for easy use in astrophysical modeling codes.

  11. Inactivation of factor XII active fragment in normal plasma. Predominant role of C-1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    de Agostini, A; Lijnen, H R; Pixley, R A; Colman, R W; Schapira, M

    1984-06-01

    To define the factors responsible for the inactivation of the active fragment derived from Factor XII (Factor XIIf ) in plasma, we studied the inactivation kinetics of Factor XIIf in various purified and plasma mixtures. We also analyzed the formation of 125I-Factor XIIf -inhibitor complexes by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In purified systems, the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of Factor XIIf with C-1-inhibitor, alpha 2-antiplasmin, and antithrombin III were 18.5, 0.91, and 0.32 X 10(4) M-1 min-1, respectively. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 1:1 stoichiometric complexes were formed between 125I-Factor XIIf and each of these three inhibitors. In contrast, kinetic and SDS-PAGE studies indicated that Factor XIIf did not react with alpha 1-antitrypsin or alpha 2-macroglobulin. The inactivation rate constant of Factor XIIf by prekallikrein-deficient plasma was 14.4 X 10(-2) min-1, a value that was essentially identical to the value predicted from the studies in purified systems (15.5 X 10(-2) min-1). This constant was reduced to 1.8 X 10(-2) min-1 when Factor XIIf was inactivated by prekallikrein-deficient plasma that had been immunodepleted (less than 5%) of C-1-inhibitor. In addition, after inactivation in normal plasma, 74% of the active 125I-Factor XIIf was found to form a complex with C-1-inhibitor, whereas 26% of the enzyme formed complexes with alpha 2-antiplasmin and antithrombin III. Furthermore, 42% of the labeled enzyme was still complexed with C-1-inhibitor when 125I-Factor XII was inactivated in hereditary angioedema plasma that contained 32% of functional C-1-inhibitor. This study quantitatively demonstrates the dominant role of C-1-inhibitor in the inactivation of Factor XIIf in the plasma milieu. PMID:6725552

  12. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

    A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

    This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  13. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the 'local group' of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

  14. Reduction of contact activation related fibrinolytic activity in factor XII deficient patients. Further evidence for the role of the contact system in fibrinolysis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Brandjes, D P; Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1991-01-01

    In this study the contribution of activation of the contact system to activation of the fibrinolytic system in vivo was investigated in healthy volunteers and in factor XII deficient patients. The plasminogen activating activity in plasma from healthy volunteers after infusion of desamino D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) was only partially blocked (for 77%) with specific antibodies to tissue-type plasminogen activator and urokinase type plasminogen activator. The residual activity could be quenched by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits factor XII activity and was not present in patients with a factor XII deficiency. The formation of plasmin upon the DDAVP stimulus as reflected by circulating plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes was lower in factor XII deficient patients than in healthy volunteers. Activation of the contact system occurred after DDAVP infusion in healthy volunteers and was absent in factor XII deficient patients. These results indicate that DDAVP induces a plasminogen activating activity that is partially dependent on activation of the contact system and that contributes to the overall fibrinolytic activity as indicated by the formation of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes. This fibrinolytic activity is impaired in factor XII deficient patients which may explain the occurrence of thromboembolic complications in these patients. Images PMID:1833421

  15. Sulfonamides incorporating heteropolycyclic scaffolds show potent inhibitory action against carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Barresi, Elisabetta; Salerno, Silvia; Marini, Anna Maria; Taliani, Sabrina; La Motta, Concettina; Simorini, Francesca; Da Settimo, Federico; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-02-15

    Three series of polycyclic compounds possessing either primary sulfonamide or carboxylic acid moieties as zinc-binding groups were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant CA isoforms, the cytosolic hCA I and II, as well as the transmembrane hCA IX and XII. Most of the new sulfonamides reported here showed excellent inhibitory effects against isoforms hCA II, IX and XII, but no highly isoform-selective inhibition profiles. On the other hand, the carboxylates selectively inhibited hCA IX (KIs ranging between 40.8 and 92.7nM) without inhibiting significantly the other isoforms. Sulfonamides/carboxylates incorporating polycyclic ring systems such as benzothiopyranopyrimidine, pyridothiopyranopyrimidine or dihydrobenzothiopyrano[4,3-c]pyrazole may be considered as interesting candidates for exploring the design of isoform-selective CAIs with various pharmacologic applications. PMID:26796953

  16. Synthesis and inhibition potency of novel ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating GABA as tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase IX and XII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Antel, Sabrina; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    New ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating a GABA moiety as a linker between the ureido and the sulfonamide functionalities were synthesized and their inhibition potency determined against both the predominant cytosolic (hCA I and II) and the transmembrane tumor-associated (hCA IX and XII) isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The majority of these compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic isoform hCA I and effective hCA II inhibitors, whereas they showed strong inhibition of the two transmembrane tumor-associated isoforms hCA IX and XII, with KIs in nanomolar range. Only one derivative had a good selectivity for inhibition of the tumor-associated hCA IX target isoform over the cytosolic and physiologically dominant off-target hCA I and II, being thus a potential tool to develop new anticancer agents. PMID:25792500

  17. Opisthorchiasis in infant remains from the medieval Zeleniy Yar burial ground of XII-XIII centuries AD

    PubMed Central

    Slepchenko, Sergey Mikhailovich; Gusev, Alexander Vasilevich; Ivanov, Sergey Nikolaevich; Svyatova, Evgenia Olegovna

    2015-01-01

    We present a paleoparasitological analysis of the medieval Zeleniy Yar burial ground of the XII-XII centuries AD located in the northern part of Western Siberia. Parasite eggs, identified as eggs of Opisthorchis felineus, were found in the samples from the pelvic area of a one year old infant buried at the site. Presence of these eggs in the soil samples from the infant’s abdomen suggests that he/she was infected with opisthorchiasis and imply consumption of undercooked fish. Ethnographic records collected among the population of the northern part of Western Siberia reveal numerous cases of feeding raw fish to their children. Zeleniy Yar case of opisthorchiasis suggests that this dietary custom has persisted from at least medieval times. PMID:26602874

  18. Opisthorchiasis in infant remains from the medieval Zeleniy Yar burial ground of XII-XIII centuries AD.

    PubMed

    Slepchenko, Sergey Mikhailovich; Gusev, Alexander Vasilevich; Ivanov, Sergey Nikolaevich; Svyatova, Evgenia Olegovna

    2015-12-01

    We present a paleoparasitological analysis of the medieval Zeleniy Yar burial ground of the XII-XII centuries AD located in the northern part of Western Siberia. Parasite eggs, identified as eggs of Opisthorchis felineus, were found in the samples from the pelvic area of a one year old infant buried at the site. Presence of these eggs in the soil samples from the infant's abdomen suggests that he/she was infected with opisthorchiasis and imply consumption of undercooked fish. Ethnographic records collected among the population of the northern part of Western Siberia reveal numerous cases of feeding raw fish to their children. Zeleniy Yar case of opisthorchiasis suggests that this dietary custom has persisted from at least medieval times. PMID:26602874

  19. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  20. Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  1. A novel library of saccharin and acesulfame derivatives as potent and selective inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase IX and XII isoforms.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Secci, Daniela; De Monte, Celeste; Mollica, Adriano; Ceruso, Mariangela; Akdemir, Atilla; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Codispoti, Rossella; De Cosmi, Federica; Guglielmi, Paolo; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    Small libraries of N-substituted saccharin and N-/O-substituted acesulfame derivatives were synthesized and tested as atypical and selective inhibitors of four different isoforms of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA I, II, IX and XII, EC 4.2.1.1). Most of them inhibited hCA XII in the low nanomolar range, hCA IX with KIs ranging between 19 and 2482nM, whereas they were poorly active against hCA II (KIs >10μM) and hCA I (KIs ranging between 318nM and 50μM). Since hCA I and II are ubiquitous off-target isoforms, whereas the cancer-related isoforms hCA IX and XII were recently validated as drug targets, these results represent an encouraging achievement in the development of new anticancer candidates. Moreover, the lack of a classical zinc binding group in the structure of these inhibitors opens innovative, yet unexplored scenarios for different mechanisms of inhibition that could explain the high inhibitory selectivity. A computational approach has been carried out to further rationalize the biological data and to characterize the binding mode of some of these inhibitors. PMID:26810710

  2. Annexins V and XII insert into bilayers at mildly acidic pH and form ion channels.

    PubMed

    Isas, J M; Cartailler, J P; Sokolov, Y; Patel, D R; Langen, R; Luecke, H; Hall, J E; Haigler, H T

    2000-03-21

    The functional hallmark of annexins is the ability to bind to the surface of phospholipid membranes in a reversible, Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We now report that human annexin V and hydra annexin XII reversibly bound to phospholipid vesicles in the absence of Ca(2+) at low pH; half-maximal vesicle association occurred at pH 5.3 and 5. 8, respectively. The following biochemical data support the hypothesis that these annexins insert into bilayers at mildly acidic pH. First, a photoactivatable reagent (3-trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[(125)I]iodophenyl)diazirine) which selectively labels proteins exposed to the hydrophobic domain of bilayers reacted with these annexins at pH 5.0 and below but not at neutral pH. Second, in a Triton X-114 partitioning assay, annexins V and XII act as integral membrane proteins at low pH and as hydrophilic proteins at neutral pH; in the presence of phospholipids half-maximal partitioning into detergent occurred at pH approximately 5.0. Finally, annexin V or XII formed single channels in phospholipid bilayers at low pH but not at neutral pH. A model is discussed in which the concentrations of H(+) and Ca(2+) regulate the reversible conversion of three forms of annexins-soluble, peripheral membrane, and transmembrane. PMID:10715122

  3. Optical properties of Group X-XII intermetallic compounds studied by HR-EELS.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Terauchi, Masami; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2014-11-01

    Electronic structure of d orbital states in transition metals is a key factor for their physical properties and chemical functions. Copper and intermetallic compound PdZn have good catalysis function for the methanol steam reforming reaction. Tsai et al. showed that from results of XPS measurements the d electronic structure of PdZn was similar with that of copper, and the catalysis function should be related to the d electron states [1]. This similarity of d electronic states leads to another view point of the mechanism for coloring the intermetallic compounds. It is well-known that the characteristic red color of copper is caused by interband transition from the d electrons. Therefore, PdZn and Group X-XII intermetallic compounds are expected to be colored and the optical properties should depend on the d electronic states. In this study, the relations between optical properties and d electron states of Group X-XII intermetallic compounds were investigated by using high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS) based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the relation between optical properties and d electronic states, the mechanism of colored intermetallic compounds will be discussed.Figure shows the optical reflectivity of NiZn, PdZn and PtZn, which were derived from EELS spectra by Kramers-Kronig analysis. Intensity drops (arrows) of the reflectivity were observed in visible energy region. These are caused by the interband transitions from d electronic states. The energy positions of the reflectivity drops have tendency of shifting to higher energy side with increasing atomic number of Group X elements (Ni → Pd → Pt). This indicates that the transition energies of d electrons become larger with the atomic number of the elements. First principle calculations (WIEN2k) confirmed that the interband transitions of d electronic states were excitations from bonding d states to hybrid states of anti-bonding s, p, and d states of Group

  4. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III

    PubMed Central

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M.; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W.; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12–/– mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  5. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time. PMID:25769377

  6. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12-/- mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  7. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  8. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngsoo; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matt; Bridle, Sarah; Clampitt, Joseph; Crocce, Martin; Honscheid, Klaus; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Sanchez, Carles; Wechsler, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  9. Synthesis 4-[2-(2-mercapto-4-oxo-4H-quinazolin-3-yl)-ethyl]-benzenesulfonamides with subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase II and XII inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Murat; Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Carta, Fabrizio; Ceruso, Mariangela; Al-Tamimi, Abdul-Malek S; Al-Kahtani, Abdulla A; Alasmary, Fatmah A S; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-09-15

    Condensation of substituted anthranilic acids with 4-isothiocyanatoethyl-benzenesulfonamide led to series of heterocyclic benzenesulfonamides incorporating 2-mercapto-quinazolin-4-one tails. These sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of the human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms hCA I and II (cytosolic isozymes), as well as hCA XII (a transmembrane, tumor-associated enzyme also involved in glaucoma-genesis). The new sulfonamides acted as medium potency inhibitors of hCA I (KIs of 28.5-2954nM), being highly effective as hCA II (KIs in the range of 0.62-12.4nM) and XII (KIs of 0.54-7.11nM) inhibitors. All substitution patterns present in these compounds (e.g., halogens, methyl and methoxy moieties, in positions 6, 7 and/or 8 of the 2-mercapto-quinazolin-4-one ring) led to highly effective hCA II/XII inhibitors. These compounds should thus be of interest as preclinical candidates in pathologies in which the activity of these enzymes should be inhibited, such as glaucoma (CA II and XII as targets) or some tumors in which the activity of isoforms CA II and XII is dysregulated. PMID:27396930

  10. A Zoo of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    We live in a universe filled with galaxies with an amazing variety of sizes and shapes. One of the biggest challenges for astronomers working in this field is to understand how all these types relate to each other in the background of an expanding universe. Modern astronomical surveys (like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) have revolutionised this field of astronomy, by providing vast numbers of galaxies to study. The sheer size of the these databases made traditional visual classification of the types galaxies impossible and in 2007 inspired the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org); starting the largest ever scientific collaboration by asking members of the public to help classify galaxies by type and shape. Galaxy Zoo has since shown itself, in a series of now more than 30 scientific papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this Invited Discourse I spoke a little about the historical background of our understanding of what galaxies are, of galaxy classification, about our modern view of galaxies in the era of large surveys. I finish with showcasing some of the contributions galaxy classifications from the Galaxy Zoo project are making to our understanding of galaxy evolution.

  11. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  12. Experimenting with galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    A study to demonstrate how the dynamics of galaxies may be investigated through the creation of galaxies within a computer model is presented. The numerical technique for simulating galaxies is shown to be both highly efficient and highly robust. Consideration is given to the anatomy of a galaxy, the gravitational N-body problem, numerical approaches to the N-body problem, use of the Poisson equation, and the symplectic integrator.

  13. Role of platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII in spontaneous venous thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Heestermans, Marco; Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Salvatori, Daniela; Laghmani, El Houari; Luken, Brenda M.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Korporaal, Suzanne J.; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.; Reitsma, Pieter H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII (FXII) have been implicated as important players in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis. Their role became evident in mouse models in which surgical handling was used to provoke thrombosis. Inhibiting anticoagulation in mice by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Serpinc1 and Proc also results in a thrombotic phenotype, which is spontaneous (no additional triggers) and reproducibly results in clots in the large veins of the head and fibrin deposition in the liver. This thrombotic phenotype is fatal but can be fully rescued by thrombin inhibition. The mouse model was used in this study to investigate the role of platelets, neutrophils, and FXII. After administration of siRNAs targeting Serpinc1 and Proc, antibody-mediated depletion of platelets fully abrogated the clinical features as well as microscopic aspects in the head. This was corroborated by strongly reduced fibrin deposition in the liver. Whereas neutrophils were abundant in siRNA-triggered thrombotic lesions, antibody-mediated depletion of circulating Ly6G-positive neutrophils did not affect onset, severity, or thrombus morphology. In addition, absence of circulating neutrophils did not affect quantitative liver fibrin deposition. Remarkably, siRNA-mediated depletion of plasma FXII accelerated the onset of the clinical phenotype; mice were affected with more severe thrombotic lesions. To summarize, in this study, onset and severity of the thrombotic phenotype are dependent on the presence of platelets but not circulating neutrophils. Unexpectedly, FXII has a protective effect. This study challenges the proposed roles of neutrophils and FXII in venous thrombosis pathophysiology. PMID:26932804

  14. A comparison of the effects of factor XII deficiency and prekallikrein deficiency on thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Kokoye, Yasin; Ivanov, Ivan; Cheng, Qiufang; Matafonov, Anton; Dickeson, S Kent; Mason, Shauna; Sexton, Daniel J; Renné, Thomas; McCrae, Keith; Feener, Edward P; Gailani, David

    2016-04-01

    Studies with animal models implicate the plasma proteases factor XIIa (FXIIa) and α-kallikrein in arterial and venous thrombosis. As congenital deficiencies of factor XII (FXII) or prekallikrein (PK), the zymogens of FXIIa and α-kallikrein respectively, do not cause bleeding disorders, inhibition of these enzymes may have therapeutic benefit without compromising hemostasis. The relative contributions of FXIIa and α-kallikrein to thrombosis in animal models are not clear. We compared mice lacking FXII or PK to wild type mice in established models of arterial thrombosis. Wild type mice developed carotid artery occlusion when the vessel was exposed to a 3.5% solution of ferric chloride (FeCl3). FXII-deficient mice were resistant to occlusion at 5% FeCl3 and partially resistant at 10% FeCl3. PK-deficient mice were resistant at 3.5% FeCl3 and partially resistant at 5% FeCl3. Mice lacking high molecular weight kininogen, a cofactor for PK activation and activity, were also partially resistant to thrombosis at 5% FeCl3. Induction of carotid artery thrombosis with Rose Bengal was delayed in FXII-deficient mice compared to wild type or PK-deficient animals. In human plasma supplemented with silica, DNA or collagen to induce contact activation, an antibody to the FXIIa active site was more effective at preventing thrombin generation than an antibody to the α-kallikrein active site. Similarly, the FXIIa antibody was more effective at reducing fibrin formation in human blood flowing through collagen coated-tubes. The findings suggest that inhibitors of FXIIa will have more potent anti-thrombotic effects than inhibitors of α-kallikrein. PMID:26950760

  15. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  16. Increased activity of coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) causes hereditary angioedema type III.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Sven; Martin, Ludovic; Hennies, Hans Christian; Müller, Felicitas; Van Driessche, Karen; Karpushova, Anna; Stevens, Wim; Colombo, Roberto; Renné, Thomas; Drouet, Christian; Bork, Konrad; Nöthen, Markus M

    2006-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized clinically by recurrent acute skin swelling, abdominal pain, and potentially life-threatening laryngeal edema. Three forms of HAE have been described. The classic forms, HAE types I and II, occur as a consequence of mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene. In contrast to HAE types I and II, HAE type III has been observed exclusively in women, where it appears to be correlated with conditions of high estrogen levels--for example, pregnancy or the use of oral contraceptives. A recent report proposed two missense mutations (c.1032C-->A and c.1032C-->G) in F12, the gene encoding human coagulation factor XII (FXII, or Hageman factor) as a possible cause of HAE type III. Here, we report the occurrence of the c.1032C-->A (p.Thr328Lys) mutation in an HAE type III-affected family of French origin. Investigation of the F12 gene in a large German family did not reveal a coding mutation. Haplotype analysis with use of microsatellite markers is compatible with locus heterogeneity in HAE type III. To shed more light on the pathogenic relevance of the HAE type III-associated p.Thr328Lys mutation, we compared FXII activity and plasma levels in patients carrying the mutation with that of healthy control individuals. Our data strongly suggest that p.Thr328Lys is a gain-of-function mutation that markedly increases FXII amidolytic activity but that does not alter FXII plasma levels. We conclude that enhanced FXII enzymatic plasma activity in female mutation carriers leads to enhanced kinin production, which results in angioedema. Transcription of F12 is positively regulated by estrogens, which may explain why only women are affected with HAE type III. The results of our study represent an important step toward an understanding of the molecular processes involved in HAE type III and provide diagnostic and possibly new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:17186468

  17. Competitive-Protein Adsorption in Contact Activation of Blood Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Rui; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII is dissolved. Solution yield of FXIIa arising from FXII contact with hydrophilic activating particles (fully-water-wettable glass) suspended in a protein cocktail is shown to be significantly greater than that obtained under corresponding activation conditions in buffer solutions containing only FXII. By contrast, solution yield of FXIIa arising from FXII contact with hydrophobic particles (silanized glass) suspended in protein cocktail is sharply lower than obtained in buffer. This confirms that contact activation is not specific to anionic hydrophilic surfaces as proposed by the accepted biochemistry of surface activation. Rather, contact activation in the presence of proteins unrelated to the plasma coagulation cascade leads to an apparent specificity for hydrophilic surfaces that is actually due to a relative diminution of activation at hydrophobic surfaces and an enhancement at hydrophilic surfaces. Furthermore, the rate of FXIIa accumulation in whole-plasma and buffer solution is found to decrease with time in the continuous presence of activating surfaces, leading to a steady-state FXIIa yield dependent on the initial FXII solution concentration for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic procoagulant particles suspended in either plasma, protein cocktail, or buffer. These results strongly suggest that activation competes with an autoinhibition reaction in which FXIIa itself inhibits FXII→FXIIa. Experimental results are modeled using a reaction scheme invoking FXII activation and autoinhibition linked to protein adsorption to procoagulant surfaces, where FXII activation is presumed to proceed by either autoactivation ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa) and autohydrolysis ( FXII→FXIIa2FXIIa) in buffer solution or autoactivation and reciprocal activation (kallikrein mediated hydrolysis) in plasma. FXII adsorption competition with other

  18. Role of platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII in spontaneous venous thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Heestermans, Marco; Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Salvatori, Daniela; Laghmani, El Houari; Luken, Brenda M; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Spronk, Henri M H; Korporaal, Suzanne J; Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Reitsma, Pieter H; van Vlijmen, Bart J M

    2016-05-26

    Recently, platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII (FXII) have been implicated as important players in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis. Their role became evident in mouse models in which surgical handling was used to provoke thrombosis. Inhibiting anticoagulation in mice by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Serpinc1 and Proc also results in a thrombotic phenotype, which is spontaneous (no additional triggers) and reproducibly results in clots in the large veins of the head and fibrin deposition in the liver. This thrombotic phenotype is fatal but can be fully rescued by thrombin inhibition. The mouse model was used in this study to investigate the role of platelets, neutrophils, and FXII. After administration of siRNAs targeting Serpinc1 and Proc, antibody-mediated depletion of platelets fully abrogated the clinical features as well as microscopic aspects in the head. This was corroborated by strongly reduced fibrin deposition in the liver. Whereas neutrophils were abundant in siRNA-triggered thrombotic lesions, antibody-mediated depletion of circulating Ly6G-positive neutrophils did not affect onset, severity, or thrombus morphology. In addition, absence of circulating neutrophils did not affect quantitative liver fibrin deposition. Remarkably, siRNA-mediated depletion of plasma FXII accelerated the onset of the clinical phenotype; mice were affected with more severe thrombotic lesions. To summarize, in this study, onset and severity of the thrombotic phenotype are dependent on the presence of platelets but not circulating neutrophils. Unexpectedly, FXII has a protective effect. This study challenges the proposed roles of neutrophils and FXII in venous thrombosis pathophysiology. PMID:26932804

  19. Plant nuclear shape is independently determined by the SUN-WIP-WIT2-myosin XI-i complex and CRWN1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Groves, Norman Reid; Meier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei undergo dynamic shape changes during plant development, but the mechanism is unclear. In Arabidopsis, Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, WPP domain-interacting proteins (WIPs), WPP domain-interacting tail-anchored proteins (WITs), myosin XI-i, and CROWDED NUCLEI 1 (CRWN1) have been shown to be essential for nuclear elongation in various epidermal cell types. It has been proposed that WITs serve as adaptors linking myosin XI-i to the SUN-WIP complex at the nuclear envelope (NE). Recently, an interaction between Arabidopsis SUN1 and SUN2 proteins and CRWN1, a plant analog of lamins, has been reported. Therefore, the CRWN1-SUN-WIP-WIT-myosin XI-i interaction may form a linker of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton complex. In this study, we investigate this proposed mechanism in detail for nuclei of Arabidopsis root hairs and trichomes. We show that WIT2, but not WIT1, plays an essential role in nuclear shape determination by recruiting myosin XI-i to the SUN-WIP NE bridges. Compared with SUN2, SUN1 plays a predominant role in nuclear shape. The NE localization of SUN1, SUN2, WIP1, and a truncated WIT2 does not depend on CRWN1. While crwn1 mutant nuclei are smooth, the nuclei of sun or wit mutants are invaginated, similar to the reported myosin XI-i mutant phenotype. Together, this indicates that the roles of the respective WIT and SUN paralogs have diverged in trichomes and root hairs, and that the SUN-WIP-WIT2-myosin XI-i complex and CRWN1 independently determine elongated nuclear shape. This supports a model of nuclei being shaped both by cytoplasmic forces transferred to the NE and by nucleoplasmic filaments formed under the NE. PMID:25759303

  20. Segregation properties of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, B.X.; Da Costa, L.N. )

    1990-10-01

    Using the recently completed Southern Sky Redshift Survey, in conjunction with measurements of the central surface brightness, the existence of segregation in the way galaxies of different morphology and surface brightness are distributed in space is investigated. Results indicate that there is some evidence that low surface brightness galaxies are more randomly distributed than brighter ones and that this effect is independent of the well-known tendency of early-type galaxies to cluster more strongly than spirals. Presuming that the observed clustering was established at the epoch of galaxy formation, it may provide circumstantial evidence for biased galaxy formation. 24 refs.

  1. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  2. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase I, II, IX and XII inhibitory activity of sulfamates incorporating piperazinyl-ureido moieties.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Deplano, Alessandro; Balboni, Gianfranco; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-09-01

    A series of sulfamates were synthesized using as lead compound SLC-0111, a sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitor in Phase I clinical trials. The new derivatives incorporated ureido moieties as spacers between the benzene sulfamate fragment which binds the zinc ion from the active site, and the tail of the inhibitor, but the urea moieties were part of a substituted piperazine ring system. The derivatives (and some of their phenol precursors) were tested for the inhibition of the cytosolic, hCA I and II (off target isoforms) and the trans-membrane, tumor-associated hCA IX and XII enzymes (anticancer drug targets). Generally hCA I was not effectively inhibited, whereas many low nanomolar inhibitors were evidenced against hCA II (KIs in the range of 1.0-94.4 nM), IX (KIs in the range of 0.91-36.9 nM), and XII (KIs in the range of 1.0-84.5 nM). The best substitution fragments at the piperazine ring included the following moieties: 3-methylphenyl, 2,3-dimethylphenyl, 4-methoxyphenyl, 6-arylpyrimidine-2-yl. PMID:26233796

  3. Funerary practices of the Iberomaurusian population of Taforalt (Tafoughalt, Morocco, 11-12,000 BP): the case of Grave XII.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Condemi, Silvana; Mariotti, Valentina

    2010-06-01

    The Iberomaurusian necropolis of Taforalt (Morocco, 11-12000 BP), excavated by Roche in the 1950s, contains 28 multiple graves. The funerary practices of the Taforalt population have been the focus of a previous work (Mariotti et al., 2009). In the absence of the excavation records of the necropolis, these funerary practices were investigated through the analysis of the contents of each grave and the distribution of intentionally modified specimens (ochre-dyeing, cut marks). Previous research has drawn particular attention to Grave XII (containing three male adults and two juveniles), where many intentionally modified specimens were identified. The present study focused specifically on the human remains recovered from Grave XII. Analysis of these remains has provided evidence of interventions, such as dismemberment and defleshing of the cadaver, and the use of ochre to colour the bones. Furthermore, the presence of lesions on two skulls suggests the possibility of intentional killing and cannibalism among the Taforalt population. This study further supports our previous impression of the complex and diversified funerary practices, characterising the social life of the Iberomaurusian population of Taforalt. PMID:20471665

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of IKK inhibitor XII, thymulin, and fat-soluble antioxidants in LPS-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Glushkova, O V; Lunin, S M; Parfenyuk, S B; Novoselova, T V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare the anti-inflammatory effects of several agents applied in vivo, namely, a synthetic inhibitor of the NF-κB cascade, fat-soluble antioxidants, and the thymic peptide thymulin. Cytokine response in LPS-treated mice was analysed in tandem with the following parameters: the synthesis of inducible forms of the heat shock proteins HSP72 and HSP90α; activity of the NF-κB and SAPK/JNK signalling pathways; and TLR4 expression. Inflammation-bearing Balb/c male mice were pretreated with an inhibitor of IKK-α/β kinases (IKK Inhibitor XII); with thymulin; with dietary coenzyme Q9, α-tocopherol, and β-carotene; or with combinations of the inhibitor and peptide or antioxidants. Comparable anti-inflammatory effects were observed in inflammation-bearing mice treated separately with thymulin or with dietary antioxidants administered daily for two weeks before LPS treatment. When LPS-injected mice were treated with the inhibitor and antioxidants together, neither plasma cytokines, signal proteins, nor heat shock proteins recovered more efficiently than when mice were treated with these agents separately. In contrast to antioxidant diet, the thymulin was shown to increase the effect of IKK Inhibitor XII in preventing IKK activation in LPS-treated mice. PMID:25045213

  5. Isolated galaxies, pairs, and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuneva, I.; Kalinkov, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors searched for isolated galaxies, pairs and groups of galaxies in the CfA survey (Huchra et al. 1983). It was assumed that the distances to galaxies are given by R = V/H sub o, where H sub o = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1) and R greater than 6 Mpc. The searching procedure is close to those, applied to find superclusters of galaxies (Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986). A sphere with fixed radius r (asterisk) is described around each galaxy. The mean spatial density in the sphere is m. Let G (sup 1) be any galaxy and G (sup 2) be its nearest neighbor at a distance R sub 2. If R sub 2 exceeds the 95 percent quintile in the distribution of the distances of the second neighbors, then G (sup 1) is an isolated galaxy. Let the midpoint of G (sup 1) and G (sup 2) be O sub 2 and r sub 2=R sub 2/2. For the volume V sub 2, defined with the radius r sub 2, the density D sub 2 less than k mu, the galaxy G (sup 2) is a single one and the procedure for searching for pairs and groups, beginning with this object is over and we have to pass to another object. Here the authors present the groups - isolated and nonisolated - with n greater than 3, found in the CfA survey in the Northern galactic hemisphere. The parameters used are k = 10 and r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc. Table 1 contains: (1) the group number, (2) the galaxy, nearest to the multiplet center, (3) multiplicity n, (4) the brightest galaxy if it is not listed in (2); (5) and (6) are R.A. and Dec. (1950), (7) - mean distance D in Mpc. Further there are the mean density rho (8) of the multiplet (galaxies Mpc (exp -3), (9) the density rho (asterisk) for r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc and (10) the density rho sub g for the group with its nearest neighbor. The parenthesized digits for densities in the last three columns are powers of ten.

  6. 77 FR 29633 - Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC, Alta Wind XIII, LLC, Alta Wind XIV, LLC, Alta Wind XV, LLC, Alta Windpower... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207, Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta...

  7. Semiempirical calculation of radiative constants in the spectra of nickel-like ions Kr IX, Sr XI, Y XII, Ru XVII, Pd XIX, and Ag XX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The probabilities of the electric-dipole transitions 3 d 94 p, 3 d 94 f-3 d 10, 3 d 94 s, and 3 d 94 d in the spectra of nickel-like ions Kr IX, Sr XI, Y XII, Ru XVII, Pd XIX, and Ag XX are calculated semiempirically with the use of published energy levels.

  8. Deep infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Houck, J. R.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1992-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of 17 infrared-bright emission-line galaxies near the north ecliptic pole are presented. Reddening-corrected line ratios forbidden O III 5007/H-beta, N II 6583/H-alpha, S II (6716 + 6731)/H-alpha, and O I 6300/H-alpha are used to discriminate between candidate energy generation mechanisms in each galaxy. These criteria have frequently been applied to optically selected samples of galaxies in the past, but this is the first time they have been applied to a set of faint flux-limited infrared-selected objects. The analysis indicates the sample contains seven starburst galaxies and three (AGN). However, seven galaxies in the present sample elude the classification scheme based on these line ratios. It is concluded that a two-component (starburst plus AGN) model for energy generation is inadequate for infrared galaxies.

  9. Classic Galaxy with Glamour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This color composite image of nearby NGC 300 combines the visible-light pictures from Carnegie Institution of Washington's 100-inch telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (colored red and yellow), with ultraviolet views from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Galaxy Evolution Explorer detectors image far ultraviolet light (colored blue).

    This composite image traces star formation in progress. Young hot blue stars dominate the outer spiral arms of the galaxy, while the older stars congregate in the nuclear regions which appear yellow-green. Gases heated by hot young stars and shocks due to winds from massive stars and supernova explosions appear in pink, as revealed by the visible-light image of the galaxy.

    Located nearly 7 million light years away, NGC 300 is a member of a nearby group of galaxies known as the Sculptor Group. It is a spiral galaxy like our own Milky Way.

  10. Infrared Polarimetry of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    Imaging polarimetry at near infrared wavelengths can probe the magnetic field geometry in external galaxies in regions of high extinction inaccessible to optical techniques. Polarization of starlight from deep into dustlanes, blowouts, and dust enshrouded nuclei can be measured. A total of twelve galaxies showing only interstellar polarization have been observed to date. Normal galaxies such as NGC 4565 show a magnetic field geometry lying in the plane of the disk and a polarization strength very similar to what is observed in the Milky Way. Ultraluminous galaxies and galaxies with starburst nuclei show a polar magnetic field geometry in the nucleus, causing a crossed polaroid effect and reduced polarization. Interestingly, galaxies with active disks, but otherwise normal, such as NGC 891 show the effects of blowouts in the polarization maps.

  11. Galaxy NGC5474

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer took this ultraviolet color image of the galaxy NGC5474 on June 7, 2003. NGC5474 is located 20 million light-years from Earth and is within a group of galaxies dominated by the Messier 101 galaxy. Star formation in this galaxy shows some evidence of a disturbed spiral pattern, which may have been induced by tidal interactions with Messier 101.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  12. Finding the First Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Astronomers study distant galaxies by taking long exposures in deep survey fields. They choose fields that are empty of known sources, so that they are statistically representative of the Universe as a whole. Astronomers can compare the distribution of the detected galaxies in brightness, color, morphology and redshift to theoretical models, in order to puzzle out the processes of galaxy evolution. In 2004, the Hubble Space Telescope was pointed at a small, deep-survey field in the southern constellation Fornax for more than 500 hours of exposure time. The resulting Hubble Ultra-Deep Field could see the faintest and most distant galaxies that the telescope is capable of viewing. These galaxies emitted their light less than 1 billion years after the Big Bang. From the Ultra Deep Field and other galaxy surveys, astronomers have built up a history of star formation in the universe. the peak occurred about7 billion years ago, about half of the age of the current universe, then the number of stars that were forming was about 15 time the rate today. Going backward in time to when the very first starts and galaxies formed, the average star-formation rate should drop to zero. but when looking at the most distant galaxies in the Ultra Deep field, the star formation rate is still higher than it is today. The faintest galaxies seen by Hubble are not the first galaxies that formed in the early universe. To detect these galaxies NASA is planning the James Webb Space Telescope for launch in 2013. Webb will have a 6.5-meter diameter primary mirror, much bigger than Hubble's 2.4-meter primary, and will be optimized for infrared observations to see the highly redshifted galaxies.

  13. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons.

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars.

    Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them.

    Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist.

    Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across.

    This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  14. Photometry of compact galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.; Usher, P. D.; Barrett, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photometric histories of the N galaxies 3C 390.3 and PKS 0521-36. Four other compact galaxies, Markarian 9, I Zw 92, 2 Zw 136, and III Zw 77 showed no evidence of variability. The photometric histories were obtained from an exhaustive study of those plates of the Harvard collection taken with large aperture cameras. The images of all galaxies reported were indistinguishable from stars due to the camera f-ratios and low surface brightness of the outlying nebulosities of the galaxies. Standard techniques for the study of variable stars are therefore applicable.

  15. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  16. Ripples in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, F.; Seitzer, P.

    1988-05-01

    Evidence is presented that ripples occur not only in ellipticals but also in disk galaxies of Hubble types S0, S0/Sa, and Sa, and probably even in the Sbc galaxy NGC 3310. It is argued that the ripples cannot usually have resulted from transient spiral waves or other forced vibrations in existing disks, but instead consist of extraneous sheetlike matter. The frequent presence of major disk-shaped companions suggests that ripple material may be acquired not only through wholesale mergers but also through mass transfer from neighbor galaxies. The implications of ripples in early-type disk galaxies are addressed. 40 references.

  17. Starbursts in colliding galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Duc, P. A.

    Global starbursts are a consequence of rapid changes in the dynamics of the interstellar gas. The most violent starbursts take place in the nuclear regions of galaxies, when galaxy-galaxy encounters cause a sudden reduction of angular momentum, with the subsequent infall to the central regions of a large fraction of the overall interstellar gas. Although starbursts are also observed in the central regions of isolated barred spiral galaxies, most of the starbursts with bolometric luminosities above 1012Lsun occur in mergers. Super-starbursts in galactic nuclei seem to require high infall rates of interstellar gas that can only be produced during mergers. The authors discuss the phenomenon of extranuclear starbursts in relation to the formation of dwarf galaxies during galaxy-galaxy collisions. As a consequence of tidal interactions a fraction of the less gravitationally bound atomic hydrogen that populates the outskirts of disk galaxies may escape into the intergalactic medium. It is found that the ejected gas may assemble again and collapse, leading to the formation of intergalactic starbursts, namely, tidal dwarf galaxies.

  18. From tidal dwarf galaxies to satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, F.; Duc, P.-A.

    2006-09-01

    The current popular cosmological models have granted the population of dwarf satellite galaxies a key role: their number, location, and masses constrain both the distribution of dark matter and the physical evolution of their hosts. In the past years, there has been increasing observational evidence that objects with masses of dwarf galaxies can form in the tidal tails of colliding galaxies, as well as speculations that they could become satellite-like galaxies orbiting around their progenitors and thus be cosmologically important. Yet, whether the so-called "Tidal Dwarf Galaxy" (TDG) candidates are really long-lived objects and not transient features only present in young interacting systems is still largely an open question to which numerical simulations may give precise answers. We present here a set of 96 N-body simulations of colliding galaxies with various mass ratios and encounter geometries, including gas dynamics and star formation. We study the formation and long-term evolution of their TDG candidates. Among the 593 substructures initially identified in tidal tails, about 75% fall back onto their progenitor or are disrupted in a few 108 years. The remaining 25% become long-lived bound objects that typically survive more than 2 Gyr with masses above 108 M⊙. These long-lived, satellite-like objects, are found to form in massive gaseous accumulations originally located in the outermost regions of the tidal tails. Studying the statistical properties of the simulated TDGs, we infer several basic properties that dwarf galaxies should meet to have a possible tidal origin and apply these criteria to the Local Group dwarfs. We further found that the presence of TDGs would foster the anisotropy observed in the distribution of classical satellite galaxies around their host. Identifying the conditions fulfilled by interacting systems that were able to form long-lived tidal dwarfs - a spiral merging with a galaxy between 1/4 and 8 times its mass, on a prograde orbit

  19. Gas in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn Joyce

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, and provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We investigate the neutral hydrogen properties (i.e. content, morphology, kinematics) of void galaxies, both individually and systematically, using a combination of observations and simulations, to form a more complete understanding of the nature of these systems. We investigate in detail the H I morphology and kinematics of two void galaxies. One is an isolated polar disk galaxy in a diffuse cosmological wall situated between two voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies. We also examine KK 246, the only confirmed galaxy located within the nearby Tully Void. It is a dwarf galaxy with an extremely extended H I disk and signs of an H I cloud with anomalous velocity. It also exhibits clear misalignment between the kinematical major and minor axes, and a general misalignment between the H I and optical major axes. The relative isolation and extreme underdense environment make these both very interesting cases for examining the role of gas accretion in galaxy evolution. To study void galaxies as a population, we have carefully selected a sample of 60 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS. We have imaged this new Void Galaxy Survey in H I at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope with a typical resolution of 8 kpc, probing a volume of 1.2 Mpc and 12,000 km s^-1 surrounding each galaxy. We reach H I mass limits of 2 x 10^8 M_sun and column density sensitivities of 5 x 10^19 cm^-2

  20. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected.

    A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue.

    Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise.

    NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy.

    Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.

    The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State

  1. Bars Triggered By Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2015-05-01

    Galaxy mergers drive galaxy evolution and are a key mechanism by which galaxies grow and transform. Unlike galaxy mergers where two galaxies combine into one remnant, galaxy flybys occur when two independent galaxy halos interpenetrate but detach at a later time; these one-time events are surprisingly common and can even out-number galaxy mergers at low redshift for massive halos. Although these interactions are transient and occur far outside the galaxy disk, flybys can still drive a rapid and large pertubations within both the intruder and victim halos. We explored how flyby encounters can transform each galaxy using a suite of N-body simulations. We present results from three co-planar flybys between disk galaxies, demonstrating that flybys can both trigger strong bar formation and can spin-up dark matter halos.

  2. Soft x-ray amplification in lithium-like Al XI (154 /angstrom/) and Si XII (129 /angstrom/)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Skinner, C.H.; Wouters, A.; Valeo, E.; Voorhees, D.; Suckewer, S.

    1988-03-01

    Recent experiments on soft x-ray amplification in lithium-like ions in a CO/sub 2/ laser-produced recombining plasma confined in a magnetic field are presented. The maximum gain-length products observed are GL approx. = 3 to 4 for the 154 /angstrom/, 4f-3d transition in Al XI and GL (approxreverse arrowequal/ 1 to 2 for the 129 /angstrom/, 4f-3d transition in Si XII, respectively. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code with a collisional-radiative atomic model was used to model the plasma and the theoretical predictions of gain agree well with the observations. Descriptions of both hydrodynamic and atomic physics code are given. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F.; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C.; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W.; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F.; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein–kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders. PMID:27188843

  4. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein-kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders. PMID:27188843

  5. Evolution of galaxy habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobat, R.; Hong, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We combine a semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution with constraints on circumstellar habitable zones and the distribution of terrestrial planets in order to probe the suitability of galaxies of different mass and type to host habitable planets, and how it evolves with time. We find that the fraction of stars with terrestrial planets in their habitable zone (known as habitability) depends only weakly on galaxy mass, with a maximum around 4 × 1010M⊙. We estimate that 0.7% of all stars in Milky Way-type galaxies to host a terrestrial planet within their habitable zone, consistent with the value derived from Kepler observations. On the other hand, the habitability of passive galaxies is slightly but systematically higher, unless we assume an unrealistically high sensitivity of planets to supernovae. We find that the overall habitability of galaxies has not changed significantly in the last ~8 Gyr, with most of the habitable planets in local disk galaxies having formed ~1.5 Gyr before our own solar system. Finally, we expect that ~1.4 ×109 planets similar to present-day Earth have existed so far in our galaxy.

  6. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  7. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  8. GALAXIES: SNAPSHOTS IN TIME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sequence of NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of remote galaxies offers tantalizing initial clues to the evolution of galaxies in the universe. [far left column] These are traditional spiral and elliptical-shaped galaxies that make up the two basic classes of island star cities that inhabit the universe we see in our current epoch (14 billion years after the birth of the universe in the Big Bang). Elliptical galaxies contain older stars, while spirals have vigorous ongoing star formation in their dusty, pancake-shaped disks. Our Milky Way galaxy is a typical spiral, or disk-shaped galaxy, on the periphery of the great Virgo cluster. Both galaxies in this column are a few tens of millions of light-years away, and therefore represent our current stage of the universe s evolution. [center left column] These galaxies existed in a rich cluster when the universe was approximately two-thirds its present age. Elliptical galaxies (top) appear fully evolved because they resemble today's descendants. By contrast, some spirals have a frothier appearance, with loosely shaped arms of young star formation. The spiral population appears more disrupted due to a variety of possible dynamical effects that result from dwelling in a dense cluster. [center right column] Distinctive spiral structure appears more vague and disrupted in galaxies that existed when the universe was nearly one-third its present age. These objects do not have the symmetry of current day spirals and contain irregular lumps of starburst activity. However, even this far back toward the beginning of time, the elliptical galaxy (top) is still clearly recognizable. However, the distinction between ellipticals and spirals grows less certain with increasing distance. [far right column] These extremely remote, primeval objects existed with the universe was nearly one-tenth its current age. The distinction between spiral and elliptical galaxies may well disappear at this early epoch. However, the object in

  9. MULTIPLE GALAXY COLLISIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Here is a sampling of 15 ultraluminous infrared galaxies viewed by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble's sharp vision reveals more complexity within these galaxies, which astronomers are interpreting as evidence of a multiple-galaxy pileup. These images, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are part of a three-year study of 123 galaxies within 3 billion light-years of Earth. The study was conducted in 1996, 1997, and 1999. False colors were assigned to these photos to enhance fine details within these coalescing galaxies. Credits: NASA, Kirk Borne (Raytheon and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.), Luis Colina (Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain), and Howard Bushouse and Ray Lucas (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.)

  10. Galaxy Messier 83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 83 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 7, 2003. Located 15 million light years from Earth and known as the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, Messier 83 displays significant amounts of ultraviolet emissions far from the optically bright portion of the galaxy. It is also known to have an extended hydrogen disc that appears to radiate a faint ultraviolet emission. The red stars in the foreground of the image are Milky Way stars.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission is led by the California Institute of Technology, which is also responsible for the science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument. The mission was developed under NASA's Explorers Program, managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The mission's international partners include South Korea and France.

  11. Insights on galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James Steven

    1999-12-01

    Recent advances in theoretical modeling coupled with a wealth of new observational data, provide a unique opportunity for gaining insight into process of galaxy formation. I present results which test and develop current theories. The analysis utilizes state of the art theoretical modeling and makes predictions aimed at comparisons with some of the latest and upcoming observational data sets. In part I, I discuss an analysis of the structure and properties of dark matter halos (believed to govern the dynamical evolution of galaxies). The results make use of very high-resolution N-body simulations, and are derived from a new hierarchical halo finder, designed especially for these projects and to complement advancements in simulation technology. I present information on the dark matter halo substructure, density profiles, angular momentum structure, and collision rates. In part II, I discuss some aspects of galaxy formation theory in light of new observational data. The discussion includes an investigation of the nature of high-redshift galaxies, the local velocity function of galaxies, and the use of gamma ray telescopes to probe the extra-galactic background light-the latter analysis is done in the context of semi-analytic modeling of galaxy formation. The most important conclusions of this thesis are as follows. (1)Dark matter halos at high redshift are much less concentrated than previously believed. implying that quiescently star-forming galaxies at high redshift are larger and dimmer than expected. (2)The observed bright. abundant. and highly clustered high- redshift (Lyman-break) galaxies are likely starbursts driven by collisions between relatively small galaxies at z ~ 3. And (3)there is a real possibility of using the growing advances in γ-ray astronomy to probe many poorly constrained processes of galaxy formation, including the stellar initial mass function and the star formation history of the universe.

  12. The galaxy ancestor problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, M. J.; Lang, R. H.

    2012-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) findsgalaxies whose Tolman dimming exceeds 10 mag. Could evolution alone explain these as our ancestor galaxies or could they be representatives of quite a different dynasty whose descendants are no longer prominent today? We explore the latter hypothesis and argue that surface brightness selection effects naturally bring into focus quite different dynasties from different redshifts. Thus, the HST z = 7 galaxies could be examples of galaxies whose descendants are both too small and too choked with dust to be recognizable in our neighbourhood easily today. Conversely, the ancestors of the Milky Way and its obvious neighbours would have completely sunk below the sky at z > 1.2, unless they were more luminous in the past, although their diffused light could account for the missing re-ionization flux. This Succeeding Prominent Dynasties Hypothesis (SPDH) fits the existing observations both naturally and well even without evolution, including the bizarre distributions of galaxy surface brightness found in deep fields, the angular size ˜(1 + z)-1 law, 'downsizing' which turns out to be an 'illusion' in the sense that it does not imply evolution, 'infant mortality', that is, the discrepancy between stars born and stars seen, the existence of 'red nuggets', and finally the recently discovered and unexpected excess of quasar absorption line damped Lyα systems at high redshift. If galaxies were not significantly brighter in the past and the SPDH were true, then a large proportion of galaxies could remain sunk from sight, possibly at all redshifts, and these sunken galaxies could supply the missing re-ionization flux. We show that fishing these sunken galaxies out of the sky by their optical emissions alone is practically impossible, even when they are nearby. More ingenious methods are needed to detect them. It follows that disentangling galaxy evolution through studying ever higher redshift galaxies may be a forlorn hope because one could

  13. Are spiral galaxies heavy smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.; Disney, M.; Phillipps, S )

    1990-07-01

    The dustiness of spiral galaxies is discussed. Starburst galaxies and the shortage of truly bright spiral galaxies is cited as evidence that spiral galaxies are far dustier than has been thought. The possibility is considered that the dust may be hiding missing mass.

  14. Galaxy 'Hunting' Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Galaxies found under the Glare of Cosmic Flashlights Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have discovered in a single pass about a dozen otherwise invisible galaxies halfway across the Universe. The discovery, based on a technique that exploits a first-class instrument, represents a major breakthrough in the field of galaxy 'hunting'. ESO PR Photo 40a/07 ESO PR Photo 40a/07 Newly Found Galaxies (SINFONI/VLT) The team of astronomers led by Nicolas Bouché have used quasars to find these galaxies. Quasars are very distant objects of extreme brilliance, which are used as cosmic beacons that reveal galaxies lying between the quasar and us. The galaxy's presence is revealed by a 'dip' in the spectrum of the quasar - caused by the absorption of light at a specific wavelength. The team used huge catalogues of quasars, the so-called SDSS and 2QZ catalogues, to select quasars with dips. The next step was then to observe the patches of the sky around these quasars in search for the foreground galaxies from the time the Universe was about 6 billion years old, almost half of its current age. "The difficulty in actually spotting and seeing these galaxies stems from the fact that the glare of the quasar is too strong compared to the dim light of the galaxy," says Bouché. This is where observations taken with SINFONI on ESO's VLT made the difference. SINFONI is an infrared 'integral field spectrometer' that simultaneously delivers very sharp images and highly resolved colour information (spectra) of an object on the sky. ESO PR Photo 32e/07 ESO PR Photo 40b/07 Chasing 'Hidden' Galaxies (Artist's Impression) With this special technique, which untangles the light of the galaxy from the quasar light, the team detected 14 galaxies out of the 20 pre-selected quasar patches of sky, a hefty 70% success rate. "This high detection rate alone is a very exciting result," says Bouché. "But, these are not just ordinary galaxies: they are most notable ones, actively forming a lot of

  15. Rebuilding Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Major Observing Programme Leads to New Theory of Galaxy Formation Summary Most present-day large galaxies are spirals, presenting a disc surrounding a central bulge. Famous examples are our own Milky Way or the Andromeda Galaxy. When and how did these spiral galaxies form? Why do a great majority of them present a massive central bulge? An international team of astronomers [1] presents new convincing answers to these fundamental questions. For this, they rely on an extensive dataset of observations of galaxies taken with several space- and ground-based telescopes. In particular, they used over a two-year period, several instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Among others, their observations reveal that roughly half of the present-day stars were formed in the period between 8,000 million and 4,000 million years ago, mostly in episodic burst of intense star formation occurring in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. From this and other evidence, the astronomers devised an innovative scenario, dubbed the "spiral rebuilding". They claim that most present-day spiral galaxies are the results of one or several merger events. If confirmed, this new scenario could revolutionise the way astronomers think galaxies formed. PR Photo 02a/05: Luminosity - Oxygen Abundance Relation for Galaxies (VLT) PR Photo 02b/05: The Spiral Rebuilding Scenario A fleet of instruments How and when did galaxies form? How and when did stars form in these island universes? These questions are still posing a considerable challenge to present-day astronomers. Front-line observational results obtained with a fleet of ground- and space-based telescopes by an international team of astronomers [1] provide new insights into these fundamental issues. For this, they embarked on an ambitious long-term study at various wavelengths of 195 galaxies with a redshift [2] greater than 0.4, i.e. located more than 4000 million light-years away. These galaxies were studied using ESO's Very Large Telescope, as well as the

  16. JSPAM: Interacting galaxies modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, John F.; Holincheck, Anthony; Harvey, Allen

    2015-11-01

    JSPAM models galaxy collisions using a restricted n-body approach to speed up computation. Instead of using a softened point-mass potential, the software supports a modified version of the three component potential created by Hernquist (1994, ApJS 86, 389). Although spherically symmetric gravitationally potentials and a Gaussian model for the bulge are used to increase computational efficiency, the potential mimics that of a fully consistent n-body model of a galaxy. Dynamical friction has been implemented in the code to improve the accuracy of close approaches between galaxies. Simulations using this code using thousands of particles over the typical interaction times of a galaxy interaction take a few seconds on modern desktop workstations, making it ideal for rapidly prototyping the dynamics of colliding galaxies. Extensive testing of the code has shown that it produces nearly identical tidal features to those from hierarchical tree codes such as Gadget but using a fraction of the computational resources. This code was used in the Galaxy Zoo: Mergers project and is very well suited for automated fitting of galaxy mergers with automated pattern fitting approaches such as genetic algorithms. Java and Fortran versions of the code are available.

  17. Featured Image: Spitzer Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    These three galaxies (click for a full view!) were imaged as a part of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), a recent survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 m. The bottom panels show false-color near-UV and far-UV images previously obtained with GALEX. The top panels show the new images obtained with Spitzer as part of S4G. The three galaxies shown here represent three types of galaxies that have a high concentration of mass in their centers, yet still have a high specific star-formation rate (the star formation rate per unit stellar mass):Barred galaxies with a prominent ring around their nucleus, like NGC 7552Interacting systems, like NGC 2782Galaxies with compact bulges and smooth extended disks, like NGC 3642To learn why this is the case, and to see more results from S4G, see the original paper below.CitationJuan Carlos Muoz-Mateos et al 2015 ApJS 219 3. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/219/1/3

  18. Cluster galaxies die hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; von der Linden, Anja; De Lucia, Gabriella

    2010-08-01

    We investigate how the specific star formation rates of galaxies of different masses depend on cluster-centric radius and on the central/satellite dichotomy in both field and cluster environments. Recent data from a variety of sources, including the cluster catalogue of von der Linden et al., are compared to the semi-analytic models of De Lucia & Blaizot. We find that these models predict too many passive satellite galaxies in clusters, too few passive central galaxies with low stellar masses and too many passive central galaxies with high masses. We then outline a series of modifications to the model necessary to solve these problems: (a) instead of instantaneous stripping of the external gas reservoir after a galaxy becomes a satellite, the gas supply is assumed to decrease at the same rate that the surrounding halo loses mass due to tidal stripping and (b) the active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback efficiency is lowered to bring the fraction of massive passive centrals in better agreement with the data. We also allow for radio mode AGN feedback in satellite galaxies. (c) We assume that satellite galaxies residing in host haloes with masses below 1012h-1Msolar do not undergo any stripping. We highlight the fact that in low-mass galaxies, the external reservoir is composed primarily of gas that has been expelled from the galactic disc by supernovae-driven winds. This gas must remain available as a future reservoir for star formation, even in satellite galaxies. Finally, we present a simple recipe for the stripping of gas and dark matter in satellites that can be used in models where subhalo evolution is not followed in detail.

  19. PREFACE: XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics (17-21 September 2007, Caracas, Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerta, Julio

    2008-10-01

    Some years ago a group of Latin American physicists took the initiative to consult about the viability of organizing a meeting on plasma physics for researchers and students of the region. The result was that it was not only a good idea, but a necessity in order to show and share everyone's work, and to keep updated on latest advances and technologies on plasma physics. It was decided that for new researchers as well as students of Physics, it would prove to be the best way to keep them posted on such matters. This was the birth of a series of meetings known as Latin American workshops on plasma physics that take place every two years in a different Latin American country. In Venezuela we have had the opportunity to organize two editions of this interesting and important reunion of physicists. The first of these Latin American workshops on plasma physics was held in Cambuquira (Brazil) in 1982. After organizing the first six editions of the workshop, the VII LAWPP meeting was realized in Caracas in January 1997. It was designed with a structure similar to the first edition. It developed in two stages, a first week devoted to short courses with lecturers in different fields of plasma physics and a second week for contributed and invited presentations. Participants from sixteen different countries were present, half of them from this continent and the other half from overseas, demonstrating the international character of this meeting. There have been four more editions of the workshop and once again, we have had the opportunity to organize this latest edition of the series: the XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics, which took place in Caracas, Venezuela from the 17th to the 21st of September 2007. The structure was modified, because contributed and review papers were together during the first stage, with short courses realized during the second one, called mini-courses, and given by several high level contributors such as José Boedo, Leopoldo Soto, Claude

  20. Galaxy evolution. Galactic paleontology.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Eline

    2011-07-01

    Individual low-mass stars have very long lives, comparable to the age of the universe, and can thus be used to probe ancient star formation. At present, such stars can be identified and studied only in the Milky Way and in the very closest of our neighboring galaxies, which are predominantly small dwarf galaxies. These nearby ancient stars are a fossil record that can provide detailed information about the physical processes that dominated the epoch of galaxy formation and subsequent evolution. PMID:21737732

  1. Growing Galaxies Gently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can grow by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also grow by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also grow in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence

  2. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  3. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies In Gas-rich Interacting Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions in gas-rich galaxy groups or pairs can form tidal bridges and tails. These tidal arms can contain kinematically decoupled structures with active star formation in the same mass range as dwarf galaxies, so-called tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). They differ from ordinary dwarf galaxies by their lack of dark matter and higher metallicity content. Compact groups of galaxies are an ideal environment to study the origin and evolution of TDGs since the high spatial volume density of member galaxies allows for frequent and efficient interactions between galaxies forming tidal tails. Hunsberger et al. (1996) identified 47 TDG candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) and estimated that more than 50% of all dwarf galaxies in compact groups are former TDGs. Statistical considerations based on observations of interacting galaxies illustrate that a significant fraction of today's dwarf galaxies could have had a tidal origin. In their early evolution, TDGs can easily be distinguished from classical dwarf galaxies as they are still embedded in large tidal structures and show ongoing star formation, identified via strong Hα emission in these aggregates. Simulations of interacting galaxies, and of TDGs in particular, have shown that TDGs can survive their first starburst event and turn into long-lived dwarf sized objects. Preliminary results from deep Hα imaging with the SOAR telescope to detect new TDGs in a sample of 10 Hickson compact groups will be presented.

  4. The chick and human collagen alpha1(XII) gene promoter--activity of highly conserved regions around the first exon and in the first intron.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Mumenthaler, U; Wittwer, M; Jin, W; Koch, M

    1998-10-15

    A single gene encodes collagen XII, an extracellular matrix protein with three large fibronectin-related subunits connected via a short collagen triple helix. Since collagen XII is a component of a specific subset of collagen fibrils in tissues bearing high tensile stress, we are interested to know how its restricted expression is regulated. To this aim, we have isolated the region around the first exon of both the chick and human collagen alpha1(XII) gene. The upstream sequences of the two genes share common features but are not related. Strong similarity starts about 100 bp 5' of the first exon and ends 100 bp into the first intron. In addition, two large conserved regions (56-63% similarity) were found in the first intron. A single major and two clusters of minor transcription start sites were identified in both the chick and human gene. To test for promoter activity, conserved fragments from the chick gene were cloned into reporter plasmids for transient transfection of fibroblasts. A 70-bp stretch containing a conserved nuclear factor-1 binding sequence just upstream of the first transcription start site was found to work as a basal promoter. An adjacent, but nonoverlapping short segment including the more downstream start sites and a conserved TATTAA sequence exhibited independent promoter activity. GC-rich sequences just 5' and 3' of the minimal promoter fragments were required for full activity. In contrast, inclusion of more upstream sequences (up to 2.4 kb) had no effect. The two conserved regions in the first intron showed no promoter activity on their own but modulated activity when linked to autologous or heterologous promoters. Specifically, one of these intronic regions might contain enhancer element(s) that respond to mechanical stress acting on the fibroblasts. We conclude that the collagen XII gene is driven by a basal promoter with two halves that can act independently; conserved control regions are located around the first exon and in the first

  5. Childhood stroke at three years of age with transient protein C deficiency, familial antiphospholipid antibodies and F. XII deficiency--a family study.

    PubMed

    Korte, W; Otremba, H; Lutz, S; Flury, R; Schmid, L; Weissert, M

    1994-12-01

    The unusual case of a boy with a stroke occurring at three years of age, transient reduction in protein C activity and high concentrations of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) is described. APA or Lupus Anticoagulant (LA) were found in 7 of 11 relatives studied out of three different generations. In addition, antigenic Factor (F) XII deficiencies or borderline values were found in the propositus and 2 relatives. Evidence for F. XII inhibitors was found in the propositus, one of his brothers and both of his parents. Whether F. XII inhibitors in patients with APA and/or LA are pathophysiologically relevant in vivo or if they are only an in vitro phenomenon remains to be elucidated. It is reasonable to believe that the main laboratory pathology (APA and/or LA activity) in antiphospholipid syndrome is related to the clinical picture of a hypercoagulable state. There is evidence from the literature that deficiency or inhibition of F. XII might contribute to a prothrombotic state through impairment of the fibrinolytic system. There is also evidence that APA are able to reduce protein C activation. From a clinical point of view, it seems that hypercoagulability in our patient was controlled by low-dose aspirin therapy (75 mg/d). In conclusion, this case seems to support the idea of a genetic predisposition for the development of APA and/or LA. The related disturbances of the coagulatory, anticoagulatory and fibrinolytic systems might contribute in different ways to the prothrombotic state seen in patients with "antiphospholipid syndrome", eventually resulting in possible venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis with corresponding ischaemic lesions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7770125

  6. The First Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, Volker

    2009-03-01

    An important open frontier in astrophysics is to understand how the first sources of light, the first stars and galaxies, ended the cosmic dark ages at redshifts z ≃ 15 - 20. Their formation signaled the transition from the simple initial state of the universe to one of ever increasing complexity. We here review recent progress in understanding the assembly process of the first galaxies with numerical simulations, starting with cosmological initial conditions and modelling the detailed physics of star formation. The key drivers in building up the primordial galaxies are the feedback effects from the first stars, due to their input of radiation and of heavy chemical elements in the wake of supernova explosions. In addition, the conditions inside the first galaxies are governed by the gravitationally-driven turbulence generated during the virialization of the dark matter host halo. Our theoretical predictions will be tested with upcoming near-infrared observatories, such as the James Webb Space Telecope, in the decade ahead.

  7. Supernovae in paired galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, T. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; Turatto, M.; Aramyan, L. S.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies.

  8. PEARS Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy; Hathi, Nimish P.; Cohen, Seth; Belini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitless grism spectroscopic data obtained vl'ith the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random surveY of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allOW8 us to detect the presence of multiple emission line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. 1162 [OII], [OIII] and/or H-alpha emission lines have been identified in the PEARS sample of approx 906 galaxies down to a limiting flux of approx 10 - 18 erg/s/sq cm . The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis we find three key results: 1) The computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; 2) The star forming systems show evidence of disturbed morphologies, with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass; and 3) The number density of star forming galaxies with M(*) >= 10(exp 9) Solar M decreases by an order of magnitude at z<=0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9 in support of the argument for galaxy downsizing.

  9. Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Doug; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer L.; McCollough, Michael L.; Morgan, Doug; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Paggi, Alessandro; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2016-01-01

    We present the new results from the Chandra Galaxy Atlas prpject. We have systematically analyzed the archival Chandra data of 50 early type galaxies to study their hot ISM. Taking full advantage of the Chandra capabilities, we produced spatially resolved data products with additional spectral information. We will make these products publicly available and use them for our focused science goals, e.g., gas morphology, scaling relation, X-ray based mass profile, circum-nuclear gas.

  10. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  11. Life in the Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shostak, G. S.

    The arguments for and against the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) program are discussed. Based on apparently reasonable assumptions regarding the number of civilizations likely to exist in the Galaxy, it seems that ten million years would be sufficient time for an ambitious group of aliens to colonize the Galaxy; since no concrete evidence of aliens has turned up, the assumptions have to be reconsidered. The views of Sagan, Hart, Drake and a number of other researchers are noted.

  12. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  13. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  14. Morphological evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Hill, Robert S.; Smith, Eric P.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies of the Hubble Deep Field (Abraham et al. 1996) [1] and Medium Deep Survey (Driver, Windhorst & Griffiths 1995) [6] find that the frequency of irregular/peculiar/merger systems rises with increasing redshift. However, this finding must be carefully interpreted in light of UV images of low-redshift galaxies obtained by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (Stecher et al. 1992) [9]. These UV images imply that K-correction effects may be at least partially responsible for the apparent increase in Irr galaxies with redshift. To assess the degree to which there is an overabundance of Irregular galaxies (relative to the present epoch), we must understand the degree to which the K-correction biases morphological studies. We demonstrate the importance of the morphological K-correction to the classification schemes used in the HDF. We find that high-redshift spiral galaxies are misclassified as Irr galaxies, while Elliptical/S0 galaxies, should not be affected substantially. We have been granted 40 orbits in Cycle 7 with STIS to place these conclusions on a statistical basis.

  15. H1 in RSA galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, OTTO-G.

    1993-01-01

    The original Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxy sample of almost 1300 galaxies has been augmented with further bright galaxies from the RSA appendix as well as newer galaxy catalogs. A complete and homogeneous, strictly magnitude-limited all-sky sample of 2345 galaxies brighter than 13.4 in apparent blue magnitude was formed. New 21 cm H1 line observations for more than 600 RSA galaxies have been combined with all previously available H1 data from the literature. This new extentise data act allows detailed tests of widely accepted 'standard' reduction and analysis techniques.

  16. MOJAVE. XII. ACCELERATION AND COLLIMATION OF BLAZAR JETS ON PARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D. C.; Lister, M. L.; Richards, J. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kellermann, K. I.

    2015-01-10

    We report on the acceleration properties of 329 features in 95 blazar jets from the MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array program. Nearly half the features and three-quarters of the jets show significant changes in speed and/or direction. In general, apparent speed changes are distinctly larger than changes in direction, indicating that changes in the Lorentz factors of jet features dominate the observed speed changes rather than bends along the line of sight. Observed accelerations tend to increase the speed of features near the jet base, ≲ 10-20 pc projected, and decrease their speed at longer distances. The range of apparent speeds at a fixed distance in an individual jet can span a factor of a few, indicating that shock properties and geometry may influence the apparent motions; however, we suggest that the broad trend of jet features increasing their speed near the origin is due to an overall acceleration of the jet flow out to deprojected distances of the order of 10{sup 2} pc, beyond which the flow begins to decelerate or remains nearly constant in speed. We estimate intrinsic rates of change of the Lorentz factors in the galaxy frame of the order of Γ-dot /Γ≃10{sup −3} to 10{sup –2} yr{sup –1}, which can lead to total Lorentz factor changes of a factor of a few on the length scales observed here. Finally, we also find evidence for jet collimation at projected distances of ≲ 10 pc in the form of the non-radial motion and bending accelerations that tend to better align features with the inner jet.

  17. MOJAVE. XII. Acceleration and Collimation of Blazar Jets on Parsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, D. C.; Lister, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Savolainen, T.; Kellermann, K. I.; Richards, J. L.; Ros, E.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the acceleration properties of 329 features in 95 blazar jets from the MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array program. Nearly half the features and three-quarters of the jets show significant changes in speed and/or direction. In general, apparent speed changes are distinctly larger than changes in direction, indicating that changes in the Lorentz factors of jet features dominate the observed speed changes rather than bends along the line of sight. Observed accelerations tend to increase the speed of features near the jet base, <~ 10-20 pc projected, and decrease their speed at longer distances. The range of apparent speeds at a fixed distance in an individual jet can span a factor of a few, indicating that shock properties and geometry may influence the apparent motions; however, we suggest that the broad trend of jet features increasing their speed near the origin is due to an overall acceleration of the jet flow out to deprojected distances of the order of 102 pc, beyond which the flow begins to decelerate or remains nearly constant in speed. We estimate intrinsic rates of change of the Lorentz factors in the galaxy frame of the order of \\dot{Γ }/Γ ≃ 10-3 to 10-2 yr-1, which can lead to total Lorentz factor changes of a factor of a few on the length scales observed here. Finally, we also find evidence for jet collimation at projected distances of <~ 10 pc in the form of the non-radial motion and bending accelerations that tend to better align features with the inner jet.

  18. Growing Galaxies Gently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can grow by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also grow by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also grow in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence

  19. Oral Mucosa Bleeding Times of Normal Cats and Cats with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome or Hageman Trait (Factor XII Deficiency).

    PubMed

    Parker, M T; Collier, L L; Kier, A B; Johnson, G S

    1988-01-01

    A commercially available, disposable blade in a spring-loaded cassette was used to measure oral mucosa bleeding times (OMBT) of ketamine/acepromazine-anesthetized cats. The OMBT were determined in cats homozygous for Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS, n = 7), cats heterozygous for CHS (n = 6), and cats homozygous for Hageman factor (factor XII) deficiency (n = 5). In addition, OMBT were determined in three groups of normal cats: random-source cats (n = 14), inbred normal relatives of the cats with CHS (n = 7), and inbred normal relatives of Hageman factor deficient cats (n = 9). No significant differences were found in the OMBT of the three groups of normal cats. The mean OMBT for all 30 normal cats was 1.9 minutes +/- 0.5 minutes s.d. Compared to the normal cats, those homozygous for CHS had significantly prolonged OMBT (14.1 +/- 3.3 minutes; p < 0.05). The mean OMBT of cats heterozygous for CHS (2.6 +/- 0.8 minutes) was also significantly longer than the OMBT of the combined normal group. The mean OMBT of the CHS heterozygotes, however, was not significantly longer than that of their normal relatives (OMBT = 1.8 +/- 0.5 minutes), probably because of the low number of cats in this subgroup of normals. As expected, the OMBT of cats homozygous for Hageman factor deficiency (2.3 +/- 0.3 minutes) were not significantly prolonged. PMID:15162339

  20. Iridium Concentrations and Abundances of Meteoritic Ejecta from the Eltanin Impact in Sediment Cores from Polarstern Expedition ANT XII/4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    The abundances of meteoritic ejecta from the Eltanin asteroid impact have been examined in several sediment cores recovered by the FS Polarstern during expedition ANT XII/4 using elemental concentrations of iridium and weights of coarse ejecta debris. Three cores with well-preserved impact deposits, PS204-1, PS2708-1, and PS2709-1, each contain Ir and ejecta fluences similar to those found in USNS Eltanin core E13-4. Small Ir anomalies and traces of ejecta were found in cores PS2706-1 and PS2710-1, but since these cores lack well-defined deposits, these are considered to be reworked and not representative of the fallout. No evidence of ejecta was found in cores PS2802-1 and PS2705-1. These results confirm earlier speculation that the Eltanin impact resulted in deposits of ejecta with up to 1 gram/sq centimeter of depris over a wide area of the ocean floor. However, there are sill large uncertainties over the actual regional or global extent of this unique sediment deposit.

  1. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer’s disease patient and mouse model plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A.; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  2. The evolution of clot-promoting and amidolytic activities in mixtures of Hageman factor (factor XII) and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Saito, H

    1982-08-01

    Ellagic acid (4,4',5,5',6,6'-hexahydroxydiphenic acid 2,6,2',6'-dilactone) can substitute for negatively charged surfaces as a stimulus to reactions of the intrinsic pathway. Incubation of solutions of 4 X 10(-6)M ellagic acid with purified HF (factor XII) induced clot-promoting and amidolytic activity. Clot-promoting activity tested on a substrate of HF-deficient plasma evolved much more rapidly than amidolytic activity. Clot-promoting activity generated in mixtures of HF and ellagic acid alone, but amidolytic activity was observed only if additional proteins such as albumin were also present. Treatment of purified HF with DFP or filtration of HF through columns of SBTI bound to agarose did not prevent its subsequent activation by ellagic acid. Solutions of SBTI, at high concentration, partly inhibited the generation of amidolytic activity,wheras popcorn inhibitor and a crude IgG fraction of anti-HF inhibited the amidolytic activity that had been generated in a mixture of HF and ellagic acid. Generation of clotting and amidolytic properties was accompanied by scission of HF within an internal disulfide loop and by cleavage of HF into fragments with approximate MWs of 50,000 and 30,000; cleavage was completely blocked by popcorn inhibitor and partially blocked by high concentrations of SBTI. These experiments demonstrate that ellagic acid can activate HF in a manner analogous to negatively charged solids such as glass or kaolin. PMID:7097109

  3. Calculations with Spectroscopic Accuracy: Energies and Transition Rates in the Nitrogen Isoelectronic Sequence from Ar XII to Zn XXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Si, R.; Dang, W.; Jönsson, P.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Chen, Z. B.; Zhang, H.; Long, F. Y.; Liu, H. T.; Li, D. F.; Hutton, R.; Chen, C. Y.; Yan, J.

    2016-03-01

    Combined relativistic configuration interaction and many-body perturbation calculations are performed for the 359 fine-structure levels of the 2s2 2p3, 2 s2p4, 2p5, 2s2 2p2 3l, 2 s2p3 3l, 2p4 3l, and 2s2 2p2 4l configurations in N-like ions from Ar xii to Zn xxiv. Complete and consistent data sets of energies, wavelengths, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths for all possible electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among the 359 levels are given for each ion. The present work significantly increases the amount of accurate data for ions in the nitrogen-like sequence, and the accuracy of the energy levels is high enough to enable the identification and interpretation of observed spectra involving the n = 3, 4 levels, for which experimental values are largely scarce. Meanwhile, the results should be of great help for modeling and diagnosing astrophysical and fusion plasmas.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Energies & radiative transition from ArXII to ZnXXIV (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Si, R.; Dang, W.; Jonsson, P.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Chen, Z. B.; Zhang, H.; Long, F. Y.; Liu, H. T.; Li, D. F.; Hutton, R.; Chen, C. Y.; Yan, J.

    2016-04-01

    Combined relativistic configuration interaction and many-body perturbation calculations are performed for the 359 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23l, 2s2p33l, 2p43l, and 2s22p24l configurations in N-like ions from Ar XII to Zn XXIV. Complete and consistent data sets of energies, wavelengths, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths for all possible electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among the 359 levels are given for each ion. The present work significantly increases the amount of accurate data for ions in the nitrogen-like sequence, and the accuracy of the energy levels is high enough to enable the identification and interpretation of observed spectra involving the n=3, 4 levels, for which experimental values are largely scarce. Meanwhile, the results should be of great help for modeling and diagnosing astrophysical and fusion plasmas. (2 data files).

  5. Investigation of Hot X-Ray Points (HXPs) Using Spectroheliograph Mg xii Experiment Data from CORONAS-F/SPIRIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, A.; Shestov, S.; Bogachev, S.; Kuzin, S.

    2012-02-01

    Observations in the Mg xii 8.42 Å line onboard the CORONAS-F satellite have revealed compact high temperature objects - hot X-ray points (HXPs) - and their major physical parameters were investigated. Time dependencies of temperature, emission measure, intensity, and electron density were measured for 169 HXPs. HXPs can be divided into two groups by their temperature variations: those with gradually decreasing temperature and those with rapidly decreasing temperature. HXP plasma temperatures lie in the range of 5 - 40 MK, the emission measure is 1045 - 1048 cm-3, and the electron density is above 1010 cm-3, which exceeds the electron density in the quiet Sun (108 - 109 cm-3). HXP lifetimes vary between 5 - 100 minutes, significantly longer than the conductive cooling time. This means that throughout a HXP’s lifetime, the energy release process continues, which helps to maintain its high temperature. A HXP’s thermal energy is not greater than 1028 erg, and the total energy which is released in HXPs does not exceed 1030 erg. HXPs differ in their physical properties from other flare-like microevents, such as microflares, X-ray bright points, and nanoflares.

  6. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer's disease patient and mouse model plasma.

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-03-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  7. Midsummer's Dream Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-08-01

    How does the Galaxy in which we live look like? It is almost certain that we will never be able to send a probe out of our Milky Way to take a snapshot, in the same way as the first satellites could do to give us striking images of planet Earth. But astronomers do not need this to imagine what our bigger home resembles. And they have a pretty good idea of it. The Milky Way with its several hundreds of billion stars is thought to be a relatively flat disc - 100,000 light-year across [1] - with a central bulge lying in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius (The Archer) and six spiral arms. The Milky Way has most probably also a central bar made of young, bright stars. If we can't take pictures of the Milky Way, we may photograph others galaxies which astronomers think look similar to it. The two galaxies presented here are just two magnificient examples of barred spiral galaxies. One - Messier 83 - is seen face-on, and the other - NGC 4565 - appears edge-on. Together, they give us a nice idea of how the Milky Way may appear from outer space. These images are based on data obtained with the twin FORS1 and FORS2 (FOcal Reducer and Spectrograph) instruments attached to two ESO's 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope Array located on Cerro Paranal. The data were extracted from the ESO Science Archive Facility, which contains approximately 50 Terabytes [2] of scientific data and is, since April 1, 2005, open to the worldwide community. These invaluable data have already led to the publication of more than 1000 scientific papers. They also contains many nice examples of beautiful astronomical objects which could be the theme of as many midsummer's dreams. NGC 4565 The first galaxy pictured here is NGC 4565 [3], which for obvious reasons is also called the Needle Galaxy. First spotted in 1785 by Uranus' discoverer, Sir William Herschel (1738-1822), this is one of the most famous example of an edge-on spiral galaxy and is located some 30 million light

  8. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The

  9. A MINUET OF GALAXIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This troupe of four galaxies, known as Hickson Compact Group 87 (HCG 87), is performing an intricate dance orchestrated by the mutual gravitational forces acting between them. The dance is a slow, graceful minuet, occurring over a time span of hundreds of millions of years. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provides a striking improvement in resolution over previous ground-based imaging. In particular, this image reveals complex details in the dust lanes of the group's largest galaxy member (HCG 87a), which is actually disk-shaped, but tilted so that we see it nearly edge-on. Both 87a and its elliptically shaped nearest neighbor (87b) have active galactic nuclei which are believed to harbor black holes that are consuming gas. A third group member, the nearby spiral galaxy 87c, may be undergoing a burst of active star formation. Gas flows within galaxies can be intensified by the gravitational tidal forces between interacting galaxies. So interactions can provide fresh fuel for both active nuclei and starburst phenomena. These three galaxies are so close to each other that gravitational forces disrupt their structure and alter their evolution. From the analysis of its spectra, the small spiral near the center of the group could either be a fourth member or perhaps an unrelated background object. The HST image was made by combining images taken in four different color filters in order to create a three-color picture. Regions of active star formation are blue (hot stars) and also pinkish if hot hydrogen gas is present. The complex dark bands across the large edge-on disk galaxy are due to interstellar dust silhouetted against the galaxy's background starlight. A faint tidal bridge of stars can be seen between the edge-on and elliptical galaxies. HCG 87 was selected for Hubble imaging by members of the public who visited the Hubble Heritage website (http://heritage.stsci.edu) during the month of May and registered their votes

  10. Galaxies et trous noirs supermassifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin-Zahn, Suzy

    2016-08-01

    A few percents of galaxies are classified as « active ». An active galaxy is a galaxy whose nucleus emits more energy than the whole galaxy in the form of electromagnetic radiation, relativistic particles, or mechanical energy. It is activated by a supermassive black hole fueled by matter falling on it, whose characteristics (Eddington luminosity, spin) are recalled. The class includes quasars and Seyfert galaxies. All massive "non active" galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, but there is not enough matter in its environment so as the nucleus becomes luminous. Different items are considered in the paper : how supermassive black holes are fueled, the accretion disc, the jets and the winds, the unified model of active galaxies, how are determined the masses of supermassive black holes, and what is the relation between the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes.

  11. Nuclear sources in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.

    In the local Universe most massive black holes at the centers of galaxies are not luminous quasars. Is this because (1) they are starved of gas, (2) they accrete without emitting radiation, (3) they refuse to eat, ejecting the incoming material, or (4) they are storing up matter in an accretion disk to feast later?With Chandra ACIS we have imaged a pilot sample of 6 nearby (D 30 Mpc) elliptical galaxies chosen to be especially quiescent based on the careful optical spectroscopy of Ho, measured black hole masses (Mbh > 10(7)Msol), and with existing X-ray upper limits (Lx 10(40)erg/s) implying far sub-Eddington accretion. In these galaxies we can measure, or limit, the diffuse hot interstellar medium, and so constrain the Bondi accretion rate.Faint X-ray emission is detected at or around the nucleus in each galaxy. The morphology of these weak X-ray sources is complex. The X-ray colors of the sources can be determined, and a moderate quality spectrum for one was obtained. We discuss these results against the possible explanations of black hole quiescence.On the other hand, a few percent of all galaxies shows evidence for nuclear activity and a brief review of the high energy emission from Active Galactic Nuclei is given.

  12. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  13. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (∼72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  14. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  15. Star formation in distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    Scenarios of galactic evolution, essentially based on our knowledge of nearby galaxies have been proposed. Star formation laws, initial mass function, metallicity are the main parameters. The author shortly reviews the present status of these parameters in distant galaxies and gives some deductive conclusions from a comparison with the most distant (z ≥ 3) galaxies.

  16. Constraints on galaxy formation theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities, temperature fluctuations of the microwave background and the correlation function of galaxies point to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. The velocity data provide strong constraints on the theories even in the case when light does not follow mass of the universe.

  17. Kepler View of the Galaxy

    NASA Video Gallery

    Our Sun is just one out of over 200 billion stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way. The Sun is located in the Orion arm of our galaxy about 75,000 light years from the center of the Galaxy. Kepler will...

  18. Theories of galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of some theories of galaxy formation that are consistent with the hot big bang origin of the universe is reviewed. In the cosmic turbulence theory, an attempt is made to explain not only the characteristic masses and angular momenta of galaxies, but to describe in detail the spectrum of galaxy clustering problems with regard to the observed abundances of the light elements, a Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence and the fireball are discussed. Attention is given to a primordial chaotic magnetic field, the comparison between baryon-symmetric cosmologies, the origin of galactic spin and theories starting from isothermal perturbations. Also considered are the dilemma of the initial conditions with respect to the era after 10 to the -4th s, and the pancake theory, in which the planar structures that arise provide a natural explanation for filamentary structures.

  19. Local normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    In the near future, high energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Two and possibly three local galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and M31, should be visible to the high energy gamma ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory, and the first should be seen by GAMMA-1. With the assumptions of adequate cosmic ray production and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, specific predictions of the gamma ray emission can be made separating the concepts of the galactic and universal nature of cosmic rays. A study of the synchrotron radiation from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) suggests that the cosmic ray density is similar to that in the local region of our galaxy, but not uniform. It is hoped the measurements will be able to verify this independent of assumptions about the magnetic fields in the LMC.

  20. Dynamics of Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Joshua E.

    Preface Theory of Interacting Galaxies The Role of Gravity Holmberg's Work on Tidal Interactions "Galactic Bridges and Tails" Dark Matter Numerical Stellar Dynamics Collisionless Stellar Systems Simulating the Stars Force Calculation Time Integration Errors and Relaxation Effects Initial Conditions Numerical Gas Dynamics A Sketch of the Interstellar Medium Simulating the ISM Gas in B/D/H Models Tidal Interactions Test-Particle Studies: Bridges and Tails Self-Consistent Studies Bars and Spirals Tidal Dwarf Galaxies Self-Consistent "Lookalikes" Getting the Feel of the Antennae Sneaking Up on the Mice What Happened to the Whirlpool? Unresolved Issues Mechanics of Merging Tidal Drag Orbit Decay Violent Relaxation Final Encounters Remnant Structure Phase Mixing Characteristics Scales Radial Profiles Shapes and Kinematics Orbit Structure Gas Dynamics in Mergers Inflows in Perturbed Disks Merging Encounters Remnant Structure Dissipation and Stellar Backlash Galaxy transformation and the Arrow of Time

  1. Microvariability in Seyfert galaxies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carini, M.T.; Noble, J.C.; Miller, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a search for microvariability in a sample of eight Seyfert galaxies. Microvariability (i.e., variations occurring on timescales of tens of minutes to hours) has been conclusively demonstrated to exist in the class of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) known as blazars. Its existence in other classes of AGNs is far less certain. We present the results of a study of eight Seyfert 1 galaxies, which were intensively monitored in order to determine whether such variations exist in these objects. Only one object, Ark 120, displayed any evidence of microvariations. The implications of these results with respect to current models of the mechanisms responsible for the observed emission in Seyfert galaxies are discussed. We compare our results with those obtained from other studies of microvariability in different classes of AGNs.

  2. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  3. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Putko, Joseph; Dewberry, Janosz; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2012-05-10

    Tadpole galaxies have a giant star-forming region at the end of an elongated intensity distribution. Here we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to determine the ages, masses, and surface densities of the heads and tails in 14 local tadpoles selected from the Kiso and Michigan surveys of UV-bright galaxies, and we compare them to tadpoles previously studied in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The young stellar mass in the head scales linearly with rest-frame galaxy luminosity, ranging from {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at galaxy absolute magnitude U = -13 mag to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} at U = -20 mag. The corresponding head surface density increases from several M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2} locally to 10-100 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} at high redshift, and the star formation rate (SFR) per unit area in the head increases from {approx}0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} locally to {approx}1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} at high z. These local values are normal for star-forming regions, and the increases with redshift are consistent with other cosmological SFRs, most likely reflecting an increase in gas abundance. The tails in the local sample look like bulge-free galaxy disks. Their photometric ages decrease from several Gyr to several hundred Myr with increasing z, and their surface densities are more constant than the surface densities of the heads. The far-outer intensity profiles in the local sample are symmetric and exponential. We suggest that most local tadpoles are bulge-free galaxy disks with lopsided star formation, perhaps from environmental effects such as ram pressure or disk impacts, or from a Jeans length comparable to half the disk size.

  4. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  5. OPTOPUS spectroscopy of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnur, G. F. O.

    The spectra of selected H II regions in the center of the starburst galaxy NGC 1808 and of many faint galaxies surrounding the NGC 1808 were obtained simultaneously, using the Optopus fiber-optics spectrograph facility (described by Lund, 1986) at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. The preparation of Optopus plates (each of which employed more than 40 fibers), observations, and the procedures of data processing and Optopus calibration are described together with the problems caused by cosmic ray events. Preliminary results are included.

  6. Supermassive disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Galletta, G.; Saglia, R. P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    1991-03-01

    In order to investigate the properties of supermassive disk galaxies (SDGs), an extensive optical survey of SDG candidates in the Southern Hemisphere was performed with the 2.2-m ESO/MPI telescope at La Silla. The question of whether SDGs have in general an unusually high content of dark matter in the inner regions or, perhaps, an unusual stellar population is addressed. It is suggested that SDGs are formed as the result of a series of accretion events, possibly induced also by the progressive deepening of the galaxy potential well.

  7. Validating a dark galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Michael

    2005-07-01

    VIRGOHI21 is an object detected in the Virgo Cluster HI survey of Davies et al {2004}, with a velocity width typical of a disc galaxy {220 km/s} but which does not appear to have an optical counterpart down to a surface brightness level of 27.5 B mag/sq. arcsec. Altogether, it is the best ever candidate for a Dark Galaxy. We propose to image this object with the ACS through the F814W filter for 9 orbits to see if this object contains a population of individually very faint stars which would be missed by ground-based telescopes.

  8. Dwarf galaxy evolution within the environments of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraki, Kenza S.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Ceverino, Daniel; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding galaxy evolution depends on connecting large-scale structure determined by the ΛCDM model with, at minimum, the small-scale physics of gas, star formation, and stellar feedback. Formation of galaxies within dark matter halos is sensitive to the physical phenomena occurring within and around the halo. This is especially true for dwarf galaxies, which have the smallest potential wells and are more susceptible to the effects of gas ionization and removal than larger galaxies. At dwarf galaxies scales comparisons of dark matter-only simulations with observations has unveiled various differences including the core-cusp, the missing satellites, and the too-big-to-fail problems. We have run a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations using the ART code to examine the evolution of dwarf galaxies in massive host environments. These are cosmological zoom-in simulations including deterministic star formation and stellar feedback in the form of supernovae feedback, stellar winds, radiation pressure, and photoionization pressure. We simulates galaxies with final halo masses on the order of 1012 M⊙ with high resolution, allowing us to examine the satellite dwarf galaxies and local isolated dwarf galaxies around each primary galaxy. We analyzed the abundance and structure of these dwarfs specifically the velocity function, their star formation rates, core creation and the circumgalactic medium. By reproducing observations of dwarf galaxies in simulations we show how including baryons in simulations relieves tensions seen in comparing dark matter only simulations with observations.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) blended spectra catalogue: strong galaxy-galaxy lens and occulting galaxy pair candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Baldry, I. K.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Conselice, C.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M. J.; Moffett, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high-resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its AUTOZ automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km s-1, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter `Ef' classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g. strong gravitational lens surveys.

  10. HUBBLE'S INFRARED GALAXY GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have used the NASA Hubble Space Telescope to produce an infrared 'photo essay' of spiral galaxies. By penetrating the dust clouds swirling around the centers of these galaxies, the telescope's infrared vision is offering fresh views of star birth. These six images, taken with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer, showcase different views of spiral galaxies, from a face-on image of an entire galaxy to a close-up of a core. The top row shows spirals at diverse angles, from face-on, (left); to slightly tilted, (center); to edge-on, (right). The bottom row shows close-ups of the hubs of three galaxies. In these images, red corresponds to glowing hydrogen, the raw material for star birth. The red knots outlining the curving spiral arms in NGC 5653 and NGC 3593, for example, pinpoint rich star-forming regions where the surrounding hydrogen gas is heated by intense ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars. In visible light, many of these regions can be hidden from view by the clouds of gas and dust in which they were born. The glowing hydrogen found inside the cores of these galaxies, as in NGC 6946, may be due to star birth; radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which are powered by massive black holes; or a combination of both. White is light from middle-age stars. Clusters of stars appear as white dots, as in NGC 2903. The galaxy cores are mostly white because of their dense concentration of stars. The dark material seen in these images is dust. These galaxies are part of a Hubble census of about 100 spiral galaxies. Astronomers at Space Telescope Science Institute took these images to fill gaps in the scheduling of a campaign using the NICMOS-3 camera. The data were non-proprietary, and were made available to the entire astronomical community. Filters: Three filters were used: red, blue, and green. Red represents emission at the Paschen Alpha line (light from glowing hydrogen) at a wavelength of 1.87 microns. Blue shows the

  11. HUBBLE REVEALS 'BACKWARDS' SPIRAL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have found a spiral galaxy that may be spinning to the beat of a different cosmic drummer. To the surprise of astronomers, the galaxy, called NGC 4622, appears to be rotating in the opposite direction to what they expected. Pictures by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise by showing which side of the galaxy is closer to Earth. A Hubble telescope photo of the oddball galaxy is this month's Hubble Heritage offering. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars [shown in blue]. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. To add to the conundrum, NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction it is rotating. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. What caused this galaxy to behave differently from most galaxies? Astronomers suspect that NGC 4622 interacted with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a small companion galaxy. The galaxy's core provides new evidence for a merger between NGC 4622 and a smaller galaxy. This information could be the key to understanding the unusual leading arms. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 resides 111 million light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. The pictures were taken in May 2001 with Hubble

  12. Supernovae in paired host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, T. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; Turatto, M.; Aramyan, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of host and neighbor galaxies in pairs. The orientation of SNe with respect to the preferred direction toward neighbor galaxy is found to be isotropic and independent of kinematical properties of the galaxy pair.

  13. IRAS observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The IRAS survey gives an unbiased view of the infrared properties of the active galaxies. Seyfert galaxies occupy much the same area in color-color plots as to normal infrared bright galaxies, but extend the range towards flatter 60 to 25 mm slopes. Statistically the Seyfert 1 galaxies can be distinguished from the Seyfert 2 galaxies, lying predominantly closer to the area with constant slopes between 25 and 200 mm. The infrared measurements of the Seyfert galaxies cannot distinguish between the emission mechanisms in these objects although they agree with the currently popular ideas; they do provide a measure of the total luminosity of the Seyferts. The quasar's position in the color-color diagrams continue the trend of the Seyferts. The quasar 3C48 is shown to be exceptional among the radio loud quasars in that it has a high infrared luminosity which dominates the power output of the quasar and is most likely associated with the underlying host galaxy.

  14. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher; Barlow, Thomas; Barnhart, William; Bianchi, Luciana; Blakkolb, Brian K.; Bruno, Dominique; Bushman, Joseph; Byun, Yong-Ik; Chiville, Michael; Conrow, Timothy; Cooke, Brian; Donas, Jose; Fanson, James L.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Grange, Robert; Griffiths, David; Heckman, Timothy; Lee, James; Jelinsky, Patrick N.; Kim, Sug-Whan; Lee, Siu-Chun; Lee, Young-Wook; Liu, Dankai; Madore, Barry F.; Malina, Roger; Mazer, Alan; McLean, Ryan; Milliard, Bruno; Mitchell, William; Morais, Marco; Morrissey, Patrick F.; Neff, Susan G.; Raison, Frederic; Randall, David; Rich, Michael; Schiminovich, David; Schmitigal, Wes; Sen, Amit; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Small, Todd; Stock, Joseph M.; Surber, Frank; Szalay, Alexander; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Weigand, Timothy; Welsh, Barry Y.; Wu, Patrick; Wyder, Ted; Xu, C. Kevin; Zsoldas, Jennifer

    2003-02-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), a NASA Small Explorer Mission planned for launch in Fall 2002, will perform the first Space Ultraviolet sky survey. Five imaging surveys in each of two bands (1350-1750Å and 1750-2800Å) will range from an all-sky survey (limit mAB~20-21) to an ultra-deep survey of 4 square degrees (limit mAB~26). Three spectroscopic grism surveys (R=100-300) will be performed with various depths (mAB~20-25) and sky coverage (100 to 2 square degrees) over the 1350-2800Å band. The instrument includes a 50 cm modified Ritchey-Chrétien telescope, a dichroic beam splitter and astigmatism corrector, two large sealed tube microchannel plate detectors to simultaneously cover the two bands and the 1.2 degree field of view. A rotating wheel provides either imaging or grism spectroscopy with transmitting optics. We will use the measured UV properties of local galaxies, along with corollary observations, to calibrate the UV-global star formation rate relationship in galaxies. We will apply this calibration to distant galaxies discovered in the deep imaging and spectroscopic surveys to map the history of star formation in the universe over the red shift range zero to two. The GALEX mission will include an Associate Investigator program for additional observations and supporting data analysis. This will support a wide variety of investigations made possible by the first UV sky survey.

  15. CLEARING OUT A GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Zubovas, Kastytis; King, Andrew

    2012-02-15

    It is widely suspected that active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity ultimately sweeps galaxies clear of their gas. We work out the observable properties required to achieve this. Large-scale AGN-driven outflows should have kinetic luminosities {approx}{eta} L{sub Edd}/2 {approx} 0.05 L{sub Edd} and momentum rates {approx}20 L{sub Edd}/c, where L{sub Edd} is the Eddington luminosity of the central black hole and {eta} {approx} 0.1 its radiative accretion efficiency. This creates an expanding two-phase medium in which molecular species coexist with hot gas, which can persist after the central AGN has switched off. This picture predicts outflow velocities {approx}1000-1500 km s{sup -1} and mass outflow rates up to 4000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} on kpc scales, fixed mainly by the host galaxy velocity dispersion (or equivalently black hole mass). All these features agree with those of outflows observed in galaxies such as Mrk231. This strongly suggests that AGN activity is what sweeps galaxies clear of their gas on a dynamical timescale and makes them red and dead. We suggest future observational tests of this picture.

  16. Our wobbly galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvitch, Katia

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that the Milky Way rotates around a supermassive black hole, but researchers have found that our galaxy undulates up and down as well like a giant galactic merry-go-round. Katia Moskvitch reports on this surprising finding.

  17. Automated galaxy recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, Barry; Anderson, Kurt

    Previous approaches to automated image processing have used both deterministic and nondeterministic techniques. These have not used any form of conceptual learning nor have they employed artificial intelligence techniques. Addition of such techniques to the task of image processing may significantly enhance the efficiencies and accuracies of the recognition and classification processes. In our application, the objects to be recognized and classified are galaxies.

  18. Life in the Galaxy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the origin of life on the basis of information about cosmic evolution, stellar alchemy, atmospheric histories, and rise and fall of civilizations. Indicates that man's contact with other civilizations in our galaxy may be made possible through studies of interstellar communication. (CC)

  19. Tides in Colliding Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Renaud, Florent

    Long tails and streams of stars are the most noticeable traces of galaxy collisions. However, their tidal origin was recognized only less than 50 years ago and more than 10 years after their first observations. This review describes how the idea of galactic tides has emerged thanks to advances in numerical simulations, from the first simulations that included tens of particles to the most sophisticated ones with tens of millions of them and state-of-the-art hydrodynamical prescriptions. Theoretical aspects pertaining to the formation of tidal tails are then presented. The third part turns to observations and underlines the need for collecting deep multi-wavelength data to tackle the variety of physical processes exhibited by collisional debris. Tidal tails are not just stellar structures, but turn out to contain all the components usually found in galactic disks, in particular atomic/molecular gas and dust. They host star-forming complexes and are able to form star-clusters or even second-generation dwarf galaxies. The final part of the review discusses what tidal tails can tell us (or not) about the structure and the content of present-day galaxies, including their dark components, and explains how they may be used to probe the past evolution of galaxies and the history of their mass assembly. On-going deep wide-field surveys disclose many new low-surface brightness structures in the nearby Universe, offering great opportunities for attempting galactic archeology with tidal tails.

  20. The Hooked Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    Life is not easy, even for galaxies. Some indeed get so close to their neighbours that they get rather distorted. But such encounters between galaxies have another effect: they spawn new generations of stars, some of which explode. ESO's VLT has obtained a unique vista of a pair of entangled galaxies, in which a star exploded. Because of the importance of exploding stars, and particularly of supernovae of Type Ia [1], for cosmological studies (e.g. relating to claims of an accelerated cosmic expansion and the existence of a new, unknown, constituent of the universe - the so called 'Dark Energy'), they are a preferred target of study for astronomers. Thus, on several occasions, they pointed ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) towards a region of the sky that portrays a trio of amazing galaxies. MCG-01-39-003 (bottom right) is a peculiar spiral galaxy, with a telephone number name, that presents a hook at one side, most probably due to the interaction with its neighbour, the spiral galaxy NGC 5917 (upper right). In fact, further enhancement of the image reveals that matter is pulled off MCG-01-39-003 by NGC 5917. Both these galaxies are located at similar distances, about 87 million light-years away, towards the constellation of Libra (The Balance). ESO PR Photo 22/06 ESO PR Photo 22/06 The Hooked Galaxy and its Companion NGC 5917 (also known as Arp 254 and MCG-01-39-002) is about 750 times fainter than can be seen by the unaided eye and is about 40,000 light-years across. It was discovered in 1835 by William Herschel, who strangely enough, seems to have missed its hooked companion, only 2.5 times fainter. As seen at the bottom left of this exceptional VLT image, a still fainter and nameless, but intricately beautiful, barred spiral galaxy looks from a distance the entangled pair, while many 'island universes' perform a cosmic dance in the background. But this is not the reason why astronomers look at this region. Last year, a star exploded in the vicinity of the hook

  1. Quantitative analysis of substituted N,N-dimethyl-tryptamines in the presence of natural type XII alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the qualitative and quantitative analysis (QA) of mixtures of hallucinogens, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) (1), 5-methoxy- (la) and 5-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (1b) in the presence of beta-carbolines (indole alkaloids of type XII) ((2), (3) and (5)}. The validated electronic absorption spectroscopic (EAs) protocol achieved a concentration limit of detection (LOD) of 7.2.10(-7) mol/L {concentration limit of quantification (LOQ) of 24.10(-7) mol/L) using bands (lambda max within 260+/-0.23-262+/-0.33 nm. Metrology, including accuracy, measurement repeatability, measurement precision, trueness of measurement, and reproducibility of the measurements are presented using N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMA) as standard. The analytical quantities of mixtures of alkaloids 4, 6 and 7 are: lambda max 317+/-0.45, 338+/-0.69 and 430+/-0.09 for 4 (LOD, 8.6.10(-7) mol/L; LOQ, 28.66(6), mol/L), as well as 528+/-0.75 nm for 6 and 7 (LOD, 8.2.10(-7) mol/L; LOQ, 27.33(3), mol/L), respectively. The partially validated protocols by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), electrospray ionization (ESI), mass spectrometry (MS), both in single and tandem operation (MS/MS) mode, as well as matrix/assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS are elaborated. The Raman spectroscopic (RS) protocol for analysis of psychoactive substances, characterized by strong fluorescence RS profile was developed, with the detection limits being discussed. The known synergistic effect leading to increase the psychoactive and hallucinogenic properties and the reported acute poisoning cases from 1-7, make the present study emergent, since as well the current lack of analytical data and the herein metrology obtained contributed to the elaboration of highly selective and precise analytical protocols, which would be of interest in the field of criminal forensic analysis. PMID:23156988

  2. Factor XII stimulates ERK1/2 and Akt through uPAR, integrins, and the EGFR to initiate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    LaRusch, Gretchen A.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Adams, Gregory; Sitrin, Robert G.; Zhang, Wan Ming; McCrae, Keith R.

    2010-01-01

    Factor XII (FXII) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) mutually block each other's binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We investigated if FXII stimulates cells by interacting with uPAR. FXII (3-62nM) with 0.05mM Zn2+ induces extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2; mitogen-activated protein kinase 44 [MAPK44] andMAPK42) and Akt (Ser473) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. FXII-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 or Akt is a zymogen activity, not an enzymatic event. ERK1/2 or Akt phosphorylation is blocked upstream by PD98059 or Wortmannin or LY294002, respectively. An uPAR signaling region for FXII is on domain 2 adjacent to uPAR's integrin binding site. Cleaved HK or peptides from HK's domain 5 blocks FXII-induced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. A β1 integrin peptide that binds uPAR, antibody 6S6 to β1 integrin, or the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 blocks FXII-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. FXII induces endothelial cell proliferation and 5-bromo-2′deoxy-uridine incorporation. FXII stimulates aortic sprouting in normal but not uPAR-deficient mouse aorta. FXII produces angiogenesis in matrigel plugs in normal but not uPAR-deficient mice. FXII knockout mice have reduced constitutive and wound-induced blood vessel number. In sum, FXII initiates signaling mediated by uPAR, β1 integrin, and the EGFR to induce human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, growth, and angiogenesis. PMID:20228268

  3. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  4. Uncovering blue diffuse dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-04-01

    Extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies are known to be very rare, despite the large numbers of low-mass galaxies predicted by the local galaxy luminosity function. This paper presents a subsample of galaxies that were selected via a morphology-based search on Sloan Digital Sky Survey images with the aim of finding these elusive XMP galaxies. By using the recently discovered XMP galaxy, Leo P, as a guide, we obtained a collection of faint, blue systems, each with isolated H II regions embedded in a diffuse continuum, that have remained optically undetected until now. Here we show the first results from optical spectroscopic follow-up observations of 12 of ˜100 of these blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies yielded by our search algorithm. Oxygen abundances were obtained via the direct method for eight galaxies, and found to be in the range 7.45 < 12 + log (O/H) < 8.0, with two galaxies being classified as XMPs. All BDDs were found to currently have a young star-forming population (<10 Myr) and relatively high ionization parameters of their H II regions. Despite their low luminosities (-11 ≲ MB ≲ -18) and low surface brightnesses (˜23-25 mag arcsec-2), the galaxies were found to be actively star forming, with current star formation rates between 0.0003 and 0.078 M⊙ yr-1. From our current subsample, BDD galaxies appear to be a population of non-quiescent dwarf irregular galaxies, or the diffuse counterparts to blue compact galaxies and as such may bridge the gap between these two populations. Our search algorithm demonstrates that morphology-based searches are successful in uncovering more diffuse metal-poor star-forming galaxies, which traditional emission-line-based searches overlook.

  5. Discovering Teenage Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Staring for the equivalent of every night for two weeks at the same little patch of sky with ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers has found the extremely faint light from teenage galaxies billions of light years away. These galaxies, which the research team believes are the building blocks of normal galaxies like our Milky Way, had eluded detection for three decades, despite intensive searches. ESO PR Photo 52/07 ESO PR Photo 52/07 A 92-hour long spectrum Two-dimensional spectrum obtained in 92 hours of exposure time, showing the line emitter candidates. The quasar absorption lines are visible close to the centre of the image. The team, led by Martin Haehnelt of the University of Cambridge, UK, Michael Rauch and George Becker of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution, USA, and Andy Bunker of the Anglo-Australian Observatory, reports their results in the 1 March 2008 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. "This is the first time that the sky has been searched to this depth and the unrivalled sensitivity of the picture taken with the VLT was key to succeeding," says Haehnelt. Experts have long speculated that galaxies like ours were created by the amalgamation of proto-galaxies early in the history of the Universe, but the light from these fragments was so faint that astronomers had struggled to prove they were there at all. Astronomers thought that the teenage galaxies must be out there because they were blocking part of the light from objects even further away in space. "Previous attempts have usually been frustrated by the difficulty of detecting extremely faint objects: the amount of time required even with an 8-metre class telescope like the VLT considerably exceeds typical observing time awards. We have thus exploited the periods of less good weather with the FORS2 spectrograph at the VLT, taking advantage of the service observing mode," says Becker. In service mode, ESO staff astronomers at Paranal are responsible for carrying

  6. The Densest Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, Jay; Seth, Anil C.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Caldwell, Nelson; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2013-09-01

    We report the discovery of a remarkable ultra-compact dwarf galaxy around the massive Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), which we call M60-UCD1. With a dynamical mass of 2.0 × 108 M ⊙ but a half-light radius of only ~24 pc, M60-UCD1 is more massive than any ultra-compact dwarfs of comparable size, and is arguably the densest galaxy known in the local universe. It has a two-component structure well fit by a sum of Sérsic functions, with an elliptical, compact (rh = 14 pc n ~ 3.3) inner component and a round, exponential, extended (rh = 49 pc) outer component. Chandra data reveal a variable central X-ray source with LX ~ 1038 erg s-1 that could be an active galactic nucleus associated with a massive black hole or a low-mass X-ray binary. Analysis of optical spectroscopy shows the object to be old (gsim 10 Gyr) and of solar metallicity, with elevated [Mg/Fe] and strongly enhanced [N/Fe] that indicates light-element self-enrichment; such self-enrichment may be generically present in dense stellar systems. The velocity dispersion (σ ~ 70 km s-1) and resulting dynamical mass-to-light ratio (M/LV = 4.9 ± 0.7) are consistent with—but slightly higher than—expectations for an old, metal-rich stellar population with a Kroupa initial mass function. The presence of a massive black hole or a mild increase in low-mass stars or stellar remnants is therefore also consistent with this M/LV . The stellar density of the galaxy is so high that no dynamical signature of dark matter is expected. However, the properties of M60-UCD1 suggest an origin in the tidal stripping of a nucleated galaxy with MB ~ -18 to -19.

  7. Where do Galaxies End?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael

    2014-04-01

    Our current view of galaxies considers them as systems of stars and gas embedded in extended halos of dark matter, much of it formed by the infall of smaller systems at earlier times. The true extent of a galaxy remains poorly determined, with the "virial radius" (R vir) providing a characteristic separation between collapsed structures in dynamical equilibrium and external infalling matter. Other physical estimates of the extent of gravitational influence include the gravitational radius, gas accretion radius, and "galactopause" arising from outflows that stall at 100-200 kpc over a range of outflow parameters and confining gas pressures. Physical criteria are proposed to define bound structures, including a more realistic definition of R vir(M *, Mh , za ) for stellar mass M * and halo mass Mh , half of which formed at "assembly redshifts" ranging from za ≈ 0.7-1.3. We estimate the extent of bound gas and dark matter around L* galaxies to be ~200 kpc. The new virial radii, with mean langR virrang ≈ 200 kpc, are 40%-50% smaller than values estimated in recent Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph detections of H I and O VI absorbers around galaxies. In the new formalism, the Milky Way stellar mass, log M * = 10.7 ± 0.1, would correspond to R_vir = 153^{+25}_{-16} kpc for half-mass halo assembly at za = 1.06 ± 0.03. The frequency per unit redshift of low-redshift O VI absorption lines in QSO spectra suggests absorber sizes ~150 kpc when related to intervening 0.1L* galaxies. This formalism is intended to clarify semantic differences arising from observations of extended gas in galactic halos, circumgalactic medium (CGM), and filaments of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Astronomers should refer to bound gas in the galactic halo or CGM, and unbound gas at the CGM-IGM interface, on its way into the IGM.

  8. Triple Scoop from Galaxy Hunter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3

    Silver Dollar Galaxy: NGC 253 (figure 1) Located 10 million light-years away in the southern constellation Sculptor, the Silver Dollar galaxy, or NGC 253, is one of the brightest spiral galaxies in the night sky. In this edge-on view from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the wisps of blue represent relatively dustless areas of the galaxy that are actively forming stars. Areas of the galaxy with a soft golden glow indicate regions where the far-ultraviolet is heavily obscured by dust particles.

    Gravitational Dance: NGC 1512 and NGC 1510 (figure 2) In this image, the wide ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer show spiral galaxy NGC 1512 sitting slightly northwest of elliptical galaxy NGC 1510. The two galaxies are currently separated by a mere 68,000 light-years, leading many astronomers to suspect that a close encounter is currently in progress.

    The overlapping of two tightly wound spiral arm segments makes up the light blue inner ring of NGC 1512. Meanwhile, the galaxy's outer spiral arm is being distorted by strong gravitational interactions with NGC 1510.

    Galaxy Trio: NGC 5566, NGC 5560, and NGC 5569 (figure 3) NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a triplet of galaxies in the Virgo cluster: NGC 5560 (top galaxy), NGC 5566 (middle galaxy), and NGC 5569 (bottom galaxy).

    The inner ring in NGC 5566 is formed by two nearly overlapping bright arms, which themselves spring from the ends of a central bar. The bar is not visible in ultraviolet because it consists of older stars or low mass stars that do not emit energy at ultraviolet wavelengths. The outer disk of NGC 5566 appears warped, and the disk of NGC 5560 is clearly disturbed. Unlike its galactic neighbors, the disk of NGC 5569 does not appear to have been distorted by any passing

  9. Galaxy NGC 4013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An amazing 'edge-on' view of a spiral galaxy 55 million light years from Earth has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. The image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc , reveals in great detail huge clouds of dust and gas extending along and above the galaxy's main disk.

    The image was taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, which was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The galaxy, called NGC 4013, lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. If we could see it pole-on, it would look like a nearly circular pinwheel. In this Hubble image, NGC 4013 is seen edge-on, from our vantage point. Because the galaxy is larger than Hubble's field of view, the image shows only a little more than half the object, but with unprecedented detail.

    Dark clouds of interstellar dust stand out, since they absorb the light of background stars. Most of the clouds lie in the galaxy's plane and form the dark band, about 500 light years thick, that appears to cut the galaxy in two from upper right to lower left. Scientists believe that new stars form in dark interstellar clouds. NGC 4013 shows several examples of these stellar kindergartens near the center of the image, in front of the dark band along the galaxy's equator. One extremely bright star near the upper left corner is merely a nearby foreground star that lies in our Milky Way and happened to be in the line of sight.

    This new picture was constructed from Hubble images taken in January 2000 by Dr. J. Christopher Howk of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., and Dr. Blair D. Savage of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Images taken through three different filters have been combined into a color composite covering the region of the galaxy nucleus (behind the bright foreground star at the upper left) and extending along one edge of the galaxy to the lower right.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space

  10. FOREWORD: The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) (Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA, 19-23 April 2009) The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) (Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA, 19-23 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Thomas M.; Diebold, Ulrike

    2010-03-01

    The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) took place from 19-23 April 2009 in Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA. This was the 12th conference in a strong and vibrant series, which dates back to the early 1980s. DIET XII continued the tradition of exceptional interdisciplinary science and focused on the study of desorption and dynamics induced by electronic excitations of surfaces and interfaces. The format involved invited lectures, contributed talks and a poster session on the most recent developments and advances in this area of surface physics. The Workshop International Steering Committee and attendees wish to dedicate DIET XII to the memory of the late Professor Theodore (Ted) Madey. Ted was one of the main pioneers of this field and was one of the primary individuals working to keep this area of science exciting and adventurous. His overall contributions to surface science were countless and his contributions to the DIET field and community were enormous. He is missed and remembered by many friends and colleagues throughout the world. The papers collected in this issue cover many of the highlights of DIET XII. Topics include ultrafast electron transfer at surfaces and interfaces, quantum and spatially resolved mapping of surface dynamics and desorption, photon-, electron- and ion-beam induced processes at complex interfaces, the role of non-thermal desorption in astrochemistry and astrophysics and laser-/ion-based methods of examining soft matter and biological media. Although the workshop attracted many scientists active in the general area of non-thermal surface processes, DIET XII also attracted many younger scientists (i.e., postdoctoral fellows, advanced graduate students, and a select number of advanced undergraduate students). This field has had an impact in a number of areas including nanoscience, device physics, astrophysics, and now biophysics. We believe that this special issue of Journal of Physics

  11. Galaxy collisions - A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions of spherical galaxies were studied in a series of numerical experiments to see what happens when galaxies collide. Each experiment starts with two model galaxies, each consisting of 50,000 stars, moving toward each other along a specified orbit. The series of experiments provides a systematic sampling of the parameter space spanned by the initial orbital energy and the initial angular momentum. Deeply penetrating collisions are emphasized. The collisions reported here scale to relative velocities as great as 500 km/s, well into the range for collisions within clusters of galaxies. It is found that: (1) the galaxies contract momentarily to about half their original sizes shortly after close passage; and (2) the initial galaxies blend into a single dynamical system while they are near each other.

  12. Young Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2005-10-01

    We propose deep XMM-Newton observations of two young, post-merger elliptical galaxies, NGC 3377 and NGC 5018. Because their X-ray to optical luminosity ratios are the lowest among ellipticals and their stellar populations are significantly metal-enriched, they are the best candidates to address two biggest unsolved problems of the X-ray study of elliptical galaxies: large L_X/L_B scatter and ISM Fe discrepancy. Our XMM-Newton data, in conjunction with the existing Chandra data will allow us to accurately determine Fe and alpha-elements abundances. We will then address the origin of the large L_X/L_B scatter in terms of ISM removal mechanisms by merger-induced galactic winds.

  13. Spokes in ring galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weil, Melinda L.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the response of self-gravitating primary galaxies consisting of dark matter halos and disks containing both stars and gas to collisions with less massive companions. The primaries were constructed using a technique which makes it possible to realize multi-component systems that are stable and virtually in precise equilibrium. A total of 65,536 particles were employed to represent the primary and 4096 to represent the companion. Half the particles in the primary comprise its halo and the other half its disk. Gas makes up 10 percent of the disk mass and is represented by 8192 of the disk particles. A system of units is used where the gravitational constant, total disk mass, and disk exponential scale length are unity. The primary motivation of the present study is to determine whether effects associated with dissipation and self-gravity can account for the unusual morphology of the Cartwheel galaxy.

  14. Starburst Galaxy NGC 3310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are studying the colors of star clusters to determine the age and history of starburst galaxies, a technique somewhat similar to the process of learning the age of a tree by counting its rings.

    This month's Hubble Heritage image showcases the galaxy NGC 3310. It is one of several starburst galaxies, which are hotbeds of star formation, being studied by Dr. Gerhardt Meurer and a team of scientists at Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Md.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/26 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but starburst galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue and older stars redder, the colors relate to their ages.

    NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. The new image shows several hundred star clusters, visible as the bright blue, diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy.

    The star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show their ages range between about one million and more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' more than 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when NGC 3310 collided with a companion galaxy.

    These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once

  15. The Galaxy's Eating Habits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, M. E.; Thom, C.; Gibson, B. K.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2004-06-01

    The possibility of a gaseous halo stream which was stripped from the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy is presented. The total mass of the neutral hydrogen along the orbit of the Sgr dwarf in the direction of the Galactic Anti-Center is 4 - 10 × 106 M⊙ (at 36 kpc, the distance to the stellar debris in this region). Both the stellar and gaseous components have negative velocities in this part of the sky, but the gaseous component extends to higher negative velocities. We suggest this gaseous stream was stripped from the main body of the dwarf 0.2 - 0.3 Gyr ago during its current orbit after a passage through a diffuse edge of the Galactic disk with a density > 10-4 cm-3. The gas would then represent the dwarf's last source of star formation fuel and explains how the galaxy was forming stars 0.5-2 Gyr ago.

  16. Collisionless galaxy simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Zang, T. A.; Miller, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Three-dimensional fully self-consistent computer models were used to determine the evolution of galaxies consisting of 100 000 simulation stars. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with three-dimensional simulations showed only a very slight stabilizing effect due to the additional degree of freedom. The addition of a fully self-consistent, nonrotating, exponential core/halo component resulted in considerable stabilization. A second series of computer experiments was performed to determine the collapse and relaxation of initially spherical, uniform density and uniform velocity dispersion stellar systems. The evolution of the system was followed for various amounts of angular momentum in solid body rotation. For initally low values of the angular momentum satisfying the Ostriker-Peebles stability criterion, the systems quickly relax to an axisymmetric shape and resemble elliptical galaxies in appearance. For larger values of the initial angular momentum bars develop and the systems undergo a much more drastic evolution.

  17. The Anatomy of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Rampazzo, Roberto; Zaggia, Simone; Longair, Malcolm S.; Ferrarese, Laura; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; van der Kruit, Pieter C.; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Combes, Françoise; Bertin, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Calzetti, Daniela; Moss, David L.; Matteucci, Francesca; Djorgovski, Stanislav George; Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Graham, Alister W. McK.; Tully, Brent R.

    Just after WWII Astronomy started to live its "Golden Age", not differently to many other sciences and human activities, especially in the west side countries. The improved resolution of telescopes and the appearance of new efficient light detectors (e.g. CCDs in the middle eighty) greatly impacted the extragalactic researches. The first morphological analysis of galaxies were rapidly substituted by "anatomic" studies of their structural components, star and gas content, and in general by detailed investigations of their properties. As for the human anatomy, where the final goal was that of understanding the functionality of the organs that are essential for the life of the body, galaxies were dissected to discover their basic structural components and ultimately the mystery of their existence.

  18. Amido/ureidosubstituted benzenesulfonamides-isatin conjugates as low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoform XII.

    PubMed

    Eldehna, Wagdy M; Fares, Mohamed; Ceruso, Mariangela; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Abou El Ella, Dalal A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    By using a molecular hybridization approach, two series of amido/ureidosubstituted benzenesulfonamides incorporating substituted-isatin moieties were synthesized. The prepared derivatives were in vitro evaluated for their inhibitory activity against human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) I, II (cytosolic) and IX, XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated) isoforms. All these isoforms were inhibited in variable degrees by the sulfonamides reported here. hCA I was inhibited with KIs in the range of 7.9-894 nM, hCA II in the range of 7.5-1645 nM (with one compound having a KI > 10 μM); hCA IX in the range of 5.0-240 nM, whereas hCA XII in the range of 0.47-2.83 nM. As all these isoforms are involved in various pathologies, in which their inhibition can be exploited therapeutically, the derivatives reported here may represent interesting extensions to the field of CA inhibitors of the sulfonamide type. PMID:26840366

  19. Abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of abundance studies of dwarf irregular galaxies and similar objects are reviewed with special attention to variations in the CNO element group. Observations of the forbidden N II and semiforbidden C III lines in the most metal-poor galaxy known, IZw 18, are presented for the first time and CNO abundances are derived via a photoionization model and discussed in the context of the abundances found in other metal-poor H II regions and galaxies.

  20. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  1. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  2. Structural Properties of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Lee, M.; S4G Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We present that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down- bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We show that for galaxies with B/T > 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r_br/R_bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) of the bar, and thus the OLR also moves outwards at the same rate as the bar grows. For galaxies with B/T < 0.1, r_br/R_bar, spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds. We quantifiy shapes of bar radial surface brightness profiles by measuring their Sersic indices and show that bars in higher B/T galaxies have flatter radial surface brightness profile than bulgeless galaxies do. In particular, bulgeless galaxies mostly have bars with steep profiles. We show that the normalized bar length is correlated with B/T, which is consistent with bars growing longer with time.

  3. ARCHANGEL: Galaxy Photometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James

    2011-07-01

    ARCHANGEL is a Unix-based package for the surface photometry of galaxies. While oriented for large angular size systems (i.e. many pixels), its tools can be applied to any imaging data of any size. The package core contains routines to perform the following critical galaxy photometry functions: sky determinationframe cleaningellipse fittingprofile fittingtotal and isophotal magnitudes The goal of the package is to provide an automated, assembly-line type of reduction system for galaxy photometry of space-based or ground-based imaging data. The procedures outlined in the documentation are flux independent, thus, these routines can be used for non-optical data as well as typical imaging datasets. ARCHANGEL has been tested on several current OS's (RedHat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X). A tarball for installation is available at the download page. The main routines are Python and FORTRAN based, therefore, a current installation of Python and a FORTRAN compiler are required. The ARCHANGEL package also contains Python hooks to the PGPLOT package, an XML processor and network tools which automatically link to data archives (i.e. NED, HST, 2MASS, etc) to download images in a non-interactive manner.

  4. Bright Galaxies, Dark Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera

    In 1965, Vera Rubin was the first woman permitted to observe at Palomar Observatory. In the intervening years, she has become one of the world's finest and most respected astronomers. This particular collection of essays is compiled from work written over the past 15 years and deals with a variety of subjects in astronomy and astrophysics, specifically galaxies and dark matter. The book also contains biographical sketches of astronomers who have been colleagues and friends, providing a stimulating view of a woman in science. About the Author Since 1965 Vera Rubin has been a staff member at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dr. Rubin has authored nearly 200 papers on the structure of our galaxy, motions within other galaxies, and large scale motions in the universe. She has been a distinguished visiting astronomer at the Cerro Tololo Inter American Observatory in Chile; a Chancellor's Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Berkeley; a President's Distinguished Visitor at Vassar College; and a Beatrice Tinsley visiting professor at the University of Texas, Austin.

  5. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy troughs, i.e. underdensities in the projected galaxy field, are a weak lensing probe of the low density Universe with high signal-to-noise ratio. I present measurements of the radial distortion of background galaxy images and the de-magnification of the CMB by troughs constructed from Dark Energy Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy catalogs. With high statistical significance and a relatively robust modeling, these probe gravity in regimes of density and scale difficult to access for conventional statistics.

  6. Reconstruction of SDSS Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Obric, M.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present The SDSS Multiple Offspring Recombination Engine (SMORE), a newly developed code that automatically and interactively recombines galaxies fragmented by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Photo pipeline. The SDSS software was optimized for the faint-end of the brightness limit and tends to over-deblend galaxies with angular sizes over 2 arcmin, sometimes separating spiral arms and HII regions from their parent galaxies. This process can remove a large percentage of the flux from the galaxy and bias datasets due to incorrect photometry. SMORE automatically builds galaxies from the fragments ("children"). Decisions on which child to include are made on the basis of its g-r and r-i color (relative to the mean colors of the largest galaxy children), size, distance to the center of the galaxy, type (as assigned by SDSS Photo) and the position angle. If there are pieces for which a decision cannot be made and their relative flux is more than 5% of the total flux of the galaxy, the interactive SMORE gives a user option to manually choose which of those children should be included. Recombined galaxies are built on a clean background without foreground and background objects and new photometry is performed.

  7. The Assembly of Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponman, Trevor

    2001-09-01

    The most interesting phase in the evolution of a galaxy group is the virialisation stage, at which the infall velocities of the galaxies are randomised and the interstellar gas compressed and heated. The violently fluctuating environment experienced by galaxies during this phase may have long-lasting effects on their properties. Such virialising groups appear to be quite rare, since the phase is transient, but we have identified three strong candidates from an extensive study of groups with ROSAT. We propose to obtain high quality spectral images of these with ACIS in order to study the way in which the intergalactic medium is heated, and the effects of strong interactions on galaxy properties.

  8. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  9. Chemical Signatures in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, Vanessa M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical signatures in dwarf galaxies describe the examination of specific elemental abundance ratios to investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies, particularly when compared with the variety of stellar populations in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can come from HII region emission lines, planetary nebulae, or supernova remnants, but mostly they come from stars. Since stars can live a very long time, for example, a 0.8 MSun star born at the time of the Big Bang would only now be ascending the red giant branch, and, if, for the most part, its quiescent main sequence lifetime had been uneventful, then it is possible that the surface chemistry of stars actually still resembles their natal chemistry. Detailed abundances of stars in dwarf galaxies can be used to reconstruct their chemical evolution, which we now find to be distinct from any other component of the Galaxy, questioning the assertion that dwarf galaxies like these built up the Galaxy. Potential solutions to reconciling dwarf galaxy abundances and Galaxy formation models include the timescale for significant merging and the possibility for uncovering different stellar populations in the new ultra-faint dwarfs.

  10. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mulchaey, John S.; Jeltema, Tesla E.

    2010-06-08

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

  11. Colliding Galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-10-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope looks deep within the violent center where the two Antennae Galaxies were merging. The Hubble's high resolution and sensitivity reveals the birth of young star clusters formed in the collision. New Hubble images of young star clusters help investigators put the evolutionary sequence into the right order. The Hubble Space Telescope images are: (1) zoom into the antennae galaxies; (2) galaxy merger evolution sequence; (3) the formation of the antennae pair; and (4) artist's conception of the collision of Milky-Way Galaxy with the Andromeda.

  12. The intrinsic shape of galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Silvio; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2013-09-01

    By modelling the axis ratio distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 galaxies, we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026} in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of 0.267 ± 0.009, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of 0.215 ± 0.013. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of 0.584 ± 0.006, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlopers present in samples with morphological information from photometric profiles. These interlopers are removed when selecting ellipticals using Galaxy Zoo data. We find that the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and their dust extinction vary with absolute magnitude, colour and physical size. We find that bright elliptical galaxies are more spherical than faint ones, a trend that is also present with galaxy size, and that there is no dependence of elliptical galaxy shape with colour. For spiral galaxies, we find that the reddest ones have higher dust extinction as expected, due to the fact that this reddening is mainly due to dust. We also find that the thickness of discs increases with luminosity and size, and that brighter, smaller and redder galaxies have less round discs.

  13. Giant disc galaxies: where environment trumps mass in galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, H. M.; Zaritsky, D.; Sorce, J. G.; Pomarède, D.

    2015-04-01

    We identify some of the most H I-massive and fastest rotating disc galaxies in the local universe with the aim of probing the processes that drive the formation of these extreme disc galaxies. By combining data from the Cosmic Flows project, which has consistently reanalysed archival galaxy H I profiles, and 3.6 μm photometry obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, with which we can measure stellar mass, we use the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relationship to explore whether these massive galaxies are distinct. We discuss several results, but the most striking is the systematic offset of the H I-massive sample above the BTF. These galaxies have both more gas and more stars in their discs than the typical disc galaxy of similar rotational velocity. The `condensed' baryon fraction, fC, the fraction of the baryons in a dark matter halo that settle either as cold gas or stars into the disc, is twice as high in the H I-massive sample than typical, and almost reaches the universal baryon fraction in some cases, suggesting that the most extreme of these galaxies have little in the way of a hot baryonic component or cold baryons distributed well outside the disc. In contrast, the star formation efficiency, measured as the ratio of the mass in stars to that in both stars and gas, shows no difference between the H I-massive sample and the typical disc galaxies. We conclude that the star formation efficiency is driven by an internal, self-regulating process, while fC is affected by external factors. Neither the morphology nor the star formation rate of these galaxies is primarily determined by either their dark or stellar mass. We also found that the most massive H I detected galaxies are located preferentially in filaments. We present the first evidence of an environmental effect on galaxy evolution using a dynamical definition of a filament.

  14. Giant disk galaxies : Where environment trumps mass in galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, Helene M.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sorce, Jenny G.; Pomarede, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We identify some of the most HI massive and fastest rotating disk galaxies in the local universe with the aim of probing the processes that drive the formation of these extreme disk galaxies. By combining data from the Cosmic Flows project, which has consistently reanalyzed archival galaxy HI profiles, and 3.6 micron photometry obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, with which we can measure stellar mass, we use the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship to explore whether these massive galaxies are distinct.We discuss several results, but the most striking is the systematic offset of the HI-massive sample above the baryonic Tully-Fisher. These galaxies have both more gas and more stars in their disks than the typical disk galaxy of similar rotational velocity. The ``condensed" baryon fraction, fC, the fraction of the baryons in a dark matter halo that settle either as cold gas or stars into the disk, is twice as high in the HI-massive sample than typical, and almost reaches the universal baryon fraction in some cases, suggesting that the most extreme of these galaxies have little in the way of a hot baryonic component or cold baryons distributed well outside the disk. In contrast, the star formation efficiency, measured as the ratio of the mass in stars to that in both stars and gas, shows no difference between the HI-massive sample and the typical disk galaxies. We conclude that the star formation efficiency is driven by an internal, self-regulating process, while fC is affected by external factors. Neither the morphology nor the star formation rate of these galaxies is primarily determined by either their dark or stellar mass. We also found that the most massive HI detected galaxies are located preferentially in filaments. We present the first evidence of an environmental effect on galaxy evolution using a dynamical definition of a filament.

  15. Where do galaxies end?

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael

    2014-04-01

    Our current view of galaxies considers them as systems of stars and gas embedded in extended halos of dark matter, much of it formed by the infall of smaller systems at earlier times. The true extent of a galaxy remains poorly determined, with the 'virial radius' (R {sub vir}) providing a characteristic separation between collapsed structures in dynamical equilibrium and external infalling matter. Other physical estimates of the extent of gravitational influence include the gravitational radius, gas accretion radius, and 'galactopause' arising from outflows that stall at 100-200 kpc over a range of outflow parameters and confining gas pressures. Physical criteria are proposed to define bound structures, including a more realistic definition of R {sub vir}(M {sub *}, M{sub h} , z{sub a} ) for stellar mass M {sub *} and halo mass M{sub h} , half of which formed at 'assembly redshifts' ranging from z{sub a} ≈ 0.7-1.3. We estimate the extent of bound gas and dark matter around L* galaxies to be ∼200 kpc. The new virial radii, with mean (R {sub vir}) ≈ 200 kpc, are 40%-50% smaller than values estimated in recent Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph detections of H I and O VI absorbers around galaxies. In the new formalism, the Milky Way stellar mass, log M {sub *} = 10.7 ± 0.1, would correspond to R{sub vir}=153{sub −16}{sup +25} kpc for half-mass halo assembly at z{sub a} = 1.06 ± 0.03. The frequency per unit redshift of low-redshift O VI absorption lines in QSO spectra suggests absorber sizes ∼150 kpc when related to intervening 0.1L* galaxies. This formalism is intended to clarify semantic differences arising from observations of extended gas in galactic halos, circumgalactic medium (CGM), and filaments of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Astronomers should refer to bound gas in the galactic halo or CGM, and unbound gas at the CGM-IGM interface, on its way into the IGM.

  16. THE DENSEST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Seth, Anil C.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Caldwell, Nelson; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2013-09-20

    We report the discovery of a remarkable ultra-compact dwarf galaxy around the massive Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), which we call M60-UCD1. With a dynamical mass of 2.0 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} but a half-light radius of only ∼24 pc, M60-UCD1 is more massive than any ultra-compact dwarfs of comparable size, and is arguably the densest galaxy known in the local universe. It has a two-component structure well fit by a sum of Sérsic functions, with an elliptical, compact (r{sub h} = 14 pc; n ∼ 3.3) inner component and a round, exponential, extended (r{sub h} = 49 pc) outer component. Chandra data reveal a variable central X-ray source with L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1} that could be an active galactic nucleus associated with a massive black hole or a low-mass X-ray binary. Analysis of optical spectroscopy shows the object to be old (∼> 10 Gyr) and of solar metallicity, with elevated [Mg/Fe] and strongly enhanced [N/Fe] that indicates light-element self-enrichment; such self-enrichment may be generically present in dense stellar systems. The velocity dispersion (σ ∼ 70 km s{sup –1}) and resulting dynamical mass-to-light ratio (M/L{sub V} = 4.9 ± 0.7) are consistent with—but slightly higher than—expectations for an old, metal-rich stellar population with a Kroupa initial mass function. The presence of a massive black hole or a mild increase in low-mass stars or stellar remnants is therefore also consistent with this M/L{sub V} . The stellar density of the galaxy is so high that no dynamical signature of dark matter is expected. However, the properties of M60-UCD1 suggest an origin in the tidal stripping of a nucleated galaxy with M{sub B} ∼ –18 to –19.

  17. The APM bright galaxy Surveys: the Equatorial Galaxy Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhury, S.; Lynden-Bell, D.; Scharf, C.; Hudson, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    The catalogs of bright galaxies (B_J<16.5) compiled from APM scans of UKST IIIa-J Sky Survey plates have now covered most of the southern sky (|b|>20(deg) ). This presentation reviews the current status of these catalogs, and the ongoing scientific research supported by them. In particular, the first results from the catalog of galaxies (B_J<17, D>0(') .5) compiled from the IIIa--J plates of the UKST Equatorial Survey are presented. This covers a part of the sky (-17(deg) < delta < -2(deg) , |b|>20(deg) ) that was not surveyed for the UGC and ESO catalogs, and hence is the first equivalent galaxy catalog in the Equatorial Sky. All galaxy candidates from a preliminary star-galaxy separation exercise were visually inspected, and the identified galaxies were assigned a morphological type. This catalog of over 50,000 galaxies from 200 plates lists accurate positions and shape parameters for all galaxies, together with their diameters and B_J magnitudes, measured by edge-matching and CCD calibration.

  18. Magellanic Irregular Galaxies and Chemical Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, G.; Lequeux, J.; Stasińska, G.; Vigroux, L.

    1982-03-01

    Abundance determination provides a way to study the evolution of galaxies. In conjunction with other properties of galaxies, such as the gas mass fraction, the present rate of star formation or the luminosity, they can help to determine the 3 major quantities which govern the chemical evolution of galaxies: the Initial Mass Function (IMF), the past rate of star formation (SFR), and the amount of heavy elements produced at each generation of stars. Possibilities of abundance determinations in external galaxies are rare. Even in the closest galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, stellar spectra are restricted to supergiants whose complex atmospheres prevent us from obtaining accurate abundances. Spectra or colours of the integrated light of clusters, or galaxies themselves, can give some information. However, this integrated light comes from a mixture of stars of different spectral type, luminosity c1asses and luminosity, its interpretation in terms of abundances is not straightforward (e. g. Tinsley 1980, Fund. Cosm. Phys., 5,287). For external galaxies, H I1 regions provide the most reliable abundances. They are bright enough to be observed in distant galaxies and the emission line intensities are proportional to the abundances of the emitting ions. Two major problems remain in the way to elemental abundances: correction for unseen ions, and the amount of different elements locked in dust grains.

  19. Galaxy coordinates. III. Accurate positions for 17124 galaxies including 3301 new companions of UGC galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturel, G.; Petit, C.; Garnier, R.; Prugniel, P.

    2000-06-01

    This paper gives accurate coordinates and diameters for 3301 galaxies, companions of UGC galaxies. (about 2764 companions were not yet available in electronic form). In addition previously poor equatorial coordinates are re-measured for 13823 galaxies. These coordinates which have an accuracy of 5'' or better will be used for facilitating the cross-identification with forthcoming catalogues of millions of galaxies. Full Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  20. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America, Part XII: The Basin-Plateau Tribes (cont'd.). Occasional Publications in Anthropology, Ethnology Series, No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    The Museum of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado at Greeley, has assembled various American Indian tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to comprise a series of publications. The present volume, Part XII, is a continuation of the publication on Basin-Plateau Indian groups: the Ely Indian Colony and Reno-Sparks Indian Colony of…

  1. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  2. Faint Blue Galaxies and the Epoch of Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Ferguson, Henry C.

    1996-02-01

    Several independent lines of reasoning, both theoretical and observational, suggest that the very faint (B ≳ 24) galaxies seen in deep images of the sky are small low-mass galaxies that experienced a short starburst at redshifts 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 1 and have since faded into low-luminosity, low surface brightness (LSB) objects. We examine this hypothesis in detail in order to determine whether a model incorporating such dwarfs can account for the observed wavelength-dependent number counts, as well as redshift, color, and size distributions. Low-mass galaxies generically arise in large numbers in hierarchical clustering scenarios with realistic initial conditions. Generally, these galaxies are expected to form at high redshifts. Babul & Rees have argued that the formation epoch of these galaxies is, in fact, delayed until z ≲ 1 due to the photoionization of the gas by the metagalactic UV radiation at high redshifts. We combine these two elements, along with simple heuristic assumptions regarding star formation histories and efficiency, to construct our bursting dwarf model. The slope and the normalization of the mass function of the dwarf galaxies are derived from the initial conditions and are not adjusted to fit the data. We further augment the model with a phenomenological prescription for the formation and evolution of the locally observed population of galaxies (E, S0, Sab, Sbc, and Sdm types). We use spectral synthesis and Monte Carlo methods to generate realistic model galaxy catalogs for comparison with observations. We find that for reasonable choices of the star formation histories for the dwarf galaxies, the model results are in very good agreement with the results of the deep galaxy surveys. Such a dwarf-dominated model is also qualitatively supported by recent studies of faint galaxy gravitational lensing and clustering, by galaxy size distributions measured with the Hubble Space Telescope, and by the evidence for very modest evolution in regular galaxy

  3. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  4. Radio galaxies and their environment

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.

    1993-02-24

    The relationships between radio galaxies and their environment are varied, complex, and evolve with cosmic epoch. Basic questions are what role the environment plays in triggering and fuelling (radio) galaxy activity what the effects of this activity are on its environment, and how radio galaxies and environment evolve. Clearly, this could be the topic of a workshop all in itself and the scope of this review will necessarily be limited. A review of the connections between environment and galaxy activity in general has been given by Heckman. First, I will briefly summarize the relationships between parent galaxy and cluster environments, and radio galaxies. A more detailed discussion of various aspects of this will be given elsewhere by F. Owen, J.0. Burns and R. Perley. I will then discuss the current status of investigations of extended emission-line regions in radio galaxies, again referring elsewhere in this volume for more detailed discussions of some particular aspects (kinematics and ionization mechanisms by K. Meisenheimer; polarization and spectral index lobe asymmetries by G. Pooley). I will conclude with a brief discussion of the current status of observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  5. GALAXY Classroom: Television for Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graumann, Peter

    1994-01-01

    An interactive learning service for elementary grades, "GALAXY Classroom," offers enrichment opportunities to classrooms. Students communicate via fax in response to questions posed in satellite transmitted segments. The primary market for "GALAXY Classroom" is the at-risk student. Sidebars describe costs and current offerings. (SLW)

  6. Computational astrophysics: Monstrous galaxies unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, Romeel

    2015-09-01

    The enigma of how the most luminous galaxies arise is closer to being solved. New simulations show that these are long-lived massive galaxies powered by prodigious gas infall and the recycling of supernova-driven outflows. See Letter p.496

  7. Analytic Time Depending Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Considerando las hip6tesis de Chandrasekhar para el estudjo de la GalActicaq se han desarrollado varios modelos analiticos integrables con simetria axial y dependientes del . . By considering Chandrasekhar hypotheses +or the study o+ Galactic Dynamics, several integrable analytic axisymmetric time-depending galactic models have been developed. Ke ords; GALAXY-DYNAMICS - GALAXY-STRUCTURE

  8. Which Factors Shape Galaxy Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovino, A.; Cucciati, O.; Scodeggio, M.; Knobel, K.; Kovac, K.; Lilly, S.; Zcosmos Team

    2010-10-01

    Using samples of isolated and groups galaxies obtained from the first 10000 zCOSMOS-bright high quality redshifts, we study in detail the complex interplay between environment and galaxy evolution. Our main result is that galaxies of log( M* / Msun) ≍ 10.8 do not show any strong environmental dependency up to z ˜ 1. In contrast, for masses below this value and at redshift lower than z˜ 1, we witness the emergence of what we call nurture red galaxies: galaxies that slightly deviate from the trend of the downsizing scenario displayed by the global galaxy population and do more so as cosmic time progresses. There are various mechanisms occurring in groups (gradual cessation of star formation induced by gentle gas stripping and starvation by a diffuse intragroup medium, or by slow group-scale harassment), and that are more efficient for less massive galaxies. Our analysis implies that these mechanisms begin to significantly influence galaxy evolution after z˜1, a redshift corresponding to the emergence of structures in which these mechanisms take place.

  9. The XXL Survey. XII. Optical spectroscopy of X-ray-selected clusters and the frequency of AGN in superclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouridis, E.; Poggianti, B.; Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I.; Jaffé, Y.; Adami, C.; Elyiv, A.; Melnyk, O.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Horellou, C.; Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Plionis, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Surdej, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. This article belongs to the first series of XXL publications. It presents multifibre spectroscopic observations of three 0.55 deg2 fields in the XXL Survey, which were selected on the basis of their high density of X-ray-detected clusters. The observations were obtained with the AutoFib2+WYFFOS (AF2) wide-field fibre spectrograph mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. Aims: The paper first describes the scientific rationale, the preparation, the data reduction, and the results of the observations, and then presents a study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within three superclusters. Methods: To determine the redshift of galaxy clusters and AGN, we assign high priority to a) the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), b) the most probable cluster galaxy candidates, and c) the optical counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We use the outcome of the observations to study the projected (2D) and the spatial (3D) overdensity of AGN in three superclusters. Results: We obtained redshifts for 455 galaxies in total, 56 of which are counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We were able to determine the redshift of the merging supercluster XLSSC-e, which consists of six individual clusters at z ~ 0.43, and we confirmed the redshift of supercluster XLSSC-d at z ~ 0.3. More importantly, we discovered a new supercluster, XLSSC-f, that comprises three galaxy clusters also at z ~ 0.3. We find a significant 2D overdensity of X-ray point-like sources only around the supercluster XLSSC-f. This result is also supported by the spatial (3D) analysis of XLSSC-f, where we find four AGN with compatible spectroscopic redshifts and possibly one more with compatible photometric redshift. In addition, we find two AGN (3D analysis) at the redshift of XLSSC-e, but no AGN in XLSSC-d. Comparing these findings with the optical galaxy overdensity we conclude that the total number of AGN in the area of the three superclusters significantly exceeds the field expectations. All of the

  10. Galaxy dynamics in clustered environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Maria J. R. R.

    Galaxy orientations have been studied statistically for over 70 years now, but it is only recently that alignments have been found on scales larger than those of close interacting pairs. Large scale alignments between galaxies and their surrounding tidal fields are expected to occur during formation, but what happens when these galaxies fall into larger systems? Can their orientations tell us anything about the accretion process itself? In this dissertation I will focus on the radial alignment of satellite galaxies, in which a satellite's long axis points preferentially toward the center of its host. I present observational evidence for this type of galaxy alignment in the SDSS DR3 using a sample of X-ray selected massive clusters. Then, using results from N-body cosmological simulations, I will argue that this effect is the result of a secular tidal interaction between the galaxies and their host potential. The analysis shows that subhalos are effectively torqued by their host throughout their orbits, so that their major axes tend to be aligned with the gradient of the host potential. The significant discrepancy between the magnitude of the effect as seen in these simulations and that detected in observations motivates the work of the next chapter, where I perform numerical experiments on idealized, high resolution N-body models of elliptical galaxies. These experiments show that the more centrally concentrated luminous components of galaxies take longer to react to the external torque, and, in the particular case of mildly eccentric orbits, their orientations can figure rotate in periodic patterns that are not radially aligned on average. The mechanism is more effective on galaxies that have larger triaxialities, but the overall effect of torquing is to make galaxies rounder, since radially misaligned galaxies tend to become more spherical as they are torqued towards equilibrium. In the last chapter, I briefly discuss the impact of these results for galaxy

  11. Cold Gas in Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, Christopher; Walter, Fabian

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, observations of the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in distant galaxies via molecular and atomic fine structure line (FSL) emission have gone from a curious look into a few extreme, rare objects to a mainstream tool for studying galaxy formation out to the highest redshifts. Molecular gas has been observed in about 200 galaxies at z > 1 to z ~ 7, including AGN host-galaxies, highly star-forming submillimeter galaxies, and increasing samples of main-sequence color-selected star-forming galaxies. Studies have moved well beyond simple detections to dynamical imaging at kpc resolution and multiline, multispecies studies that determine the physical conditions in the ISM in early galaxies. Observations of the cool gas are the required complement to studies of the stellar density and star-formation history of the Universe as they reveal the phase of the ISM that immediately precedes star formation in galaxies.Current observations suggest that the order of magnitude increase in the cosmic star-formation rate density from z ~ 0 to 2 is commensurate with a similar increase in the gas-to-stellar mass ratio in star-forming disk galaxies. Progress has been made in determining the CO luminosity to H2 mass conversion factor at high z. The dichotomy between high versus low values for the conversion factor for main-sequence versus starburst galaxies, respectively, appears to persist with increasing redshift, with a likely dependence on metalicity and other local physical conditions. There may also be two sequences in the relationship between star-formation rate and gas mass: one for starbursts, in which the gas consumption timescale is short (~ few e7 years), and one for main sequence galaxies, with an order of magnitude longer gas consumption timescale.With the advent of ALMA, studies of atomic FSL emission are rapidly progressing, with ~ 50 galaxies detected in the exceptionally bright [CII] 158 um line to date, 50% in the last year or so. The [CII] line is

  12. Feeding Versus Feedback in Active Galactic Nuclei from Near-Infrared integral field spectroscopy - XII. NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönell, Astor J.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério

    2016-09-01

    We map the gas excitation and kinematics, and the stellar population properties of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 using Gemini NIFS Spectrograph in the J and K bands at a spatial and velocity resolution of 105 pc and 45 km s-1 respectively. Emission-line flux distributions in ionized and molecular gas extend up to ≈ 400 pc from the nucleus, where they are found to peak. The mass of HII is 4.8±0.6 × 106 M⊙ and the mass of warm H2 is 1.1±0.2 × 103 M⊙, while the mass of cold H2 is estimated as 5.8±1.2 × 108 M⊙. The Paβ emission shows two kinematic components: one in blueshift, with velocity reaching ≈ -300 km s-1 and another showing a velocity field characteristic of rotation in the galaxy plane. The blueshifted component is also observed in the coronal line [S IX]λ1.2523μm, while the rotational component is also observed in the molecular gas. We interpret this velocity field as due to gas rotating in the galaxy plane plus an outflow, and estimate a mass outflow rate of 6.8±0.75 M⊙ yr-1. Spectral synthesis of the continuum shows nuclear emission dominated by a featureless AGN continnum combined with hot dust emission attributed to a dusty torus. The stellar population is dominated by an old (2 Gyr < t ≤ 15 Gyr) component between 160 and 300 pc, while closer to the nucleus, an intermediate age (50 Myr < t ≤ 2 Gyr) component contributes at levels ranging from ≈ 40% to ≈ 100% to the flux at 2.12μm.

  13. Galaxies in extreme environments: Isolated galaxies versus compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbala, Adriana

    2009-06-01

    This Dissertation comprises two distinct studies of galaxies in dramatically different environments: extreme isolation versus compact groups. We emphasize empirically how "nature" (i.e. internal, secular processes) plays the dominant role in defining the evolution of isolated galaxies and how "nurture" dictates the fate of galaxies in very crowded environments. Two chapters report on a detailed photometric study of a well-defined sample of N ~100 isolated Sb-Sc spiral galaxies. Data source is Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using i-band images we perform three kinds of measures: (a) bulge/disk/bar decomposition, (b) CAS parametrization (Concentration, Asymmetry, Clumpiness), and (c) Fourier decomposition/analysis of spiral arms and bar properties including dynamical measures of the torque. Having quantified a large set of properties we look for: (i) the interplay between different components of the same galaxy, (ii) trends along the morphological sequence Sb-Sbc-Sc, and (iii) statistical differences between our "isolated" sample and samples of galaxies of similar morphology constructed without regard for isolation. We find that the majority of isolated late-type disk galaxies host pseudobulges rather than classical bulges. The pseudobulges probably form through internal secular processes and bars may play an important role. A clear separation is noted between Sb and Sbc/Sc in various measures, i.e. the former are redder, brighter, have larger disks and bars, more luminous bulges, are more concentrated, more symmetric and dumpier than the latter. Isolated galaxies host larger bars than galaxies in samples defined without isolation constraints. Longer bars are not necessarily stronger, but show a higher contrast in Fourier analysis. Another chapter is a multiwavelength study of Seyfert's Sextet, the highest density galaxy aggregate in the local Universe. Four of its five galaxies are interpreted as remnant bulges of accreted spirals and are now embedded in a luminous halo

  14. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  15. HII Galaxies in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E.

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution I review some results of the integral field spectroscopy of HII galaxies. The two main topics are related to their internal kinematics and the distribution of physical conditions. HII galaxies present a L-σ relation similar to elliptical galaxies. However, the origin of supersonic motions of the ionized gas (σ) is still a matter of debate. We show that the core of the star forming region dominates the internal kinematics and probes the underlying turbulent motions. The show our latest calibration of the L-sigma relation of local HII galaxies. We also show that the physical conditions are very uniform throughout the whole extent of the star forming region, once you account for the levels of ionization. HII galaxies are excellent laboratories for constraining the ionization power of high mass stars at low metallicities.

  16. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  17. Galaxy NGC 1850

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    By spying on a neighboring galaxy, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured an image of a young, globular-like star cluster -- a type of object unknown in our Milky Way Galaxy.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/25 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The double cluster NGC 1850 lies in a neighboring satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. It has two relatively young components. The main, globular-like cluster is in the center. A smaller cluster is seen below and to the right, composed of extremely hot, blue stars and fainter red T-Tauri stars. The main cluster is about 50 million years old; the smaller one is 4 million years old.

    A filigree pattern of diffuse gas surrounds NGC 1850. Scientists believe the pattern formed millions of years ago when massive stars in the main cluster exploded as supernovas.

    Hubble can observe a range of star types in NGC 1850, including the faint, low-mass T-Tauri stars, which are difficult to distinguish with ground-based telescopes. Hubble's fine angular resolution can pick out these stars, even in other galaxies. Massive stars of the OB type emit large amounts of energetic ultraviolet radiation, which is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. From Hubble's position above the atmosphere, it can detect this ultraviolet light.

    NGC 1850, the brightest star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is in the southern constellation of Dorado, called the Goldfish or the Swordfish. This image was created from five archival exposures taken by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 between April 3, 1994 and February 6, 1996. More information about the Hubble Space Telescope is online at http://www.stsci.edu. More information about the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 is at http://wfpc2.jpl.nasa.gov.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore

  18. Galaxy populations in rich environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy Huu

    2002-11-01

    Combining two color HST/WFPC2 mosaics with extensive Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we derive physical properties for over 400 confirmed cluster members at z = 0.33, 0.58, and 0.83 to provide key tests of current CDM models of hierarchical galaxy formation. Morphological characteristics such as bulge to total luminosity, half-light radius, bulge/disk scale length, and galaxy asymmetry are measured by determining the best-fit 2D bulge + disk model for each galaxy. We rigorously test these measurements using extensive mock galaxy catalogs to quantify systematic and random errors. Utilizing quantitative structural parameters, spectral indices ([OII] λ3727, HS, and H-γ), Hubble types, internal velocity dispersions (for a subset), and galaxy colors, we find that: (1)Galaxies spanning the range of Hubble type (-5 ≤ T ≤ 8) are well-fit by a de Vaucouleurs bulge with exponential disk profile; (2)The average [OII] equivalent width of the most disk-dominated members (B/T < 0.25) is significantly higher than the average of the bulge-dominated members (B/T ≥ 0.4); (3)The physical properties, e.g. half-light radii, bulge-to-total luminosities, and bulge ellipticities, of cluster elliptical and S0 galaxies (-17.3 ≥ MBz - 5log h 70 ≥ -19.3) are consistent with the two types sharing a common parent galaxy population; (4)In these three clusters, the distributions of cluster disk sizes are indistinguishable, a result contrary to predictions from current hierarchical formation models; (5)Post- starburst (“E + A”) galaxies are a non- negligible fraction (˜5 20%) of the cluster population at these redshifts; (6)We find compelling evidence that the E + A mass distribution evolves with redshift (“downsizing”) such that E + A galaxies span the range in mass at high redshift but only low mass E + A's exist in nearby clusters.

  19. Factor XII assay

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiencies. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: ... disorders. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: ...

  20. Factor XII assay

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Division XII Business Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm G.; Genova, Francoise; Anderson, Johannes; Federman, Steven R.; Gilmore, Alan C.; Nha, Il-Seong; Norris, Raymond P.; Robson, Ian E.; Stavinschi, Magda G.; Trimble, Virginia L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2010-05-01

    Brief meetings were held to confirm the elections of the incoming Division President, Francoise Genova and Vice President, Ray Norris along with the Organizing Committee which will consist of the incoming Presidents of the 7 Commissions (5,6,14,41,46,50 and 55) plus additional nominated members. The incoming Organizing Committee will thus consist of:

  2. XII Recontres De Blois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, Louis (Technical Monitor); Forman, William

    2004-01-01

    In the initial awarding of the grant, we had difficulty phasing our proposed support of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and young US scientists with the meeting schedule and the grant cycle. Initially, the grant arrived too late to support the meeting. The following year, a combination of the renewal process and the meeting announcement prevented us from announcing the support opportunity sufficiently in advance to allow us to make awards and provide support. As described in the initial proposal, the Moriond and Blois meetings are a unique opportunity for younger researchers to make oral presentations of their work at an international venue. As noted above, the phasing of meetings combined with the difficulty of arranging foreign travel for scientists at other institutions precluded the possibility of supporting the proposed meetings and providing young US scientists and post-doctoral fellows support to attend these meetings.

  3. The dwarf galaxy population of nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisker, Thorsten; Wittmann, Carolin; Pak, Mina; Janz, Joachim; Bialas, Daniel; Peletier, Reynier; Grebel, Eva; Falcon Barroso, Jesus; Toloba, Elisa; Smakced Collaboration, Focus Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Fornax, Virgo, Ursa Major and Perseus galaxy clusters all have very different characteristics, in terms of their density, mass, and large-scale environment. We can regard these clusters as laboratories for studying environmental influence on galaxy evolution, using the sensitive low-mass galaxies as probes for external mechanisms. Here we report on recent and ongoing observational studies of the said clusters with imaging and spectroscopy, as well as on the interpretation of present-day cluster galaxy populations with the aid of cosmological simulations.Multicolor imaging data allow us to identify residual star formation in otherwise red early-type dwarf galaxies, which hold clues to the strength of gas stripping processes. Major-axis spectra and 2D kinematical maps provide insight regarding the amount of rotational support and how much dynamical heating a dwarf galaxy may have experienced. To this end, dedicated N-body simulations that follow the evolution of galaxies since early epochs reveal their path through parameter space, and can be compared to observations in order to understand the time-integrated effect of environmental influence.

  4. ORIENTATION OF BRIGHTER GALAXIES IN NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Panko, E.; Juszczyk, T.; Flin, P. E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.pl

    2009-12-15

    A sample of 6188 nearby galaxy structures, complete to r{sub F} = 18fm3 and containing at least 10 members each, was the observational basis for an investigation of the alignment of bright galaxies with the major axes for the parent clusters. The distribution of position angles for galaxies within the clusters, specifically the brightest, the second brightest, the third, and the tenth brightest galaxies was tested for isotropy. Galaxy position angles appear to be distributed isotropically, as are the distributions of underlying cluster structure position angles. The characterization of galaxy structures according to richness class also appears to be isotropic. Characterization according to BM types, which are known for 1056 clusters, is more interesting. Only in the case of clusters of BM type I is there an alignment of the brightest cluster member with the major axis of the parent cluster. The effect is observed at the 2 significance level. In other investigated cases the distributions are isotropic. The results confirm the special role of cD galaxies in the origin/evolution of large-scale structures.

  5. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates for galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey with -23 < Mr < -17 (ΩM = 0.27, ΩΛ = 0.73, H0 = 100 km s-1 Mpc-1) at 0.01 < z < 0.22 (look-back time of <2 Gyr). The merger fraction is approximately 1.5 per cent Gyr-1 at all luminosities (assuming 50 per cent of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is ≈3.5 × 10-4 Mpc-3 Gyr-1. We examine how the merger rate varies by luminosity and morphology. Dry mergers (between red/spheroidal galaxies) are found to be uncommon and to decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue/discy galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < Mr < -20), the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology, out to z ˜ 0.2. The makeup of the merging population does not appear to change over this redshift range. Galaxy growth by major mergers appears comparatively unimportant and dry mergers are unlikely to be significant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity (BPT class, Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich) of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated objects in the same volume. Galaxies in close pairs tend to be both redder and slightly more spheroid dominated than the comparison sample. We suggest that this may be due to `harassment' in multiple previous passes prior to the current close interaction. Galaxy pairs do not appear to prefer significantly denser environments. There is no evidence of an enhancement in the AGN fraction in pairs, compared to other galaxies in the same volume.

  6. DEPENDENCE OF BARRED GALAXY FRACTION ON GALAXY PROPERTIES AND ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gwang-Ho; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of the occurrence of bars in galaxies on galaxy properties and environment. We use a volume-limited sample of 33,391 galaxies brighter than M{sub r} = -19.5 + 5logh at 0.02 {<=} z {<=} 0.05489, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We classify the galaxies into early and late types, and identify bars by visual inspection. Among 10,674 late-type galaxies with axis ratio b/a > 0.60, we find 3240 barred galaxies (f{sub bar} = 30.4%) which divide into 2542 strong bars (f{sub SB1} = 23.8%) and 698 weak bars (f{sub SB2} = 6.5%). We find that f{sub SB1} increases as u - r color becomes redder and that it has a maximum value at intermediate velocity dispersion ({sigma} {approx_equal}150 km s{sup -1}). This trend suggests that strong bars are dominantly hosted by intermediate-mass systems. Weak bars prefer bluer galaxies with lower mass and lower concentration. In the case of strong bars, their dependence on the concentration index appears only for massive galaxies with {sigma} > 150 km s{sup -1}. We also find that f{sub bar} does not directly depend on the large-scale background density when other physical parameters (u - r color or {sigma}) are fixed. We discover that f{sub SB1} decreases as the separation to the nearest neighbor galaxy becomes smaller than 0.1 times the virial radius of the neighbor regardless of neighbor's morphology. These results imply that strong bars are likely to be destroyed during strong tidal interactions and that the mechanism for this phenomenon is gravitational and not hydrodynamical. The fraction of weak bars has no correlation with environmental parameters. We do not find any direct evidence for environmental stimulation of bar formation.

  7. An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mark H.; Lambourne, Robert J. A.; Serjeant, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction; 1. The Milky Way - our galaxy; 2. Normal galaxies; 3. Active galaxies; 4. The spatial distribution of galaxies; 5. Introducing cosmology - the science of the Universe; 6. Big bang cosmology - the evolving Universe; 7. Observational cosmology - measuring the Universe; 8. Questioning cosmology - outstanding problems about the Universe; Answers and comments; Appendix; Glossary; Further reading; Acknowledgements; Figure references; Index.

  8. Carbon monoxide emission from small galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Bally, John

    1987-01-01

    A search was conducted for J = 1 yields 0 CO emission from 22 galaxies, detecting half, as part of a survey to study star formation in small to medium size galaxies. Although substantial variation was found in the star formation efficiencies of the sample galaxies, there is no apparent systematic trend with galaxy size.

  9. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  10. Our Cannibalistic Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    It is now evident that our Milky Way has cannibalistic tendencies. Recently found examples of satellite star systems being digested by our galaxy demonstrate that Milky Way-like spiral galaxies continue to grow through the piecemeal accumulation of mass from smaller neighbors, as predicted by Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models of structure formation. Cross-sections of the Milky Way halo reveal it to be networked with long-lived, coherent debris streams of stars and star clusters that attest to its accretive formation. These dynamically cold streams, created from the tidal disruption of satellite star systems, in turn provide useful tools to explore both the nature of Galactic dwarf satellites as well as the the dark matter distribution of the Milky Way; the results of such work, however, yield some unexpected results compared to current CDM models. (Research described has been supported by NASA/JPL, the National Science Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Research Corporation, and the F.H. Levinson Fund of the Peninsula Community Foundation.)

  11. Spiral galaxies in clusters. III. Gas-rich galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Schommer, R.A.; Sullivan, W.T. III

    1982-05-01

    We report the results of a 21-cm and optical survey of disk galaxies in the vicinity of the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies. The color--gas content relation (log(M/sub H//L/sub B/) vs (B-V)/sup T//sub 0/ ) for this particular cluster reveals the presence of a substantial number of blue, gas-rich galaxies. With few exceptions, the disk systems in Pegasus I retain large amounts of neutral hydrogen despite their presence in a cluster. This directly shows that environmental processes have not yet removed substantial amounts of gas from these disk galaxies. We conclude that the environment has had little or no observable effect upon the evolution of disk galaxies in Pegasus I. The overall properties of the Pegasus I spirals are consistent with the suggestion that this cluster is now at an early stage in its evolution.

  12. DETECTION OF HIGH VELOCITY OUTFLOWS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 590

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blueshifted absorption lines of O VIII and Ne IX in the medium energy grating spectrum and Si XIV and Mg XII in the high energy grating spectrum on board the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best-fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameters and high column densities, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi et al. We also found suggestive evidence for super-solar silicon in these components. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has a low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta et al. in Ark 564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity versus ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter space of active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. The presence of ultra-fast outflows in moderate luminosity AGNs poses a challenge to models of AGN outflows.

  13. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  14. DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the deepest images to date of the universe, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST), reveals thousands of faint galaxies at the detection limit of present day telescopes. Peering across a large volume of the observable cosmos, Hubble resolves thousands of galaxies from five to twelve billion light-years away. The light from these remote objects has taken billions of years to cross the expanding universe, making these distant galaxies fossil evidence' of events that happened when the universe was one-third its present age. A fraction of the galaxies in this image belong to a cluster located nine billion light-years away. Though the field of view (at the cluster's distance) is only two million light-years across, it contains a multitude of fragmentary objects. (By comparison, the two million light-years between our Milky Way galaxy and its nearest large companion galaxy, in the constellation Andromeda, is essentially empty space!) Very few of the cluster's members are recognizable as normal spiral galaxies (like our Milky Way), although some elongated members might be edge-on disks. Among this zoo of odd galaxies are ``tadpole-like'' objects, disturbed and apparently merging systems dubbed 'train-wrecks,' and a multitude of faint, tiny shards and fragments, dwarf galaxies or possibly an unknown population of objects. However, the cluster also contains red galaxies that resemble mature examples of today's elliptical galaxies. Their red color comes from older stars that must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2. The picture was taken in intervals between May 11 and June 15, 1994 and required an 18-hour long exposure, over 32 orbits of HST, to reveal objects down to 29th magnitude. [bottom right] A close up view of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C324 used to locate the cluster. The galaxy is nine billion light-years away as measured by its spectral redshift (z=1.2), and located in the

  15. FIR statistics of paired galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the effects of interaction on galaxies (see reviews in this volume by Heckman and Kennicutt). Evidence for enhanced emission from galaxies in pairs first emerged in the radio (Sulentic 1976) and optical (Larson and Tinsley 1978) domains. Results in the far infrared (FIR) lagged behind until the advent of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The last five years have seen numerous FIR studies of optical and IR selected samples of interacting galaxies (e.g., Cutri and McAlary 1985; Joseph and Wright 1985; Kennicutt et al. 1987; Haynes and Herter 1988). Despite all of this work, there are still contradictory ideas about the level and, even, the reality of an FIR enhancement in interacting galaxies. Much of the confusion originates in differences between the galaxy samples that were studied (i.e., optical morphology and redshift coverage). Here, the authors report on a study of the FIR detection properties for a large sample of interacting galaxies and a matching control sample. They focus on the distance independent detection fraction (DF) statistics of the sample. The results prove useful in interpreting the previously published work. A clarification of the phenomenology provides valuable clues about the physics of the FIR enhancement in galaxies.

  16. Galaxies appear simpler than expected.

    PubMed

    Disney, M J; Romano, J D; Garcia-Appadoo, D A; West, A A; Dalcanton, J J; Cortese, L

    2008-10-23

    Galaxies are complex systems the evolution of which apparently results from the interplay of dynamics, star formation, chemical enrichment and feedback from supernova explosions and supermassive black holes. The hierarchical theory of galaxy formation holds that galaxies are assembled from smaller pieces, through numerous mergers of cold dark matter. The properties of an individual galaxy should be controlled by six independent parameters including mass, angular momentum, baryon fraction, age and size, as well as by the accidents of its recent haphazard merger history. Here we report that a sample of galaxies that were first detected through their neutral hydrogen radio-frequency emission, and are thus free from optical selection effects, shows five independent correlations among six independent observables, despite having a wide range of properties. This implies that the structure of these galaxies must be controlled by a single parameter, although we cannot identify this parameter from our data set. Such a degree of organization appears to be at odds with hierarchical galaxy formation, a central tenet of the cold dark matter model in cosmology. PMID:18948949

  17. Galaxies appear simpler than expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, M. J.; Romano, J. D.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Cortese, L.

    2008-10-01

    Galaxies are complex systems the evolution of which apparently results from the interplay of dynamics, star formation, chemical enrichment and feedback from supernova explosions and supermassive black holes. The hierarchical theory of galaxy formation holds that galaxies are assembled from smaller pieces, through numerous mergers of cold dark matter. The properties of an individual galaxy should be controlled by six independent parameters including mass, angular momentum, baryon fraction, age and size, as well as by the accidents of its recent haphazard merger history. Here we report that a sample of galaxies that were first detected through their neutral hydrogen radio-frequency emission, and are thus free from optical selection effects, shows five independent correlations among six independent observables, despite having a wide range of properties. This implies that the structure of these galaxies must be controlled by a single parameter, although we cannot identify this parameter from our data set. Such a degree of organization appears to be at odds with hierarchical galaxy formation, a central tenet of the cold dark matter model in cosmology.

  18. Modelling nova populations in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical modelling of the evolution of classical and recurrent novae plays an important role in studies of binary evolution, nucleosynthesis and accretion physics. However, from a theoretical perspective the observed statistical properties of novae remain poorly understood. In this paper, we have produced model populations of novae using a hybrid binary population synthesis approach for differing star formation histories (SFHs): a starburst case (elliptical-like galaxies), a constant star formation rate case (spiral-like galaxies) and a composite case (in line with the inferred SFH for M31). We found that the nova rate at 10 Gyr in an elliptical-like galaxy is ˜10-20 times smaller than a spiral-like galaxy with the same mass. The majority of novae in elliptical-like galaxies at the present epoch are characterized by low-mass white dwarfs (WDs), long decay times, relatively faint absolute magnitudes and long recurrence periods. In contrast, the majority of novae in spiral-like galaxies at 10 Gyr have massive WDs, short decay times, are relatively bright and have short recurrence periods. The mass-loss time distribution for novae in our M31-like galaxy is in agreement with observational data for Andromeda. However, it is possible that we underestimate the number of bright novae in our model. This may arise in part due to the present uncertainties in the appropriate bolometric correction for novae.

  19. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  20. The Assembly of Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-05-16

    We study the formation of fifty-three galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10{sup 14.0-14.76} M{sub {circle_dot}}) formed within a pair of cosmological {Lambda}CDM N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host {approx} 0.1L{sub *} galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'pre-processing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, {approx} 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; and less than {approx} 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past ({approx}< 6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local, cluster processes like ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass; and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with {approx} 20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and {approx} 20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate time-scale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be {approx} 6 Gyr.

  1. Fire within the Antennae Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveals hidden populations of newborn stars at the heart of the colliding 'Antennae' galaxies. These two galaxies, known individually as NGC 4038 and 4039, are located around 68 million light-years away and have been merging together for about the last 800 million years. The latest Spitzer observations provide a snapshot of the tremendous burst of star formation triggered in the process of this collision, particularly at the site where the two galaxies overlap.

    The image is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer and visible-light data from Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Visible light from stars in the galaxies (blue and green) is shown together with infrared light from warm dust clouds heated by newborn stars (red).

    The two nuclei, or centers, of the merging galaxies show up as yellow-white areas, one above the other. The brightest clouds of forming stars lie in the overlap region between and left of the nuclei.

    Throughout the sky, astronomers have identified many of these so-called 'interacting' galaxies, whose spiral discs have been stretched and distorted by their mutual gravity as they pass close to one another. The distances involved are so large that the interactions evolve on timescales comparable to geologic changes on Earth. Observations of such galaxies, combined with computer models of these collisions, show that the galaxies often become forever bound to one another, eventually merging into a single, spheroidal-shaped galaxy.

    Wavelengths of 0.44 microns are represented in blue, .70 microns in green and 8.0 microns in red. This image was taken on Dec. 24, 2003.

  2. IRAS observations of irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Rice, W.; Gallagher, J.; Gillett, F.

    1987-01-01

    Normal irregular galaxies seem to be unusual in having vigorous star formation yet lacking the many dark nebulae typical of spirals. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of a large sample of irregulars are used to explore the dust contents of these galaxies. Compared to normal spirals, the irregulars generally have higher L sub IR/L sub B ratios, warmer f(100)/f(60) dust color temperatures, and lower globally-averaged dust/gas ratios. The relationship between the infrared data and various global optical properties of the galaxies is discussed.

  3. Asymmetric Galaxies: Nature or Nurture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcots, E. M.

    2010-10-01

    Asymmetry is a common characteristic of many disk galaxies, but we have little understanding of its causes. In this contribution we look at the H I properties of a sample of Magellanic spirals, some of the most lopsided galaxies in the local Universe, and a sample of isolated spirals. In neither case do we see evidence of a link between the presence of a companion and asymmetry; indeed, asymmetry persists even in the absence of a companion or evidence of a recent interaction. These results suggest that once it arises, asymmetry may be a very long-lived characteristic of disk galaxies.

  4. Galaxy Transformation from Flyby Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christina

    2016-05-01

    Galaxy flybys are transient encounters where two halos interpenetrate and later detach forever. Although these encounters are surprisingly common—even outnumbering galaxy mergers for massive halos at the present epoch—their dynamical effects have been largely ignored. Using idealized collisionless N-body simulations of flyby encounters, it has been shown that a galaxy flyby can excite a bar and spin up the halo. Here, we compare the structural properties of recent flybys to that of recent mergers and isolated systems within the Illustris Simulation.

  5. Dark matter in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carollo, C. M.; Zeeuw, P. T. DE; Marel, R. P. Van Der; Danziger, I. J.; Qian, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of the shape of the stellar line-of-sight velocity distribution out to two effective radii along the major axes of the four elliptical galaxies NGC 2434, 2663, 3706, and 5018. The velocity dispersion profiles are flat or decline gently with radius. We compare the data to the predictions of f = f(E, L(sub z)) axisymmetric models with and without dark matter. Strong tangential anisotropy is ruled out at large radii. We conclude from our measurements that massive dark halos must be present in three of the four galaxies, while for the fourth galaxy (NGC 2663) the case is inconclusive.

  6. Searches for High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R.

    In recent years, the technique of Lyman break imaging has proven very effective at identifying large numbers of galaxies at high redshifts through deep multicolour imaging (Steidel et al 1996b; Steidel et al 1999). The combination of an intrinsic break in the spectra of star-forming galaxies below the rest-frame wavelength of Lyman-alpha and attenuation by intervening HI systems on the line of sight to high redshifts makes for a pronounced drop in the flux of high redshift galaxies between 912 Å and 1216 Å in the rest-frame. At redshifts z> 3, the break is shifted sufficiently far into the optical window accessible to ground-based telescopes for galaxies at such redshift to be distinguished from the foreground galaxy population through photometry alone. Through modelling of the expected colours of a wide range of galaxy types, ages and redshifts, taking into account the effects of reddening (Calzetti, Kinney and Storchi-Bergmann 1994) and intergalactic attenuation (Madau 1995), we assess the likely colours of high redshift galaxies and determine the redshift ranges most effectively probed by the imaging filters. We obtain multicolour imaging of the fields of four high redshift radio galaxies, covering around 40 arcmin2 in each, allowing us to attempt to find ordinary galaxies at similar redshifts to the central radio galaxies through photometric colour selection techniques. Some idea as to the effectiveness comes through additional colour and morphological information obtained from high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images and from data taken in the near infra-red. While we do not have spectroscopic evidence for the redshifts of our candidates, given the available evidence we conclude that the number densities of Lyman break galaxies in the radio galaxy fields are in broad agreement with the data of Steidel et al (1999). Finally, we assess the prospects for future studies of the high redshift Universe, in particular the potential of the Oxford Deep Wide Field

  7. XMM tests galaxy evolutions models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Current models of galaxy evolution rely critically on feedback supernova and AGN feedback processes. The energy released by past star formation and AGN activity imprints a fossil record on the thermodynamic properties of the intra-group-medium (IGM). This can be decoded by studying the X-ray emission. for an unbiased sample of groups with known galaxy and AGN properties. Therefore we propose an X-ray survey with XMM-Newton for 255 ksec to observe 17 galaxy groups with Msim10(13) M_odot selected from our Zurich ENvironmental Survey that host >8 members.

  8. The dwarf galaxy UGC 5272 and its small companion galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopp, U.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present study of optical images and spectroscopy of the dwarf irregular galaxy UGC 5272 notes the presence, at 3.6 kpc, of a small neighboring galaxy which is also of irregular type and has a Holmberg diameter of 0.6 kpc. Attention is given to the possibility that the two galaxies, which are resolved into single stars, may form a physical pair. It is suggested that the blue-to-red supergiant ratio of UGC 5272 is high due to its low metallicity. While its extremely blue colors are suggestive of a recent starburst, the structural parameters of the galaxy are surprisingly normal. The gas contribution to total mass is high.

  9. Galaxy Portal: interacting with the galaxy platform through mobile devices

    PubMed Central

    Børnich, Claus; Grytten, Ivar; Hovig, Eivind; Paulsen, Jonas; Čech, Martin; Sandve, Geir Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present Galaxy Portal app, an open source interface to the Galaxy system through smart phones and tablets. The Galaxy Portal provides convenient and efficient monitoring of job completion, as well as opportunities for inspection of results and execution history. In addition to being useful to the Galaxy community, we believe that the app also exemplifies a useful way of exploiting mobile interfaces for research/high-performance computing resources in general. Availability and implementation: The source is freely available under a GPL license on GitHub, along with user documentation and pre-compiled binaries and instructions for several platforms: https://github.com/Tarostar/QMLGalaxyPortal. It is available for iOS version 7 (and newer) through the Apple App Store, and for Android through Google Play for version 4.1 (API 16) or newer. Contact: geirksa@ifi.uio.no PMID:26819474

  10. Galaxy NGC 1512

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A rainbow of colors is captured in the center of a magnificent barred spiral galaxy, as witnessed by the three cameras of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The color-composite image of the galaxy NGC 1512 was created from seven images taken with the JPL-designed and built Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2), along with the Faint Object Camera and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer. Hubble's unique vantage point high above the atmosphere allows astronomers to see objects over a broad range of wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the infrared and to detect differences in the regions around newly born stars.

    The new image is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/16 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The image reveals a stunning 2,400 light-year-wide circle of infant star clusters in the center of NGC 1512. Located 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Horologium, NGC 1512 is a neighbor of our Milky Way galaxy.

    With the Hubble data, a team of Israeli and American astronomers performed one of the broadest, most detailed studies ever of such star-forming regions. Results will appear in the June issue of the Astronomical Journal. The team includes Dr. Dan Maoz, Tel-Aviv University, Israel and Columbia University, New York, N.Y.; Dr. Aaron J. Barth, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass.; Dr. Luis C. Ho, The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington; Dr. Amiel Sternberg, Tel-Aviv University, Israel; and Dr. Alexei V. Filippenko, University of California, Berkeley.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Inc., for NASA under contract with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international

  11. Empirical measurements of massive galaxy and active galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Richard Jacob

    Using new wide-area galaxy redshift surveys, we explore the evolution of the most massive galaxies and the most luminous quasars in the universe over much of cosmic history. Quasars and massive red galaxies both are extremes; the most luminous high redshift quasars likely play a key role in shaping their nearby environment and the universe as a whole. The most massive galaxies represent the end points of galaxy evolution and contain a fossil record of the galaxy evolution process. Using the AGES redshift survey completed with the MMT and the Hectospec multi- object spectrograph as well as new z -band observations of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey Bootes field, we report the discovery of three new quasars at z > 5. We explore new mid-infrared selection in light of these three new quasars and place constraints on the slope of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function. At lower redshift (0.1< z <0.4) we measure the scatter in red galaxy colors around the optical red-sequence using imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With our sample of nearly 20,000 massive early-type galaxies ( L [Special characters omitted.] 2.2 L *), we find that the scatter around the color-magnitude relation is quite small in colors studied. Each of three model star formation histories can reproduce the scatter we measure, none of the models produce color distributions matching those observed. We measure the evolution of the LRG luminosity function in the redshift range 0.1< z <0.9. We find that the LRG population has evolved little beyond the passive fading of its stellar populations since z ~ 0.9. The most massive (L > 3 L *) red galaxies have grown by less than 50% (at 99% confidence) since z = 0.9 in stark contrast to the factor of 2 to 4 growth observed in the L * red galaxy population over the same epoch. Finally, we introduce the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS), a new redshift survey aimed at collecting ~300,000 galaxy spectra over 10 deg 2 to z ~ 1. We

  12. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  13. Joint Analysis of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering: Methodology and Forecasts for DES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.

    2015-07-19

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large scale structure. Our analysis will be carried out on data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. We develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting small scale lensing, which provides halo masses, and large scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects sub-dominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degeneracies necessitate the detailed joint modeling of the galaxy sample that we employ. Finally, we conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/optimistically constraining the growth function to 7.9%/4.8% with its first-year data that covered over 1000 square degrees, and to 3.9%/2.3% with its full five-year data that will survey 5000 square degrees, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  14. Binary satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2014-05-01

    Suggestions have appeared in the literature that the following four pairs of Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxies are gravitationally bound: Draco and Ursa Minor, Leo IV and V, Andromeda I and III, and NGC 147 and 185. Assuming that a given pair is gravitationally bound, the Virial theorem provides a crude estimate of its total mass and so its instantaneous tidal radius. In the case of each pair except for Leo IV and Leo V, the estimated tidal radius is inferior to the separation between the two satellites, suggesting that these pairs are not currently gravitationally bound. Their proximities may be explained if each pair condensed from the remnants of a formerly gravitationally bound structure, but such a scenario is in tension with the absence of older pairs with a wider separation.

  15. Bright galaxies, dark matters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, V.

    This book charts two extraordinary journeys: the road to a better understanding of the structure and composition of the universe, and V. Rubin's own pathbreaking career. The scientific papers included here offer an overview of the topic that has been the major focus of her career: the motions of stars within galaxies and the evidence from these motions that most of the matter in the universe is dark. Elsewhere the author examines some of the tools of her trade - from star charts to the Hubble Telescope to some of the observatories where she has worked. The concluding section, "The astronomical life", finds V. Rubin writing candidly about the demands and rewards of her career, offering insightful portraits of colleagues, friends, and other notable women in science.

  16. SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY NUMBER COUNTS AND MAGNIFICATION BY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Marcos; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Devlin, Mark; Aguirre, James

    2010-07-01

    We present an analytical model that reproduces measured galaxy number counts from surveys in the wavelength range of 500 {mu}m-2 mm. The model involves a single high-redshift galaxy population with a Schechter luminosity function that has been gravitationally lensed by galaxy clusters in the mass range 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. This simple model reproduces both the low-flux and the high-flux end of the number counts reported by the BLAST, SCUBA, AzTEC, and South Pole Telescope (SPT) surveys. In particular, our model accounts for the most luminous galaxies detected by SPT as the result of high magnifications by galaxy clusters (magnification factors of 10-30). This interpretation implies that submillimeter (submm) and millimeter surveys of this population may prove to be a useful addition to ongoing cluster detection surveys. The model also implies that the bulk of submm galaxies detected at wavelengths larger than 500 {mu}m lie at redshifts greater than 2.

  17. GREEN GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 'green valley' galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV–r {sup +} color is used to define 'green valley'; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M{sub 20} planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ{sub 10}) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  18. Green Galaxies in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu

    2013-10-01

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 "green valley" galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV-r + color is used to define "green valley"; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M 20 planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ10) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M * < 1010.0 M ⊙ green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M * < 1010.0 M ⊙ blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  19. Cosmological parameter constraints from galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering with the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Slosar, Anže; Baldauf, Tobias; Seljak, Uroš; Hirata, Christopher M.; Nakajima, Reiko; Reyes, Reinabelle; Smith, Robert E.

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the cross-correlation coefficient between galaxies and dark matter is very close to unity on scales outside a few virial radii of galaxy haloes, independent of the details of how galaxies populate dark matter haloes. This finding makes it possible to determine the dark matter clustering from measurements of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing and galaxy clustering. We present new cosmological parameter constraints based on large-scale measurements of spectroscopic galaxy samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7. We generalize the approach of Baldauf et al. to remove small-scale information (below 2 and 4 h-1 Mpc for lensing and clustering measurements, respectively), where the cross-correlation coefficient differs from unity. We derive constraints for three galaxy samples covering 7131 deg2, containing 69 150, 62 150 and 35 088 galaxies with mean redshifts of 0.11, 0.28 and 0.40. We clearly detect scale-dependent galaxy bias for the more luminous galaxy samples, at a level consistent with theoretical expectations. When we vary both σ8 and Ωm (and marginalize over non-linear galaxy bias) in a flat Λ cold dark matter model, the best-constrained quantity is σ8(Ωm/0.25)0.57 = 0.80 ± 0.05 (1σ, stat. + sys.), where statistical and systematic errors (photometric redshift and shear calibration) have comparable contributions, and we have fixed ns = 0.96 and h = 0.7. These strong constraints on the matter clustering suggest that this method is competitive with cosmic shear in current data, while having very complementary and in some ways less serious systematics. We therefore expect that this method will play a prominent role in future weak lensing surveys. When we combine these data with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year (WMAP7) cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, constraints on σ8, Ωm, H0, wde and ∑mν become 30-80 per cent tighter than with CMB data alone, since our data break several parameter

  20. Largescale QSO - Galaxy Correlations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, M.; Schneider, P.

    1993-04-01

    Fugmann (1990) claimed indications for correlations between Lick galaxies and high-redshift, radio-loud background sources. We re- analyze these correlations using an improved statistical method based on Spearman's rank-order test, which we have introduced recently (Bartelmann & Schneider 1993). To our surprise, we are not able to reproduce Fugmann's results, but we detect a significant correlation between moderate-redshift sources from the 1-Jansky catalog and Lick galaxies, which increases when we apply an optical flux limit to the source sample. We interpret these empirical results in terms of an amplification bias caused by gravitational light deflection by dark matter; in particular, we argue that the observed large-scale QSO-galaxy correlations can provide a proof for the association of luminous matter (galaxies) with dark matter.

  1. Extinction Curves of Lensing Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elíasdóttir, Árdís

    2006-09-01

    Dust extinction causes light from distant sources to be dimmed on itsway to the observer. In cosmological studies, such as SN Ia studies,it is of great importance that the effects of dust extinction becorrectly accounted for. However, although dust properties, andhence extinction, are expected to vary with redshift, not very muchis known about the extinction properties of high redshift galaxies.This is because the methods traditionally used to study extinctioncurves are only applicable for the most nearby galaxies. Studyinggravitationally lensed quasars is an emerging method of studying thedust extinction of high redshift galaxies. I will present an ESO VLTstudy of 10 such lensing galaxies, with redshifts up to 1. The 10systems display varying amount and type of extinction, with thedoubly imaged quasar B1152+199 showing the greatest extinction with A(V)=2.4 and R_V=2.1 for a Galactic type extinction law.

  2. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  3. Dynamical interactions of galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    1990-01-01

    Here the author briefly reviews the dynamics of sinking satellites and the effect of companions on elliptical galaxies. The author then discusses recent work on interacting disk systems, and finally focuses on a favorite interacting pair, NGC 5194/5195.

  4. HUBBLE SERVES UP A GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What may first appear as a sunny side up egg is actually NASA Hubble Space Telescope's face-on snapshot of the small spiral galaxy NGC 7742. But NGC 7742 is not a run-of-the-mill spiral galaxy. In fact, this spiral is known to be a Seyfert 2 active galaxy, a type of galaxy that is probably powered by a black hole residing in its core. The core of NGC 7742 is the large yellow 'yolk' in the center of the image. The lumpy, thick ring around this core is an area of active starbirth. The ring is about 3,000 light-years from the core. Tightly wound spiral arms also are faintly visible. Surrounding the inner ring is a wispy band of material, which is probably the remains of a once very active stellar breeding ground. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  5. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  6. The KMOS Galaxy Clusters Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Roger L.; Beifiori, A.; Bender, R.; Cappellari, M.; Chan, J.; Houghton, R.; Mendel, T.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R.; Stott, J.; Smith, R.; Wilman, D.

    2015-04-01

    KMOS is a cryogenic infrared spectrograph fed by twentyfour deployable integral field units that patrol a 7.2 arcminute diameter field of view at the Nasmyth focus of the ESO VLT. It is well suited to the study of galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 2 where the well understood features in the restframe V-band are shifted into the KMOS spectral bands. Coupled with HST imagining, KMOS offers a window on the critical epoch for galaxy evolution, 7-10 Gyrs ago, when the key properties of cluster galaxies were established. We aim to investigate the size, mass, morphology and star formation history of galaxies in the clusters. Here we describe the instrument, discuss the status of the observations and report some preliminary results.

  7. THE SPIRAL GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An image of the grand design of spiral galaxy M100 obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope resolves individual stars within the majestic spiral arms. (These stars typically appeared blurred together when viewed with ground-based telescopes.) Hubble has the ability to resolve individual stars in other galaxies and measure accurately the light from very faint stars. This makes space telescope invaluable for identifying a rare class of pulsating stars, called Cepheid Variable stars embedded within M100's spiral arms. Cepheids are reliable cosmic distance mileposts. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance, which turns out to be 56 million light-years. M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a majestic face-on spiral galaxy. It is a rotating system of gas and stars, similar to our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Hubble routinely can view M100 with a level of clarity and sensitivity previously possible only for the very few nearby galaxies that compose our 'Local Group.'' M100 is a member of the huge Virgo cluster of an estimated 2,500 galaxies. The galaxy can be seen by amateur astronomers as a faint, pinwheel-shaped object in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken on December 31, 1993 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This color picture is a composite of several images taken in different colors of light. Blue corresponds to regions containing hot newborn stars. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: J. Trauger, JPL and NASA

  8. Technical Civilizations in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Are there other technical civilizations in the galaxy? Past analyses come to different conclusions. Cocconi and Morrison demonstrated in 1959 that interstellar radio communication was possible and Drake conducted the first search for beacons in 1960. The Drake equation estimates the number of galactic civilizations that are transmitting beacons as the product of the rate of star formation in the galaxy, the fraction of stars with planets, their average number of earthlike planets, the fraction with intelligent life and interstellar communication, and the average lifetime of a technical civilization. The Drake model of the galaxy contains many technical civilizations with communication but no interstellar travel. Michael Hart in 1975 strongly challenged this model. Starting with the fact that no extraterrestrials have been observed on Earth, and assuming that interstellar colonization is possible, he concluded that it was very likely that we are the first civilization in our galaxy and that searching or beacons is probably a waste of time and money. The Fermi paradox similarly reasons that if extraterrestrials exist: they should be here, and asks, Where are they? The Hart/Fermi model of the galaxy contains only our civilization and suggests we may colonize the galaxy. A third galactic model is that we are alone but will never develop interstellar travel. The fourth alternate model has many technical civilizations, with interstellar travel and colonization. The possibilities are clear and momentous. Either we are the only technical civilization in the galaxy or there are others. Technical civilizations will colonize the galaxy or not. We have four cosmic conjectures - one or many, colonization or not - but however unlikely they seem based on our limited evidence, one of these four models must be collect.

  9. Detection of galaxies with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. E.; Krone-Martins, A.; dos Anjos, S.; Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: Besides its major objective tuned to detecting the stellar galactic population, the Gaia mission experiment will also observe a large number of galaxies. In this work we intend to evaluate the number and the characteristics of the galaxies that will effectively pass the on-board selection algorithm of Gaia. Methods: The detection of objects in Gaia will be performed in a section of the focal plane known as the Sky Mapper. Considering the Video Processing Algorithm criterion of detection and the known light profiles of disc and bulges galaxies, we assess the number and the type of extra-galactic objects that will be observed by Gaia. Results: We show that the stellar disc population of galaxies will be very difficult to observe. In contrast, the spheroidal component of elliptical galaxies and bulges having higher central surface brightness and steeper brightness profile will be easier to detect. We estimate that most of the 20 000 elliptical population of nearby galaxies inside the local region up to 170 Mpc are in a state to be observed by Gaia. A similar number of bulges could also be observed, although the low luminosity bulges should escape detection. About two thirds of the more distant objects up to 600 Mpc could also be detected, increasing the total sample to half a million objects including ellipticals and bulges. The angular size of the detected objects will never exceed 4.72 arcsec, which is the size of the largest transmitted windows. Conclusions: A heterogeneous population of elliptical galaxies and bulges will be observable by Gaia. This nearby Universe sample of galaxies should constitute a very rich and interesting sample for studying their structural properties and their distribution.

  10. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  11. Magnetic fields in irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T.

    Radio data of large irregular galaxies reveal some extended synchrotron emission with a substantial degree of polarization. In the case of NGC 4449 strong galaxy-scale regular magnetic fields were found, in spite of the lack of ordered rotation required for the conventional dynamo action. The rigidly rotating large irregular NGC 55 shows vertical polarized spurs connected with a network of ionized gas filaments. Small dwarf irregulars show only isolated polarized spots.

  12. Hidden interaction in SBO galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galletta, G.; Bettoni, D.; Oosterloo, T.; Fasano, G.

    1990-01-01

    Galaxies, like plants, show a large variety of grafts: an individual of some type connects physically with a neighborhood of same or different type. The effects of these interactions between galaxies have a broad range of morphologies depending, among other quantities, on the distance of the closest approach between systems and the relative size of the two galaxies. A sketch of the possible situations is shown in tabular form. This botanical classification is just indicative, because the effects of interactions can be notable also at relatively large separations, when additional conditions are met, as for example low density of the interacting systems or the presence of intra-cluster gas. In spite of the large variety of encounters and effects, in the literature the same terms are often used to refer to different types of interactions. Analysis indicates that only few of the situations show evident signs of interaction. They appear to be most relevant when the size of the two galaxies is comparable. Bridges and tails, like the well known case of NGC 4038/39, the Antennae, are only observed for a very low percentage of all galaxies (approx. 0.38 percent, Arp and Madore 1977). In most cases of gravitational bond between two galaxies, the effects of interactions are not relevant or evident. For instance, the detection of stellar shells (Malin and Carter 1983), which have been attributed to the accretion of gas stripped from another galaxy or to the capture and disruption of a small stellar system (Quinn 1984), requires particular observing and reduction techniques. Besides these difficulties of detection, time plays an important role in erasing, within a massive galaxy, the effects of interactions with smaller objects. This can happen on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, so the number of systems now showing signs of interaction suggests lower limits to the true frequency of interactions in the life-time of a stellar system.

  13. The Secret Lives of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The ground-based image in visible light locates the hub imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope. This barred galaxy feeds material into its hub, igniting star birth. The Hubble NICMOS instrument penetrates beneath the dust to reveal clusters of young stars. Footage shows ground-based, WFPC2, and NICMOS images of NGS 1365. An animation of a large spiral galaxy zooms from the edge to the galactic bulge.

  14. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  15. Supernovae without host galaxies?. Hypervelocity stars in foreign galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Grunden, P.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Harvesting the SAI supernova catalog, the most complete list of supernovae (SNe) currently available, we search for SNe that apparently do not occur within a distinct host galaxy but lie a great distance (several arcmin) apart from the host galaxy given in the catalog or even show no sign of an identifiable galaxy in their direct vicinity. Aims: We attempt to distinguish between two possible explanations of this host-lessness of a fraction of reported SNe, namely (i) that a host galaxy is too faint (of too low surface brightness) to be detected within the limits of currently available surveys (presumably a low surface brightness galaxy) or (ii) the progenitor of the SN is a hypervelocity star (HVS) that exploded kiloparsecs away from its host galaxy. Methods: We use deep imaging to test the first explanation. If no galaxy is identified within our detection limit of ~27 mag arcsec-2, which is the central surface brightness of the faintest known LSB galaxy so far, we discard this explanation and propose that the SN, after several other checks, had a hypervelocity star progenitor. We focus on observations for which this is the case and give lower limits to the actual space velocities of the progenitors, making them the first hypervelocity stars known in galaxies other than our own Milky Way. Results: Analyzing a selected subsample of five host-less SNe, we find one, SN 2006bx in UGC 5434, is a possible hypervelocity progenitor category with a high probability, exhibiting a projected velocity of ~800 km s-1. SN 1969L in NGC 1058 is most likely an example of a very extended star-forming disk visible only in the far-UV, but not in the optical wavebands. Therefore, this SN is clearly due to in situ star formation. This mechanism may also apply to two other SNe that we investigated (SN 1970L and SN 1997C), but this cannot be determined with certainty. Another SN, SN 2005 nc which is associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB 050525), is a special case that is not

  16. NGC 3934: a shell galaxy in a compact galaxy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Galletta, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Marino, A.; Mazzei, P.; Buson, L. M.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Mergers/accretions are considered the main drivers of the evolution of galaxies in groups. We investigate the NGC 3933 poor galaxy association that contains NGC 3934, which is classified as a polar-ring galaxy. Aims: The multi-band photometric analysis of NGC 3934 allows us to investigate the nature of this galaxy and to re-define the NGC 3933 group members with the aim to characterize the group's dynamical properties and its evolutionary phase. Methods: We imaged the group in the far (FUV, λeff = 1539 Å) and near (NUV, λeff = 2316 Å) ultraviolet (UV) bands of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). From the deep optical imaging we determined the fine structure of NGC 3934. We measured the recession velocity of PGC 213894 which shows that it belongs to the NGC 3933 group. We derived the spectral energy distribution (SED) from FUV to far-IR emission of the two brightest members of the group. We compared a grid of smooth particle hydrodynamical (SPH) chemo-photometric simulations with the SED and the integrated properties of NGC 3934 and NGC 3933 to devise their possible formation/evolutionary scenarios. Results: The NGC 3933 group has six bright members: a core composed of five galaxies, which have Hickson's compact group characteristics, and a more distant member, PGC 37112. The group velocity dispersion is relatively low (157 ± 44 km s-1). The projected mass, from the NUV photometry, is ~7 × 1012 M⊙ with a crossing time of 0.04 Hubble times, suggesting that at least in the center the group is virialized. We do not find evidence that NGC 3934 is a polar-ring galaxy, as suggested by the literature, but find that it is a disk galaxy with a prominent dust-lane structure and a wide type-II shell structure. Conclusions: NGC 3934 is a quite rare example of a shell galaxy in a likely dense galaxy region. The comparison between physically motivated SPH simulations with multi-band integrated photometry suggests that NGC 3934 is the product of a major merger.

  17. The Origin of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John

    1998-07-01

    Most clusters and groups of galaxies contain a giant elliptical galaxy in their centers that far outshines and outweighs normal ellipticals. The origin of these brightest cluster galaxies is intimately related to the collapse and formation of the cluster. Using an N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies in a hierarchical cosmological model, we show that galaxy merging naturally produces a massive central galaxy with surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles similar to those of observed BCGs. To enhance the resolution of the simulation, 100 dark halos at z = 2 are replaced with self-consistent disk + bulge + halo galaxy models following a Tully-Fisher relation using 100,000 particles for the 20 largest galaxies and 10,000 particles for the remaining ones. This technique allows us to analyze the stellar and dark-matter components independently. The central galaxy forms through the merger of several massive galaxies along a filament early in the cluster's history. Galactic cannibalism of smaller galaxies through dynamical friction over a Hubble time only accounts for a small fraction of the accreted mass. The galaxy is a flattened, triaxial object whose long axis aligns with the primordial filament and the long axis of the cluster galaxy distribution, agreeing with observed trends for galaxy cluster alignment.

  18. Enhancement classification of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, John

    With the advent of astronomical imaging technology developments, and the increased capacity of digital storage, the production of photographic atlases of the night sky have begun to generate volumes of data which need to be processed autonomously. As part of the Tonantzintla Digital Sky Survey construction, the present work involves software development for the digital image processing of astronomical images, in particular operations that preface feature extraction and classification. Recognition of galaxies in these images is the primary objective of the present work. Many galaxy images have poor resolution or contain faint galaxy features, resulting in the misclassification of galaxies. An enhancement of these images by the method of the Heap transform is proposed, and experimental results are provided which demonstrate the image enhancement to improve the presence of faint galaxy features thereby improving classification accuracy. The feature extraction was performed using morphological features that have been widely used in previous automated galaxy investigations. Principal component analysis was applied to the original and enhanced data sets for a performance comparison between the original and reduced features spaces. Classification was performed by the Support Vector Machine learning algorithm.

  19. The Rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher than the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with a/b > 1.8 and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy, which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ≈ 35% . The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not experience mergings with other clusters and groups of galaxies, as a result of which the rotation was prevented.

  20. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ≳ 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ∼5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  1. Mirages in galaxy scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkov, A. V.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    2014-06-01

    We analysed several basic correlations between structural parameters of galaxies. The data were taken from various samples in different passbands which are available in the literature. We discuss disc scaling relations as well as some debatable issues concerning the so-called Photometric Plane for bulges and elliptical galaxies in different forms and various versions of the famous Kormendy relation. We show that some of the correlations under discussion are artificial (self-correlations), while others truly reveal some new essential details of the structural properties of galaxies. Our main results are as follows: At present, we cannot conclude that faint stellar discs are, on average, more thin than discs in high surface brightness galaxies. The `central surface brightness-thickness' correlation appears only as a consequence of the transparent exponential disc model to describe real galaxy discs. The Photometric Plane appears to have no independent physical sense. Various forms of this plane are merely sophisticated versions of the Kormendy relation or of the self-relation involving the central surface brightness of a bulge/elliptical galaxy and the Sérsic index n. The Kormendy relation is a physical correlation presumably reflecting the difference in the origin of bright and faint ellipticals and bulges. We present arguments that involve creating artificial samples to prove our main idea.

  2. ROSAT observations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1993-12-01

    First results of pointed and All Sky Survey observations of galaxies with the X-ray observatory satellite ROSAT are reported. During observations of the Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda galaxy new super-soft X-ray sources have been detected. This new class of luminous X-ray sources may help to solve the millisecond pulsar progenitor problem. Due to the improved sensitivity and longer observation times of ROSAT new X-ray point sources have been resolved in several nearby galaxies. The diffuse emission of the Large Magellanic Cloud that was already reported by HEAO 2 (EINSTEIN) has been mapped in detail. It shows a lot of fine structure and temperatures around 5 x 106 K. The improved low energy response of ROSAT led to the discovery of 106 K gas from the spiral galaxy M101 and the halo of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. No diffuse emission was detected from the halo of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 5907.

  3. Bar Formation from Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2016-05-01

    Both simulations and observations reveal that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar; bars form in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities >0.5, sizes on the order of the scale length of the disk, and persist to the end of our simulations, ~5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with flyby interactions than previously thought.

  4. The Evolution of Evolved Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe

    The plethora of high redshift multifrequency surveys currently under way, that were extensively illustrated at this meeting will shortly provide us with a sequence of "fossil" galaxies, eventually disclosing the secret of their evolution, much as fossil organisms guided paleontologists tracing the evolution of species. Meanwhile we wish to remind to both theorists and to observers that the characterization of local galaxies, representing the boundary condition at z=0 of any evolutionary model, is not yet fully achieved. With this purpose we conceived an extensive observational campaign aimed at providing the phenomenology of local galaxies in the broadest possible frequency range. We took observations and collected data from the literature for over 3600 local (z<0.03) galaxies, mainly members to rich clusters, spending a large effort in making the literature data as homogeneous as possible with our own. The data cover the range from 2000 Å (UV) to the centimetric radio domain. The Web site "GOLDmine" (Galaxy On Line Database Milano Network) [10] is designed to provide world-wide access to this massive data-set on local galaxies.

  5. Age-density relation of Main galaxies at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; Song, Jun; Chen, Yi-Qing; Jiang, Peng; Ding, Ying-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we examine the environmental dependence of galaxy age at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families. Statistical results show that the environmental dependence of galaxy age is stronger for late type galaxies, but can be still observed for the early types: the age of galaxies in the densest regime is preferentially older than that in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. We also find that the environmental dependence of galaxy age for red galaxies and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies is stronger, while the one for blue galaxies and High Stellar Mass ( HSM ) galaxies is very weak.

  6. Submillimeter galaxies as progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Toft, S.; Zirm, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Man, A. W. S.; Smolčić, V.; Krpan, J.; Magnelli, B.; Karim, A.; Michalowski, M.; Capak, P.; Sheth, K.; Schawinski, K.; Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Staguhn, J.; Berta, S.; Sanders, D.; Mccracken, H.; Riechers, D.

    2014-02-20

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z = 2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low-redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3 < z < 6). Simulations show that gas-rich major mergers can give rise to such starbursts, which produce dense remnants. Submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) are prime examples of intense, gas-rich starbursts. With a new, representative spectroscopic sample of compact, quiescent galaxies at z = 2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z = 3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z = 2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses, and internal velocities. Assuming an evolutionary connection, their space densities also match if the mean duty cycle of SMG starbursts is 42{sub −29}{sup +40} Myr (consistent with independent estimates), which indicates that the bulk of stars in these massive galaxies were formed in a major, early surge of star formation. These results suggest a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent star formation through their appearance as high stellar-density galaxy cores and to their ultimate fate as giant ellipticals.

  7. Submillimeter Galaxies as Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, S.; Smolcic, V.; Magnelli, B.; Karim, A.; Zirm, A.; Michalowski, M.; Capak, P.; Sheth, K.; Schawinski, K.; Krogager, J.-K.; Wuyts, S.; Sanders, D.; Man, A. W. S.; Lutz, D.; Staguhn, J.; Berta, S.; McCracken, H.; Krpan, J.; Riechers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z = 2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low-redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3 < z < 6). Simulations show that gas-rich major mergers can give rise to such starbursts, which produce dense remnants. Submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) are prime examples of intense, gas-rich starbursts.With a new, representative spectroscopic sample of compact, quiescent galaxies at z = 2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z = 3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z = 2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses, and internal velocities. Assuming an evolutionary connection, their space densities also match if the mean duty cycle of SMG starbursts is 42(sup+40) -29 Myr (consistent with independent estimates), which indicates that the bulk of stars in these massive galaxies were formed in a major, early surge of star formation. These results suggest a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent star formation through their appearance as high stellar-density galaxy cores and to their ultimate fate as giant ellipticals.

  8. Do Galaxies Follow Darwinian Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Using VIMOS on ESO's Very Large Telescope, a team of French and Italian astronomers have shown the strong influence the environment exerts on the way galaxies form and evolve. The scientists have for the first time charted remote parts of the Universe, showing that the distribution of galaxies has considerably evolved with time, depending on the galaxies' immediate surroundings. This surprising discovery poses new challenges for theories of the formation and evolution of galaxies. The 'nature versus nurture' debate is a hot topic in human psychology. But astronomers too face similar conundrums, in particular when trying to solve a problem that goes to the very heart of cosmological theories: are the galaxies we see today simply the product of the primordial conditions in which they formed, or did experiences in the past change the path of their evolution? ESO PR Photo 17/06 ESO PR Photo 45/06 Galaxy Distribution in Space In a large, three-year long survey carried out with VIMOS [1], the Visible Imager and Multi-Object Spectrograph on ESO's VLT, astronomers studied more than 6,500 galaxies over a wide range of distances to investigate how their properties vary over different timescales, in different environments and for varying galaxy luminosities [2]. They were able to build an atlas of the Universe in three dimensions, going back more than 9 billion years. This new census reveals a surprising result. The colour-density relation, that describes the relationship between the properties of a galaxy and its environment, was markedly different 7 billion years ago. The astronomers thus found that the galaxies' luminosity, their initial genetic properties, and the environments they reside in have a profound impact on their evolution. "Our results indicate that environment is a key player in galaxy evolution, but there's no simple answer to the 'nature versus nurture' problem in galaxy evolution," said Olivier Le Fèvre from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

  9. Missing Mass in Collisional Debris from Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Brinks, Elias; Boquien, Médéric; Amram, Philippe; Lisenfeld, Ute; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Walter, Fabian; Charmandaris, Vassilis

    2007-05-01

    Recycled dwarf galaxies can form in the collisional debris of massive galaxies. Theoretical models predict that, contrary to classical galaxies, these recycled galaxies should be free of nonbaryonic dark matter. By analyzing the observed gas kinematics of such recycled galaxies with the help of a numerical model, we demonstrate that they do contain a massive dark component amounting to about twice the visible matter. Staying within the standard cosmological framework, this result most likely indicates the presence of large amounts of unseen, presumably cold, molecular gas. This additional mass should be present in the disks of their progenitor spiral galaxies, accounting for a substantial part of the so-called missing baryons.

  10. Star formation enhancement characteristics in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Beckman, J. E.; Font, J.; Camps-Fariña, A.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.

    2015-02-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxies using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (La Palma). We have extracted the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosity and velocity dispersion) of 236 HII regions for the full sample of interacting galaxies. We have derived the physical properties of 664 HII regions for a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare both populations of HII regions, finding that there are brighter and denser star forming regions in the interacting galaxies compared with the isolated galaxies sample.

  11. Galaxy tracers in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, F. J.; Evrard, August E.; Davis, Marc

    1993-01-01

    Using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, we have modeled the formation of a compact group of galaxies with sufficient resolution to trace galaxies. Radiative cooling allows the baryons to dissipate their thermal energy and collapse to overdensities characteristic of real galaxies. With their cross section greatly reduced, these galaxy tracers remain distinct during cluster formation while their dark matter halos merge. In addition, the number density, the mass distribution function, and even the morphology of these objects are similar to those of observed galaxies. A viable population of galaxy tracers can be unambiguously defined.

  12. 9,10-Dibromo-N-aryl-9,10-dihydro-9,10-[3,4]epipyrroloanthracene-12,14-diones: Synthesis and Investigation of Their Effects on Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II, IX, and XII.

    PubMed

    Göksu, Haydar; Topal, Meryem; Keskin, Ali; Gültekin, Mehmet S; Çelik, Murat; Gülçin, İlhami; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-06-01

    N-substituted maleimides were synthesized from maleic anhydride and primary amines. 1,4-Dibromo-dibenzo[e,h]bicyclo-[2,2,2]octane-2,3-dicarboximide derivatives (4a-f) were prepared by the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of dibromoanthracenes with the N-substituted maleimide derivatives. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory effects of the new derivatives were assayed against the human (h) isozymes hCA I, II, IX, and XII. All tested bicyclo dicarboximide derivatives exhibited excellent inhibitory effects in the nanomolar range, with Ki values in the range of 117.73-232.87 nM against hCA I and of 69.74-111.51 nM against hCA II, whereas they were low micromolar inhibitors against hCA IX and XII. PMID:27174792

  13. The nature of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Scott Christopher

    Many details of the structure of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) galaxies continue to elude researchers in the field. To shed light on some of the enigmas related to the fueling and classification of AGN, I have studied the core structure of a sample of 37 nearby Seyfert galaxies at high resolution using adaptive optics on the CFHT. This dataset consists of near-IR imaging from 1 to 3 μm (the J, H, and K bands). I first describe the instruments and observing techniques along with a presentation of the galaxy sample properties. I then outline the detailed data reduction and image processing required with adaptive optics observations, highlighting some of the associated unavoidable perils. A detailed multi-wavelength study is pursued for two nearby Seyfert galaxies, NGC3227 and NGC2992. With these objects, the current ideas of Seyfert fueling and unification of Seyfert types are scrutinized, focusing on the high spatial resolution achieved using adaptive optics in the near-IR. The dynamical processes and differing classifications of these galaxies are substantially clarified through their core morphologies. These studies show that scientific results can be established with AO data, in spite of the above mentioned artifact. For NGC2992, a spiral structure within the central 6' and a 1' extended feature are traced down to the core at the resolution of our images. We speculate, based on these observed structures, that multiple radio components are superposed which contribute to the observed figure-8 morphology in the VLA images: one associated with the spiral structure in the galaxy disk, and another flowing out of the galaxy plane. I then address whether the classification of Seyfert galaxy types can be explained via patchy dust at fairly large distances (~100 pc) from the central engine. Maps of dust extinction are constructed with the deep view afforded by the near-IR. These are compared with optical images observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to aid in

  14. Strong bimodality in the host halo mass of central galaxies from galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Wang, Wenting; Zu, Ying; White, Simon; Henriques, Bruno; More, Surhud

    2016-04-01

    We use galaxy-galaxy lensing to study the dark matter haloes surrounding a sample of locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We measure mean halo mass as a function of the stellar mass and colour of the central galaxy. Mock catalogues constructed from semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations demonstrate that most LBGs are the central objects of their haloes, greatly reducing interpretation uncertainties due to satellite contributions to the lensing signal. Over the full stellar mass range, 10.3 < log [M*/M⊙] < 11.6, we find that passive central galaxies have haloes that are at least twice as massive as those of star-forming objects of the same stellar mass. The significance of this effect exceeds 3σ for log [M*/M⊙] > 10.7. Tests using the mock catalogues and on the data themselves clarify the effects of LBG selection and show that it cannot artificially induce a systematic dependence of halo mass on LBG colour. The bimodality in halo mass at fixed stellar mass is reproduced by the astrophysical model underlying our mock catalogue, but the sign of the effect is inconsistent with recent, nearly parameter-free age-matching models. The sign and magnitude of the effect can, however, be reproduced by halo occupation distribution models with a simple (few-parameter) prescription for type dependence.

  15. Cosmology with galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies are powerful probes to constrain parameters that describe the cosmological models and to distinguish among different models. Since, the evolution of the cluster mass function and large-scale clustering contain the informations about the linear growth rate of perturbations and the expansion history of the Universe, clusters have played an important role in establishing the current cosmological paradigm. It is crucial to know how to determine the cluster mass from observational quantities when using clusters as cosmological tools. For this, numerical simulations are helpful to define and study robust cluster mass proxies that have minimal and well understood scatter across the mass and redshift ranges of interest. Additionally, the bias in cluster mass determination can be constrained via observations of the strong and weak lensing effect, X-ray emission, the Sunyaev- Zel’dovic effect, and the dynamics of galaxies.A major advantage of X-ray surveys is that the observable-mass relation is tight. Moreover, clusters can be easily identified in X-ray as continuous, extended sources. As of today, interesting cosmological constraints have been obtained from relatively small cluster samples (~102), X-ray selected by the ROSAT satellite over a wide redshift range (0105 clusters with photometric redshifts from multi-band optical surveys (e.g. PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST). This will vastly improve upon current cosmological constraints, especially by the synergy with other cluster surveys that

  16. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spectrally Dissecting 3400 Galaxies By the Dozen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Croom, S.; The SAMI Galaxy Survey Team

    2014-01-01

    More than 440 mapped, less than 3000 to go in the Sydney-AAO Multi-object IFU (SAMI) Galaxy Survey! SAMI uses novel, photonic fused-optical fiber “hexabundles” that were developed successfully at The University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory AAO), with support from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO). The SAMI Galaxy Survey, led by Assoc. Prof. Croom, is backed by an international team. This spectro-bolometric survey mitigates against “aperture effects” that may mislead when stacking single-fiber galaxy spectra. We seek to answer questions such as “what is the physical role of environment in galaxy evolution? How is stellar mass growth and angular momentum development related in galaxies? How does gas get into and out of galaxies, and how do such flows drive star formation?” SAMI maps stellar and gas properties with 13 integral-field units (IFU) plugged onto a dozen galaxies over the 1° field of the AAT prime-focus corrector. 78% of each bundle's area is filled by sixty-one 1.6-arcsec diameter fibers that are packed closely into concentric circles then their etched, thinned cladding is fused without deforming their cores. The fiber hexabundles route to the bench-mounted AAOmega double-beam spectrograph to cover simultaneously 373-570 nm at R=1730 and 620-735 nm at R=4500. Full spatial resolution of the observing site is recovered by dithered exposures totaling 3.5 hours per field. Target stellar masses generally exceed 108 M⊙, and span a range of environments: ˜650 are within clusters of virial mass 1014-15 M⊙ at 0.03 < z < 0.06, the rest are in the z < 0.1 field with extensive frequency data ancillary to the GAMA Survey. We display some key early results of major science themes being addressed by the SAMI survey team, from rotation curve dependence on group halo mass, through galaxy winds and AGN feedback mechanisms, to oxygen abundance gradients, kinematic decomposition

  17. Molecular gas in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoli, F.; Sauty, S.; Gerin, M.; Boselli, A.; Fouque, P.; Braine, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Lequeux, J.; Dickey, J.

    1998-03-01

    The molecular hydrogen content of a galaxy is a key parameter for its activity and future evolution. Its variations with basic properties such as size, mass, morphological type, and environment, the ratio of molecular to atomic gas masses, should provide us with a better view of galaxy evolution. Such studies have been done in the past by Sage (1993a) or the FCRAO group (e.g. Young & Knezek 1989), and have led to controversial results, for example about the MHH /MHI ratio. While Sage (1993a), using a distance-limited sample of 65 galaxies and the \\COA line emission as a tracer of the HH mass, finds that most galaxies have MHH /MHI lower than 1, Young & Knezek (1989) and Young et al. (1995), from a different sample of 178 objects, claim equal amounts of gas in the molecular and atomic phase. Here we again tackle this problem, by gathering a much larger sample of 582 objects, not only from the literature but also from several \\COA surveys that we have completed and which are largely unpublished. Our sample is clearly not complete and contains a large number of cluster galaxies as well as many more massive objects than a distance-limited sample. Contrary to previous analyses, we have taken into account the non-detections by using the survival analysis method. Our sample includes 105 isolated galaxies, observed by us, that we use as a reference sample in order to determine whether cluster galaxies are CO-deficient. We find that the ratio of HH and HI masses is on the average lower than 1, with = log(0.20) +/- 0.04 (median = log(0.27) +/- 0.04). For spirals with types Sa to Sc, we have slightly higher values: log(0.28) and log(0.34) respectively. The actual HH masses and MHH /MHI ratios could be lower than given above if, as suggested by recent gamma -ray and 1.3 mm continuum data, the conversion factor between \\COA emissivities and HH masses for large spiral galaxies is lower than the value adopted here (X=2.310(20) cm(-2) /(Kkms(-1) )). The

  18. Galaxies that shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, Joakim; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

    2015-07-01

    Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy discs of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photoionization heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multiscattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photoheating smooths and thickens the discs and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of (`thermal dump') supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but for the IR radiation we show that its impact is limited by our inability to resolve the high optical depths for which multiscattering becomes important. While artificially boosting the IR optical depths does reduce the star formation, it does so by smoothing the gas rather than by generating stronger outflows. We conclude that although higher resolution simulations, and potentially also different supernova implementations, are needed for confirmation, our findings suggest that radiation feedback is more gentle and less effective than is often assumed in subgrid prescriptions.

  19. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical models of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holincheck, Anthony J.; Wallin, John F.; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M.; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C.; Parrish, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of citizen scientists, we sample 105 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the simulation parameters generated by the project. They are now publicly available in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org/mergers.html. Though our best-fitting model parameters are not an exact match to previously published models, our method for determining uncertainty measurements will aid future comparisons between models. The dynamical clocks from our models agree with previous results of the time since the onset of star formation from starburst models in interacting systems and suggest that tidally induced star formation is triggered very soon after closest approach.

  20. Radio Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters: Feedback, Merger Signatures, and Signposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Ashby, Matthew; Brodwin, Mark; Bulbul, Esra; Clarke, Tracy E.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Johnson, Ryan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Wing, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Extended, double-lobed radio sources are often located in rich galaxy clusters. I will present results of an optical and X-ray analysis of two nearby clusters with such radio sources - one of the clusters is relaxed (A2029) and one of the clusters is undergoing a merger (A98). Because of their association with clusters, extended radio sources can be used to locate clusters at a wide range of distances. The number of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters with is very low compared to the number of well-studied low-redshift clusters. In the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) survey, we use bent, double-lobed radio sources as signposts to efficiently locate high-redshift clusters. Using a Spitzer Snapshot Survey of our sample of 653 bent, double-lobed radio sources (selected from the FIRST survey and with galaxy hosts too faint to be detected in the SDSS), we have the potential to identify approximately 400 new clusters and groups with redshifts. I will present results from the Spitzer observations regarding the efficiency of the method for finding new clusters. These newly identified clusters will be used to study galaxy formation and evolution, as well as the effect that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) has on galaxies and their environments.

  1. The Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are the most numerous galaxies in the Universe, yet the driving forces in their evolution remain elusive. The proposed evolutionary link between dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical/spheroidal galaxies is investigated using broad-band UBVR photometry obtained for a sample of 29 dwarf galaxies. The galaxies span a range of absolute B-band magnitude from -13.67 to -19.86 mag. Broad-band colors and Sérsic surface brightness profile fits are compared for the two morphological types. All optical parameters are statistically different between the two subsamples, as evidenced by the significance level of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic.Others have noted that dwarf ellipticals might have looked much like the currently observed dwarf irregulars in the past based on optical colors. An overlap between in the range of colors observed is noted for these targets, implying the possibility of an evolutionary link. A difference is noted between the two samples in the value of n (the power-law exponent determined from the Sérsic profile fitting), suggesting that the two main types of dwarf galaxy are structurally distinct. The differences in the structure of the stellar components would imply that dwarf irregulars do not evolve to become dwarf ellipticals in isolation, meaning that some sort of external interaction is required if the transformation is to occur. However, when the brightest dwarf elliptical targets are eliminated from the comparison, the two dwarf samples are much more similar in their values and range for the power-law exponent, which again suggests a possible evolutionary link. The environments of the galaxies are initially classified as either field or group/cluster, though no definitive environmental comparison is presented here.

  2. Multiwavelength studies of Markarian galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.

    2013-10-01

    Markarian galaxies are the result of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) conducted in 1965-1980 by B.E. Markarian et al. The sample consists of 1515 UV-excess galaxies containing many active galaxies, both AGN and starburst (SB) galaxies that are interesting from the point of view of galaxy evolution and multiwavelength studies. Several catalogs of Markarian galaxies have been published; however, multiwavelength (MW) data were not provided and matched for more efficient investigations. Moreover, SDSS spectra now give possibility for better classification by activity types, and we have accomplished fine classification obtaining new types and subtypes for most of the objects. We have cross-correlated the Markarian catalogue with all available large-area MW catalogues at various wavelengths, from X-ray to radio: ROSAT BSC and FSC, GALEX, APM, MAPS, USNO B1.0, GSC 2.3.2, SDSS, 2MASS PSC and ESC, WISE, AKARI-IRC, IRAS PSC, FSC, and SSSC, AKARI-FIS, GB6, NVSS, FIRST, SUMSS, WENSS, and 7C providing 35 photometric data-points, as well as the Digitized FBS (DFBS, http://byurakan.phys.uniroma1.it/) and Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) low-dispersion spectra. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) services have been used for cross-correlations and extraction of DFBS spectra; MW SEDs have been built using the IVOA tools, and MW classification has been accomplished. Diagrams with MW flux ratios have been built to reveal objects with extreme characteristics. The classifications have been matched with these flux ratios. A MW catalog of Markarian galaxies has been compiled.

  3. Infrared images of merging galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, G. S.; James, P. A.; Joseph, R. D.; Mclean, I. S.; Doyon, R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared imaging of interacting galaxies is especially interesting because their optical appearance is often so chaotic due to extinction by dust and emission from star formation regions, that it is impossible to locate the nuclei or determine the true stellar distribution. However, at near-infrared wavelengths extinction is considerably reduced, and most of the flux from galaxies originates from red giant stars that comprise the dominant stellar component by mass. Thus near infrared images offer the opportunity to study directly components of galactic structure which are otherwise inaccessible. Such images may ultimately provide the framework in which to understand the activity taking place in many of the mergers with high Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) luminosities. Infrared images have been useful in identifying double structures in the nuclei of interacting galaxies which have not even been hinted at by optical observations. A striking example of this is given by the K images of Arp 220. Graham et al. (1990) have used high resolution imaging to show that it has a double nucleus coincident with the radio sources in the middle of the dust lane. The results suggest that caution should be applied in the identification of optical bright spots as multiple nuclei in the absence of other evidence. They also illustrate the advantages of using infrared imaging to study the underlying structure in merging galaxies. The authors have begun a program to take near infrared images of galaxies which are believed to be mergers of disk galaxies because they have tidal tails and filaments. In many of these the merger is thought to have induced exceptionally luminous infrared emission (cf. Joseph and Wright 1985, Sanders et al. 1988). Although the optical images of the galaxies show spectacular dust lanes and filaments, the K images all have a very smooth distribution of light with an apparently single nucleus.

  4. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  5. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  6. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2016-02-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50-100 km s-1 line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s-1, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  7. Comparing galaxy populations in compact and loose groups of galaxies. II. Brightest group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Héctor J.; Coenda, Valeria; Muriel, Hernán

    2013-09-01

    Aims: The properties of the brightest galaxies (BCGs) are studied in both compact and loose groups of galaxies in order to better understand the physical mechanisms influencing galaxy evolution in different environments. Methods: Samples of BCGs are selected in compact and loose groups of galaxies previously identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The following physical properties of the BCGs in compact groups and in sub-samples of loose groups are compared, defined by their mass and total luminosity: absolute magnitude, colour, size, surface brightness, stellar mass, concentration and morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo. The fraction of BCGs classified as red and/or early-type as a function of galaxy luminosity is studied. The fraction of the group's total luminosity contained in the BCG and the difference in luminosity between the BCG and the second-ranked galaxy, are also analysed. Results: Some properties of BCGs in compact and loose groups are comparable. However, BCGs in compact groups are systematically more concentrated and have larger surface brightness than their counterparts in both, high- and low-mass loose groups. The fractions of red and early-type BCGs in compact groups are consistent with those of high-mass loose groups. Comparing BCGs in sub-samples of compact and loose groups selected for their similar luminosities, BCGs in compact groups are found to be, on average, brighter, more massive, larger, redder and more frequently classified as elliptical. In compact groups, the BCG contains a larger fraction of the system's total luminosity and differs more in absolute magnitude from the second-ranked galaxy. Using a simple model, which dry-merges the BCG in loose groups with a random choice among the 2nd, 3rd and 4th-ranked galaxies in the group, and allowing for some star loss in the process, we show that the absolute magnitude distributions of BCGs in compact and loose groups of similar luminosities can be made more alike. Conclusions

  8. The missing mass in clusters of galaxies and elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    We review the available data for the existence of dark matter in clusters of galaxies and elliptical galaxies. While the amount of dark matter in clusters is not well determined, both the X-ray and optical data show that more than 50 percent of the total mass must be dark. There is in general fair agreement in the binding mass estimates between the X-ray and optical techniques, but there is not detailed agreement on the form of the potential or the distribution of dark matter. The X-ray spectral and spatial observations of elliptical galaxies demonstrate that dark matter is also required in these objects and that it must be considerably more extended than the stellar distribution.

  9. The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    ESO's Wide Field Imager has captured the intricate swirls of the spiral galaxy Messier 83, a smaller look-alike of our own Milky Way. Shining with the light of billions of stars and the ruby red glow of hydrogen gas, it is a beautiful example of a barred spiral galaxy, whose shape has led to it being nicknamed the Southern Pinwheel. Messier 83, M83 ESO PR Photo 25/08 Spiral Galaxy Messier 83 This dramatic image of the galaxy Messier 83 was captured by the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory, located high in the dry desert mountains of the Chilean Atacama Desert. Messier 83 lies roughly 15 million light-years away towards the huge southern constellation of Hydra (the sea serpent). It stretches over 40 000 light-years, making it roughly 2.5 times smaller than our own Milky Way. However, in some respects, Messier 83 is quite similar to our own galaxy. Both the Milky Way and Messier 83 possess a bar across their galactic nucleus, the dense spherical conglomeration of stars seen at the centre of the galaxies. This very detailed image shows the spiral arms of Messier 83 adorned by countless bright flourishes of ruby red light. These are in fact huge clouds of glowing hydrogen gas. Ultraviolet radiation from newly born, massive stars is ionising the gas in these clouds, causing the great regions of hydrogen to glow red. These star forming regions are contrasted dramatically in this image against the ethereal glow of older yellow stars near the galaxy's central hub. The image also shows the delicate tracery of dark and winding dust streams weaving throughout the arms of the galaxy. Messier 83 was discovered by the French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the mid 18th century. Decades later it was listed in the famous catalogue of deep sky objects compiled by another French astronomer and famous comet hunter, Charles Messier. Recent observations of this enigmatic galaxy in ultraviolet light and radio waves have shown that even its outer desolate regions

  10. Stellar Populations in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, L. A.; Courteau, S.; Bell, E. F.; Holtzman, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate optical and near-IR color gradients in a sample of 172 low-inclination galaxies spanning Hubble types S0--Irr. The colors are compared to stellar population synthesis models from which luminosity-weighted average ages and metallicities are determined. We explore the effects of different underlying star formation histories and additional bursts of star formation. Because the observed gradients show radial structure, we measure ``inner'' and ``outer'' disk age and metallicity gradients. Relative trends in age and metallicity and their gradients are explored as a function of Hubble type, rotational velocity, total near-IR galaxy magnitude, central surface brightness, and scale length. We find strong correlations in age and metallicity with Hubble type, rotational velocity, total magnitude, and central surface brightness in the sense that earlier-type, faster rotating, more luminous, and higher surface brightness galaxies are older and more metal-rich, suggesting an early and more rapid star formation history for these galaxies. The increasing trends level off for T ⪉ 4 (Sbc and earlier), V {rot} ⪆ 120 km s-1, MK ⪉ -23 mag, and μ 0 ⪉ 18.5 mag arcsec-2. Outer disk gradients are weaker than the inner gradients as expected for a slower variation of the potential and surface brightness in the outer parts. We find that stronger age gradients are associated with weaker metallicity gradients. Relative trends in gradients with galaxy parameters do not agree with predictions of semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation, possibly as a result of bar-induced radial flows. However, the observed trends are in agreement with chemo-spectro photometric models of spiral galaxy evolution based on CDM-motivated scaling laws but including none of the hierarchical merging characteristics. This implies a strong dependence of the star formation history of spiral galaxies on the galaxy potential and halo spin parameter. L.A.M. and S.C acknowledge support

  11. Colliding Galaxies Create Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Video Gallery

    This simulation follows the collision of two spiral galaxies that harbor giant black holes. The collision merges the black holes and stirs up gas in both galaxies. The merged black hole gorges on t...

  12. The Population One Core of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Allen, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral imaging in the near-infrared of the central parsec of the Galaxy has revealed that a population of massive young stars resides in the core of our Galaxy. We suggest it has undergone a mild starburst.

  13. Astrophysics: How black holes restrain old galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Supermassive black holes are thought to keep star formation under control by ejecting or stirring gas in galaxies. Observations of an old galaxy reveal a potential mechanism for how this process occurs. See Letter p.504

  14. Study Finds Surprising Trend in Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Video Gallery

    A study of 544 star-forming galaxies observed by the Keck and Hubble telescopes shows that disk galaxies like our own Milky Way unexpectedly reached their current state long after much of the unive...

  15. The Impossibly Early Galaxy Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.; Capak, Peter L.; Masters, Daniel; Speagle, Josh S.

    2016-01-01

    The current hierarchical merging paradigm and ΛCDM predict that the z ~ 4-8 universe should be a time in which the most massive galaxies are transitioning from their initial halo assembly to the later baryonic evolution seen in star-forming galaxies and quasars. However, no evidence of this transition has been found in many high redshift galaxy surveys including CFHTLS, CANDELS and SPLASH, the first studies to probe the high-mass end at these redshifts. Indeed, if halo mass to stellar mass ratios estimated at lower-redshift continue to z ~ 6-8, CANDELS and SPLASH report several orders of magnitude more M ~ 10^12-13 M⊙ halos than are possible to have formed by those redshifts, implying these massive galaxies formed impossibly early. We consider various systematics in the stellar synthesis models used to estimate physical parameters and possible galaxy formation scenarios in an effort to reconcile observation with theory. Although known uncertainties can greatly reduce the disparity between recent observations and cold dark matter merger simulations, even taking the most conservative view of the observations, there remains considerable tension with current theory.

  16. Invisible Galaxies Come to Life!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation demonstrates that an invisible galaxy shrouded in dust can become glaringly bright when viewed in infrared light. The movie begins with a visible-light view, showing a dark blob of a galaxy that is so shrouded in dust it appears invisible. The picture then transitions to what the same region of space might look like in infrared light. A galaxy appears out of the darkness, because its heated dust glows at infrared wavelengths.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope uncovered a hidden population of invisible galaxies like these using its highly sensitive infrared eyes. The dusty galaxies are among the brightest in the universe and are located 11 billion light-years away, back to a time when the universe was 3 billion years old. The universe is currently believed to be 13.5 billion years old.

    Astronomers are not sure what is lighting up these cosmic behemoths, but they speculate that quasars--the most luminous objects in the universe--may be lurking inside.

  17. The Impossibly Early Galaxy Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles. L.; Capak, Peter; Masters, Dan; Speagle, Josh S.

    2016-06-01

    The current hierarchical merging paradigm and ΛCDM predict that the z˜ 4-8 universe should be a time in which the most massive galaxies are transitioning from their initial halo assembly to the later baryonic evolution seen in star-forming galaxies and quasars. However, no evidence of this transition has been found in many high-redshift galaxy surveys including CFHTLS, Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Survey (CANDELS), and Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH), which were the first studies to probe the high-mass end at these redshifts. Indeed, if halo mass to stellar mass ratios estimated at lower-redshift continue to z˜ 6-8, CANDELS and SPLASH report several orders of magnitude more M˜ {10}12-13{M}ȯ halos than is possible to have been formed by those redshifts, implying that these massive galaxies formed impossibly early. We consider various systematics in the stellar synthesis models used to estimate physical parameters and possible galaxy formation scenarios in an effort to reconcile observation with theory. Although known uncertainties can greatly reduce the disparity between recent observations and cold dark matter merger simulations, there remains considerable tension with current theory even if taking the most conservative view of the observations.

  18. The fueling of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Collisions of galaxies are often invoked to explain violent phenomena in the universe. The dynamics of interacting galaxies is intrinsically three-dimensional and involves both gas and stellar dynamics. In general, a computational approach is needed to model galactic collisions. Galaxy encounters are studied using a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code, capable of integrating systems of stars, gas, and dark matter in a fully self-consistent manner. These experiments demonstrate that gravitational coupling between gas and stars in galactic interactions can drive most of the gas throughout a galaxy into the nucleus of a merger remnant. The high densities in these gas concentrations are likely to result in strong bursts of star formation. Hence, this process may explain the nuclear starbursts in some systems of interacting galaxies. Further collapse of these gas concentrations can trigger even more intense activity if some gas is eventually accreted by a supermassive black hole. Such an evolutionary sequence may account for some quasars and active galactic nuclei.

  19. The Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. R.; Iribarrem, A.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-empirical relativistic approach which uses the general model connecting cosmological theory to observational data derived from galaxy surveys (Ribeiro & Stoeger 2003, ApJ, 592, 1) to study the galactic mass evolution. For this purpose we define a new quantity named the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF). We used the FORS Deep Field survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 5.0 and its luminosity function in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar masses. We obtained that the GCMF behaves as a power-law given by ζ (z) ∝ [M_{g}(z)]^{-2.3± 0.4}, where M_{g} is the average galactic mass in the studied redshift interval. This result can be seen as an average of the galaxy stellar mass function pattern found in the literature, where more massive galaxies were assembled earlier than less massive ones.

  20. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  1. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    The authors have measured 83 new redshifts for galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White and Albert, White, and Morgan. For three systems (MKW 1s, AWM 1, and AWM 7) complete redshift samples were obtained for galaxies brighter than mB(0) = 15.7 within 1° of the D or cD galaxy. The authors estimate masses for the clusters by applying both the virial theorem and the projected mass method. For the two clusters with the highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are ≡700 km s-1, and mass-to-light ratios M/LB(0) ⪆ 400 M_sun;/L_sun;. For the five other clusters the velocity dispersions are ⪉370 km s-1, and four of the five have mass-to-light ratios ⪉250 M_sun;/L_sun;. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of the system.

  2. Morphology of High Redshifted Galaxies using GALEX Ultraviolet Observations of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bum-Suk; Kim, Y.; Rey, S.; Kim, S.; Joe, Y.; Gil de Paz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy morphology provides clues about the processes in the understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this respect, the prediction of optical-band morphologies at high redshifts requires ultraviolet (UV) images of local galaxies with various morphologies. We simulated optical images at high redshifts using more diverse and high-quality nearby galaxies obtained through the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV observations. We present a quantitative analysis of the morphology of galaxies at near-ultraviolet (NUV) and simulated optical images. We also present a correlation between the isophotal-shape parameter and UV colors for nearby early-type galaxies.

  3. GOODS-Herschel: the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the far-infrared properties of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H. S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Borgne, D.; Buat, V.; Magdis, G. E.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Coia, D.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dasyra, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We study the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the far-infrared properties of galaxies and its evolution at 0 < z < 1.2. Methods: Using the high-z galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) observed by the Herschel Space Observatory in the framework of the GOODS-Herschel key program and the local IRAS or AKARI-selected galaxies in the field of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we investigate the dependence of galaxy properties on the morphology of and the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy. Results: We find that the star-formation rates (SFRs) and the specific SFRs (SSFRs) of galaxies on average depend on the morphology of and the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy in this redshift range. When a late-type galaxy has a close neighbor galaxy, the SFR and the SSFR increase as it approaches a late-type neighbor, which is supported by Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) and Monte Carlo (MC) tests with a significance level of >99%. However, the SFR and the SSFR decrease or do not change much as the galaxy approaches an early-type neighbor. The bifurcations of SFRs and SSFRs depending on the neighbor's morphology seem to occur at Rn ≈ 0.5rvir,nei (virial radius of the neighbor), which is supported by K-S and MC tests with a significance level of >98%. For all redshift bins, the SSFRs of late-type galaxies interacting with late-type neighbors are increased by factors of about 1.8 ± 0.7 and 4.0 ± 1.2 compared to those of non-interacting galaxies when the pair separation is smaller than 0.5rvir,nei and 0.1rvir,nei, respectively. The dust temperature of both local and high-z late-type galaxies that strongly interact with late-type neighbors (i.e. Rn ≤ 0.1rvir,nei) appears to be higher than that of non-interacting galaxies with a significance level of 96-99%. However, the dust temperature of local late-type galaxies that strongly interact with early-type neighbors seems to be lower than or similar to that of non

  4. A ring galaxy in Canes Venatici and related ring galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Nishida, M.T. Kobe Women's University )

    1991-04-01

    A spectroscopic observation was made of a ring-shaped object in Canes Venatici. A bright knot at the edge of the ring has a recession velocity of 10,960 + or - 30 km/s and so is confirmed as an extragalactic object. It shows no sign of nuclear activity but appears to be an H II region of intermediate excitation class. The linear diameter of the ring is 14.2 + or - 0.8 kpc, a typical size for ring galaxies. Recession velocities of several other ring galaxies are also given. 24 refs.

  5. Halotools: Galaxy-Halo connection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew; Tollerud, Erik; Robitaille, Thomas; Droettboom, Michael; Zentner, Andrew; Bray, Erik; Craig, Matt; Bradley, Larry; Barbary, Kyle; Deil, Christoph; Tan, Kevin; Becker, Matthew R.; More, Surhud; Günther, Hans Moritz; Sipocz, Brigitta

    2016-04-01

    Halotools builds and tests models of the galaxy-halo connection and analyzes catalogs of dark matter halos. The core functions of the package include fast generation of synthetic galaxy populations using HODs, abundance matching, and related methods; efficient algorithms for calculating galaxy clustering, lensing, z-space distortions, and other astronomical statistics; a modular, object-oriented framework for designing galaxy evolution models; and end-to-end support for reducing halo catalogs and caching them as hdf5 files.

  6. Neutral hydrogen survey of andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Brundage, W D; Kraus, J D

    1966-07-22

    A neutral hydrogen survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) has been conducted with the 260-foot (80m) Ohio State University radio telescope. The neutral hydrogen is concentrated in the spiral arm regions, with but relatively small amounts near the center of the galaxy. Similar deficiencies have been found near the center of M33 and our galaxy, suggesting similar evolutionary processes in the three galaxies. PMID:17839713

  7. Do elliptical galaxies have thick disks?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. C.; Wright, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss new evidence which supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies. Numerical simulations of weak interactions with thick disk systems produce shell structures very similar in appearance to those observed in many shell galaxies. The authors think this model presents a more plausible explanation for the formation of shell structures in elliptical/SO galaxies than does the merger model and, if correct, supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies.

  8. On the formation of ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2011-08-01

    The formation scenario of ring galaxies is addressed in this paper. We focus on the P-type ring galaxies presented in Madore, Nelson & Petrillo (2009), particularly on the axis-symmetric ones. Our simulations show that a ring can form through the collision of disc and dwarf galaxies, and the locations, widths, and density contrasts of the ring are well determined. We find that a ring galaxy such as AM 2302-322 can be produced by this collision scenario.

  9. High resolution imaging of galaxy cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, P.; Stiavelli, M.; King, I. R.; Deharveng, J. M.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Surface photometry data obtained with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope in the cores of ten galaxies is presented. The major results are: (1) none of the galaxies show truly 'isothermal' cores, (2) galaxies with nuclear activity show very similar light profiles, (3) all objects show central mass densities above 10 exp 3 solar masses/cu pc3, and (4) four of the galaxies (M87, NGC 3862, NGC 4594, NGC 6251) show evidence for exceptional nuclear mass concentrations.

  10. THE METALLICITY OF VOID DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Croxall, K.; Pogge, R. W.; Van de Weygaert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The current ΛCDM cosmological model predicts that galaxy evolution proceeds more slowly in lower density environments, suggesting that voids are a prime location to search for relatively pristine galaxies that are representative of the building blocks of early massive galaxies. To test the assumption that void galaxies are more pristine, we compare the evolutionary properties of a sample of dwarf galaxies selected specifically to lie in voids with a sample of similar isolated dwarf galaxies in average density environments. We measure gas-phase oxygen abundances and gas fractions for eight dwarf galaxies (M{sub r} > –16.2), carefully selected to reside within the lowest density environments of seven voids, and apply the same calibrations to existing samples of isolated dwarf galaxies. We find no significant difference between these void dwarf galaxies and the isolated dwarf galaxies, suggesting that dwarf galaxy chemical evolution proceeds independent of the large-scale environment. While this sample is too small to draw strong conclusions, it suggests that external gas accretion is playing a limited role in the chemical evolution of these systems, and that this evolution is instead dominated mainly by the internal secular processes that are linking the simultaneous growth and enrichment of these galaxies.

  11. High velocity gas in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamphuis, J.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Sancisi, R.

    1990-01-01

    Two nearby, nearly face-on spiral galaxies, M 101 and NGC 6946, observed in the HI with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) as part of a program to search for high velocity gas in other galaxies, are used to illustrate the range of properties of high velocity gas in other galaxies found thusfar.

  12. The Evolution of Galaxies and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David (Editor); Thronson, Harley A. (Editor); Shull, J. Michael (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Third Teton Summer School on Astrophysics discussed the formation of galaxies, star formation in galaxies, galaxies and quasars at high red shift, and the intergalactic and intercluster medium and cooling flows. Observation and theoretical research on these topics was presented at the meeting and summaries of the contributed papers are included in this volume.

  13. The Alignment of Galaxy Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, M.; Panko, E.; Bajan, K.; Godłowski, W.; Flin, P.

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the orientation of the sample of ACO galaxy clusters. We examined the alignment in a subsample of 1056 galaxy structures taken from the Panko-Flin (2006) Catalog with known BM morphological types. We were looking for a correlation between the orientation of the cluster and the positions of neighboring clusters. The Binggeli effect (the excess of small values of the Δθ angles between the direction toward neighboring clusters and the cluster position angle) is observed, having a range up to about 45 h-1 Mpc. The strongest effect was found for elongated BM type I clusters. This is probably connected with the origins of the supergiant galaxy and with cluster formation along a long filament or plane in a supercluster.

  14. Galaxy and cluster redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of galaxy and cluster redshift surveys gives attention to the CfA redshift survey and a deep Abell cluster redshift survey. These data support a structure in which galaxies lie on thin sheets which nearly surround vast, low-density voids. Voids such as that in Bootes are a common feature of galaxy distribution, posing a serious challenge for models. The Huchra et al. (1988) deep-cluster survey exhibits a correlation function amplitude that is a factor of about 2 smaller than that of the earlier Bahcall and Soneira (1983) sample; the difference may not be significant, however, because the cluster samples are sufficiently small to be dominated by single systems.

  15. AGN and their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, L. K.; Dolag, K.; Hirschmann, M.; Remus, R.-S.; Teklu, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Large scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations are an important tool to study the co-evolution between black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. However, in order to model the accretion onto BHs and AGN feedback we need sub-grid models which contain several free parameters. The choice of these parameters has a significant impact on the properties of the BHs and their host galaxies. Therefore, we improve the accretion model and the AGN feedback model based on both theory and observations to eliminate most free parameters. In that way, the slope of the observed relation between BH mass and stellar mass is reproduced self-consistently. We performed a few extremely large simulation runs as part of the Magneticum Pathfinder simulation set, combining a high resolution with very large cosmological volumes, enabling us to study for example dual AGN, the role of galaxy mergers and AGN clustering properties.

  16. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement of 83 new redshifts from galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan et al (1975) and Albert et al (1977) has been followed by an estimation of cluster masses through the application of both the virial theorem and the projected mas method. For each system, these two estimates are consistent. For the two clusters with highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are about 700 km/sec, while for the five other clusters, the dispersions are of the order of less than about 370 km/sec. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of each system.

  17. Cosmic Shear from Galaxy Spins.

    PubMed

    Lee; Pen

    2000-03-20

    We discuss the origin of galactic angular momentum and the statistics of the present-day spin distribution. It is expected that the galaxy spin axes are correlated with the intermediate principal axis of the gravitational shear tensor. This allows one to reconstruct the shear field and thereby the full gravitational potential from the observed galaxy spin fields. We use the direction of the angular momentum vector without any information of its magnitude, which requires a measurement of the position angle and inclination on the sky of each disk galaxy. We present the maximum likelihood shear inversion procedure, which involves a constrained linear minimization. The theory is tested against numerical simulations. We find the correlation strength of nonlinear structures with the initial shear field and show that accurate large-scale density reconstructions are possible at the expected noise level. PMID:10702119

  18. Division J Commission 28: Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John S.; Davies, Roger L.; Courteau, Stéphane; Dekel, Avishai; Franx, Marijn; Jog, Chanda J.; Jogee, Sardha; Nakai, Naomasa; Rubio, Monica; Tacconi, Linda; Terlevich, Elena

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 28 (IAU C28: Galaxies) was founded in the late 1930s at which time it had only a small membership (see the historical notes by Sadler et al. 2007). When C28 ended its existence in 2015 there were well over 1000 members on its books. The membership had grown to the point where the effort to keep track of active participants had become a major task. During the C28s tenure 27 IAU Symposia have been devoted to galaxies, the third highest number (Mickaelian 2014)

  19. The IRAS Galaxy Atlas (IGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In 1993 we proposed a project to NASA having the goal of producing a new infrared map of our Galaxy. In particular, we proposed to reprocess the IRAS data taken in the early 1980's using modern image processing algorithms and the large Intel parallel computers of the Center for Advanced Computing Research, (at that time called the Caltech Concurrent Supercomputing Facilities - CCSF). The rationale was simple: what took approximately 100 days on a typical workstation would take less than a day on the multi-processor parallel computers, thus making a high-resolution infrared atlas of the Galaxy feasible.

  20. Quest for Truly Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, N.

    2010-10-01

    I describe attempts to identify and understand the most isolated galaxies starting from my 1983 Leiden PhD thesis, continuing through a string of graduate theses on various aspects of this topic, and concluding with an up-to-date account of the difficulty to find really isolated objects. The implication of some of the findings revealed on the way and presented here is that the nearby Universe may contain many small dark-matter haloes, and that some such haloes may possibly be accreting intergalactic gas to form dwarf galaxies.

  1. Galaxy Cluster Smashes Distance Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    he most distant galaxy cluster yet has been discovered by combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical and infrared telescopes. The cluster is located about 10.2 billion light years away, and is observed as it was when the Universe was only about a quarter of its present age. The galaxy cluster, known as JKCS041, beats the previous record holder by about a billion light years. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe. Finding such a large structure at this very early epoch can reveal important information about how the Universe evolved at this crucial stage. JKCS041 is found at the cusp of when scientists think galaxy clusters can exist in the early Universe based on how long it should take for them to assemble. Therefore, studying its characteristics - such as composition, mass, and temperature - will reveal more about how the Universe took shape. "This object is close to the distance limit expected for a galaxy cluster," said Stefano Andreon of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Milan, Italy. "We don't think gravity can work fast enough to make galaxy clusters much earlier." Distant galaxy clusters are often detected first with optical and infrared observations that reveal their component galaxies dominated by old, red stars. JKCS041 was originally detected in 2006 in a survey from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The distance to the cluster was then determined from optical and infrared observations from UKIRT, the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope in Hawaii and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared observations are important because the optical light from the galaxies at large distances is shifted into infrared wavelengths because of the expansion of the universe. The Chandra data were the final - but crucial - piece of evidence as they showed that JKCS041 was, indeed, a genuine galaxy cluster. The extended X-ray emission seen by Chandra shows that hot gas has been detected

  2. Brightest Cluster Galaxies & Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    In the absence of any form of feedback heating, the gas in the central regions of massive relaxed cluster should cool and initiate a cooling flow. The presence/efficiency of an additional heating and the ultimate fate of the cooling gas is the subject of an extensive debate. In the last decade, molecular and atomic gas have been found in many Brightest Cluster Galaxies. I will review these observational results and discuss their implication for galaxy formation/evolution, in the perspective of ALMA.

  3. Water balance and flow rate discharge on a receiving water body: Application to the B-XII Irrigation District in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Maria C.; Tornos, Lucia; Juana, Luis

    2015-08-01

    The quantification of the main water balance components becomes necessary to diminish the pollutants load from drainage, and its harmful effect on the environment, aggravated within a context of increasing water scarcity. As a first approach to the hydrological study of the 15,000 ha B-XII Irrigation District in Spain, a conceptual lumped model entitled WATEN has been developed, aiming to calculate the monthly flow rate discharge to the Guadalquivir River over the period 2002-2012. The model requires as inputs, irrigation, precipitation and potential crop evapotranspiration. Main model parameters are the total and readily available moisture in the soil, the effective rainfall and the irrigation efficiency. Energy consumption for drainage discharge was used for calibration. Both classical optimization and a robust approach based on Monte Carlo were performed. In order to diminish computational requirements, Monte Carlo was not haphazardly applied, but conducted on a similar manner to genetic algorithms, entitled Parameters Estimation on Driven Trials (PEDT). The model attained an average Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient e2 ≅ 0.90 between observed and estimated drainage discharge. It was detected a significant crop evapotranspiration reduction compared to potential values. The volume of water discharged to the river might be sufficient for leaching irrigation water salts.

  4. ER network dynamics are differentially controlled by myosins XI-K, XI-C, XI-E, XI-I, XI-1, and XI-2

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, Lawrence R.; Gao, Hongbo T.; Sparkes, Imogen

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of higher plants is a complex network of tubules and cisternae. Some of the tubules and cisternae are relatively persistent, while others are dynamically moving and remodeling through growth and shrinkage, cycles of tubule elongation and retraction, and cisternal expansion and diminution. Previous work showed that transient expression in tobacco leaves of the motor-less, truncated tail of myosin XI-K increases the relative area of both persistent cisternae and tubules in the ER. Likewise, transient expression of XI-K tail diminishes the movement of organelles such as Golgi and peroxisomes. To examine whether other class XI myosins are involved in the remodeling and movement of the ER, other myosin XIs implicated in organelle movement, XI-1 (MYA1),XI-2 (MYA2), XI-C, XI-E, XI-I, and one not, XI-A, were expressed as motor-less tail constructs and their effect on ER persistent structures determined. Here, we indicate a differential effect on ER dynamics whereby certain class XI myosins may have more influence over controlling cisternalization rather than tubulation. PMID:24904614

  5. The impact of hydroquinone on acetylcholine esterase and certain human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX, and XII).

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Kalın, Pınar; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gülçin, İlhami; Alwasel, Saleh H

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are widespread and the most studied members of a great family of metalloenzymes in higher vertebrates including humans. CAs were investigated for their inhibition of all of the catalytically active mammalian isozymes of the Zn(2+)-containing CA, (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). On the other hand, acetylcholinesterase (AChE. EC 3.1.1.7), a serine protease, is responsible for ACh hydrolysis and plays a fundamental role in impulse transmission by terminating the action of the neurotransmitter ACh at the cholinergic synapses and neuromuscular junction. In the present study, the inhibition effect of the hydroquinone (benzene-1,4-diol) on AChE activity was evaluated and effectively inhibited AChE with Ki of 1.22 nM. Also, hydroquinone strongly inhibited some human cytosolic CA isoenzymes (hCA I and II) and tumour-associated transmembrane isoforms (hCA IX, and XII), with Kis in the range between micromolar (415.81 μM) and nanomolar (706.79 nM). The best inhibition was observed in cytosolic CA II. PMID:25586344

  6. A probable case of gigantism/acromegaly in skeletal remains from the Jewish necropolis of "Ronda Sur" (Lucena, Córdoba, Spain; VIII-XII centuries CE).

    PubMed

    Viciano, Joan; De Luca, Stefano; López-Lázaro, Sandra; Botella, Daniel; Diéguez-Ramírez, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism is a rare endocrine disorder caused by hypersecretion of growth hormone during growing period. Individuals with this disorder have an enormous growth in height and associated degenerative changes. The continued hypersecretion of growth hormone during adulthood leads to acromegaly, a condition related to the disproportionate bone growth of the skull, hands and feet. The skeletal remains studied belong to a young adult male from the Jewish necropolis of "Ronda Sur" in Lucena (Córdoba, Spain, VIII-XII centuries CE). The individual shows a very large and thick neurocranium, pronounced supraorbital ridges, an extremely prominent occipital protuberance, and an extremely large and massive mandible. Additional pathologies include enlargement of the vertebral bodies with degenerative changes, thickened ribs, and a slight increased length of the diaphysis with an increased cortical bone thickness of lower limbs. Comparative metric analysis of the mandible with other individuals from the same population and a contemporary Mediterranean population shows a trend toward acromegalic morphology. This case is an important contribution in paleopathological literature because it is a rare condition that has not been widely documented in ancient skeletal remains. PMID:25776010

  7. Strong Infrared NLO Tellurides with Multifunction: CsX(II)4In5Te12 (X(II) = Mn, Zn, Cd).

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Liu-Jiang; Zhao, Hua-Jun; Chen, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenides are the most promising mid- and far-infrared materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications. Yet, most of them are sulfides and selenides, and tellurides are still rare. Herein, we report three new KCd4Ga5S12-structure type NLO-active tellurides, CsX(II)4In5Te12 (X(II) = Mn, Zn, Cd), synthesized by solid-state reactions. The structure features a 3D diamond-like framework constructed by vertex-sharing asymmetric MTe4 tetrahedra that are stacked along the c-axis. CsCd4In5Te12 exhibits the strongest powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) intensity at 2050 nm (0.61 eV) among tellurides to date, 9 × benchmark AgGaS2 in the range of 46-74 μm particle size. The primary studies reveal the 1.42 eV direct band gap and high absorption coefficient in the visible spectral region for CsCd4In5Te12, suggesting it is a new potential solar cell absorber material. In addition, CsMn4In5Te12 also displays a spin-canted antiferromagnetic property below 50 K. PMID:27070041

  8. On the formation of polar ring galaxies and tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia; Sweet, Sarah; Meurer, Gerhardt; Drinkwater, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a study of the properties of galaxies and dwarfs in 16 gas-rich galaxy groups identified in the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG; Meurer et al. 2006). We have found a young gas-rich coalescing galaxy group, J1051-17. Key features of this system are gas-rich tidal tails, studded with dwarf galaxies extending 200 kpc which merge in to a low surface brightness polar disk orbiting a very red edge-on host hosting a central AGN. Accretion from the polar disk may be feeding the AGN and powering a galactic wind. The example of this system suggests that tidal interactions with gas rich satellites may be a key process that aligns satellites in to polar planes while fuelling accretion down to the very centres of the host. We discuss the formation scenario of this polar ring galaxy, and investigate the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies in the wider group sample.

  9. Tasking Citizen Scientists from Galaxy Zoo to Model Galaxy Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, J.; Holincheck, A.; Borne, K.; Lintott, C.; Smith, A.; Bamford, S.; Fortson, L.

    2010-06-01

    The huge data volumes across the sciences require us to consider new approaches to data analysis and simulations. In this project, we investigate how citizen scientists from GalaxyZoo.org can be tasked to address this data flood by providing the human input to classify simulations of galaxy interactions. The primary science goal in the galaxy collision project is developing numerical models for hundreds of interacting systems. With these simulations, we will determine if these collisions are unique locations in the multi-parameter phase space that defines the input parameters to our simulations. We will also correlate these dynamical parameters with the star formation and nuclear activity in these systems. Further self-consistent, high resolution models will follow from these simple matches to compare simulations directly with the observations. A secondary goal of the galaxy collision project is to create a set of human-selected matches between simulations and models which can be used as a training set for machine learning algorithms. Analysis of this data set will allow the creation of a robust fitness function for evolutionary computing algorithms that can be used to model other interacting systems.

  10. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey IX: the isolated galaxy sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R.; Davies, J. I.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Keenan, O. C.; Momjian, E.; Rodriguez, R.; Taber, T.; Taylor, R.

    2016-02-01

    We have used the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) to map three regions, each of 5 deg2, around the isolated galaxies NGC 1156, UGC 2082, and NGC 5523. In the vicinity of these galaxies we have detected two dwarf companions: one near UGC 2082, previously discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, and one near NGC 1156, discovered by this project and reported in an earlier paper. This is significantly fewer than the 15.4^{+1.7}_{-1.5} that would be expected from the field H I mass function from ALFALFA or the 8.9 ± 1.2 expected if the H I mass function from the Local Group applied in these regions. The number of dwarf companions detected is, however, consistent with a flat or declining H I mass function as seen by a previous, shallower, H I search for companions to isolated galaxies. We attribute this difference in H I mass functions to the different environments in which they are measured. This agrees with the general observation that lower ratios of dwarf to giant galaxies are found in lower density environments.

  11. An Imaging Survey of Late-Type Galaxies: Local Benchmarks of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, V. A.

    2005-12-01

    Nearby (z ˜ 0) irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies resemble the majority of galaxy types observed at high redshift. Since optical observations of galaxies at high redshift cover their rest-frame ultraviolet emission, imaging of local late-type galaxies in the ultraviolet and optical will provide a necessary basis for understanding high-redshift galaxies and their implications for galaxy formation and evolution. For this purpose, I present an analysis of a unique, panchromatic sample of 199 mostly late-type, irregular, peculiar, and merging nearby galaxies observed in a combination of 10 different pass-bands from the far ultraviolet through the infrared. I first present results of a study of the color gradients of these galaxies. I find that although elliptical through mid-type spiral galaxies are redder in their centers than their outskirts, most late-type spirals, irregular, and merging galaxies are bluer in their centers, becoming increasingly redder at larger radii. This indicates that late-type galaxies have a significant halo or thick disk of older stars, while young UV-bright stars dominate their inner regions. These results are consistent with models of hierarchical galaxy formation. I also present measurements of the concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness ("CAS") parameters of these galaxies. These fundamental galaxy parameters can be used for galaxy classification, and studying and identifying merging and perturbed galaxies. The dependence of these parameters on wavelength yields a quantitative measure of the "morphological k-correction," which describes how the appearance of a galaxy changes with rest-frame wavelength. I find that the CAS parameters depend on galaxy type, and vary significantly with rest-frame wavelength, especially short-ward of the Balmer break. Galaxies generally become less concentrated and more asymmetric and clumpy at shorter wavelengths. Funded by NASA grants GO-8645.01-A, GO-9124.01-A and GO-9824.01-A, GALEXGI04

  12. Morphology of Our Galaxy's 'Twin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured these infrared images of a nearby spiral galaxy that resembles our own Milky Way. The targeted galaxy, known as NGC 7331 and sometimes referred to as our galaxy's twin, is found in the constellation Pegasus at a distance of 50 million light-years. This inclined galaxy was discovered in 1784 by William Herschel, who also discovered infrared light.

    The evolution of this galaxy is a story that depends significantly on the amount and distribution of gas and dust, the locations and rates of star formation, and on how the energy from star formation is recycled by the local environment. The new Spitzer images are allowing astronomers to 'read' this story by dissecting the galaxy into its separate components.

    The image, measuring 12.6 by 8.2 arcminutes, was obtained by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is a four-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (yellow) and 8.0 microns (red). These wavelengths are roughly 10 times longer than those seen by the human eye.

    The infrared light seen in this image originates from two very different sources. At shorter wavelengths (3.6 to 4.5 microns), the light comes mainly from stars, particularly ones that are older and cooler than our Sun. This starlight fades at longer wavelengths (5.8 to 8.0 microns), where instead we see the glow from clouds of interstellar dust. This dust consists mainly of a variety of carbon-based organic molecules known collectively as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Wherever these compounds are found, there will also be dust granules and gas, which provide a reservoir of raw materials for future star formation.

    One feature that stands out in the Spitzer image is the ring of actively forming stars that surrounds the galaxy center (yellow). This ring, with a radius of nearly 20,000 light-years, is invisible at shorter wavelengths, yet has been detected at

  13. Statistics of associations among IR galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Jack F.; Keel, William C.

    1990-01-01

    In the course of expanding the search of Kleinmann et. al. (1988) for distant, infrared-luminous objects, the authors noticed (as is often remarked) that a large number of infrared-selected galaxies have close neighbors or show merger characteristics (e.g., tidal tails, distorted disks). Because the sample size is large (567 infrared galaxies and 2182 field galaxies), this sample is ideal for statistically examining the importance of interactions among infrared galaxies. In particular, the authors compare the nearest-neighbor distribution and the two-point correlation function of their sample with that of a control sample of field galaxies.

  14. Galaxy Evolution in Clusters Since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Salamanca, A.

    Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature" vs. "nurture" in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the Universe was half its present age. Many of the results presented here have been obtained within the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  15. Galaxy evolution in clusters since z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2010-09-01

    Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature" vs. "nurture" in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the universe was half its present age. Many of the results presented here have been obtained within the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  16. Stellar Rotation Curves of Starbursting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D.; Salzer, John J.

    2001-02-01

    A year ago, we successfully completed a pilot project to obtain stellar rotation curves of starbursting dwarf galaxies. These observations provided the first spatially resolved stellar rotation curves of gas-rich dwarf galaxies. We now propose to expand our sample (by a factor of 2) by observing 4 additional dwarf galaxies with the CTIO 4m. The fundamental question to be addressed is whether the gas and stars are kinematically coupled in these small galaxies. These observations will place the first kinematic constraints on evolutionary models for dwarf galaxies.

  17. What are IRAS galaxies? an optical answer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, V. S.; Allen, D. A.; Norris, R. P.; Roche, P. F.

    A survey of the optical spectra of IRAS galaxies, made with the AAT, has shown that the majority have strong emission lines. Ratios of the emission lines have been plotted on the Veilleux-Osterbrock diagram (forbidden O III/H-beta against forbidden N II/H-alpha); this shows that the IRAS galaxies comprise several classes. In this sample, the majority appear to be starburst galaxies, but Seyfert, Liner, and narrow-line galaxies are also represented. Coadded spectra of the galaxy classes are presented. On the basis of optical spectroscopy, it appears that the starburst phenomenon is capable of generating luminosities exceeding 10 to the 12th solar luminosities.

  18. Dark Times for the Fluffiest Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Beasley, Michael A.; Burkert, Andreas; Abraham, Roberto G.; Brodie, Jean P.; Deich, Aaron; Martin-navarro, Ignacio; Martinez-Delgado, David; Pota, Vincenzo; Rider, Nicole; Sandoval, Michael; Santhanakrishnan, Vakini; Stone, Maria; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) were recently recognized as an abundant class of low-surface brightness galaxies with unusually large sizes -- found both in galaxy clusters and in the field. The nature and origins of these galaxies are unclear, with one intriguing possibility that some of them are "failed Milky Ways" with massive halos but a paucity of stars. I will present observations of stars and globular clusters in UDGs that constrain their stellar populations and masses -- including evidence for being ultra-rich in dark matter. I will also show results from simulations of UDG formation through ram-pressure stripping of gas-rich disk galaxies.

  19. Catalogue of radial velocities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Galaxies is a survey of radial velocities of redshifts of the galaxies in the universe. It lists all available measurements for each galaxy (including Russian citations) from the measurement of the first radial velocity by Slipher in 1914 through December 1980. It includes optical and radio measurements for all galaxies in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In bringing together uniformly and concisely all published references, the catalogue affords readers the opportunity to evaluate the data and determine which measurement for the radical velocity of each galaxy.

  20. VISTA Views the Sculptor Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    A spectacular new image of the Sculptor Galaxy (NGC 253) has been taken with the ESO VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile as part of one of its first major observational campaigns. By observing in infrared light VISTA's view is less affected by dust and reveals a myriad of cooler stars as well as a prominent bar of stars across the central region. The VISTA image provides much new information on the history and development of the galaxy. The Sculptor Galaxy (NGC 253) lies in the constellation of the same name and is one of the brightest galaxies in the sky. It is prominent enough to be seen with good binoculars and was discovered by Caroline Herschel from England in 1783. NGC 253 is a spiral galaxy that lies about 13 million light-years away. It is the brightest member of a small collection of galaxies called the Sculptor Group, one of the closest such groupings to our own Local Group of galaxies. Part of its visual prominence comes from its status as a starburst galaxy, one in the throes of rapid star formation. NGC 253 is also very dusty, which obscures the view of many parts of the galaxy (eso0902). Seen from Earth, the galaxy is almost edge on, with the spiral arms clearly visible in the outer parts, along with a bright core at its centre. VISTA, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy, the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert, is the world's largest survey telescope. After being handed over to ESO at the end of 2009 (eso0949) the telescope was used for two detailed studies of small sections of the sky before it embarked on the much larger surveys that are now in progress. One of these "mini surveys" was a detailed study of NGC 253 and its environment. As VISTA works at infrared wavelengths it can see right through most of the dust that is such a prominent feature of the Sculptor Galaxy when viewed in visible light. Huge numbers of cooler stars that are barely detectable with visible

  1. Watching a Cannibal Galaxy Dine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    A new technique using near-infrared images, obtained with ESO's 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), allows astronomers to see through the opaque dust lanes of the giant cannibal galaxy Centaurus A, unveiling its "last meal" in unprecedented detail - a smaller spiral galaxy, currently twisted and warped. This amazing image also shows thousands of star clusters, strewn like glittering gems, churning inside Centaurus A. Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the nearest giant, elliptical galaxy, at a distance of about 11 million light-years. One of the most studied objects in the southern sky, by 1847 the unique appearance of this galaxy had already caught the attention of the famous British astronomer John Herschel, who catalogued the southern skies and made a comprehensive list of nebulae. Herschel could not know, however, that this beautiful and spectacular appearance is due to an opaque dust lane that covers the central part of the galaxy. This dust is thought to be the remains of a cosmic merger between a giant elliptical galaxy and a smaller spiral galaxy full of dust. Between 200 and 700 million years ago, this galaxy is indeed believed to have consumed a smaller spiral, gas-rich galaxy - the contents of which appear to be churning inside Centaurus A's core, likely triggering new generations of stars. First glimpses of the "leftovers" of this meal were obtained thanks to observations with the ESA Infrared Space Observatory , which revealed a 16 500 light-year-wide structure, very similar to that of a small barred galaxy. More recently, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope resolved this structure into a parallelogram, which can be explained as the remnant of a gas-rich spiral galaxy falling into an elliptical galaxy and becoming twisted and warped in the process. Galaxy merging is the most common mechanism to explain the formation of such giant elliptical galaxies. The new SOFI images, obtained with the 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory

  2. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji; Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Kilborn, Virginia

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  3. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

  5. Spectral classification of emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Pindao, M.; Maeder, A.; Kunth, D.

    2000-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to further investigate the classification of emission-line galaxies from the ``Spectrophotometric Catalogue of H II galaxies'' by Terlevich et al. (1991) in a homogeneous and objective way, using the three line-ratio diagrams, called diagnostic diagrams, of Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987). On the basis of the resulting catalogue, we critically discuss the classification methods in the optical range. In particular we compare our classification scheme to the one done by Rola et al. (1997) which is efficient for the classification of redshifted galaxies. We also propose a new diagnostic diagram involving the known intensity ratio R23=([O II],l 3727+[O III] l 4959+{[O III] l 5007)/Hb which appears to be a very good criterion allowing to discriminate the Seyfert 2 from H ii galaxies. The revised catalogue including 314 narrow-emission-line galaxies contains H II galaxies, Seyfert 2 galaxies, Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-Line Regions (hereafter LINERs) galaxies and some particular types of galaxies with the most intriguing ones, called ``ambiguous'', due to the ambiguity of their location in the diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies appear as H II galaxies and as active galactic nuclei (hereafter AGNs) in different diagrams of Veilleux & Osterbrock and constitute certainly a sample of particularly interesting candidates for a thorough study of connections between starbursts and AGNs. Available in electronic form only via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  6. Galaxy Clustering Around Nearby Luminous Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Karl B.; Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z approx. less than 0.30) quasars observed with the Wide Field Camera-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST resolution makes possible galaxy identification brighter than V = 24.5 and as close as 1 min or 2 min to the quasar. We find a significant enhancement of galaxies within a projected separation of approx. less than 100 1/h kpc of the quasars. If we model the QSO/galaxy correlation function as a power law with a slope given by the galaxy/galaxy correlation function, we find that the ratio of the QSO/galaxy to galaxy/galaxy correlation functions is 3.8 +/- 0.8. The galaxy counts within r less than 15 1/h kpc of the quasars are too high for the density profile to have an appreciable core radius (approx. greater than 100 1/h kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  7. Stellar Population Gradients in SO Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Leslie C.; Courteau, S.; McDonald, M.; Rose, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of S0 galaxies is a cornerstone of galaxy formation models. This work is a study of the mechanisms involved in the formation and evolution of S0 galaxies through the analysis of radial trends in stellar populations extending far into the galaxies' outskirts. Our analysis is based on new, deep, optical and NIR imaging of a large sample of S0 galaxies covering a wide range of properties. Color gradients, computed from SDSS griz and UH2.2m J & H band imaging beyond 4.5 Re, are matched with stellar population models to derive population ages and metallicity gradients. These trends are compared amongst galaxies of varying properties. The changes in stellar populations with galaxy components (bulge/disk/halo), environment, galaxy mass, concentration, and other structural properties will provide formation models with critical constraints. Intriguingly, we find that ages increase substantially with radius for a large sub-sample of S0 galaxies. In fact, in approximately 25% of our sample, the population age of the galaxies increases by more than 8 Gyr from the center out. We provide tentative interpretations for this and other observed trends, in the context of current galaxy formation scenarios.

  8. Cosmic Collisions: Galaxy Mergers and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura; Willett, Kyle; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Christopher; Whyte, Laura; Lynn, Stuart; Tremonti, Christina A.

    2014-08-01

    Over the years evidence has mounted for a significant mode of galaxy evolution via mergers. This process links gas-rich, spiral galaxies; starbursting galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); post-starburst galaxies; and gas-poor, elliptical galaxies, as objects representing different phases of major galaxy mergers. The post-starburst phase is particularly interesting because nearly every galaxy that evolves from star-forming to quiescent must pass through it. In essence, this phase is a sort of galaxy evolution “bottleneck” that indicates that a galaxy is actively evolving through important physical transitions. In this talk I will present the results from the ‘Galaxy Zoo Quench’ project - using post-starburst galaxies to place observational constraints on the role of mergers and AGN activity in quenching star formation. `Quench’ is the first fully collaborative research project with Zooniverse citizen scientists online; engaging the public in all phases of research, from classification to data analysis and discussion to writing the article and submission to a refereed journal.

  9. Morphologies at High Redshift from Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Simmons, Brooke; Willett, Kyle; Lintott, Chris

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from Galaxy Zoo classification of galaxies observed in public observed frame optical HST surveys (e.g. COSMOS, GOODS) as well as in observed frame NIR with (ie. CANDELS). Early science results from these classifications have investigated the changing bar fraction in disc galaxies as a function of redshift (to z~1 in Melvin et al. 2014; and at z>1 in Simmons et al. 2015), as well as how the morphologies of galaxies on the red sequence have been changing since z~1 (Melvin et al. in prep.). These unique dataset of quantitative visual classifications for high redshift galaxies will be made public in forthcoming publications (planned as Willett et al. for Galaxy Zoo Hubble, and Simmons et al. for Galaxy Zoo CANDELS).

  10. Galaxies, their satellites and progenitors: chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, I.; Cora, S. A.; Padilla, N. D.

    We use a model that combines N-body cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation (SAG: Semi-analytical galaxies; Lagos, Cora & Padilla, 2008) in order to study the properties of galaxy progenitors, using the information provided by their stellar haloes, and surviving satellites at redshift z = 0. We model the formation of stellar haloes by considering tidal stripping events acting on the satellite galaxies before the mergers occur, being able to follow their mass, luminosity and chemical properties. We find that the satellite galaxies have lower metal- licities than the stellar haloes of central galaxies for a given host DM halo mass, as has been already noted by Lagos, Padilla & Cora (2009), using a different approach.

  11. Global properties of infrared bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Judith S.; Xie, Shuding; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Rice, Walter L.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared flux densities of 182 galaxies, including 50 galaxies in the Virgo cluster, were analyzed using IRAS data for 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns, and the results were compared with data listed in the Point Source Catalog (PSC, 1985). In addition, IR luminosities, L(IRs), colors, and warm dust masses were derived for these galaxies and were compared with the interstellar gas masses and optical luminosities of the galaxies. It was found that, for galaxies whose optical diameter measures between 5 and 8 arcmin, the PSC flux densities are underestimated by a factor of 2 at 60 microns, and by a factor of 1.5 at 100 microns. It was also found that, for 49 galaxies, the mass of warm dust correlated well with the H2 mass, and that L(IR) correlated with L(H-alpha), demonstrating that the L(IR) measures the rate of star formation in these galaxies.

  12. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  13. Mass of Galaxies in Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; Chan, R.

    We have compared the frequency distribution of the dynamical observed quantity log (V r), for a sample of 46 pairs of elliptical galaxies, to the distribution of this quantity obtained from numerical simulations of pairs of galaxies. From such an analysis, where we have considered the structure of the galaxies and its influence in the orbital evolution of the system, we have obtained the characteristic mass and the mass-luminosity ratio for the sample. Our results show that the hypothesis of point-mass in elliptical orbits is, for this sample, an approximation as good as the model that takes into account the structure of the galaxies. The statistical method used here gives an estimate of a more reliable mass, it minimizes the contamination of spurious pairs and it considers adequately the contribution of the physical pairs. We have obtained a characteristic mass to the 46 elliptical pairs of 1.68 × 10^12 +/- 7.01 × 10^11 M_solar with M/L = 17.6 +/- 7.3 (H_0 = 60 km s^-1 Mpc^-1).

  14. Dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we treat the problem of the dynamical friction decay of a massive object moving in an elliptical galaxy with a cuspidal inner distribution of the mass density. We present results obtained by both self-consistent, direct summation, N-body simulations, as well as by a new semi-analytical treatment of dynamical friction valid in such cuspy central regions of galaxies. A comparison of these results indicates that the proposed semi-analytical approximation is the only reliable one in cuspy galactic central regions, where the standard Chandrasekhar's local approximation fails and also gives estimates of decay times that are correct at 1% with respect to those given by N-body simulations. The efficiency of dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies is found definitively higher than in core galaxies, especially on more radially elongated satellite orbits. As another relevant result, we find a proportionality of the dynamical friction decay time to the –0.67 power of the satellite mass, M, shallower than the standardly adopted M {sup –1} dependence.

  15. Slow bars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2000-11-01

    Here we put forward some arguments in favour of the existence of slow bars. More then a half of spiral galaxies have in their central regions a bar - a structure in the form of triaxial ellipsoid. Historically two models of the bar were developed - those of the so called ``slow'' and ``fast'' bars. In both cases the bar is in some resonance with the galactic disc region near the bar ends - it is the corotation resonance for a fast bar and the inner Lindblad resonance for a slow bar. For the same angular velocity the fast bar would be larger then the slow bar. Alternatively, for the same size the fast bar would have much higher angular velocity, that being the reason for the terminology used. Up till now, the direct measurement of angular velocity of a bar has been an open problem. This is why all arguments on the nature of bar observed in some particular galaxy are inevitably indirect. Despite the fact that the model of slow bars was developed slightly earlier, the main part of attention was focused on the fast bars. Presently many researchers believe in the existence of the fast bars in real galaxies, while discussions on the existence of the slow bars continue so far. In this Letter we demonstrate that the bar detected in the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 157 is the slow bar.

  16. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called 'superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea. PMID:25186900

  17. Dark matter in massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin

    2013-07-01

    The spatial distributions of luminous and dark matter in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) reflect the formation processes which shaped these systems. This article reviews the predictions of cosmological simulations for the dark and baryonic components of ETGs, and the observational constraints from lensing, hydrostatic X-ray gas atmospheres, and outer halo stellar dynamics.

  18. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  19. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called `superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

  20. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  1. Dying radio galaxies in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Parma, P.; Mack, K.-H.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Fanti, R.; Govoni, F.; Tarchi, A.; Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present a study of five "dying" nearby (z ≤ 0.2) radio galaxies belonging to both the WENSS minisurvey and the B2 bright catalogs WNB1734+6407, WNB1829+6911, WNB1851+5707, B2 0120+33, and B2 1610+29. Methods: These sources have been selected on the basis of their extremely steep broad-band radio spectra, which strongly indicates that either these objects belong to the rare class of dying radio galaxies or we are observing "fossil" radio plasma remaining from a previous instance of nuclear activity. We derive the relative duration of the dying phase from the fit of a synchrotron radiative model to the radio spectra of the sources. Results: The modeling of the integrated spectra and the deep spectral index images obtained with the VLA confirmed that in these sources the central engine has ceased to be active for a significant fraction of their lifetime, although their extended lobes have not yet completely faded away. We found that WNB1851+5707 is in reality composed of two distinct dying galaxies, which appear blended together as a single source in the WENSS. In the cases of WNB1829+6911 and B2 0120+33, the fossil radio lobes are seen in conjunction with a currently active core. A very faint core is also detected in a MERLIN image of WNB1851+5707a, one of the two dying sources composing WNB1851+5707. We found that all sources in our sample are located (at least in projection) at the center of an X-ray emitting cluster. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the duration of the dying phase for a radio source in a cluster can be significantly higher than that of a radio galaxy in the field, although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small number statistics involved. The simplest interpretation of the tendency for dying galaxies to be found in clusters is that the low-frequency radio emission from the fading radio lobes lasts longer if their expansion is somewhat reduced or even stopped. Another possibility is that the occurrence of dying

  2. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  3. On the occurrence of galaxy harassment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, D.; Lisker, T.; Olczak, C.; Spurzem, R.; Kotulla, R.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Tidal interactions of galaxies in galaxy clusters have been proposed as one potential explanation of the morphology-density relation at low masses. Earlier studies have shown that galaxy harassment is a suitable mechanism for inducing a morphological transformation from low-mass late-type disk galaxies to the abundant early-type galaxies. Aims: The efficiency of tidal transformation is expected to depend strongly on the orbit of a galaxy within the cluster halo. The orbit determines both the strength of the cluster's global tidal field and the probability of encounters with other cluster members. Here we aim to explore these dependencies. Methods: We use a combination of N-body simulation and Monte-Carlo method to study the efficiency of the transformation of late-type galaxies by tidal interactions on different orbits in a galaxy cluster. Additionally, we investigate the effect of an inclination between the disk of the infalling galaxy and its orbital plane. We compare our results to observational data to assess the possible relevance of such transformations for the existing cluster galaxy population. Results: We find that galaxies that entered a cluster from the outskirts are unlikely to be significantly transformed (stellar mass loss ≤6%). Closer to the cluster centre, tidal interactions are a more efficient mechanism (stellar mass loss up to 50%) for producing harassed galaxies. The inclination of the disk can reduce the mass loss significantly, yet it amplifies the thickening of the galaxy disk. Galaxies with smaller sizes on intermediate orbits are nearly unaffected by tidal interactions. The tidal influence on an infalling galaxy and the likelihood that it leads to galaxy harassment make a very stochastical process that depends on the galaxy's specific history. Conclusions: We conclude that harassment is a suitable mechanism that could explain the transformation of at least a fraction of galaxies inside galaxy clusters. However, the transformation

  4. The role of submillimetre galaxies in galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Erin Alexandra

    2007-08-01

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study of high redshift submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) using the deepest multi-wavelength observations. The submm sample consists of galaxies detected at 850 mm with the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey- North region. Using the deep Spitzer Space Telescope images and new data and reductions of the Very Large Array radio data, I find statistically secure counterparts for 60% of the submm sample, and identify tentative counterparts for most of the remaining objects. This is the largest sample of submm galaxies with statistically secure counterparts detected in the radio and with Spitzer . This thesis presents spectral energy distributions (SEDs), Spitzer colours, and infrared (IR) luminosities for the SMGs. A composite rest-frame SED shows that the submm sources peak at longer wavelengths than those of local ultraluminous IR galaxies (ULIRGs), i.e. they appear to be cooler than local ULIRGs of the same luminosity. This demonstrates the strong selection effects, both locally and at high redshift, which may lead to an incomplete census of the ULIRG population. The SEDs of submm galaxies are also different from those of their high redshift neighbours, the near-IR selected BzK galaxies, whose mid-IR to radio SEDs are more like those of local ULIRGs. I fit templates that span the mid-IR through radio to derive the integrated 1R luminosities of the submm galaxies and find a median value of L IR (8-1000 mm) = 6.0 x 10 12 [Special characters omitted.] . I also find that submm flux densities by themselves systematically overpredict L IR when using templates which obey the local ULIRG temperature-luminosity relation. The SED fits show that SMGs are consistent with the correlation between radio and IR luminosity observed in local galaxies. Because the shorter Spitzer wavelengths sample the stellar bump at the redshifts of the submm sources, one can obtain a model independent

  5. Galaxy formation in an Omega = 1 cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardeen, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A model for galaxy formation is proposed which assumes that bright galaxies form where the primordial density fluctuations exceed a high threshold. Most of the mass in the universe is uncondensed or associated with low surface brightness galaxies. Physical mechanisms and predicitons for the galaxy-galaxy correlation function are discussed.

  6. The Superwind Galaxy NGC 4666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The galaxy NGC 4666 takes pride of place at the centre of this new image, made in visible light with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. NGC 4666 is a remarkable galaxy with very vigorous star formation and an unusual "superwind" of out-flowing gas. It had previously been observed in X-rays by the ESA XMM-Newton space telescope, and the image presented here was taken to allow further study of other objects detected in the earlier X-ray observations. The prominent galaxy NGC 4666 in the centre of the picture is a starburst galaxy, about 80 million light-years from Earth, in which particularly intense star formation is taking place. The starburst is thought to be caused by gravitational interactions between NGC 4666 and its neighbouring galaxies, including NGC 4668, visible to the lower left. These interactions often spark vigorous star-formation in the galaxies involved. A combination of supernova explosions and strong winds from massive stars in the starburst region drives a vast flow of gas from the galaxy into space - a so-called "superwind". The superwind is huge in scale, coming from the bright central region of the galaxy and extending for tens of thousands of light-years. As the superwind gas is very hot it emits radiation mostly as X-rays and in the radio part of the spectrum and cannot be seen in visible light images such as the one presented here. This image was made as part of a follow-up to observations made with the ESA XMM-Newton space telescope in X-rays. NGC 4666 was the target of the original XMM-Newton observations, but thanks to the telescope's wide field-of-view many other X-ray sources were also seen in the background. One such serendipitous detection is a faint galaxy cluster seen close to the bottom edge of the image, right of centre. This cluster is much further away from us than NGC 4666, at a distance of about three billion light-years. In order to fully understand the nature of

  7. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the life and times of L★ galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Driver, S. P.; Sansom, A. E.; Baldry, I. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Colless, M.; Christodoulou, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Grootes, M. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Norberg, P.; Loveday, J.; Phillipps, S.; Sharp, R.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we investigate in detail the effects the local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6150 galaxies are visually classified to determine the emission features, morphological type and presence of a disc. This large sample allows for the significant characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo; the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1; otherwise, we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and while the star-forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky Way halo mass groups. Low-mass haloes, and in particular Local Group mass haloes, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, while pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.

  9. How absorption selected galaxies trace the general high-redshift galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise

    2015-08-01

    Strong absorption lines seen in quasar spectra arise when the lines of sight to the quasars intersect intervening galaxies. The associated metal absorption lines from the strongest absorption lines, the damped Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs), allow us to trace the metallicity of galaxies back to redshifts z>5. Typical metallicities range from 0.1-100% solar metallicities with a huge scatter at any given redshift. Understanding the nature of galaxies that host DLAs is one strategy to probe the early phase and origin of stars in the outskirts of present-day galaxy disks.The search for emission from the elusive high-redshift DLA galaxies has reached a mature state now that we have determined how to best identify the absorbing galaxies. From a growing number of emission-line detections from DLA galaxies at redshifts ranging between 0.1 and 3, we can analyse galaxies in both absorption and emission, and probe the gas-phase metallicities in the outskirts and halos of the galaxies.By combining information for galaxies seen in emission and absorption, I will show that there is a relation between DLA metallicities and the host galaxy luminosities similar to the well-known the mass-metallicity relation for luminosity selected galaxies. This implies that DLA galaxies are drawn from the general population of low- to intermediate mass galaxies. We can determine a metallicity gradient in the extended halo of the galaxies out to ~40 kpc, and this allows us to reproduce observed galaxy correlation functions derived from conventional samples of luminosity selected galaxies.

  10. The Topsy-Turvy Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    The captivating appearance of this image of the starburst galaxy NGC 1313, taken with the FORS instrument at ESO's Very Large Telescope, belies its inner turmoil. The dense clustering of bright stars and gas in its arms, a sign of an ongoing boom of star births, shows a mere glimpse of the rough times it has seen. Probing ever deeper into the heart of the galaxy, astronomers have revealed many enigmas that continue to defy our understanding. ESO PR Photo 43a/06 ESO PR Photo 43a/06 The Topsy-Turvy Galaxy NGC 1313 This FORS image of the central parts of NGC 1313 shows a stunning natural beauty. The galaxy bears some resemblance to some of the Milky Way's closest neighbours, the Magellanic Clouds. NGC 1313 has a barred spiral shape, with the arms emanating outwards in a loose twist from the ends of the bar. The galaxy lies just 15 million light-years away from the Milky Way - a mere skip on cosmological scales. The spiral arms are a hotbed of star-forming activity, with numerous young clusters of hot stars being born continuously at a staggering rate out of the dense clouds of gas and dust. Their light blasts through the surrounding gas, creating an intricately beautiful pattern of light and dark nebulosity. But NGC 1313 is not just a pretty picture. A mere scratch beneath the elegant surface reveals evidence of some of the most puzzling problems facing astronomers in the science of stars and galaxies. Starburst galaxies are fascinating objects to study in their own right; in neighbouring galaxies, around one quarter of all massive stars are born in these powerful engines, at rates up to a thousand times higher than in our own Milky Way Galaxy. In the majority of starbursts the upsurge in star's births is triggered when two galaxies merge, or come too close to each other. The mutual attraction between the galaxies causes immense turmoil in the gas and dust, causing the sudden 'burst' in star formation. ESO PR Photo 43b/06 ESO PR Photo 43b/06 Larger View of NGC 1313

  11. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q.; Sheldon, Erin S.

    2013-08-20

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  12. Galaxy Evolution Across The Redshift Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulla, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    GALEV evolutionary synthesis models are an ideal tool to study the formation and evolution of galaxies. I present a large model grid that contains undisturbed E and Sa-Sd type galaxies as well as a wide range of models undergoing starbursts of various strengths and at different times and also includes the subsequent post-starburst phases for these galaxies. This model grid not only allows to describe and refine currently used color selection criteria for Lyman Break Galaxies, BzK galaxies, Extremely Red Objects (ERO) and both Distant and Luminous Red Galaxies (DRG, LRG). It also gives accurate stellar masses, gas fractions, star formation rates, metallicities and burst strengths for an unprecedentedly large sample of galaxies with multi-band photometry. We find, amongst other things, that LBGs are most likely progenitors of local early type spiral galaxies and low-mass ellipticals. We are for the first time able to reproduce E+A features in EROs by post-starbursts as an alternative to dusty starforming galaxies and predict how to discriminate between these scenarios. Our results from photometric analyses perfectly agree with all available spectroscopic information and open up a much wider perspective, including the bulk of the less luminous and more typical galaxy population, in the redshift desert and beyond. All model data are available online at http://www.galev.org.

  13. Forty Years of Research on Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J.

    2010-10-01

    Isolated galaxies have not been a hot topic over the past four decades. This is partly due to uncertainties about their existence. Are there galaxies isolated enough to be interesting? Do they exist in sufficient numbers to be statistically useful? Most attempts to compile isolated galaxy lists were marginally successful-too small number and not very isolated galaxies. If really isolated galaxies do exist then their value becomes obvious in a Universe where effects of interactions and environment (i.e. nurture) are important. They provide a means for better quantifying effects of nurture. The Catalog of Isolated Galaxies (CIG) compiled by Valentina Karachentseva appeared near the beginning of the review period. It becomes the focus of this review because of its obvious strengths and because the AMIGA project has increased its utility through a refinement (a vetted CIG). It contains almost 1000 galaxies with nearest neighbor crossing times of 1--3 Gyr. It is large enough to serve as a zero-point or control sample. The galaxies in the CIG (and the distribution of galaxy types) may be significantly different than those in even slightly richer environments. The AMIGA-CIG, and future iterations, may be able to tell us something about galaxy formation. It may also allow us to better define intrinsic (natural) correlations like e.g. Fisher-Tully and FIR-OPTICAL. Correlations can be better defined when the dispersion added by external stimuli (nurture) is minimized or removed.

  14. The dynamics of isolated Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-03-01

    We measured velocities of 862 individual red giant stars in seven isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group: NGC 6822, IC 1613, VV 124 (UGC 4879), the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216), Leo A, Cetus and Aquarius (DDO 210). We also computed velocity dispersions, taking into account the measurement uncertainties on individual stars. None of the isolated galaxies is denser than the densest Local Group satellite galaxy. Furthermore, the isolated dwarf galaxies have no obvious distinction in the velocity dispersion-half-light radius plane from the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and M31. The similarity of the isolated and satellite galaxies' dynamics and structural parameters imposes limitations on environmental solutions to the `too big to fail' problem, wherein there are fewer dense dwarf satellite galaxies than would be expected from cold dark matter simulations. This data set also has many other applications for dwarf galaxy evolution, including the transformation of dwarf irregular into dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We intend to explore these issues in future work.

  15. Morphology and Structures of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mira; Ann, HongBae

    2015-08-01

    We performed an analysis of the structure of nearby dwarf galaxies based on a 2-dimensional decomposition of galaxy images using GALFIT. The present sample consists of ~1,100 dwarf galaxies with redshift less than z = 0.01, which is is derived from the morphology catalog of the Visually classified galaxies in the local universe (Ann, Seo, and Ha 2015). In this catalog, dwarf galaxies are divided into 5 subtypes: dS0, dE, dSph, dEbc, dEblue with distinction of the presence of nucleation in dE, dSph, and dS0. We found that dSph and dEblue galaxies are fainter than other subtypes of dwarf galaxies. In most cases, single component, represented by the Sersic profile with n=1~1.5, well describes the luminosity distribution of dwarf galaxies in the present sample. However, a significant fraction of dS0, dEbc, and dEbue galaxies show sub-structures such as spiral arms and rings. We will discuss the morphology dependent evolutionary history of the local dwarf galaxies.

  16. THE GALACTIC SPIN OF AGN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Hernandez, X.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: xavier@astroscu.unam.mx

    2011-07-01

    Using an extensive sample of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5, we compare the angular momentum distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with non-AGN hosting late-type galaxies. To this end we characterize galactic spin through the dimensionless angular momentum parameter {lambda}, which we estimate through simple dynamical considerations. Using a volume-limited sample, we find a considerable difference when comparing the empirical distributions of {lambda} for AGNs and non-AGN galaxies, the AGNs showing typically low {lambda} values and associated dispersions, while non-AGNs present higher {lambda} values and a broader distribution. A more striking difference is found when looking at {lambda} distributions in thin M{sub r} cuts; while the spin of non-AGN galaxies presents an anticorrelation with M{sub r} , with bright (massive) galaxies having low spins, AGN host galaxies present uniform values of {lambda} at all magnitudes, a behavior probably imposed by the fact that most late-type AGN galaxies present a narrow range in color, with a typical constant {lambda} value. We also find that the fraction of AGN hosting galaxies in our sample strongly depends on galactic spin, increasing dramatically for decreasing {lambda}. For AGN host galaxies, we compute the mass of their supermassive black holes and find that this value tends to be higher for low spin galaxies, even at fixed luminosity, a result that could account, to a certain extent, for the spread on the luminosity-black-hole mass relation.

  17. GEMS: The destiny of Blue Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häußler, Boris; Bell, Eric F.; Barden, Marco; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Borch, Andrea; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; Koposov, Sergey E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Wolf, Christian

    2007-05-01

    One of the key predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation models is that a significant fraction of elliptical galaxies form in late merging events. One of the most important observations of such an assembly is the existence of blue spheroidal galaxies, which have spheroid-dominated morphologies and blue colors indicating recent star formation, as an intermediate step in the evolution of elliptical galaxies. We present results from the GEMS survey showing the properties of these galaxies derived from 2-D galaxy fitting of the ˜8000 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 28'x28' HST mosaic. For the first time we were able to divide the observed population of blue elliptical galaxies into sub-populations of different stellar masses. We found that massive blue ellipticals are likely to be the progenitors of red elliptical galaxies while low-mass blue ellipticals have half-light radii considerably in excess of those measured for low-mass present day elliptical galaxies and instead have larger sizes similar to present-day disk-dominated systems with substantial bulges (see Figure)

  18. Baby Galaxies in the Adult Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This artist's conception illustrates the decline in our universe's 'birth-rate' over time. When the universe was young, massive galaxies were forming regularly, like baby bees in a bustling hive. In time, the universe bore fewer and fewer 'offspring,' and newborn galaxies (white circles) matured into older ones more like our own Milky Way (spirals).

    Previously, astronomers thought that the universe had ceased to give rise to massive, young galaxies, but findings from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer suggest that may not be the case. Surveying thousands of nearby galaxies with its highly sensitive ultraviolet eyes, the telescope spotted three dozen that greatly resemble youthful galaxies from billions of years ago. In this illustration, those galaxies are represented as white circles on the right, or 'today' side of the timeline.

    The discovery not only suggests that our universe may still be alive with youth, but also offers astronomers their first close-up look at what appear to be baby galaxies. Prior to the new result, astronomers had to peer about 11 billion light-years into the distant universe to see newborn galaxies. The newfound galaxies are only about 2 to 4 billion light-years away.

  19. Exploring Dwarf Galaxy Evolution through Metallicity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    As the most numerous type of galaxy, dwarf galaxies are ideal for examining galactic evolution on small scales. Additional clues to galactic evolution come from the metallicity distribution function (MDF), which is influenced by the star formation, accretion, outflows and galaxy interactions. We derived stellar MDFs for the Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies using HST images in order to examine how their evolution compares as a function of various galaxy properties. These galaxies span a range of different morphologies, masses, SFHs and distances from the MW. We fit a simple evolution model and an accretion model to the MDFs in order to quantify the effect of gas flows and enrichment within the galaxies. The MDFs of Leo II (dSph), Phoenix (dTrans) and IC 1613 (dIr) have similar shapes, though their peak metallicities differ. Additionally, we find the accretion model, over the simple model, is a better fit chemical evolution model for these three galaxies. However these best fit accretion models do not require a significant amount of additional gas to explain the MDF shapes. In contrast the chemical evolution model that best fits the narrow MDF of Leo I implies twice the additional gas accretion. The similarities in the MDF shapes of Leo II, Phoenix and IC 1613, even though these galaxies all have different morphologies, implies that the current morphology is not the driving factor in shaping the MDF of these galaxies.

  20. Galaxy-CMB and galaxy-galaxy lensing on large scales: Sensitivity to primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2009-12-01

    A convincing detection of primordial non-Gaussianity in the local form of the bispectrum, whose amplitude is given by the fNL parameter, offers a powerful test of inflation. In this paper, we calculate the modification of two-point cross-correlation statistics of weak lensing—galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy-cosmic microwave background (CMB) crosscorrelation—due to fNL. We derive and calculate the covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy lensing, including cosmic variance terms. We focus on large scales (l<100) for which the shape noise of the shear measurement becomes irrelevant and cosmic variance dominates the error budget. For a modest degree of non-Gaussianity, fNL=±50 modifications of the galaxy-galaxy-lensing signal at the 10% level are seen on scales R˜300Mpc, and grow rapidly toward larger scales as ∝R2. We also see a clear signature of the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the matter power spectrum at ˜150Mpc, which can be measured by next-generation lensing experiments. In addition, we can probe the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity in the galaxy-CMB lensing signal by correlating the lensing potential reconstructed from CMB with high-z galaxies. For example, for fNL=±50, we find that the galaxy-CMB lensing cross-power spectrum is modified by ˜10% at l˜40, and by a factor of 2 at l˜10, for a population of galaxies at z=2 with a bias of 2. The effect is greater for more highly biased populations at larger z; thus, high-z galaxy surveys cross correlated with CMB offer a yet another probe of primordial non-Gaussianity.

  1. New Identifications of Fe IX, Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, and Fe XIII Lines in the Spectrum of Procyon Observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lepson, J. K.; Desai, P.; Díaz, F.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2014-02-01

    We have analyzed 280 ks of co-added observations performed with Chandra's Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer using theoretical spectra of Fe VIII through Fe XVII. The model spectral data were produced by combining collisional excitation data generated with the Flexible Atomic Code and transition energies generated with a relativistic code based on the multi-reference Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. The spectroscopic accuracy of the theoretical Fe IX wavelengths was ascertained in a comparison with existing laboratory measurements. We find several new Fe IX lines in the 100-140 Å region and confirm two previous identifications. We also have identified a new line from Fe X near 111 Å several weak features near 102 Å may also be ascribed to Fe X. A line near 100.5 Å is identified as originating from Fe XI; a neighboring feature near 101 Å may also be from Fe XI. A cluster of three weak lines between 117 and 118 Å may be ascribed to Fe XII. Two lines near 104 and 106 Å, respectively, have been assigned to Fe XIII. In addition, we confirmed the presence of two out of four Fe VIII lines that were thought to exist in the spectrum. These two lines are located near 131 Å. The Fe IX emission is weakly sensitive to the assumed electron density, while the Fe XIII is strongly dependent on density. We find that a density between 109 and 1010 cm-3 provides the best fit to the Procyon spectrum. We note that several of the new identifications have come at the expense of prior assignments to magnesium or calcium lines, removing evidence for the presence of these elements in this spectral region. No evidence for Fe XVIII, Fe XIX, or Fe XX was found.

  2. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor and factor XII mutation: a series of 57 patients from the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Deroux, A; Boccon-Gibod, I; Fain, O; Pralong, P; Ollivier, Y; Pagnier, A; Djenouhat, K; Du-Thanh, A; Gompel, A; Faisant, C; Launay, D; Bouillet, L

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease associated with either a quantitative or qualitative deficiency in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) or normal C1-INH. HAE with normal C1-INH is associated in 20% of cases with mutations in the gene for factor XII (FXII) or FXII-HAE. A recent review described 41 families, including 14 German and 15 Spanish families. We have constructed a register of French patients and their characteristics. A national survey was launched through the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema (CREAK) to study the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of patients with HAE linked to a mutation of FXII gene. Fifty-seven patients were identified from 24 different families. In most cases they were young women (mean age at diagnosis: 31 years, mean age at first symptom: 21 years, female/male ratio: 76%). Twenty-one per cent of the patients experienced angioedema attacks only during pregnancy or when on oestrogen contraception. Sixty-three per cent had attacks at all times, but they were more severe during these same periods. Male carriers of the mutation were more frequently asymptomatic than females (P = 0·003). C1-INH concentrate and icatibant were both effective for treating attacks. The prophylactic use of tranexamic acid led to a 64% decrease in the number of attacks. This is one of the largest series reported of HAE patients with FXII mutation. The therapeutic management appeared to be identical to that of HAE with C1-INH deficiency. PMID:27271546

  3. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic investigations on carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII of a thioureido analog of SLC-0111.

    PubMed

    Lomelino, Carrie L; Mahon, Brian P; McKenna, Robert; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    SLC-0111 (4-(4-fluorophenylureido)-benzenesulfonamide) is the first carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) IX inhibitor to reach phase I clinical trials as an antitumor/antimetastatic agent. Here we report a kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study of a congener of SLC-0111 which incorporates a thioureido instead of ureido linker between the two aromatic rings as inhibitor of four physiologically relevant CA isoforms. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido derivative was a weak hCA I and II inhibitor and a potent one against hCA IX and XII. X-ray crystallography of its adduct with hCA II and comparison of the structure with that of other five hCA II-sulfonamide adducts belonging to the SLC-0111 series, afforded us to understand the particular inhibition profile of the new sulfonamide. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido sulfonamide primarily interacted with the hydrophobic side of the hCA II active site, with the tail participating in van der Waals interactions with Phe131 and Pro202, in addition to the coordination of the deprotonated sulfonamide to the active site metal ion. On the contrary, the tail of other sulfonamides belonging to the SLC-0111 series (2-isopropyl-phenyl; 3-nitrophenyl) were orientated towards the hydrophilic half of the active site, which was correlated with orders of magnitude better inhibitory activity against hCA II, and a loss of selectivity for the inhibition of the tumor-associated CAs. PMID:26810836

  4. Multiwavelength Study of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh

    2010-08-01

    Seyfert galaxies are a subclass of active galaxies and are categorized as nearby, low luminosity, radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) hosted in spiral or lenticular galaxies. Demographically, Seyfert galaxies may account for ~ 10% of the entire population of active galaxies in the nearby universe. Seyfert galaxies are classified mainly into two subclasses named as `type 1' and `type 2' Seyferts, based on the presence and absence of broad permitted emission lines in their optical spectra, respectively. Detection of broad permitted emission lines in some Seyfert type 2s observed in the polarized light laid the foundation of the Seyfert unification scheme, which hypothesizes that Seyfert type 1s and type 2s belong to the same parent population and appear different solely due to the differing orientations of the obscuring material having a torus-like geometry around the AGN (Antonucci and Miller 1985; Antonucci 1993). The primary objective of this thesis work is to examine the validity and limitations of the orientation and obscuration based Seyfert unification scheme using multiwavelength (mainly X-ray and radio) observations. The key issue in testing the Seyfert unification scheme has been acquiring a well defined rigorously selected Seyfert sample. I have argued that the Seyfert samples based on flux limited surveys at optical, IR, UV and X-ray are likely to be biased against obscured and faint sources. In order to test the predictions of Seyfert unification scheme I use a sample based on properties (i.e., cosmological redshift, [OIII] emission line luminosity, absolute bulge magnitude, absolute stellar magnitude of the host galaxy and the Hubble stage of the host galaxy) that are independent to the orientation of the obscuring torus, host galaxy and the AGN axis. Furthermore, two Seyfert subtypes of our sample have matched distributions in the orientation-independent properties and this ensures the intrinsic similarity between two Seyfert subtypes within the

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  6. Spectrophotometry of Seyfert 2 galaxies and narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koski, A. T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for a spectrophotometric survey of several Seyfert 2 galaxies, intermediate Seyferts, and narrow-line radio galaxies. The emission-line spectra of the galaxies are analyzed, emphasizing line intensities, reddening, temperatures, densities, line strength correlations, line widths, and redshift differences. The continuous spectra are examined, and possible ionization sources are considered. It is found that: (1) there are no distinguishing differences between the spectra of Seyfert 2 galaxies and narrow-line radio galaxies; (2) the emission spectra are rich in lines from a wide range of ionization levels; (3) the continuum is starlight diluted by an underlying continuous spectrum; (4) the line widths of both classes of galaxies have the same distribution; (5) there appear to be regions of high and low ionization in the Seyfert 2 and narrow-line radio galaxies; (6) photoionization seems quite likely as the energy input to the gas; and (7) all the galaxies show a UV excess in their spectra.

  7. Supernovae and the formation of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the cumulative effect of many SNs in a galaxy, especially a young galaxy, as well as the effect of the blast wave resulting from the combination of all individual SNs on the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is suggested that the IGM can be shock-heated by this process, so that in the late stages of an individual expanding galaxy's shock a shell may form whose mass is many times greater than that of the seed galaxy. If this shell fragments, due to gravitational instability, it will give rise to a new generation of galaxies. SN explosions may thereby provide a hydrodynamic amplifier of some significance in the process of galaxy formation.

  8. Galaxy evolution in clusters since z=1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Salamanca, A.

    2011-11-01

    It is now 30 years since Alan Dressler published his seminal paper onthe morphology-density relation. Although there is still much to learnon the effect of the environment on galaxy evolution, extensive progress has been made since then both observationally and theoretically.Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature'' vs. "nurture'' in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the universe was half its present age.Many of the results presented here have been obtainedwithin the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  9. Blue star-forming isolated elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerna, I.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Avila-Reese, V.; Abonza-Sane, J.; del Olmo, A.

    2016-06-01

    The isolated environment seems to favor the formation of blue, star-forming galaxies that are not observed in a high-density environment such as the Coma supercluster. These galaxies, with masses between 7 × 10^9 and 2 × 10^10 h‑2 Msun, are also the youngest galaxies from a sample of isolated elliptical galaxies with light-weighted stellar ages ˜1 < Gyr and exhibit bluer colors toward the galaxy center. Around 30-60% of their present-day luminosity, but only <5% of their present-day mass, is due to star formation in the last 1 Gyr. The color and star-formation activity in these galaxies could be explained by rejuvenation of ellipticals by recent (<1 Gyr) cold gas accretion.

  10. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky and reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is assembled from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's All-Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog,; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The colors represent how the many galaxies appear at three distinct wavelengths of infrared light (blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns). Quite evident are the many galactic clusters and superclusters, as well as some streamers composing the large-scale structure of the nearby universe. The blue overlay represents the very close and bright stars from our own Milky Way galaxy. In this projection, the bluish Milky Way lies predominantly toward the upper middle and edges of the image.

  11. Primeval galaxies and cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Szalay, Alexander S.

    1987-01-01

    In the context of the cold dark matter theory for the large-scale matter distribution, the onset of galaxy formation is a gradual process, with star formation being initiated at z = about 10 and reaching a peak for luminous galaxies at z = about 1. The mass function of galaxy cores matches the observed quasar luminosity function at z = 2-3. Primeval galaxies are envisaged as a collection of many interacting and merging clumps, attaining a peak luminosity that is an order of magnitude below that achieved in models in which galaxy formation is initiated abruptly. Hence, ongoing searches for primeval galaxies would not necessarily have been successful unless they are designed to find moderately low-luminosity, low-surface-brigtness extended objects at low redshift.

  12. Cosmology with void-galaxy correlations.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Sutter, P M; Lavaux, Guilhem; Warren, Michael S

    2014-01-31

    Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids. PMID:24580436

  13. On dynamic gas ablation from spherical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepveu, M.

    1981-05-01

    Two-dimensional, time dependent gas dynamic calculations are presented on the transonic motion of galaxies through a cluster medium. Lea and De Young's (1976) calculations are extended to include violent behavior in the center. On time scales of 10 to the 8th yr, galaxies in clusters can already lose a significant fraction of their gaseous content (up to 50% has been found in the calculations). This dynamic ablation occurs through rarefaction rather than shock heating. Explosions in spherical galaxies become effective as mechanisms for gas removal only if the galaxy moves with respect to its surroundings. Speculations are made on stripping of spiral galaxies (moving head-on in a cluster); the Gunn and Gott (1972) stripping formula is put to doubt. A method is suggested to obtain information on the state of motion of field galaxies.

  14. SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access. SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

  15. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  16. Reconstructing galaxy histories from globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael J.; Côté, Patrick; Marzke, Ronald O.; Jordán, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Nearly a century after the true nature of galaxies as distant `island universes' was established, their origin and evolution remain great unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. One of the most promising ways to investigate galaxy formation is to study the ubiquitous globular star clusters that surround most galaxies. Globular clusters are compact groups of up to a few million stars. They generally formed early in the history of the Universe, but have survived the interactions and mergers that alter substantially their parent galaxies. Recent advances in our understanding of the globular cluster systems of the Milky Way and other galaxies point to a complex picture of galaxy genesis driven by cannibalism, collisions, bursts of star formation and other tumultuous events.

  17. Reconstructing galaxy histories from globular clusters.

    PubMed

    West, Michael J; Côté, Patrick; Marzke, Ronald O; Jordán, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Nearly a century after the true nature of galaxies as distant 'island universes' was established, their origin and evolution remain great unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. One of the most promising ways to investigate galaxy formation is to study the ubiquitous globular star clusters that surround most galaxies. Globular clusters are compact groups of up to a few million stars. They generally formed early in the history of the Universe, but have survived the interactions and mergers that alter substantially their parent galaxies. Recent advances in our understanding of the globular cluster systems of the Milky Way and other galaxies point to a complex picture of galaxy genesis driven by cannibalism, collisions, bursts of star formation and other tumultuous events. PMID:14702077

  18. Galaxy evolution: The Milky Way perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on the evolution of the Galaxy are presented. The individual topics addressed include: the possibility of a merger in the Galactic past; the age and formation redshift of the Galaxy; starcounts as a probe of Galactic structure; the history of the Galactic bulge; kinematics, chemistry, and stellar populations; Monte Carlo analyses of biased Galactic structure data; dynamical history of the Galactic disk; globular cluster kinematics; destruction of globular clusters in the Galaxy. Also discussed are: globular clusters of the outer halo as probes of the Galaxy's structure and early evolution; measuring relative ages of Galactic globular clusters; accretion-induced heating of disks in galaxies; formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge and halo; history of halo gas in normal galaxies.

  19. Clustering of galaxies in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameeda, Mir; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the clustering of galaxies using a modified Newtonian potential. This modification of the Newtonian potential occurs due to the existence of extra dimensions in brane world models. We will analyze a system of galaxies interacting with each other through this modified Newtonian potential. The partition function for this system of galaxies will be calculated, and this partition function will be used to calculate the free energy of this system of galaxies. The entropy and the chemical potential for this system will also be calculated. We will derive explicit expression for the clustering parameter for this system. This parameter will determine the behavior of this system, and we will be able to express various thermodynamic quantities using this clustering parameter. Thus, we will be able to explicitly analyze the effect that modifying the Newtonian potential can have on the clustering of galaxies. We also analyse the effect of extra dimensions on the two-point functions between galaxies.

  20. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.