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Sample records for galaxies sdss galaxies

  1. Reconstruction of SDSS Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Obric, M.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present The SDSS Multiple Offspring Recombination Engine (SMORE), a newly developed code that automatically and interactively recombines galaxies fragmented by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Photo pipeline. The SDSS software was optimized for the faint-end of the brightness limit and tends to over-deblend galaxies with angular sizes over 2 arcmin, sometimes separating spiral arms and HII regions from their parent galaxies. This process can remove a large percentage of the flux from the galaxy and bias datasets due to incorrect photometry. SMORE automatically builds galaxies from the fragments ("children"). Decisions on which child to include are made on the basis of its g-r and r-i color (relative to the mean colors of the largest galaxy children), size, distance to the center of the galaxy, type (as assigned by SDSS Photo) and the position angle. If there are pieces for which a decision cannot be made and their relative flux is more than 5% of the total flux of the galaxy, the interactive SMORE gives a user option to manually choose which of those children should be included. Recombined galaxies are built on a clean background without foreground and background objects and new photometry is performed.

  2. HI Selected Galaxies in SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Disney, M. J.; SDSS Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of HI selected galaxies that fall within both the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By comparing optical properties derived from SDSS with the HI properties from HIPASS, we are able to observe relationships between the cool gas and the stellar populations. We investigate how various physical parameters such as color, morphology, gas fraction, baryonic mass, dynamical mass, and surface brightness correlate with each other. This provides an important sample that can be used to study the factors that play a role in star formation efficiency. This study also allows us to compare the differences between HI and optically selected samples.

  3. HI Selected Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew A.; Garcia-Appadoo, Diego A.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Disney, Mike J.

    2005-04-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of HI selected galaxies that fall within both the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By comparing the optical properties derived from the SDSS 5-band photometry with the HI properties from HIPASS, we are able to probe the relationship between the stellar populations and the neutral gas over a range of Hubble types. Our HIPASS/SDSS catalog provides a uniform, homogeneous data set that can be used to investigate the factors that contribute to star formation on global scales. In addition, the construction of this catalog has led to a set of tools to aid in the analysis of large nearby galaxies in the SDSS. We have identified a significant group of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, not included in most SDSS studies. A preliminary comparison of the integrated colors of these LSB galaxies with population synthesis models reveals that many of these galaxies are not well described by simple models of star formation. Further work is needed to constrain the star formation histories of these objects.

  4. The intrinsic shape of galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Silvio; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2013-09-01

    By modelling the axis ratio distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 galaxies, we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026} in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of 0.267 ± 0.009, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of 0.215 ± 0.013. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of 0.584 ± 0.006, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlopers present in samples with morphological information from photometric profiles. These interlopers are removed when selecting ellipticals using Galaxy Zoo data. We find that the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and their dust extinction vary with absolute magnitude, colour and physical size. We find that bright elliptical galaxies are more spherical than faint ones, a trend that is also present with galaxy size, and that there is no dependence of elliptical galaxy shape with colour. For spiral galaxies, we find that the reddest ones have higher dust extinction as expected, due to the fact that this reddening is mainly due to dust. We also find that the thickness of discs increases with luminosity and size, and that brighter, smaller and redder galaxies have less round discs.

  5. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  6. HI Selected Galaxies from the SDSS and HIPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. A.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Rockosi, C. M.; Disney, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    We present results from a study of HI selected galaxies that fall within both the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By comparing the optical properties derived from the SDSS 5-band photometry with the HI properties from HIPASS, we are able to probe the relationship between the stellar populations and the neutral gas over a range of Hubble types. Our HIPASS/SDSS catalog provides a uniform, homogeneous data set that can be used to investigate the factors that contribute to star formation on global scales. The HI selection has allowed us to identify a significant group of low surface brightness galaxies, not included in most SDSS studies. In addition, the construction of this catalog has led to a set of tools to aid in the analysis of large nearby galaxies in the SDSS.

  7. Cosmological parameter constraints from galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering with the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Slosar, Anže; Baldauf, Tobias; Seljak, Uroš; Hirata, Christopher M.; Nakajima, Reiko; Reyes, Reinabelle; Smith, Robert E.

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the cross-correlation coefficient between galaxies and dark matter is very close to unity on scales outside a few virial radii of galaxy haloes, independent of the details of how galaxies populate dark matter haloes. This finding makes it possible to determine the dark matter clustering from measurements of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing and galaxy clustering. We present new cosmological parameter constraints based on large-scale measurements of spectroscopic galaxy samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7. We generalize the approach of Baldauf et al. to remove small-scale information (below 2 and 4 h-1 Mpc for lensing and clustering measurements, respectively), where the cross-correlation coefficient differs from unity. We derive constraints for three galaxy samples covering 7131 deg2, containing 69 150, 62 150 and 35 088 galaxies with mean redshifts of 0.11, 0.28 and 0.40. We clearly detect scale-dependent galaxy bias for the more luminous galaxy samples, at a level consistent with theoretical expectations. When we vary both σ8 and Ωm (and marginalize over non-linear galaxy bias) in a flat Λ cold dark matter model, the best-constrained quantity is σ8(Ωm/0.25)0.57 = 0.80 ± 0.05 (1σ, stat. + sys.), where statistical and systematic errors (photometric redshift and shear calibration) have comparable contributions, and we have fixed ns = 0.96 and h = 0.7. These strong constraints on the matter clustering suggest that this method is competitive with cosmic shear in current data, while having very complementary and in some ways less serious systematics. We therefore expect that this method will play a prominent role in future weak lensing surveys. When we combine these data with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year (WMAP7) cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, constraints on σ8, Ωm, H0, wde and ∑mν become 30-80 per cent tighter than with CMB data alone, since our data break several parameter

  8. SDSS superclusters: morphology and galaxy content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, M.; Lietzen, H.; Tempel, E.; Gramann, M.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Einasto, J.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Understanding the formation, evolution and present-day properties of the cosmic web and objects forming it is an important task in cosmology. Aims: We compare the galaxy populations in superclusters of different morphology in the nearby Universe (180 h-1 Mpc ≤ d ≤ 270 h-1 Mpc) to see whether the inner structure and overall morphology of superclusters are important in shaping galaxy properties in superclusters. Methods: We find supercluster morphology with Minkowski functionals and analyse the probability density distributions of colours, morphological types, stellar masses, star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies, and the peculiar velocities of the main galaxies in groups in superclusters of filament and spider types, and in the field. We test the statistical significance of the results with the KS test. Results: The fraction of red, early-type, low SFR galaxies in filament-type superclusters is higher than in spider-type superclusters; in low-density global environments their fraction is lower than in superclusters. In all environments the fraction of red, high stellar mass, and low SFR galaxies in rich groups is higher than in poor groups. In superclusters of spider morphology red, high SFR galaxies have higher stellar masses than in filament-type superclusters. Groups of equal richness host galaxies with larger stellar masses, a larger fraction of early-type and red galaxies, and a higher fraction of low SFR galaxies, if they are located in superclusters of filament morphology. The peculiar velocities of the main galaxies in groups from superclusters of filament morphology are higher than in those of spider morphology. Groups with higher peculiar velocities of their main galaxies in filament-type superclusters are located in higher density environment than those with low peculiar velocities. There are significant differences between galaxy populations of the individual richest superclusters. Conclusions: Both local (group) and global (supercluster

  9. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin, Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  10. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  11. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using GALEX NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5M⊙ and 1010.7M⊙, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003) with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  12. Intrinsic alignments of SDSS-III BOSS LOWZ sample galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel; More, Surhud

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsic alignments (IA) of galaxies, i.e. correlations of galaxy shapes with each other (II) or with the density field (gI), are potentially a major astrophysical source of contamination for weak lensing surveys. We present the results of IA measurements of galaxies on 0.1-200 h-1 Mpc scales using the SDSS-III BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ) sample, in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36. We extend the existing IA measurements for spectroscopic luminous red galaxies (LRGs) to lower luminosities, and show that the luminosity dependence of large-scale IA can be well described by a power law. Within the limited redshift and colour range of our sample, we observe no significant redshift or colour dependence of IA. We measure the halo mass of galaxies using galaxy-galaxy lensing, and show that the mass dependence of large-scale IA is also well described by a power law. We detect variations in the scale dependence of IA with mass and luminosity, which underscores the need to use flexible templates in order to remove the IA signal. We also study the environment dependence of IA by splitting the sample into field and group galaxies, which are further split into satellite and central galaxies. We show that group central galaxies are aligned with their haloes at small scales and also are aligned with the tidal fields out to large scales. We also detect the radial alignments of satellite galaxies within groups. These results can be used to construct better IA models for removal of this contaminant to the weak lensing signal.

  13. The dark side of galaxy colour: evidence from new SDSS measurements of galaxy clustering and lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Watson, Douglas F.; Becker, Matthew R.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Berlind, Andreas A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-10-01

    The age-matching model has recently been shown to predict correctly the luminosity L and g - r colour of galaxies residing within dark matter haloes. The central tenet of the model is intuitive: older haloes tend to host galaxies with older stellar populations. In this paper, we demonstrate that age matching also correctly predicts the g - r colour trends exhibited in a wide variety of statistics of the galaxy distribution for stellar mass M* threshold samples. In particular, we present new Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) measurements of galaxy clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal ΔΣ as a function of M* and g - r colour, and show that age matching exhibits remarkable agreement with these and other statistics of low-redshift galaxies. In so doing, we also demonstrate good agreement between the galaxy-galaxy lensing observed by SDSS and the ΔΣ signal predicted by abundance matching, a new success of this model. We describe how age matching is a specific example of a larger class of conditional abundance matching models (CAM), a theoretical framework we introduce here for the first time. CAM provides a general formalism to study correlations at fixed mass between any galaxy property and any halo property. The striking success of our simple implementation of CAM suggests that this technique has the potential to describe the same set of data as alternative models, but with a dramatic reduction in the required number of parameters. CAM achieves this reduction by exploiting the capability of contemporary N-body simulations to determine dark matter halo properties other than mass alone, which distinguishes our model from conventional approaches to the galaxy-halo connection.

  14. Herschel Dust Measurements of SDSS Supernovae Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Donald; Cooray, Asantha R.; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Herschel Hermes and h-atlas Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We use Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) far-infrared observations of Supernova host galaxies to study the cosmological distant measurement from Hubble diagrams. We investigate the dust content of SN host galaxy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survery (SDSS) using the far-infrared stacks of Herschel in the Equatorial Stripe using , Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey (HELMS), and the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HERS). Cosmic dust may contribute to much more obscuring of standard candles than previously thought. Measuring the average flux values of stacks from dim Type-Ia supernovae provides a measure of the dust content of galaxies as a function of deviation of those sources from the Hubble diagram given a standard cosmology. Using the optical to far infrared stacked data of the galaxies we also measure the physical properties of the standard candles as a function of dust content.

  15. Anomaly detection for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million `clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 `anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed `anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80 per cent when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.

  16. The dark side of galaxy colour: evidence from new SDSS measurements of galaxy clustering and lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Watson, Douglas F.; Becker, Matthew R.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Berlind, Andreas A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-08-12

    The age matching model has recently been shown to predict correctly the luminosity L and g-r color of galaxies residing within dark matter halos. The central tenet of the model is intuitive: older halos tend to host galaxies with older stellar populations. In this paper, we demonstrate that age matching also correctly predicts the g-r color trends exhibited in a wide variety of statistics of the galaxy distribution for stellar mass M* threshold samples. In particular, we present new measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal as a function of M* and g-r color from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and show that age matching exhibits remarkable agreement with these and other statistics of low-redshift galaxies. In so doing, we also demonstrate good agreement between the galaxy-galaxy lensing observed by SDSS and the signal predicted by abundance matching, a new success of this model. We describe how age matching is a specific example of a larger class of Conditional Abundance Matching models (CAM), a theoretical framework we introduce here for the first time. CAM provides a general formalism to study correlations at fixed mass between any galaxy property and any halo property. The striking success of our simple implementation of CAM provides compelling evidence that this technique has the potential to describe the same set of data as alternative models, but with a dramatic reduction in the required number of parameters. CAM achieves this reduction by exploiting the capability of contemporary N-body simulations to determine dark matter halo properties other than mass alone, which distinguishes our model from conventional approaches to the galaxy-halo connection.

  17. New resources to explore the old galaxy: Mining the SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    C. Allende Prieto et al.

    2003-07-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is collecting photometry and intermediate resolution spectra for {approx} 10{sup 5} stars in the thick-disk and stellar halo of the Milky Way. This massive dataset can be used to infer the properties of the stars that make up these structures, and considerably deepen our vision of the old components of the Galaxy. We devise tools for automatic analysis of the SDSS photometric and spectroscopic data based on plane-parallel line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres and fast optimization algorithms. A preliminary study of about 5000 stars in the Early Data Release gives a hint of the vast amount of information that the SDSS stellar sample contains.

  18. Mapping stellar content to dark matter haloes using galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing in the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    The mapping between the distributions of the observed galaxy stellar mass and the underlying dark matter haloes provides the crucial link from theories of large-scale structure formation to interpreting the complex phenomena of galaxy formation and evolution. We develop a novel statistical method, based on the halo occupation distribution (HOD) model, to solve for this mapping by jointly fitting the galaxy clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method, called the iHOD model, extracts maximum information from the survey by including ˜80 per cent more galaxies than the traditional HOD methods, accounting for the incompleteness of the stellar mass samples self-consistently. The derived stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) explains the clustering and lensing of SDSS galaxies over four decades in stellar mass, while successfully predicting the observed stellar mass functions (SMFs). By modelling significantly more galaxies, the iHOD breaks the degeneracy between the logarithmic scatter in the stellar mass at fixed halo mass and the slope of the mean SHMR at high masses, without assuming a strong prior on the scatter and/or using the SMF as an input. We detect a decline of the scatter with halo mass, from 0.22_{-0.01}^{+0.02} dex below 1012 h-1 M⊙ to 0.18 ± 0.01 dex at 1014 h-1 M⊙. The model predicts a departure of satellite SMFs from the Schechter form in massive haloes and a linear scaling of satellite number with halo mass. The iHOD model can be easily applied to other spectroscopic data sets, greatly improving statistical constraints on the SHMR compared to traditional HOD methods within the same survey.

  19. Galaxy Zoo 2: A Detailed Morphological Catalog of 295,000 Galaxies from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Masters, K. L.; Simmons, B.; Fortson, L.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) citizen science project was designed to obtain detailed morphological classifications of roughly a quarter million bright galaxies in the SDSS North Galactic Cap. This was enabled by more than 16 million classifications of images by 80,000 volunteer citizen scientists. Galaxy Zoo 2 greatly extends the original classifications of the Galaxy Zoo project (which primarily identified spiral and elliptical galaxies) by adding quantification of details such as oblateness, bars, bulge strength and shape, spiral arm multiplicity and tightness, and the existence of rarer features such as mergers, lenses, and dust lanes. We present preliminary results on our debiasing methods, addressing both biases from individual citizen scientist classifiers and intrinsic biases as a function of redshift, size, and absolute magnitude. We compare the GZ2 data to catalogs produced by professional astronomers and by machine-learning algorithms. Citizen science results can be directly compared to these techniques by examining the galaxies that appear in both samples. The weighted vote fractions in GZ2 show good agreement with expert classifications for fine structure morphology, particularly in identifying galactic bars and prominent bulges. The bulge classification in particular is shown to be a reasonable proxy from which T-Types can be derived using GZ2 data. A notable strength of the final catalog will be its size, with more than an order of magnitude more galaxies than extant morphological catalogs. GZ2 will be a unique resource to establish the full panoply of galaxy morphologies, as well as a baseline for studying how galaxies evolve over cosmic timescales.

  20. Nitrogen abundance in the Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, K. B.

    2015-09-01

    We examined all of the galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) to select those with a detected OIII λ4363 emission line, which allows to derive electron temperatures in HII regions and element abundances by the direct method. We selected two sub-samples of galaxies: one with detected WR features in their spectra, and the other with the nebular HeII~λ4686 emission line. We confirm the increase of the N/O abundance ratio with decrease of the equivalent width EW(Hβ) of the Hβ emission line. This result is explained by gradual nitrogen enrichment of the interstellar medium by ejecta from massive stars in the most recent starburst episode.

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): detection of low-surface-brightness galaxies from SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard P.; Baldry, I. K.; Kelvin, L. S.; James, P. A.; Driver, S. P.; Prescott, M.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Moffett, A. J.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the GAMA equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS PHOTO, combining gri images weighted to maximise the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their g - i and J - K colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The photometry is carried out using an AUTO aperture for each detection giving surface brightnesses of μr ≳ 25 mag arcsec-2 and magnitudes of r > 19.8 mag. None of these galaxies are bright enough to be within the GAMA main survey limit but could be part of future deeper surveys to measure the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.

  2. Spectral Investigation and Physical Properties of Markarian Galaxies from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Beginning in the mid-1960s and continuing through 1978, the first large-area objective-prism survey for galaxies with blue and ultraviolet excess in their continuum radiation was conducted by Markarian, Lipovetskii and Stepanian (published in Lists I-XV). Observations were carried out using primarily a 1.5° objective prism with the 40″/52″ (1.0/1.3 m) Schmidt telescope at Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. Their setup produced an inverse dispersion of 2500 Å/mm at Hβ (Markarian 1967). The publication of the List XV (Markarian et al. 1981) completed the Markarian Survey (also known as FBS, First Byurakan Survey). We present some average characteristics for 1493 Markarian galaxies derived from SDSS images and spectra and compare them to those of the two groups of the Second Byurakan Survey galaxies, defined using two indicators of activity as observed on objective-prism spectra: the presence of UV excess (860 UVX) in the continuum and the presence of emission lines (813 ELs). The parameters used for the comparison were morphology, redshift, apparent magnitude, absolute magnitude, the ratio of the small and the large semi-axes R (J), and close environment. For UVG the average apparent magnitude is 16.95m, for Mrk it is 15.2m, and for ELG it is 16.7m; the average absolute magnitude is 20.1m for Mrk, 20.73m for UVG, and 20.67m for ELG; the redshift is 0.024 for Mrk, 0.046 for UVG and 0.035 for ELG; the ratio of the small and the large semi-axes R (J) is 0.74 for Mrk and UVG, and 0.67 for ELG. On average, there are more spiral and compact galaxies among Mrk, UVG, and ELG objects. Some 31% of Mrk galaxies, 38% of UVG and 25% of ELG have neighboring galaxies in a circle with a radius of 50 kpc. In the course of the Markarian survey, more than 200 Seyfert galaxies, and hundreds of starburst, blue compact, and HII galaxies were discovered.

  3. The Alignment effect of brightest cluster galaxies in the SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, R. S. J.; Annis, J.; Strauss, M. A.; Lupton, R. H.; Bahcall, N. A.; Gunn, J. E.; Kepner, J. V.; Postman, M.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z >~ 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z <~ 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We do not find strong evidence for (or against) redshift evolution between 0SDSS cluster catalogs, which will provide us with better statistics for systematic investigations of the alignment with redshift, richness and morphology of both the cluster and the BCG.

  4. The Very Small Scale Clustering of SDSS-II and SDSS-III Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscionere, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We measure the angular clustering of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 in order to probe the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies within their dark matter halos. Specifically, we measure the angular correlation function on very small scales (7 - 320‧‧) in a range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes of -18 up to -21) that are constructed from the subset of SDSS that has been spectroscopically observed more than once (the so-called plate overlap region). We choose to measure angular clustering in this reduced survey footprint in order to minimize the effects of fiber collision incompleteness, which are otherwise substantial on these small scales. We model our clustering measurements using a fully numerical halo model that populates dark matter halos in N-body simulations to create realistic mock galaxy catalogs. The model has free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host halos. We adopt a flexible density profile for the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies that is similar to the dark matter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, except that the inner slope is allowed to vary. We find that the angular clustering of our most luminous samples (Mr < -20 and -21) suggests that luminous satellite galaxies have substantially steeper inner density profiles than NFW. Lower luminosity samples are less constraining, however, and are consistent with satellite galaxies having shallow density profiles. Our results confirm the findings of Watson et al. (2012) while using different clustering measurements and modeling methodology. With the new SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS; Dawson et al., 2013), we can measure how the same class of galaxy evolves over time. The BOSS CMASS sample is of roughly constant stellar mass and number density out to z ˜ 0.6. The clustering of these samples appears to evolve very little with redshift, and each of the

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parameters of Spiral galaxies from SDSS 7 (Hall+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M.; Courteau, S.; Dutton, A. A.; McDonald, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-08-01

    We have compiled a sample of 3041 spiral galaxies with multiband gri imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) and available galaxy rotational velocities, V, derived from HI linewidths. We compare the data products provided through the SDSS imaging pipeline with our own photometry of the SDSS images, and use the velocities, V, as an independent metric to determine ideal galaxy sizes (R) and luminosities (L). Our radial and luminosity parameters improve upon the SDSS DR7 Petrosian radii and luminosities through the use of isophotal fits to the galaxy images. This improvement is gauged via VL (Vmag-Luminosity) and RV relations whose respective scatters are reduced by ~8 and ~30% with our parameters compared to similar relations built with SDSS parameters. (1 data file).

  6. The Alignment Effect of Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R. S. J.; Sloan Digital Sky Survey Collaboration

    2001-12-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z > 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z < 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We discuss ways in which we can distinguish between the viable scenarios.

  7. Alignments of galaxies within cosmic filaments from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; Van den Bosch, Frank C. E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2013-12-20

    Using a sample of galaxy groups selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we examine the alignment between the orientation of galaxies and their surrounding large-scale structure in the context of the cosmic web. The latter is quantified using the large-scale tidal field, reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the major axes of galaxies in filaments tend to be preferentially aligned with the directions of the filaments, while galaxies in sheets have their major axes preferentially aligned parallel to the plane of the sheets. The strength of this alignment signal is strongest for red, central galaxies, and in good agreement with that of dark matter halos in N-body simulations. This suggests that red, central galaxies are well aligned with their host halos, in quantitative agreement with previous studies based on the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies. There is a luminosity and mass dependence that brighter and more massive galaxies in filaments and sheets have stronger alignment signals. We also find that the orientation of galaxies is aligned with the eigenvector associated with the smallest eigenvalue of the tidal tensor. These observational results indicate that galaxy formation is affected by large-scale environments and strongly suggest that galaxies are aligned with each other over scales comparable to those of sheets and filaments in the cosmic web.

  8. The SDSS Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Post-Starburst Galaxy at z=0.766

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min-Su; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Falco, Emilio E.; Broadhurst, Tom; Gunn, James E.

    2008-09-30

    We present the first result of a survey for strong galaxy-galaxy lenses in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. SDSS J082728.70+223256.4 was selected as a lensing candidate using selection criteria based on the color and positions of objects in the SDSS photometric catalog. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy showed this object to be a lensing system. The lensing galaxy is an elliptical at z = 0.349 in a galaxy cluster. The lensed galaxy has the spectrum of a post-starburst galaxy at z = 0.766. The lensing galaxy has an estimated mass of {approx} 1.2 x 10{sup 12} M{sub {circle_dot}} and the corresponding mass to light ratio in the B-band is {approx} 26 M{sub {circle_dot}}/L{sub {circle_dot}} inside 1.1 effective radii of the lensing galaxy. Our study shows how catalogs drawn from multi-band surveys can be used to find strong galaxy-galaxy lenses having multiple lens images. Our strong lensing candidate selection based on photometry-only catalogs will be useful in future multi-band imaging surveys such as SNAP and LSST.

  9. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  10. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; Gerdes, David; Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  11. Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

    SciTech Connect

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Sako, Masao; Gupta, Ravi R.; Bassett, Bruce; Kunz, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Cosmological constraints from the SDSS luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Strauss, Michael A.; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, James E.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Seljak, Uroš; Seo, Hee-Jong; Swanson, Molly; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Yoo, Jaiyul; Zehavi, Idit; Abazajian, Kevork; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bassett, Bruce; Berlind, Andreas; Brinkmann, Jon; Budavari, Tamás; Castander, Francisco; Connolly, Andrew; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Hogg, David W.; Ivezić, Željko; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Brian C.; Lin, Huan; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pan, Kaike; Park, Changbom; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pope, Adrian; Richmond, Michael; Rockosi, Constance; Scranton, Ryan; Sheth, Ravi K.; Stebbins, Albert; Stoughton, Christopher; Szapudi, István; Tucker, Douglas L.; vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G.

    2006-12-01

    We measure the large-scale real-space power spectrum P(k) using luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and use this measurement to sharpen constraints on cosmological parameters from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We employ a matrix-based power spectrum estimation method using Pseudo-Karhunen-Loève eigenmodes, producing uncorrelated minimum-variance measurements in 20 k-bands of both the clustering power and its anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions, with narrow and well-behaved window functions in the range 0.01h/Mpcgalaxy samples are consistent, with the former providing higher signal-to-noise. Our results are robust to omitting angular and radial density fluctuations and are consistent between different parts of the sky. They provide a striking confirmation of the predicted large-scale ΛCDM power spectrum. Combining only SDSS LRG and WMAP data places robust constraints on many cosmological parameters that complement prior analyses of multiple data sets. The LRGs provide independent cross-checks on Ωm and the baryon fraction in good agreement with WMAP. Within the context of flat ΛCDM models, our LRG measurements complement WMAP by sharpening the constraints on the matter density, the neutrino density and the tensor amplitude by about a factor of 2, giving Ωm=0.24±0.02 (1σ), ∑mν≲0.9eV (95%) and r<0.3 (95%). Baryon oscillations are clearly detected and provide a robust measurement of the comoving distance to the median survey redshift z=0.35 independent of curvature and dark energy properties. Within the ΛCDM framework, our power spectrum measurement improves the evidence for spatial flatness, sharpening the curvature constraint Ωtot=1.05±0.05 from WMAP alone to Ωtot=1.003±0.010. Assuming Ωtot=1, the equation of state parameter is constrained to w=-0.94±0.09, indicating the potential for more ambitious future LRG measurements to provide precision

  13. An Imaging and Spectroscopic Survey of Bright Strongly-Lensed Galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Lin, Huan; Allam, Sahar; Kubo, Jeff; Diehl, Tom; Tucker, Douglas; Kubik, Donna; Annis, Jim

    2009-02-01

    We propose for WIYN imaging and Mayall spectroscopic follow-up for a sample of 21 very bright, candidate strong lensing systems from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), found as part of our systematic search for potentially lensed bright blue arcs and knots around luminous red galaxies from the SDSS. Our survey has already spectroscopically confirmed 12 strong lensing systems, including 6 among the brightest lensed Lyman break galaxies known at z > 2, including the ``8 o'clock arc.'' We will take advantage of the excellent WIYN image quality to obtain gri color data vital to derive optimal lensing models for our systems, and we also take advantage of the brightness of our lensed galaxies, whose redshifts may be efficiently measured on the Mayall 4m. Overall, we expect to compile a final sample of order 30 spectroscopically confirmed SDSS lensing systems, a large data set which allows us to expand our ongoing follow-up studies of the physical properties of individual bright lensed star-forming galaxies at high redshifts z ~ 1-3. Moreover, this larger sample allows us to better constrain the mass distributions of the group/cluster environments around our z ~ 0.4 red lens galaxies, in a 3''-10'' Einstein radius regime that is complementary to the smaller single- galaxy and larger galaxy-cluster scales probed by other SDSS strong lens data sets.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS nearby galaxies morphologies (Yoshino+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, A.; Yamauchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    These catalogues are intended to study statistically Box/Peanut or Bar structures in edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies, containing values of surface brightness parameters of model galaxy, coordinate, redshift, morphology and matched PGC number for edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies in g, r and i-band selected from SDSS DR7. table1[gri].dat are the catalogues for edge-on galaxies in g, r and i-band, respectively. table2[gri].dat are those for face-on galaxies. table3[gri].dat contain only Box/Peanut galaxies extracted from table1[gri].dat. table4[gri].dat contain only Barred galaxies extracted from table2[gri].dat. (12 data files).

  15. Red galaxies with pseudo-bulges in the SDSS: closer to disc galaxies or to classical bulges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, B.; Lobo, C.; Antón, S.; Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-03-01

    Pseudo-bulges are expected to markedly differ from classical quasi-monolithically forming bulges in their star formation history (SFH) and chemical abundance patterns. To test this simple expectation, we carry out a comparative structural and spectral synthesis analysis of 106 red massive galaxies issued from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), sub-divided into bulgeless, pseudo-bulge and classical bulge galaxies according to their photometric characteristics, and further obeying a specific selection to minimize uncertainties in the analysis and ensure an unbiased derivation and comparison of SFHs. Our 2D photometry analysis suggests that discs underlying pseudo-bulges typically have larger exponential scalelengths than bulgeless galaxies, despite similar integral disc luminosities. Spectral synthesis models of the stellar emission within the 3-arcsec SDSS fibre aperture reveal a clear segregation of bulgeless and pseudo-bulge galaxies from classical bulges on the luminosity-weighted planes of age-metallicity and mass-metallicity, though a large dispersion is observed within the two former classes. The secular growth of pseudo-bulges is also reflected upon their cumulative stellar mass as a function of time, which is shallower than that for classical bulges. Such results suggest that the centres of bulgeless and pseudo-bulge galaxies substantially differ from those of bulgy galaxies with respect to their SFH and chemical enrichment history, which likely points to different formation/assembly mechanisms.

  16. The CASSOWARY spectroscopy survey: a new sample of gravitationally lensed galaxies in SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Auger, Matthew; Belokurov, Vasily; Jones, Tucker; Robertson, Brant; Ellis, Richard S.; Sand, David J.; Moiseev, Alexei; Eagle, Will; Myers, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Bright gravitationally lensed galaxies provide our most detailed view of galaxies at high redshift. The very brightest (r < 21) systems enable high spatial and spectral resolution measurements, offering unique constraints on the outflow energetics, metallicity gradients and stellar populations in high-redshift galaxies. Yet as a result of the small number of ultrabright z ≃ 2 lensed systems with confirmed redshifts, most detailed spectroscopic studies have been limited in their scope. With the goal of increasing the number of bright lensed galaxies available for detailed follow-up, we have undertaken a spectroscopic campaign targeting wide separation (≳3 arcsec) galaxy-galaxy lens candidates within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Building on the earlier efforts of our Cambridge and Sloan Survey Of Wide Arcs in Thesky survey, we target a large sample of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems in SDSS using a well-established search algorithm which identifies blue arc-like structures situated around luminous red galaxies. In this paper, we present a new redshift catalogue containing 29 lensed sources in SDSS confirmed through spectroscopic follow-up of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems. Included in this new sample are two of the brightest galaxies (r = 19.6 and 19.7) known at z ≃ 2, a low metallicity (12 + log (O/H) ≃ 8.0) extreme nebular line emitting galaxy at z = 1.43, and numerous systems for which detailed follow-up will be possible. The source redshifts span 0.9 < z < 2.5 (median redshift of 1.9), and their optical magnitudes are in the range 19.6 ≲ r ≲ 22.3. We present a brief source-by-source discussion of the spectroscopic properties extracted from our confirmatory spectra and discuss some initial science results. Preliminary lens modelling reveals average source magnifications of 5-10 times. With more than 50 gravitationally lensed z ≳ 1 galaxies now confirmed within SDSS, it will soon be possible for the first time to develop generalized

  17. Environmental dependence of the stellar velocity dispersion at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families in the main galaxy sample of SDSS DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinfa; Jiang, Peng; Zhong, Shuangying; Ding, Yingping

    2015-01-01

    Using the apparent magnitude-limited Main Galaxy Sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we examine the environmental dependence of the stellar velocity dispersion at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families. Limiting or fixing certain parameters exerts substantial influence on the environmental dependence of the stellar velocity dispersion of the galaxies which suggests that much of the stellar velocity dispersion-density relation is likely attributable to the relations between other galaxy parameters and density. The environmental dependence of the stellar velocity dispersion for red galaxies is very strong in certain redshift bins. This dependence can still be observed in some redshift bins for late-type galaxies, HSM galaxies, and LSM galaxies but is fairly weak in all redshift bins for early-type galaxies and blue galaxies.

  18. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g < 11 mag. After correcting the g and i magnitudes for Galactic and internal extinction, the blue and red sequences in the color magnitude diagram are well separated, with similar slopes. In addition, we study (i) the color-magnitude diagrams in different galaxy regions, the inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  19. Assigning Star-galaxy Probabilities to SDSS Stripe 82 Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Annie; Willman, B.; Fadely, R.; Bochanski, J. J.; Hogg, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 imaging covers 275 deg^2 in ugriz. Reaching ~ 1-2 magnitudes deeper than the SDSS main survey (50% point source completeness at r ~24.2 mag), the public Stripe 82 catalog provides new opportunities in Galactic structure, weak lensing, and large scale structure. However, at magnitudes fainter than r ~ 22, unresolved galaxies dominate star counts in the point source catalog. The resulting contamination of point sources by galaxies can be mitigated by using multi-color information to derive star-galaxy probabilities. In this poster, we quantify the expected demographics of the Stripe 82 point source catalog. We use ugriz magnitudes to assign star-galaxy classification probabilities to Stripe 82 point sources with maximum likelihood, hierarchical Bayesian, and SVM techniques. We thank NSF AST-0908193 and NSF AST-1151462 for support.

  20. A Computer-generated Visual Morphology Catalog of ~3,000,000 SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuminski, Evan; Shamir, Lior

    2016-04-01

    We have applied computer analysis to classify the broad morphological types of ∼3 · 106 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. For each galaxy, the catalog provides the DR8 object ID, the R.A., the decl., and the certainty for the automatic classification as either spiral or elliptical. The certainty of the classification allows us to control the accuracy of a subset of galaxies by sacrificing some of the least certain classifications. The accuracy of the catalog was tested using galaxies that were classified by the manually annotated Galaxy Zoo catalog. The results show that the catalog contains ∼900,000 spiral galaxies and ∼600,000 elliptical galaxies with classification certainty that has a statistical agreement rate of ∼98% with the Galaxy Zoo debiased “superclean” data set. The catalog also shows that objects assigned by the SDSS pipeline with a relatively high redshift (z > 0.4) can have clear visual spiral morphology. The catalog can be downloaded at http://vfacstaff.ltu.edu/lshamir/data/morph_catalog. The image analysis software that was used to create the catalog is also publicly available.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact early-type galaxies in SDSS (Saulder+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulder, C.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Mieske, S.

    2015-11-01

    As the baseline sample of our search for b19 analogues, we made broad use of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys (SDSS) and especially of its tenth (Ahn et al., 2014ApJS..211...17A) and seventh (Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) data releases (DR10 and DR7). Furthermore, we used GalaxyZoo (Lintott et al., 2008MNRAS.389.1179L, 2011, Cat. J/MNRAS/410/166) for our galaxy classifications, the refits of SDSS DR7 using Sersic profiles done by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), and the stellar masses from Mendel et al. (2014, Cat. J/ApJS/210/3), which is itself based on the previous work of Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11). For comparison, we also used the list of 63 compact massive galaxies from Taylor et al. (2010, Cat. J/ApJ/720/723), which is based on SDSS DR7 as well as a list of 29 compact massive galaxies from Trujillo et al. (2009ApJ...692L.118T), which is based on the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (Blanton et al., 2005AJ....129.2562B) and covers a sub-sample of SDSS. (9 data files).

  2. The Spatial Distribution of Satellite Galaxies within Halos: Measuring the Very Small Scale Angular Clustering of SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscionere, Jennifer A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Scoccimarro, Román

    2015-06-01

    We measure the angular clustering of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 in order to probe the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies within their dark matter halos. Specifically, we measure the angular correlation function on very small scales (7″–320″) in a range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes from ‑18 up to ‑21) that are constructed from the subset of SDSS that has been spectroscopically observed more than once (the so-called plate overlap region). We choose to measure angular clustering in this reduced survey footprint in order to minimize the effects of fiber collision incompleteness, which are otherwise substantial on these small scales, and we discuss the possible impact that fiber collisions have on our measurements. We model our clustering measurements using a fully numerical halo model that populates dark matter halos in N-body simulations to create realistic mock galaxy catalogs. The model has free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host halos. We adopt a flexible density profile for the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies that is similar to the dark matter Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) profile, except that the inner slope is allowed to vary. We find that the angular clustering of our most luminous samples ({{M}r} < ‑20 and ‑21) suggests that luminous satellite galaxies have substantially steeper inner density profiles than NFW. Lower-luminosity samples are less constraining, however, and are consistent with satellite galaxies having shallow density profiles. Our results confirm the findings of Watson et al. while using different clustering measurements and modeling methodology.

  3. The Properties of Radio Selected Galaxies in HIPASS/HIJASS and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Disney, M. J.

    2004-06-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the properties of HI selected galaxies selected from the HIPASS and HIJASS surveys and that fall within the SDSS. From SDSS photometry in the early data release (EDR), we have obtained optical properties such as color, morphology, surface brightness and size. By comparing these with the HI properties derived from HIPASS/HIJASS, we are able to find relationships between the cool gas and the current generation of stars.

  4. Further constraining galaxy evolution models through the size function of SDSS early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Marulli, Federico; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Dai, Xinyu; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2010-06-01

    We discuss how the effective radius Re function (ERF) recently worked out by Bernardi et al. represents a new testbed to improve the current understanding of semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. In particular, we show here that a detailed hierarchical model of structure formation can broadly reproduce the correct peak in the size distribution of local early-type galaxies, although it significantly overpredicts the number of very compact and very large galaxies. This in turn is reflected in the predicted size-mass relation, much flatter than the observed one, due to too large (>~3kpc) low-mass galaxies (<1011Msolar), and to a non-negligible fraction of compact (<~0.5-1kpc) and massive galaxies (>~1011Msolar). We also find that the latter discrepancy is smaller than previously claimed, and limited to only ultra-compact (Re <~ 0.5kpc) galaxies when considering elliptical-dominated samples. We explore several causes behind these effects. We conclude that the former problem might be linked to the initial conditions, given that large and low-mass galaxies are present at all epochs in the model. The survival of compact and massive galaxies might instead be linked to their very old ages and peculiar merger histories. Overall, knowledge of the galactic stellar mass and size distributions allows a better understanding of where and how to improve models.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-II SN Survey: host-galaxy spectral data (Wolf+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. C.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Gupta, R. R.; Sako, M.; Fischer, J. A.; Kessler, R.; Jha, S. W.; March, M. C.; Scolnic, D. M.; Fischer, J.-L.; Campbell, H.; Nichol, R. C.; Olmstead, M. D.; Richmond, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Smith, M.

    2016-07-01

    Observations from the full 3yr SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS; Sako et al. 2014, arXiv:1401.3317) were used for our SN Ia sample, and a combination of spectra from SDSS and BOSS was utilized for host-galaxy spectroscopy. (1 data file).

  6. Multiwavelength Measures of Star Formation: Galaxies observed by GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. D.; Schiminovich, D.; GALEX Science Team

    2006-06-01

    We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ˜ 1000 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS, provides a multiwavelength (presently 0.15-70 micron) view of star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M⊙/year. We present first results on the dust-age-color relation,showing that long wavelength-baseline colors (e.g. NUV-3.6 micron) can be cleanly decomposed into contributions from dust (measured with the infrared to UV ratio) and star formation history (measured with the relatively dust-insensitive D4000). We also show the relation of 8 micron PAH emission to other indicators of star formation and 8/24 micron vs. 24/70 micron color-color diagrams for the sample galaxies. Finally, we present initial empirical SEDs, split by relevant galaxy properties. The SEDs combined with many global measures of stellar, gas and dust properties will provide a useful local reference for models of galaxy formation and will also help guide interpretations of observations of higher redshift galaxies. We gratefully acknowledge NASA's support for construction, operation, and science analysis for the GALEX mission, developed in cooperation with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiale of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. BDJ was supported by NASA GSRP Grant NNG05GO43H.

  7. A Statistical Study of Mg II Absorption Selected Galaxies in the SDSS at 0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Brittney; Lundgren, B.

    2014-01-01

    The spectra of distant quasars frequently exhibit absorption features from singly-ionized magnesium (Mg II), which are understood to trace gas outflow and accretion processes in foreground galaxies. Host galaxies of the Mg II absorbing gas are difficult to detect because they are often faint and have small angular separation from the bright background quasar. We have undertaken a statistical study of low redshift ( 0.4) galaxies identified as potential Mg II absorption hosts which are visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using data from the SDSS DR7, we compiled a census of ~3200 photometrically-identified galaxies within a projected 150 kpc of an Mg II absorbing system. These potential Mg II absorption hosts were then compared to a control sample of galaxies in the foreground of quasars without absorption systems in the same redshift range. We report a positive detection of excess galaxies around the lines of sight to quasars with Mg II absorption systems, extending to ~90 kpc. We present the luminosity distribution of these excess galaxies and compare to previous, smaller studies from the literature. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  8. E+A galaxies in the SDSS. Stellar population and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, R.; Galaz, G.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxies with E+A spectrum have deep Balmer absorption and no H_{α} and [OII] emission. This suggest recent star formation and the lack of ongoing star formation. With an E+A sample from the SDSS DR 7 (Aihara et al. 2011) we study the morphology with Galaxy Zoo 1 data and the star formation history fitting models from Bruzual & Charlot (2003). We found an underpopulation of spiral and disk like galaxies and an overpopulation of interacting galaxies, the last seems consistent with the scenario where, at low z, the interaction mechanism is responsible for at least part of the E+A galaxies. The star formation history (SFH) fits most of the spectra indicating an increased star formation around 2 Gyr in the past. Additional parameters like dust internal extinction need to be included to improve the fitting.

  9. The nature and origin of Narrow Line AGN activity in a sample of isolated SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Islas-Islas, J. M.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M.; Andernach, H.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of the nuclear activity observed in a sample of 292 SDSS narrow-emission-line galaxies, considered to have formed and evolved in isolation. The fraction of Narrow Line AGNs (NLAGNs) and Transition type Objects (TOs; a NLAGN with circumnuclear star formation) amounts to 64% of the galaxies. We verify that the probability for a galaxy to show an AGN characteristic increases with the bulge mass of the galaxy (Torres-Papaqui et al. 2011), and find evidence that this trend is really a by-product of the morphology, suggesting that the AGN phenomenon is intimately connected with the formation process of the galaxies. The NLAGNs in our sample are consistent with a scaled-down or powered-down versions of quasars and Broad Line AGNs.

  10. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  11. The Properties of Radio Selected Galaxies in HIPASS/HIJASS and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Appadoo, D.; West, A.; Disney, M.; Dalcanton, J.; Kilborn, V.

    2005-06-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the properties of HI selected galaxies that fall within the HIPASS and HIJASS neutral hydrogen surveys, and the optical SDSS region. From SDSS photometry, we have obtained optical properties such as colour, morphology, surface brightness and size. SDSS spectra yield rough properties of the ISM such as metallicity, SFR, and extinction. By comparing these with the HI properties derived from HIPASS/HIJASS, we are able to find relationships between the cool gas (which has the potential to make stars), and the current generation of stars.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact groups of galaxies in SDSS DR7 (Mendel+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Simard, L.; Patton, D. R.; McConnachie, A. W.

    2012-07-01

    In Paper III (Cat. J/MNRAS/395/255) we describe the photometric selection of CGs from the SDSS Data Release 6 (Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282/), which included imaging of the entire SDSS-II Legacy Survey area. Since that paper, SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) has provided an additional ~1200deg2 of spectroscopic data, completing spectroscopic observations of the SDSS-II Legacy Survey footprint. In what follows we use galaxy catalogues drawn from SDSS DR7 and, where available, supplement the CG samples in Paper III with updated spectroscopic information. (2 data files).

  13. The Optical Luminosity Function of Void Galaxies in the SDSS and ALFALFA Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal M.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Hoyle, Fiona; Pan, Danny C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    We measure the r-band galaxy luminosity function (LF) across environments over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.107 using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We divide our sample into galaxies residing in large-scale voids (void galaxies) and those residing in denser regions (wall galaxies). The best-fitting Schechter parameters for void galaxies are {log}{{{Φ }}}*=-3.40+/- 0.03 log(Mpc-3), {M}* = -19.88 ± 0.05, and α = -1.20 ± 0.02. For wall galaxies, the best-fitting parameters are {log}{{{Φ }}}*=-2.86+/- 0.02 log(Mpc-3), {M}* = -20.80 ± 0.03, and α = -1.16 ± 0.01. We find a shift in the characteristic magnitude, {M}*, toward fainter magnitudes for void galaxies and find no significant difference between the faint-end slopes of the void and wall galaxy LFs. We investigate how low-surface-brightness selection effects can affect the galaxy LF. To attempt to examine a sample of galaxies that is relatively free of surface-brightness selection effects, we compute the optical galaxy LF of galaxies detected by the blind H i survey Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA). We find that the global LF of the ALFALFA sample is not well fit by a Schechter function because of the presence of a wide dip in the LF around Mr = -18 and an upturn at fainter magnitudes (α ˜ -1.47). We compare the H i selected r-band LF to various LFs of optically selected populations to determine where the H i selected optical LF obtains its shape. We find that sample selection plays a large role in determining the shape of the LF.

  14. Groups and clusters of galaxies in the SDSS DR8. Value-added catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Tago, E.; Liivamägi, L. J.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: We intend to compile a new galaxy group and cluster sample of the latest available SDSS data, adding several parameter for the purpose of studying the supercluster network, galaxy and group evolution, and their connection to the surrounding environment. Methods: We used a modified friends-of-friends (FoF) method with a variable linking length in the transverse and radial directions to eliminate selection effects and to find reliably as many groups as possible. Using the galaxies as a basis, we calculated the luminosity density field. Results: We create a new catalogue of groups and clusters for the SDSS data release 8 sample. We find and add environmental parameters to our catalogue, together with other galaxy parameters (e.g., morphology), missing from our previous catalogues. We take into account various selection effects caused by a magnitude limited galaxy sample. Our final sample contains 576 493 galaxies and 77 858 groups. The group catalogue is available at http://www.aai.ee/~elmo/dr8groups/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/540/A106

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGN activity in isolated SDSS galaxies (Coziol+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Islas-Islas, J. M.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M.; Andernach, H.

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of the nuclear activity observed in a sample of 292 SDSS narrow-emission-line galaxies, considered to have formed and evolved in isolation. All these galaxies are spiral like and show some kind of nuclear activity. The fraction of Narrow Line AGNs (NLAGNs) and Transition type Objects (TOs; a NLAGN with circumnuclear star formation) is relatively high, amounting to 64% of the galaxies. There is a definite trend for the NLAGNs to appear in early-type spirals, while the star forming galaxies and TOs are found in later-type spirals. We verify that the probability for a galaxy to show an AGN characteristic increases with the bulge mass of the galaxy (Torres-Papaqui et al. 2011), and find evidence that this trend is really a by-product of the morphology, suggesting that the AGN phenomenon is intimately connected with the formation process of the galaxies. Consistent with this interpretation, we establish a strong connection between the astration rate -- the efficiency with which the gas is transformed into stars - the AGN phenomenon, and the gravitational binding energy of the galaxies: the higher the binding energy, the higher the astration rate and the higher the probability to find an AGN. The NLAGNs in our sample are consistent with scaled-down or powered-down versions of quasars and Broad Line AGNs. (2 data files).

  16. Comparing the clustering of galaxies and galaxy group by using the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiran; Brunner, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    By using the angular two-point correlation function, we measure the clustering strength of a clean sample of galaxies (explored in Wang, Brunner, & Dolence 2013) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven. By using these same data, we first find isolated pairs, triplets, quads, and larger groups of galaxies, and subsequently measure the clustering of these subsamples. We find the clustering strength increases with groups size, which supports the halo model of galaxy clustering and demonstrates the efficacy of our isolated group catalog for general studies such as the galaxy merger rate. Finally, we explore the effects of galaxy spectral type and photometric redshift on the clustering behavior of these galaxy group samples. References: Blake, C., Collister, A., Lahav, O. 2008, MNRAS, 385, 1257 Hickson, P. 1982, ApJ, 255, 382 Ross, A. J., Brunner, R. J. 2009, MNRAS, 399, 878 Wang Y., Brunner R. J., Dolence J. C. 2013, MNRAS, 432, 1961 Zehavi, I., et al. 2004, ApJ, 608, 16

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Morphologies of z<0.01 SDSS-DR7 galaxies (Ann+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, H. B.; Seo, M.; Ha, D. K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a catalog of the morphological types of galaxies whose redshifts are less than z=0.01. The morphological types are determined by a visual inspection of the color images provided by SDSS DR7 (II/294). The majority of galaxies in the present sample come from the KIAS-VAGC (Choi et al. 2010JKAS...43..191C) which is based on the spectroscopic target galaxies of the SDSS DR7 complemented by the bright galaxies with known redshifts from various catalogs. (1 data file).

  18. ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES IN THE WISE AND SDSS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Shanshan; Kong, Xu; Li, Jinrong; Fang, Guanwen E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-11-20

    In this paper, we present a large catalog of 419 Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), carefully selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-infrared data and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey eighth data release, and classify them into three subsamples, based on their emission line properties: H II-like ULIRGs, Seyfert 2 ULIRGs, and composite ULIRGs. We apply our new efficient spectral synthesis technique, which is based on mean field approach to Bayesian independent component analysis (MF-ICA) method, to the galaxy integrated spectra. We also analyze the stellar population properties, including percentage contribution, stellar age, and stellar mass, for these three types of ULIRGs, and explore the evolution among them. We find no significant difference between the properties of stellar populations in ULIRGs with or without active galactic nucleus components. Our results suggest that there is no evolutionary link among these three type ULIRGs.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Tully-Fisher relation for SDSS galaxies (Reyes+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.; Lackner, C. N.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we derive scaling relations between photometric observable quantities and disc galaxy rotation velocity Vrot or Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs). Our methodology is dictated by our purpose of obtaining purely photometric, minimal-scatter estimators of Vrot applicable to large galaxy samples from imaging surveys. To achieve this goal, we have constructed a sample of 189 disc galaxies at redshifts z<0.1 with long-slit Hα spectroscopy from Pizagno et al. (2007, Cat. J/AJ/134/945) and new observations. By construction, this sample is a fair subsample of a large, well-defined parent disc sample of ~170000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7). (4 data files).

  20. Spectroscopic identification of 25 disk galaxy candidate gravitational lenses in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, P.; Rossetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Galaxy-scale gravitational lenses are powerful tools, which can be used to address major astrophysical questions that are still open. They can be identified either through imaging or through spectroscopy, which is less efficient than imaging but offers the major advantage of having both source and deflector red shift previously measured at discovery. Spectroscopic identification requires huge data sets of high spectral quality, such as the SDSS, and has so far focused on early-type galaxies, as the most massive galaxies are found among them. Aims: We aimed to perform spectroscopic identification of disk galaxies acting as gravitational lenses. Methods: We have selected about 300 000 galaxy spectra with EW(Hα) ≤-10 Å from the SDSS DR 8. On these spectra, we ran our original code RES, which is a fast, reliable tool able to provide a red-shift measure and to identify discordant red-shift systems if present. We have required RES to identify only systems based on a minimum number of four emission lines. We have inspected all the (54) SDSS images of the double z systems identified by RES and discarded systems for which z duplicity could be easily ascribed to the presence of two distinct objects. The remaining 25 systems, for which double z is very likely to be due to the gravitational lensing phenomenon, constitute our sample. Results: For each gravitational lens candidate system, we provide SDSS identification and image emission lines detected by RES and activity classification, when derivable. The disky nature of our candidate lenses is confirmed by their images, stellar mass estimates, g - r rest-frame colours and occurrence of star burst phenomena.

  1. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  2. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Myers, Adam D.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J.; Bautista, Julian E.; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Schlegel, David J.; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M.; McBride, Cameron K.; Ben Zhu, Guangtun; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S.; Delubac, Timothée; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R.; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Prada, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z < 19.95 and 19.9 < i < 21.8, respectively. Our algorithm selects roughly 50 LRG targets per square degree, the great majority of which lie in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.0 (median redshift 0.71). We demonstrate that our methods are highly effective at eliminating stellar contamination and lower-redshift galaxies. We perform a number of tests using spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/BOSS ancillary programs to determine the redshift reliability of our target selection and its ability to meet the science requirements of eBOSS. The SDSS spectra are of high enough signal-to-noise ratio that at least ∼89% of the target sample yields secure redshift measurements. We also present tests of the uniformity and homogeneity of the sample, demonstrating that it should be clean enough for studies of the large-scale structure of the universe at higher redshifts than SDSS-III/BOSS LRGs reached.

  3. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Myers, Adam D.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J.; Bautista, Julian E.; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Schlegel, David J.; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M.; McBride, Cameron K.; Ben Zhu, Guangtun; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S.; Delubac, Timothée; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R.; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Prada, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z < 19.95 and 19.9 < i < 21.8, respectively. Our algorithm selects roughly 50 LRG targets per square degree, the great majority of which lie in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.0 (median redshift 0.71). We demonstrate that our methods are highly effective at eliminating stellar contamination and lower-redshift galaxies. We perform a number of tests using spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/BOSS ancillary programs to determine the redshift reliability of our target selection and its ability to meet the science requirements of eBOSS. The SDSS spectra are of high enough signal-to-noise ratio that at least ˜89% of the target sample yields secure redshift measurements. We also present tests of the uniformity and homogeneity of the sample, demonstrating that it should be clean enough for studies of the large-scale structure of the universe at higher redshifts than SDSS-III/BOSS LRGs reached.

  4. Recovering 3D structural properties of galaxies from SDSS-like photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo; Tamm, Antti; Kipper, Rain; Tenjes, Teeter

    2015-10-01

    Because of the 3D nature of galaxies, an algorithm for constructing spatial density distribution models of galaxies on the basis of galaxy images has many advantages over approximations of the surface density distribution. We present a method for deriving the spatial structure and overall parameters of galaxies from images and estimate its accuracy and derived parameter degeneracies on a sample of idealised model galaxies. The test galaxies consist of a disc-like component and a spheroidal component with varying proportions and properties. Both components are assumed to be axially symmetric and coplanar. We simulate these test galaxies as if they had been observed in the SDSS project through ugriz filters, thus gaining a set of realistically imperfect images of galaxies with known intrinsic properties. These artificial SDSS galaxies were thereafter remodelled by approximating the surface brightness distribution with a 2D projection of a bulge+disc spatial distribution model and the restored parameters were compared to the initial ones. Down to the r-band limiting magnitude of 18, errors in the restored integral luminosities and colour indices remain within 0.05 mag and errors in the luminosities of individual components within 0.2 mag. Accuracy of the restored bulge-to-disc luminosity ratio (B/D) is within 40% in most cases, and becomes worse for galaxies with low B/D, but the general balance between bulges and discs is not shifted systematically. Assuming that the intrinsic disc axial ratio is ≤ 0.3, then the inclination angles can be estimated with errors < 5° for most of the galaxies with B/D < 2 and with errors < 15° up to B/D = 6. Errors in the recovered sizes of the galactic components are below 10% in most cases. The axial ratios and the shape parameter N of Einasto's distribution (similar to the Sérsic index) are relatively inaccurate, but can provide statistical estimates for large samples. In general, models of disc components are more accurate than

  5. H I OBSERVATIONS OF THE Ca II ABSORBING GALAXIES Mrk 1456 AND SDSS J211701.26-002633.7

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2009-12-15

    In an effort to study Damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) galaxies at low redshift, we have been using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify galaxies projected onto quasi-stellar object (QSO) sight lines and to characterize their optical properties. For low-redshift galaxies, the H I 21 cm emission line can be used as an alternate tool for identifying possible DLA galaxies, since H I-emitting galaxies typically exhibit H I columns that are larger than the classical DLA limit. Here, we report on follow-up H I 21 cm emission-line observations of two DLA candidates that are both low-redshift spiral galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7. The observations were made using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Arecibo telescope, respectively. Analysis of their H I properties reveal the galaxies to be about one and two M*{sub HI} galaxies, respectively, and to have average H I mass, gas richness, and gas-mass fraction for their morphological types. We consider Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 to be candidate DLA systems based upon the strength of the Ca II absorption lines they cause in their QSO's spectra, and impact parameters to the QSO that are smaller than the stellar disk. Compared to the small numbers of other H I detected DLA and candidate DLA galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 have high H I masses. Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 have also been found to lie in galaxy groups that are high in H I gas mass compared to the group containing SBS 1543+593, the only DLA galaxy previously known to be situated in a galaxy group. When compared with the expected properties of low-z DLAs from an H I-detected sample of galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 fall within the ranges for impact parameter and M{sub B} ; and the H I mass distribution for the H I-detected DLAs agrees with that of the expected H I mass distribution for low-z DLAs. Our observations support galaxy-evolution models in which high-mass galaxies make up an increasing

  6. The Study of Active Galactic Nuclei and Galaxy Structure Using SDSS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Benjamin

    Two distinct projects involving spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented. Data from both the Legacy (SDSS-II) and BOSS (SDSS-III) surveys are used to study stellar populations and active galactic nuclei in old, red galaxies. In the first project, we infer stellar metallicity and abundance ratio gradients for a sample of red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Main galaxy sample. Because this sample does not have multiple spectra at various radii in a single galaxy, we measure these gradients statistically. This method is possible because for a fixed aperture size and a varying redshift range, the aperture will cover different physical sizes on each galaxy dependent on redshift. We stack galaxy spectra in relatively narrow redshift bins and calculate several absorption line indices in projected annuli by differencing spectra in neighboring redshift bins. After determining the line indices, we use stellar population modeling from the EZ_Ages software to calculate ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios within each annulus. Our data covers the central regions of these galaxies, out to slightly higher than 1 Re. We find detectable gradients in metallicity and relatively shallow gradients in abundance ratios, similar to results found for direct measurements of individual galaxies. We compare this data to previous observations and find general agreement, and then briefly to several theoretical studies simulating galaxy evolution models to see what the metallicity gradients and abundance ratios imply about the evolutionary track of these red galaxies. This project also involves developing a code framework to verify this method, with potential more generally applicable future uses. For the second project, we examine the sample of luminous galaxies in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We find a potentially new observational class of AGN, one with strong and broad MgII 2799A line emission, but very weak emission in

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Herschel far-IR counterparts of SDSS galaxies (Dominguez+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez Sanchez, H.; Bongiovanni, A.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Oteo, I.; Cepa, J.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Ederoclite, A.; Lutz, D.; Cresci, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present results for galaxies from the SDSS-DR7, with a counterpart from the PEP (Lutz et al., 2011, Cat. J/A+A/532/A90) Herschel survey in two different fields: the COSMOS field (Scoville et al. 2007ApJS..172....1S) and the Lockman Hole (LH hereafter; Lockman, Jahoda & McCammon 1986ApJ...302..432L). (1 data file).

  8. Catalogs of Compact Groups of Galaxies from the Enhanced SDSS DR12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Zahid, H. Jabran; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2016-08-01

    We apply a friends-of-friends algorithm to an enhanced SDSS DR12 spectroscopic catalog, including redshift from the literature to construct a catalog of 1588 N≥slant 3 compact groups of galaxies containing 5178 member galaxies and covering the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.19. This catalog contains 18 times as many systems and reaches 3 times the depth of the similar catalog of Barton et al. We construct catalogs from both magnitude-limited and volume-limited galaxy samples. Like Barton et al. we omit the frequently applied isolation criterion in the compact group selection algorithm. Thus the groups selected by fixed projected spatial and rest-frame line-of-sight velocity separation produce a catalog of groups with a redshift-independent median size. In contrast to previous catalogs, the enhanced SDSS DR12 catalog (including galaxies with r < 14.5) includes many systems with z ≲ 0.05. The volume-limited samples are unique to this study. The compact group candidates in these samples have a median stellar mass independent of redshift. Groups with velocity dispersion ≲100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 show abundant evidence for ongoing dynamical interactions among the members. The number density of the volume-limited catalogs agrees with previous catalogs at the lowest redshifts but decreases as the redshift increases. The SDSS fiber placement constraints limit the catalog’s completeness. In spite of this issue, the volume-limited catalogs provide a promising basis for detailed spatially resolved probes of the impact of galaxy–galaxy interactions within similar dense systems over a broad redshift range.

  9. Galaxies in Filaments have More Satellites: The Influence of the Cosmic Web on the Satellite Luminosity Function in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Quan; Tempel, E.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. < M prim. + 2.0) by a factor of ~2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  10. A catalogue of photometric redshifts for the SDSS-DR9 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; De Stefano, V.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Accurate photometric redshifts for large samples of galaxies are among the main products of modern multiband digital surveys. Over the last decade, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has become a sort of benchmark against which to test the various methods. Aims: We present an application of a new method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. Methods: The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE), is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. Results: The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ = 0.023 with a very small average bias of ~3 × 10-5, and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 2σ) of ~5%. This result is slightly better than what was already available in the literature in terms of the smaller fraction of catastrophic outliers as well. The produced catalogue, composed by 58 tables is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A126

  11. Exploring the SDSS Photometric Galaxies with Clustering Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-04-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SED). We identify and locate star-forming, quiescent galaxies, and AGN, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric redshift estimates (likely artifacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  12. Exploring the SDSS photometric galaxies with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify and locate star-forming quiescent galaxies, and active galactic nuclei, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering-redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric-redshift estimates (likely artefacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high-redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectral galaxy pairs from SDSS DR9 (Yang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Luo, A.; Chen, X.; Zhang, J.; Hou, W.; Cai, J.; Wei, P.; Ren, J.; Liu, X.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Spectral galaxy pairs (hereafter as SGPs) are composite galaxy spectra that contain two independent redshift systems. These spectra are useful for studying the dust properties of the foreground galaxies. In this article, a total of 165 spectra of SGPs are mined from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) using the concept of 'membership degree' from fuzzy set theory, especially defined to be suitable for fuzzy identification of emission lines. The spectra and images of this sample are classified according to their membership degree and image features, respectively. Many of the second redshift systems are too small or too dim to select from SDSS images alone, making the sample a potentially unique source of information on dust effects in low-luminosity or low surface brightness galaxies, which are underrepresented in morphological pair samples. The dust extinction of those objects with high membership degree is also estimated by Balmer decrement. Additionally, analyses for a series of spectroscopic observations of one SGP from 165 systems indicate that a newly star-forming region of our Milky Way might exist. (1 data file).

  14. Low-redshift quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82. Host galaxy colours and close environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Falomo, R.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Karhunen, K.; Uslenghi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a photometrical and morphological multicolour study of the properties of low-redshift (z < 0.3) quasar hosts based on a large and homogeneous data set of quasars derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7). We used quasars that were imaged in the SDSS Stripe82 that is up to 2 mag deeper than standard Sloan images. This sample is part of a larger data set of ˜400 quasars at z < 0.5 for which both the host galaxies and their galaxy environments were studied. For 52 quasars, we undertake a study of the colour of the host galaxies and of their close environments in the u, g, r, i and z bands. We are able to resolve almost all the quasars in the sample in the filters g, r, i and z and also in u for about 50 per cent of the targets. We found that the mean colours of the QSO host galaxy (g - i = 0.82 ± 0.26; r - i = 0.26 ± 0.16 and u - g = 1.32 ± 0.25) are very similar to the values of a sample of inactive galaxies matched in terms of redshift and galaxy luminosity with the quasar sample. There is a suggestion that the most massive QSO hosts have bluer colours. Both quasar hosts and the comparison sample of inactive galaxies have candidates of close (<50 kpc) companion galaxies for ˜30 per cent of the sources with no significant difference between active and inactive galaxies. We do not find significant correlation between the central black hole (BH) mass and the quasar host luminosity that appears to be extra luminous at a given BH mass with respect to the local relation (MBH - Mhost) for inactive galaxies. This confirms previous suggestion that a substantial disc component, not correlated with the BH mass, is present in the galaxies hosting low-z quasars. These results support a scenario where the activation of the nucleus has negligible effects on the global structural and photometrical properties of the hosting galaxies.

  15. SDSS IV MaNGA - Spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams: A proof that many galaxies are LIERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Francesco; Maiolino, Roberto; Maraston, Claudia; Emsellem, Eric; Bershady, Matthew A.; Masters, Karen L.; Yan, Renbin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Boquien, Médéric; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Heckman, Timothy M.; Law, David R.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Stanghellini, Letizia; Thomas, Daniel; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spatially resolved excitation properties of the ionised gas in a sample of 646 galaxies using integral field spectroscopy data from SDSS-IV MaNGA. Making use of Baldwin-Philips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams we demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of extended (kpc scale) low ionisation emission-line regions (LIERs) in both star forming and quiescent galaxies. In star forming galaxies LIER emission can be associated with diffuse ionised gas, most evident as extra-planar emission in edge-on systems. In addition, we identify two main classes of galaxies displaying LIER emission: `central LIER' (cLIER) galaxies, where central LIER emission is spatially extended, but accompanied by star formation at larger galactocentric distances, and `extended LIER' (eLIER) galaxies, where LIER emission is extended throughout the whole galaxy. In eLIER and cLIER galaxies, LIER emission is associated with radially flat, low Hα equivalent width of line emission (< 3 Å) and stellar population indices demonstrating the lack of young stellar populations, implying that line emission follows tightly the continuum due to the underlying old stellar population. The Hα surface brightness radial profiles are always shallower than 1/r2 and the line ratio [OIII]λ5007/[OII]λ3727,29 (a tracer of the ionisation parameter of the gas) shows a flat gradient. This combined evidence strongly supports the scenario in which LIER emission is not due to a central point source but to diffuse stellar sources, the most likely candidates being hot, evolved (post-asymptotic giant branch) stars. Shocks are observed to play a significant role in the ionisation of the gas only in rare merging and interacting systems.

  16. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  17. Ongoing assembly of massive galaxies by major merging in large groups and clusters from the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng; Hertzberg, Jen; Katz, Neal; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the incidence of major mergers creating massive (Mstar > 1011Msolar) galaxies in present-day (z <= 0.12) groups and clusters. Using a volume-limited sample of 845 groups with dark matter halo masses above 2.5 × 1013Msolar, we isolate 221 galaxy pairs with <=1.5r-band magnitude differences, <=30 kpc projected separations and combined masses above 1011Msolar. We fit the r-band images of each pair as the line-of-sight projection of symmetric models and identify 38 mergers by the presence of residual asymmetric structure associated with both progenitors, such as non-concentric isophotes, broad and diffuse tidal tails and dynamical friction wakes. In other words, at the resolution and sensitivity of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 16 per cent of massive major pairs in dense environments have mutual tidal interaction signatures; relying on automated searches of major pairs from the SDSS spectroscopic galaxy sample will result in missing 70 per cent of these mergers owing to spectroscopic incompleteness in high-density regions. We find that 90 per cent of these mergers are between two nearly equal-mass progenitors with red-sequence colours and centrally concentrated morphologies, in agreement with numerical simulations that predict that an important mechanism for the formation of massive elliptical galaxies is the dissipationless (gas-poor or so-called dry) major merging of spheroid-dominated galaxies. We identify seven additional massive mergers with disturbed morphologies and semiresolved double nuclei; thus, 1.5 +/- 0.2 per cent of Mstar >= 5 × 1010Msolar galaxies in large groups are involved in the major merger assembly of massive galaxies. Mergers at the centres of these groups are more common than between two satellites, but both types are morphologically indistinguishable and we tentatively conclude that the latter are likely located at the dynamical centres of large subhaloes that have recently been accreted by their host halo. Based on

  18. Flying across Galaxy Clusters with Google Earth: additional imagery from SDSS co-added data

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; Annis, James; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are spectacular. We provide a Google Earth compatible imagery for the deep co-added images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and make it a tool for examing galaxy clusters. Google Earth (in sky mode) provides a highly interactive environment for visualizing the sky. By encoding the galaxy cluster information into a kml/kmz file, one can use Google Earth as a tool for examining galaxy clusters and fly across them freely. However, the resolution of the images provided by Google Earth is not very high. This is partially because the major imagery google earth used is from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (SDSS collaboration 2000) and the resolutions have been reduced to speed up the web transferring. To have higher resolution images, you need to add your own images in a way that Google Earth can understand. The SDSS co-added data are the co-addition of {approx}100 scans of images from SDSS stripe 82 (Annis et al. 2010). It provides the deepest images based on SDSS and reach as deep as about redshift 1.0. Based on the co-added images, we created color images in a way as described by Lupton et al. (2004) and convert the color images to Google Earth compatible images using wcs2kml (Brewer et al. 2007). The images are stored at a public server at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and can be accessed by the public. To view those images in Google Earth, you need to download a kmz file, which contains the links to the color images, and then open the kmz file with your Google Earth. To meet different needs for resolutions, we provide three kmz files corresponding to low, medium and high resolution images. We recommend the high resolution one as long as you have a broadband Internet connection, though you should choose to download any of them, depending on your own needs and Internet speed. After you open the downloaded kmz file with Google Earth (in sky mode), it takes about 5 minutes (depending on your Internet connection and the resolution of images you

  19. Detection of stacked filament lensing between SDSS luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Miyatake, Hironao; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Takada, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    We search for the lensing signal of massive filaments between 135 000 pairs of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop a new estimator that cleanly removes the much larger shear signal of the neighbouring LRG haloes, relying only on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider two models: a `thick'-filament model constructed from ray-tracing simulations for Λ cold dark matter model, and a `thin'-filament model which models the filament by a string of haloes along the line connecting the two LRGs. We show that the filament lensing signal is in nice agreement with the thick simulation filament, while strongly disfavouring the thin model. The magnitude of the lensing shear due to the filament is below 10-4. Employing the likelihood ratio test, we find a 4.5σ significance for the detection of the filament lensing signal, corresponding to a null hypothesis fluctuation probability of 3 × 10-6. We also carried out several null tests to verify that the residual shear signal from neighbouring LRGs and other shear systematics are minimized.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A VERY BRIGHT, STRONGLY LENSED z = 2 GALAXY IN THE SDSS DR5

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Huan; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Diehl, H. Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa

    2009-07-10

    We report on the discovery of a very bright z = 2.00 star-forming galaxy that is strongly lensed by a foreground z = 0.422 luminous red galaxy (LRG), SDSS J120602.09+514229.5. This system, nicknamed the 'Clone', was found in a systematic search for bright arcs lensed by LRGs and brightest cluster galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. Follow-up observations on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A simple lens model for the system, assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass distribution, yields an Einstein radius of {theta}{sub Ein} = 3.82 {+-} 0.''03 or 14.8 {+-} 0.1 h{sup -1} kpc at the lens redshift. The total projected mass enclosed within the Einstein radius is 2.10 {+-} 0.03 x 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M{sub sun}, and the magnification factor for the source galaxy is 27 {+-} 1. Combining the lens model with our gVriz photometry, we find a (unlensed) star formation rate (SFR) for the source galaxy of 32 h{sup -1} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}, adopting a fiducial constant SFR model with an age of 100 Myr and E(B - V) = 0.25. With an apparent magnitude of r = 19.8, this system is among the very brightest lensed z {>=} 2 galaxies, and provides an excellent opportunity to pursue detailed studies of the physical properties of an individual high-redshift star-forming galaxy.

  1. Using SDSS & GalaxyZoo Databases to Ask Research-able Questions in Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Using Galaxy Zoo1 at: http://zoo1.galaxyzoo.org/ accessing SDSS and a multi-phase backwards faded scaffolding approach, we first ask students to classify 30 galaxies and consider proposed conclusion: "most galaxies are elliptical” based on the evidence collected. Here, student attention is isolated from generating a question or even a data collection protocol, but focused on the issue of "does the evidence match the conclusion?” The next phase focuses on generating conclusions from evidence, whereas the previous phase was focused on evaluating conclusions. Students explain their reasoning provide evidence in response to "What conclusions and generalizations can you make from the following data collected by a student in terms of do spiral galaxies generally spin clockwise or anticlockwise given that one observes 36 spirals spinning clockwise, 21 spirals spinning anticlockwise, and 16 appearing to be edge-on or unclear.” Next, students are asked to consider what evidence needs to be collected in order to complete a scientific inquiry related to a given question. Students propose what evidence is needed in order to pursue, "What fraction of galaxies observed appear to be in the process of merging with other galaxies?” Note students are explicitly asked not to actually gather data as it detracts from developing an understanding of how data collection needs to be tightly aligned with the question. And, in practice, students can intellectually engage with a data collection plan that is simply too ominous to actually collect. By this point, students have extended experience with inquiry in this domain. Students are now ready to wrestle with creating a fruitful question. Students are tasked to design an answerable research question, propose a plan to pursue evidence, collect data using the present astronomical data base and create an evidence-based conclusion about the nature and or frequency of galaxies.

  2. Photometric Redshift Probability Distributions for Galaxies in the SDSS DR8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Cunha, Carlos E.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brinkmann, J.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-08-01

    We present redshift probability distributions for galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 imaging data. We used the nearest-neighbor weighting algorithm to derive the ensemble redshift distribution N(z), and individual redshift probability distributions P(z) for galaxies with r < 21.8 and u < 29.0. As part of this technique, we calculated weights for a set of training galaxies with known redshifts such that their density distribution in five-dimensional color-magnitude space was proportional to that of the photometry-only sample, producing a nearly fair sample in that space. We estimated the ensemble N(z) of the photometric sample by constructing a weighted histogram of the training-set redshifts. We derived P(z)'s for individual objects by using training-set objects from the local color-magnitude space around each photometric object. Using the P(z) for each galaxy can reduce the statistical error in measurements that depend on the redshifts of individual galaxies. The spectroscopic training sample is substantially larger than that used for the DR7 release. The newly added PRIMUS catalog is now the most important training set used in this analysis by a wide margin. We expect the primary sources of error in the N(z) reconstruction to be sample variance and spectroscopic failures: The training sets are drawn from relatively small volumes of space, and some samples have large incompleteness. Using simulations we estimated the uncertainty in N(z) due to sample variance at a given redshift to be ~10%-15%. The uncertainty on calculations incorporating N(z) or P(z) depends on how they are used; we discuss the case of weak lensing measurements. The P(z) catalog is publicly available from the SDSS Web site.

  3. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR GALAXIES IN THE SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Cunha, Carlos E.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Brinkmann, J.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-08-01

    We present redshift probability distributions for galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 imaging data. We used the nearest-neighbor weighting algorithm to derive the ensemble redshift distribution N(z), and individual redshift probability distributions P(z) for galaxies with r < 21.8 and u < 29.0. As part of this technique, we calculated weights for a set of training galaxies with known redshifts such that their density distribution in five-dimensional color-magnitude space was proportional to that of the photometry-only sample, producing a nearly fair sample in that space. We estimated the ensemble N(z) of the photometric sample by constructing a weighted histogram of the training-set redshifts. We derived P(z)'s for individual objects by using training-set objects from the local color-magnitude space around each photometric object. Using the P(z) for each galaxy can reduce the statistical error in measurements that depend on the redshifts of individual galaxies. The spectroscopic training sample is substantially larger than that used for the DR7 release. The newly added PRIMUS catalog is now the most important training set used in this analysis by a wide margin. We expect the primary sources of error in the N(z) reconstruction to be sample variance and spectroscopic failures: The training sets are drawn from relatively small volumes of space, and some samples have large incompleteness. Using simulations we estimated the uncertainty in N(z) due to sample variance at a given redshift to be {approx}10%-15%. The uncertainty on calculations incorporating N(z) or P(z) depends on how they are used; we discuss the case of weak lensing measurements. The P(z) catalog is publicly available from the SDSS Web site.

  4. Outflows and complex stellar kinematics in SDSS star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicone, C.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the properties of star-formation-driven outflows by using a large spectroscopic sample of ~160 000 local "normal" star-forming galaxies drawn from the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS), spanning a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M∗). The galaxy sample is divided into a fine grid of bins in the M∗-SFR parameter space, for each of which we produced a composite spectrum by stacking the SDSS spectra of the galaxies contained in that bin together. We exploited the high signal-to-noise of the stacked spectra to study the emergence of faint features of optical emission lines that may trace galactic outflows and are otherwise too faint to detect in individual galaxy spectra. We have adopted a novel approach that relies on the comparison between the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LoSVD) of the ionised gas (as traced by the [OIII]λ5007 and Hα+[NII]λλ6548, 6583 emission lines) and the LoSVD of the stars, which are used as a reference for tracing virial motions. Significant deviations in the gas kinematics from the stellar kinematics in the high-velocity tail of the LoSVDs are interpreted as a signature of outflows. Our results suggest that the incidence of ionised outflows increases with SFR and specific SFR. The outflow velocity (vout) is found to correlate tightly with the SFR for SFR> 1 M⊙ yr-1, whereas the dependence of vout on SFR is nearly flat at lower SFRs. The outflow velocity appears to also increase with the stellar velocity dispersion (σ∗), although this relation has a much larger scatter than the one with SFR, and we infer velocities as high as vout ~ (6-8)σ∗. Strikingly, we detect the signature of ionised outflows only in galaxies located above the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies in the M∗-SFR diagram, and the incidence of such outflows increases sharply with the offset from the MS. This result suggests that star-formation-driven outflows may be responsible for shaping the upper

  5. Spectral energy distributions of an AKARI-SDSS-GALEX sample of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Heinis, S.; Yuan, F.-T.; Burgarella, D.; Noll, S.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The nearby universe remains the best laboratory to understand the physical properties of galaxies and is a reference for any comparison with high redshift observations. The all sky (or very large) surveys that have been performed from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (far-IR) provide us with large datasets of very large wavelength coverage to perform a reference study. Aims: We investigate the dust attenuation characteristics, as well as the star formation rate (SFR) calibrations of a sample of nearby galaxies observed over 13 bands from 0.15 to 160 μm. Methods: A sample of 363 galaxies is built from the AKARI /FIS all sky survey cross-correlated with the SDSS and GALEX surveys. Broad-band spectral energy distributions are fitted with the CIGALE code optimized to analyse variations in the dust attenuation curves and SFR measurements and based on an energetic budget between the stellar and dust emission. Results: Our galaxy sample is primarily selected in far-IR and mostly constituted of massive, actively star-forming galaxies. There is some evidence for a dust attenuation law that is slightly steeper than that used for starburst galaxies but we are unable to constrain the presence or not of a bump at 220 nm. We confirm that a time-dependent dust attenuation is necessary to perform the best fits. Various calibrations of the dust attenuation in the UV as a function of UV-optical colours are discussed. A calibration of the current SFR combining UV and total IR emissions is proposed with an accurate estimate of dust heating by old stars. For the whole sample, 17% of the total dust luminosity is unrelated to the recent star formation.

  6. Probing the Stellar Content of Galaxy Groups with Value-Added Group Catalogues in the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Victor; Berlind, Andreas A.; Sinha, Manodeep; McBride, Cameron; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We present galaxy group catalogues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7). Specifically, we use the Berlind et. al. (2006) Friends-of-Friends group finding algorithm to identify galaxy groups and clusters in three volume-limited samples. We assign group masses, Mgroup, to the galaxy groups via abundance matching based on their total luminosity, and we designate galaxies as centrals or satellites, where each central galaxy is the brightest member of its group. Additionally, we assign stellar masses, Mstar, and star formation rates, SFRs, to the galaxies from the MPA-JHU value- added catalogue. We explore the relationships between Mstar, SFR, and Mgroup for central and satellite galaxies, as well as for galaxy groups as a whole. We also present a set of mock group catalogues that are constructed from N-body simulations and we use them to estimate the impact of group-finding errors on our results. The SDSS and mock group catalogues will be made publicly available.

  7. What stellar populations can tell us about the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Gomes, J. M.; Schlickmann, M.; Mateus, A.; Schoenell, W.

    2010-04-01

    During the last three decades, many papers have reported the existence of a luminosity metallicity or mass metallicity (M-Z) relation for all kinds of galaxies: The more massive galaxies are also the ones with more metal-rich interstellar medium. We have obtained the mass-metallicity relation at different lookback times for the same set of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using the stellar metallicities estimated with our spectral synthesis code starlight. Using stellar metallicities has several advantages: We are free of the biases that affect the calibration of nebular metallicities; we can include in our study objects for which the nebular metallicity cannot be measured, such as AGN hosts and passive galaxies; we can probe metallicities at different epochs of a galaxy evolution. We have found that the M-Z relation steepens and spans a wider range in both mass and metallicity at higher redshifts for SDSS galaxies. We also have modeled the time evolution of stellar metallicity with a closed-box chemical evolution model, for galaxies of different types and masses. Our results suggest that the M-Z relation for galaxies with present-day stellar masses down to 1010 M⊙ is mainly driven by the star formation history and not by inflows or outflows.

  8. PROPERTIES OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN THE SDSS PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITIES, COLORS, AND PROJECTED NUMBER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lares, M.; Lambas, D. G.; Dominguez, M. J.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze photometric data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) to infer statistical properties of faint satellites associated with isolated bright galaxies (M{sub r} < -20.5) in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.1. The mean projected radial number density profile shows an excess of companions in the photometric sample around the primaries, with approximately a power-law shape that extends up to {approx_equal} 700 kpc. Given this overdensity signal, a suitable background subtraction method is used to study the statistical properties of the population of bound satellites, down to magnitude M{sub r} = -14.5, in the projected radial distance range 100 < r{sub p} /kpc < 3(R{sub vir}). The maximum projected distance corresponds to the range 470-660 kpc for the different samples. We have also considered a color cut consistent with the observed colors of spectroscopic satellites in nearby galaxies so that distant redshifted galaxies do not dominate the statistics. We have tested the implementation of this background subtraction procedure using a mock catalog derived from the Millennium simulation semianalytic galaxy catalog based on a {Lambda} cold dark matter model. We find that the method is effective in reproducing the true projected radial satellite number density profile and luminosity distributions, providing confidence in the results derived from SDSS data. We find that the spatial extent of satellite systems is larger for bright, red primaries. Also, we find a larger spatial distribution of blue satellites. For the different samples analyzed, we derive the average number of satellites and their luminosity distributions down to M{sub r} = -14.5. The mean number of satellites depends very strongly on host luminosity. Bright primaries (M{sub r} < -21.5) host on average {approx}6 satellites with M{sub r} < -14.5. This number is reduced for primaries with lower luminosities (-21.5 < M{sub r} < -20.5) which have less than one satellite per host. We

  9. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Faint quenched galaxies I- Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-08-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ < M⋆ < 5 × 109 M⊙, EWHα < 2 Å, and all have red colours (u - r) > 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot < 15 km s-1 at ˜1 Re, and may be dominated by pressure support at all radii. Two galaxies in our sample have kinematically distinct cores in their stellar component, likely the result of accretion. Six contain ionised gas despite not hosting ongoing star formation, and this gas is typically kinematically misaligned from their stellar component. This is the first large-scale Integral Field Unit (IFU) study of low mass galaxies selected without bias against low-density environments. Nevertheless, we find the majority of these galaxies are within ˜1.5 Mpc of a bright neighbour (MK < -23; or M⋆ > 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  10. Spatially Resolved Stellar Populations Of Nearby Post-Starburst Galaxies In SDSS-IV MaNGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Charles; Betances, Ashley; Bonilla, Alaina Marie; Gonzalez, Andrea; Migliore, Christina; Goddard, Daniel; Masters, Karen; SDSS-IV MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    We have selected five galaxies in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) project of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) identified as post-starburst (E+A) systems, in the transition between "blue cloud" and "red sequence" galaxies. We measure the equivalent widths of the Balmer series, D4000 break, and metal lines across each galaxy, and produce maps of the stellar age, stellar mass, and metallicities of each galaxy using FIREFLY, a full spectral analysis code. We have found that the measured properties of the galaxies overall generally matches well with single-aperture SDSS spectra from which the original post-starburst identifications were made. The variation in the spatial distributions of the stellar populations, in particular the A-stars, give us insight into the details of the transitional E+A quenching phase. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement No. SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  11. Catalog of Four-Color Photometry of Stars, Galaxies, and QSOs Using SDSS Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, Heidi Jo; Richards, Gordon T.; Richmond, Michael; Fan, Xiaohui

    1999-08-01

    We present a catalog containing the measurements of 2262 sources, including 334 extended sources, 1915 point sources, and 13 known QSOs, in five SDSS passbands. Of these objects, over 1600 are measured in 15 fields covering 0.5 deg2, with a limiting magnitude of r{sup *}<19.5, similar to the photometric limit of the SDSS spectroscopic survey. Color plots of the data show that stars, galaxies, and quasars are fairly well separated by color alone. The stellar locus populates a ribbon-like subset of color-color-color space. It is shown that stars, galaxies, and QSOs tend toward the same fundamental plane in three-dimensional color space. The stars are compared with synthetic photometry from Kurucz models; the agreement is consistent with the errors in the data. The stellar locus moves in color space by about a tenth of a magnitude from r{sup *}=14 to r{sup *}=19.5. The shift is consistent with a shift in the metallicity from about [Me/H] = -1 to [Me/H] = -2. We compare this with previously measured metallicity gradients as a function of distance from the galactic plane. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  12. The infrared luminosities of ˜332 000 SDSS galaxies predicted from artificial neural networks and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossein; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The total infrared (IR) luminosity (LIR) can be used as a robust measure of a galaxy's star formation rate (SFR), even in the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN), or when optical emission lines are weak. Unfortunately, existing all sky far-IR surveys, such as the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and AKARI, are relatively shallow and are biased towards the highest SFR galaxies and lowest redshifts. More sensitive surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory are limited to much smaller areas. In order to construct a large sample of LIR measurements for galaxies in the nearby Universe, we employ artificial neural networks (ANNs), using 1136 galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 sample as the training set. The networks are validated using two independent data sets (IRAS and AKARI) and demonstrated to predict the LIR with a scatter σ ˜ 0.23 dex, and with no systematic offset. Importantly, the ANN performs well for both star-forming galaxies and those with an AGN. A public catalogue is presented with our LIR predictions which can be used to determine SFRs for 331 926 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including ˜129 000 SFRs for AGN-dominated galaxies for which SDSS SFRs have large uncertainties.

  13. New candidates for extremely metal-poor emission-line galaxies in the SDSS/BOSS DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Y. I.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of eight extremely low-metallicity candidate emission-line galaxies with oxygen abundances possibly below 12 + log O/H = 7.35. These galaxies were selected from data release 10 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS/BOSS DR10). We will call these extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies. The electron temperature-sensitive emission line [O iii] λ4363 is detected in three galaxies and marginally detected in two galaxies, allowing for abundance determination by a "direct" method. Because of large uncertainties in the [O iii]λ4363 Å line fluxes, we also calculated oxygen abundance in these galaxies together with the remaining three galaxies using a strong-line semi-empirical method. This method gives oxygen abundances higher than 7.35 for three galaxies with detected [O iii]λ4363 Å line and lower than 7.35 for the remaining five objects of the sample. The newly-discovered galaxies represent excellent targets for follow-up spectroscopic observations with the largest telescopes to improve the oxygen abundance determination and to increase the number of these very rare low-metallicity objects. The extreme location of the most massive and luminous XMD galaxies and XMD candidates in the stellar mass-metallicity diagram implies that these galaxies may be genuine young objects. With stellar masses of up to ~107-108M⊙, the galaxies are not chemically enriched and strongly deviate to lower metallicity as compared to the relation obtained for a large sample of low-redshift, star-forming galaxies. Tables 2-4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Early-Tyoe Galaxies in SDSS and GALEX (Hernandez-Perez+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Perez, F.; Bruzual, G.

    2015-04-01

    To study the UVX phenomenon in ETGs using the Hernandez-Perez & Bruzual (2013MNRAS.431.2612H) models, we must build a sample of galaxies observed both in the UV and optical ranges. The SDSS and the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey (GALEX-MIS) overlap over 1000 square degrees in the sky and contain a considerable number of objects in common. We use SDSS pipeline parameters to select ETG candidates from the SDSS-DR8 (Aihara et al., 2011ApJS..193...29A), which will then matched to their GALEX counterparts. (1 data file).

  15. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SDSS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATES AND HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yan; Pritchet, Chris

    2013-03-15

    Studying the correlation of Type Ia supernova rates (SNRs) with host galaxy properties is an important step in understanding the exact nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We use SNe Ia from the SDSS-II sample, spectroscopically determined masses and star formation rates, and a new maximum likelihood method, to fit the Scannapieco and Bildsten rate model SNR = A Multiplication-Sign M + B Multiplication-Sign SFR, where M is galaxy mass and SFR is star formation rate. We find A = 3.5{sup +0.9}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun }){sup -1} and B = 1.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}){sup -1}, assuming overall efficiency of 0.5. This is in reasonable agreement with other determinations. However we find strong evidence that this model is a poor fit to other projections of the data: it fails to correctly predict the distribution of supernovae with host mass or SFR. An additional model parameter is required; most likely this parameter is related to host galaxy mass. Some implications of this result are discussed.

  16. X-ray survey of galaxy clusters in the SDSS Stripe 82 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, Florence; Takey, Ali

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a survey of galaxy clusters detected from XMM-Newton observations covering an area of 11.25 deg^2 in the Stripe 82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We found 94 X-ray cluster candidates from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue (3XMM-DR5) and correlated this list with recently published X-ray and optically selected cluster catalogues to obtain optical confirmations and redshifts (between 0.05 and 1.19, with a median of 0.36) for 54 galaxy groups/clusters. Of these, 17 are newly X-ray discovered clusters and 45 systems with spectroscopic confirmations. Among the remaining candidates, 25 sources are distant cluster candidates (beyond a redshift of 0.6). We will present preliminary results on the X-ray and optical properties of these clusters: luminosities and temperatures of the X-ray gas, and optical properties of the galaxies (morphology, luminosity functions).

  17. Local SDSS galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 survey: a critical assessment of optically derived star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    We study a set of 3319 galaxies in the redshift interval 0.04 < z < 0.15 with far-infrared (FIR) coverage from the Herschel Stripe 82 survey (HerS), and emission-line measurements, redshifts, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (DR7) MPA/JHU data base. About 40 per cent of the sample are detected in the Herschel/SPIRE 250 μm band. Total infrared (TIR) luminosities derived from HerS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry allow us to compare infrared and optical estimates of SFR with unprecedented statistics for diverse classes of galaxies. We find excellent agreement between TIR-derived and emission line-based SFRs for H II galaxies. Other classes, such as active galaxies and evolved galaxies, exhibit systematic discrepancies between optical and TIR SFRs. We demonstrate that these offsets are attributable primarily to survey biases and the large intrinsic uncertainties of the Dn4000- and colour-based optical calibrations used to estimate the SDSS SFRs of these galaxies. Using a classification scheme which expands upon popular emission-line methods, we demonstrate that emission-line galaxies with uncertain classifications include a population of massive, dusty, metal-rich star-forming systems that are frequently neglected in existing studies. We also study the capabilities of infrared selection of star-forming galaxies. FIR selection reveals a substantial population of galaxies dominated by cold dust which are missed by the long-wavelength WISE bands. Our results demonstrate that Herschel large-area surveys offer the means to construct large, relatively complete samples of local star-forming galaxies with accurate estimates of SFR that can be used to study the interplay between nuclear activity and star formation.

  18. The luminosities of the brightest cluster galaxies and brightest satellites in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-06-01

    We show that the distribution of luminosities of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based group catalogue suggests that BCG luminosities are just the statistical extremes of the group galaxy luminosity function. The latter happens to be very well approximated by the all-galaxy luminosity function (restricted to Mr < -19.9), provided one uses a parametrization of this function that is accurate at the bright end. A similar analysis of the luminosity distribution of the brightest satellite galaxies (BSGs) suggests that they are best thought of as being the second brightest pick from the same luminosity distribution of which BCGs are the brightest. That is, BSGs are not the brightest of some universal satellite luminosity functions, in contrast to what halo model analyses of the luminosity dependence of clustering suggest. However, we then use mark correlations to provide a novel test of these order statistics, showing that the hypothesis of a universal luminosity function (i.e. no halo mass dependence) from which the BCGs and BSGs are drawn is incompatible with the data, despite the fact that there was no hint of this in the BCG and BSG luminosity distributions themselves. We also discuss why, since extreme value statistics are explicitly a function of the number of draws, the consistency of BCG luminosities with extreme value statistics is most clearly seen if one is careful to perform the test at fixed group richness N. Tests at e.g. fixed total group luminosity Ltot will generally be biased and may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  19. Search for Hyperluminous Infrared Dust-obscured Galaxies Selected with WISE and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Y.; Nagao, T.

    2016-03-01

    We aim to search for hyperluminous infrared (IR) galaxies (HyLIRGs) with IR luminosity {L}{{IR}} > 1013 L⊙ by applying the selection method of dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). They are spatially rare but could correspond to a maximum phase of cosmic star formation (SF) and/or active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity hence, they are a crucial population for understanding the SF and mass assembly history of galaxies. Combining the optical and IR catalogs obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we performed the extensive HyLIRGs survey; we selected 5311 IR-bright DOGs with i - [22] > 7.0 and flux at 22 μm > 3.8 mJy in 14,555 deg2, where i and [22] are i-band and 22 μm AB magnitudes, respectively. Among them, 67 DOGs have reliable spectroscopic redshifts that enable us to estimate their total IR luminosity based on the spectral energy distribution fitting. Consequently, we successfully discovered 24 HyLIRGs among the 67 spectroscopically confirmed DOGs. We found that (i) i - [22] color of IR-bright DOGs correlates with the total IR luminosity and (ii) the surface number density of HyLIRGs is >0.17 deg-2. A large fraction (˜73%) of IR-bright DOGs with i - [22] > 7.5 show {L}{{IR}} > 1013 L⊙, and the DOG criterion we adopted could be independently effective against the “W1W2-dropout method,” based on four WISE bands, for searching hyperluminous IR populations of galaxies.

  20. Bars in Disk-dominated and Bulge-dominated Galaxies at z ~ 0: New Insights from ~3600 SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazza, Fabio D.; Jogee, Shardha; Marinova, Irina

    2008-03-01

    We present a study of large-scale bars in the local universe, based on a large sample of 3692 galaxies, with 18.5 <= Mg < - 22.0 mag and redshift 0.01 <= z < 0.03, drawn from the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. Our sample includes many galaxies that are disk-dominated and of late Hubble types. Both color cuts and Sérsic cuts yield a similar sample of ~2000 disk galaxies. We characterize bars and disks by ellipse-fitting r-band images and applying quantitative criteria. After excluding highly inclined (60°) systems, we find the following results. (1) The optical r-band fraction (fopt - r) of barred galaxies, when averaged over the whole sample, is ~48%-52%. (2) When galaxies are separated according to half light radius (re), or normalized re/R24, which is a measure of the bulge-to-disk (B/D) ratio, a remarkable result is seen: fopt - r rises sharply, from ~40% in galaxies that have small re/R24 and visually appear to host prominent bulges, to ~70% for galaxies that have large re/R24 and appear disk-dominated. (3) For galaxies with bluer colors, fopt - r rises significantly (by ~30%). A weaker rise (by ~15%-20%) is seen for lower luminosities or lower masses. (4) While hierarchical ΛCDM models of galaxy evolution models fail to produce galaxies without classical bulges, our study finds that ~20% of disk galaxies appear to be ``quasi-bulgeless." (5) We outline how the effect of a decreasing resolution and a rising obscuration of bars by gas and dust over z = 0.2-1.0 can cause a significant artificial loss of bars, and an artificial reduction in the optical bar fraction over z = 0.2-1.0.

  1. Spectroscopy of supernova host galaxies from the SDSS-II SN survey with the SDSS and BOSS spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Matthew Dwaune

    Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) have been used as standard candles to measure cosmological distances. The initial discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe was performed using ~50 SNe Ia. Large SNe surveys have increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia to over a thousand with redshift coverage beyond z = 1. We are now in the age of abundant photometry without the ability for full follow-up spectroscopy of all SN candidates. SN cosmology using these large samples will increasingly rely on robust photometric classification of SN candidates. Photometric classification will increase the sample by including faint SNe as these are preferentially not observed with follow-up spectroscopy. The primary concern with using photometrically classified SNe Ia in cosmology is when a core-collapse SNe is incorrectly classified as an SN Ia. This can be mitigated by obtaining the host galaxy redshift of each SN candidate and using this information as a prior in the photometric classification, removing one degree of freedom. To test the impact of redshift on photometric classification, I have performed an assessment on photometric classification of candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. I have tested the classification with and without redshift priors by looking at the change of photometric classification, the effect of data quality on photometric classification, and the effect of SN light curve properties on photometric classification. Following our suggested classification scheme, there are a total of 1038 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1002 SNe~Ia with the spectroscopic redshift. For 912 (91.0%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Finally, I investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2

  2. HOMOGENEOUS UGRIZ PHOTOMETRY FOR ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY GALAXIES: A NON-PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS FROM SDSS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-11-15

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly {approx}10{sup 3} in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sersic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be {sigma}(B{sub T}){approx} 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to {approx} 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (B{sub T} {approx} 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ('dwarf') galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ('giant') galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample-profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness-are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a {approx}7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  3. SDSS-II Supernova Survey: An Analysis of the Largest Sample of Type Ia Supernovae and Correlations with Host-galaxy Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Rachel C.; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Fischer, John A.; Kessler, Rick; Jha, Saurabh W.; March, Marisa C.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    Using the largest single-survey sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to date, we study the relationship between properties of SNe Ia and those of their host galaxies, focusing primarily on correlations with Hubble residuals (HRs). Our sample consists of 345 photometrically classified or spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia discovered as part of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS). This analysis utilizes host-galaxy spectroscopy obtained during the SDSS-I/II spectroscopic survey and from an ancillary program on the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey that obtained spectra for nearly all host galaxies of SDSS-II SN candidates. In addition, we use photometric host-galaxy properties from the SDSS-SNS data release such as host stellar mass and star formation rate. We confirm the well-known relation between HR and host-galaxy mass and find a 3.6σ significance of a nonzero linear slope. We also recover correlations between HR and host-galaxy gas-phase metallicity and specific star formation rate as they are reported in the literature. With our large data set, we examine correlations between HR and multiple host-galaxy properties simultaneously and find no evidence of a significant correlation. We also independently analyze our spectroscopically confirmed and photometrically classified SNe Ia and comment on the significance of similar combined data sets for future surveys.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FR II radio galaxies in SDSS (Koziel-Wierzbowska+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Stasinska, G.

    2012-02-01

    We limited our search to radio sources present in the Cambridge Catalogues of Radio Sources: * 3C (Edge et al. 1959MmRAS..68...37E, Bennett 1962MmRAS..68..163B, Cat. VIII/1); * 4C (Pilkington & Scott 1965MmRAS..69..183P; Gower, Scott & Wills 1967MmRAS..71...49G, Cat. VIII/4); * 5C (Pearson 1975, Cat. J/MNRAS/171/475; Pearson & Kus 1978, J/MNRAS/182/273; Benn et al. 1982, J/MNRAS/200/747; Benn & Kenderdine 1991MNRAS.251..253B, Cat. VIII/30; Benn 1995, Cat. J/MNRAS/272/699); * 6C (Baldwin et al. 1985MNRAS.217..717B, Cat. VIII/18; Hales, Baldwin & Warner 1988MNRAS.234..919H, Cat. VIII/21, 1993MNRAS.263...25H, Cat. VIII/25; Hales et al. 1990MNRAS.246..256H, Cat. VIII/22, 1991MNRAS.251...46H, Cat. VIII/23, 1993MNRAS.262.1057H, Cat. VIII/24); * 7C (Hales et al. 2007MNRAS.382.1639H, Cat. VIII/84); * 8C (Rees 1990MNRAS.244..233R, Hales et al. 1995MNRAS.274..447H, Cat. VIII/31) and * 9C (Waldram et al. 2003, Cat. J/MNRAS/342/915), and using the SDSS CrossID we cross-identified them with the sample of 926246 galaxies from the SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample. (1 data file).

  5. Mining the SDSS Database to Teach the Evolution of Galaxy Clusters to ASTRO101 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Beth; Raddick, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy research has been undergoing an information explosion over the last few decades, with significant progress made in streamlining and simplifying Internet access to everything from telescope application processes to abstracts to multi-wavelength data. These access tools are now user-friendly enough to bring us into a new realm of teaching, giving undergraduates access to research databases using software with a gentle learning curve. We present an online module that helps introductory-level, non-science undergraduates learn to extract information about the evolution of galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. The students interface the database through the SkyServer web site at http://skyserver.sdss.org. This multimedia education module is intended for inclusion in an introductory undergraduate Astronomy course for non-science majors, as part of the galaxies and cosmology topics. It starts with a directed exploration of background information, e.g., galaxian mergers by simulations, and gradually segues into student exploration. It can be used as a PC-based laboratory activity, assigned as a homework, or used as a module in an on-line course. Support for this work was provided by the Southeast Clearinghouse (SERCH), the Maryland Space Grant Consortium, and the Simple Effective Education and Dissemination (SEED) grant program of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

  6. The Intrinsic Eddington Ratio Distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Young Galaxies from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mackenzie L.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Black, Christine; Hainline, Kevin Nicholas; DiPompeo, Michael A.

    2016-04-01

    An important question in extragalactic astronomy concerns the distribution of black hole accretion rates, i.e. the Eddington ratio distribution, of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Specifically, it is matter of debate whether AGN follow a broad distribution in accretion rates, or if the distribution is more strongly peaked at characteristic Eddington ratios. Using a sample of galaxies from SDSS DR7, we test whether an intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution that takes the form of a broad Schechter function is in fact consistent with previous work that suggests instead that young galaxies in optical surveys have a more strongly peaked lognormal Eddington ratio distribution. Furthermore, we present an improved method for extracting the AGN distribution using BPT diagnostics that allows us to probe over one order of magnitude lower in Eddington ratio, counteracting the effects of dilution by star formation. We conclude that the intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution of optically selected AGN is consistent with a power law with an exponential cutoff, as is observed in the X-rays. This work was supported in part by a NASA Jenkins Fellowship.

  7. SDSS-IV eBOSS emission-line galaxy pilot survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Jouvel, S.; Raichoor, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Le Cras, C.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D. M.; Zhu, G.; Jullo, E.; Prada, F.; Schlegel, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, H.; Bautista, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A.; Brownstein, J. R.; Dawson, K. S.; Escoffier, S.; Gaulme, P.; Kinemuchi, K.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Mariappan, V.; Newman, J. A.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Percival, W. J.; Prakash, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) will observe 195 000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to measure the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) standard ruler at redshift 0.9. To test different ELG selection algorithms, 9000 spectra were observed with the SDSS spectrograph as a pilot survey based on data from several imaging surveys. First, using visual inspection and redshift quality flags, we show that the automated spectroscopic redshifts assigned by the pipeline meet the quality requirements for a reliable BAO measurement. We also show the correlations between sky emission, signal-to-noise ratio in the emission lines, and redshift error. Then we provide a detailed description of each target selection algorithm we tested and compare them with the requirements of the eBOSS experiment. As a result, we provide reliable redshift distributions for the different target selection schemes we tested. Finally, we determine an target selection algorithms that is best suited to be applied on DECam photometry because they fulfill the eBOSS survey efficiency requirements. The catalog is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A121

  8. SDSS J085431.18+173730.5: The First Compact Elliptical Galaxy Hosting an Active Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Hilker, Michael; Ree, Change Hee; Kim, Minjin

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of a rare compact early-type galaxy, SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 (hereafter cE_AGN). It has a half-light radius of Re = 490 pc and a brightness of Mr = -18.08 mag. Optical spectroscopy available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) reveals the presence of prominent broad-line emissions with the Hα broad component width of FWHM = 2400 km s-1. The black hole (BH) mass, as estimated from the luminosity and width of the broad Hα emission, is 2.1 × 106 {M}⊙ . With the help of surface photometry, we perform a detailed analysis of the structural properties. The observed light distribution is best modeled with a double Sérsic function. Fixing the outer component as an exponential disk, we find that the inner component has a Sérsic index of n = 1.4. Considering the inner component as bulge/spheroidal we find that cE_AGN remains consistent in both the BH mass-bulge mass relation and the BH mass-bulge Sérsic index relation. Given these observational properties, we discuss its possible origin investigating the surrounding environment where it is located.

  9. Cosmological baryonic and matter densities from 600000 SDSS luminous red galaxies with photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Collister, Adrian; Bridle, Sarah; Lahav, Ofer

    2007-02-01

    We analyse MegaZ-LRG, a photometric-redshift catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) based on the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 4th Data Release. MegaZ-LRG, presented in a companion paper, contains >106 photometric redshifts derived with ANNZ, an artificial neural network method, constrained by a spectroscopic subsample of ~13000 galaxies obtained by the 2dF-SDSS LRG and Quasar (2SLAQ) survey. The catalogue spans the redshift range 0.4 < z < 0.7 with an rms redshift error σz ~ 0.03(1 + z), covering 5914 deg2 to map out a total cosmic volume 2.5h-3Gpc3. In this study we use the most reliable 600000 photometric redshifts to measure the large-scale structure using two methods: (1) a spherical harmonic analysis in redshift slices, and (2) a direct re-construction of the spatial clustering pattern using Fourier techniques. We present the first cosmological parameter fits to galaxy angular power spectra from a photometric-redshift survey. Combining the redshift slices with appropriate covariances, we determine best-fitting values for the matter density Ωm and baryon density Ωb of Ωmh = 0.195 +/- 0.023 and Ωb/Ωm = 0.16 +/- 0.036 (with the Hubble parameter h = 0.75 and scalar index of primordial fluctuations nscalar = 1 held fixed). These results are in agreement with and independent of the latest studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation, and their precision is comparable to analyses of contemporary spectroscopic-redshift surveys. We perform an extensive series of tests which conclude that our power spectrum measurements are robust against potential systematic photometric errors in the catalogue. We conclude that photometric-redshift surveys are competitive with spectroscopic surveys for measuring cosmological parameters in the simplest `vanilla' models. Future deep imaging surveys have great potential for further improvement, provided that systematic errors can be controlled.

  10. THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY: PARAMETERIZING THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATE AS A FUNCTION OF HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Dilday, Benjamin; Marriner, John; Frieman, Joshua; Kessler, Richard; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Garnavich, Peter; Jha, Saurabh W.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2012-08-10

    Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Supernova Survey-II (SDSS-II SN Survey), we measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of galaxy properties at intermediate redshift. A sample of 342 SNe Ia with 0.05 < z < 0.25 is constructed. Using broadband photometry and redshifts, we use the PEGASE.2 spectral energy distributions to estimate host galaxy stellar masses and recent star formation rates (SFRs). We find that the rate of SNe Ia per unit stellar mass is significantly higher (by a factor of {approx}30) in highly star-forming galaxies compared to passive galaxies. When parameterizing the SN Ia rate (SNR{sub Ia}) based on host galaxy properties, we find that the rate of SNe Ia in passive galaxies is not linearly proportional to the stellar mass; instead an SNR{sub Ia}{proportional_to}M{sup 0.68} is favored. However, such a parameterization does not describe the observed SNR{sub Ia} in star-forming galaxies. The SNR{sub Ia} in star-forming galaxies is well fitted by SNR{sub Ia} = (0.41 {+-} 0.15) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sup 0.72{+-}0.15} + (0.65 {+-} 0.25) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}SFR{sup 1.01{+-}0.22} (statistical errors only), where M is the host galaxy stellar mass (in M{sub Sun }) and SFR is the SFR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We show that our results, for SNe Ia in passive galaxies, are consistent with those at higher redshifts (favoring SNR{sub Ia}{proportional_to}M) when accounting for the difference in the ages of our galaxies. This suggests that the rate of SNe Ia is correlated with the age of the stellar population. The MLCS extinction parameter, A{sub V} , is similar in passive and moderately star-forming galaxies, but we find indications that it is smaller, on average, in highly star-forming galaxies. This result appears to be driven by a deficit of the reddest (A{sub V} > 0.15) SNe Ia in highly star-forming galaxies. We consider that the high levels of dust in these systems may be obscuring the reddest and faintest SNe

  11. High Resolution Molecular Gas and Star Formation in the Strongly Lensed z~2 Galaxy SDSS J0901+1814

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea; Baker, Andrew; Tagore, Amitpal; Rivera, Jesus; Keeton, Charles; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda; Wilner, David; Shapley, Alice

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand the evolution of high-redshift galaxies, it is important to accurately characterize the molecular gas that fuels their star formation. Comparisons to low-redshift galaxies using well-known correlations like the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation have been complicated by several factors, including differences in line excitation for the molecular gas tracer and a lack of spatially resolved mapping at high redshift. While access to the CO(1-0) line near the peak of the cosmic star formation rate density (z~2-3) at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array has allowed for direct comparisons between high- and low-resdhift galaxies on the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation free from potential excitation biases, many of these analyses are based on galaxy-wide average CO line measurements which may hide spatial variation on sub-galactic scales. For gravitationally lensed galaxies, integrated measurements disguising true gas conditions are particularly a concern due to the effects of differential lensing. We will present high-resolution observations of the CO(1-0), CO(3-2), CO(7-6), CI, H-alpha, and NII lines in the z=2.26 galaxy SDSS J0901+1814. With these observations we are able to place the galaxy on the true surface density version of the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and evaluate its excitation bias, as well as examine the galaxy's spatial distribution of the molecular gas physical conditions. Since this galaxy is strongly lensed, we will also be able to evaluate how characterizations of this source differ when the effects of gravitational lensing are not accounted for.

  12. The Relation between Galaxy Morphology and Environment in the Local Universe: An RC3-SDSS Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, David J.; Erwin, Peter

    2012-02-01

    We present results of an analysis of the local (z ~ 0) morphology-environment relation for 911 bright (MB < -19) galaxies, based on matching classical RC3 morphologies with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey based group catalog of Yang et al., which includes halo mass estimates. This allows us to study how the relative fractions of spirals, lenticulars, and ellipticals depend on halo mass over a range of 1011.7-1014.8 h -1 M ⊙, from isolated single-galaxy halos to massive groups and low-mass clusters. We pay particular attention to how morphology relates to central versus satellite status (where "central" galaxies are the most massive within their halo). The fraction of galaxies which are elliptical is a strong function of stellar mass; it is also a strong function of halo mass, but only for central galaxies. We interpret this as evidence for a scenario where elliptical galaxies are always formed, probably via mergers, as central galaxies within their halos, with satellite ellipticals being previously central galaxies accreted onto a larger halo. The overall fraction of galaxies which are S0 increases strongly with halo mass, from ~10% to ~70%. Here, too, we find striking differences between the central and satellite populations. 20% ± 2% of central galaxies with stellar masses M * > 1010.5 M ⊙ are S0 regardless of halo mass, but satellite S0 galaxies are only found in massive (>1013 h -1 M ⊙) halos, where they are 69% ± 4% of the M * > 1010.5 M ⊙ satellite population. This suggests two channels for forming S0 galaxies: one which operates for central galaxies and another which transforms lower-mass ( M * <~ 1011 M ⊙) accreted spirals into satellite S0 galaxies in massive halos. Analysis of finer morphological structure (bars and rings in disk galaxies) shows some trends with stellar mass, but none with halo mass; this is consistent with other recent studies which indicate that bars are not strongly influenced by galaxy environment. Radio sources in high

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-DR7 isolated galaxy morphologies (Khim+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, H.-G.; Park, J.; Seo, S.-W.; Lee, J.; Smith, R.; Yi, S. K.

    2015-10-01

    Isolated galaxies in low-density regions are significant in the sense that they are least affected by the hierarchical pattern of galaxy growth and interactions with perturbers, at least for the last few gigayears. To form a comprehensive picture of the star-formation history of isolated galaxies, we constructed a catalog of isolated galaxies and their comparison sample in relatively denser environments. The galaxies are drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 in the redshift range of 0.025galaxies. The most remarkable additional results are as follows. Isolated galaxies are dominantly late type with the morphology distribution (E:S0:S:Irr)=(9.9:11.3:77.6:1.2)%. The frequency of elliptical galaxies among isolated galaxies is only a third of that of the comparison sample. Most of the photometric and spectroscopic properties are surprisingly similar between the isolated and comparison samples. However, early-type isolated galaxies are less massive by 50% and younger (by Hβ) by 20% than their counterparts in the comparison sample. This can be explained as a result of different merger and star-formation histories for differing environments in the hierarchical merger paradigm. (2 data files).

  14. The SDSS u-band Galaxy Survey: Luminosity functions and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baldry, Ivan K.; Glazebrook, K.; Budavari, T.; Eisenstein, D.J.; Annis, J.; Bahcall, N.A.; Blanton, M.R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, I.; Heckman, T.M.; Lin, H.; Loveday, J.; Nichol, R.C.; Schneider, D.P.; /Johns Hopkins U. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Princeton U. /CCPP, New York /Apache Point Observ. /Eotvos U. /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Portsmouth U., ICG /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2005-01-01

    We construct and analyze a u-band selected galaxy sample from the SDSS Southern Survey, which covers 275 deg{sup 2}. The sample includes 43223 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.005 < z < 0.3 and with 14.5 < u < 20.5. The S/N in the u-band Petrosian aperture is improved by coadding multiple epochs of imaging data and by including sky-subtraction corrections. Luminosity functions for the near-UV {sup 0.1}u band ({lambda} {approx} 322 {+-} 26 nm) are determined in redshift slices of width 0.02, which show a highly significant evolution in M* of -0.8 {+-} 0.1 mag between z = 0 and 0.3; with M* - 5 log h{sub 70} = -18.84 {+-} 0.05 (AB mag), log {phi}* = -2.06 {+-} 0.03 (h{sub 70}{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3}) and log {rho}{sub L} = 19.11 {+-} 0.02 (h{sub 70} W Hz{sup -1}Mpc{sup -3}) at z = 0.1. The faint-end slope determined for z < 0.06 is given by {alpha} = -1.05 {+-} 0.08. This is in agreement with recent determinations from GALEX at shorter wavelengths. Comparing our z < 0.3 luminosity density measurements with 0.2 < z < 1.2 from COMBO-17, we find that the 280-nm density evolves as {rho}{sub L} {proportional_to} (1+z){sup {beta}} with {beta} = 2.1 {+-} 0.2; and find no evidence for any change in slope over this redshift range. By comparing with other measurements of cosmic star formation history, we estimate that the effective dust attenuation at 280 nm has increased by 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mag between z = 0 and 1.

  15. Observing Strategy for the SDSS-IV/MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Cherinka, Brian; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Blanton, Michael R.; Klaene, Mark A.; Moran, Sean M.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Zhang, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an integral-field spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). MaNGA’s 17 pluggable optical fiber-bundle integral field units (IFUs) will observe a sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies distributed throughout the SDSS imaging footprint (focusing particularly on the North Galactic Cap). In each pointing these IFUs are deployed across a 3° field; they yield spectral coverage 3600-10300 Å at a typical resolution R ˜ 2000, and sample the sky with 2″ diameter fiber apertures with a total bundle fill factor of 56%. Observing over such a large field and range of wavelengths is particularly challenging for obtaining uniform and integral spatial coverage and resolution at all wavelengths and across each entire fiber array. Data quality is affected by the IFU construction technique, chromatic and field differential refraction, the adopted dithering strategy, and many other effects. We use numerical simulations to constrain the hardware design and observing strategy for the survey with the aim of ensuring consistent data quality that meets the survey science requirements while permitting maximum observational flexibility. We find that MaNGA science goals are best achieved with IFUs composed of a regular hexagonal grid of optical fibers with rms displacement of 5 μm or less from their nominal packing position; this goal is met by the MaNGA hardware, which achieves 3 μm rms fiber placement. We further show that MaNGA observations are best obtained in sets of three 15 minute exposures dithered along the vertices of a 1.44 arcsec equilateral triangle; these sets form the minimum observational unit, and are repeated as needed to achieve a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 5 Å-1 per fiber in the r-band continuum at a surface brightness of 23 AB arcsec-2. In order to ensure uniform coverage and delivered image quality, we require that the

  16. Kiloparsec Mass/Light Offsets in the Galaxy Pair-Lyα Emitter Lens System SDSS J1011+0143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yiping; Bolton, Adam S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burles, Scott; Spinrad, Hyron

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of significant mass/light offsets in the strong gravitational lensing system SDSS J1011+0143. We use the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) F555W- and F814W-band imaging and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy of this system, which consists of a close galaxy pair with a projected separation of ≈ 4.2 {{kpc}} at zlens ˜ 0.331 lensing an Lyα emitter (LAE) at zsource = 2.701. Comparisons between the mass peaks inferred from lens models and light peaks from HST imaging data reveal significant spatial mass/light offsets as large as 1.72 ± 0.24 ± 0.34 kpc in both filter bands. Such large mass/light offsets, not seen in isolated field lens galaxies and relaxed galaxy groups, may be related to the interactions between the two lens galaxies. The detected mass/light offsets can potentially serve as an important test for the self-interacting dark matter model. However, other mechanisms such as dynamical friction on spatially differently distributed dark matter and stars could produce similar offsets. Detailed hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy-galaxy interactions with self-interacting dark matter could accurately quantify the effects of different mechanisms. The background LAE is found to contain three distinct star-forming knots with characteristic sizes from 116 to 438 pc. It highlights the power of strong gravitational lensing in probing the otherwise too faint and unresolved structures of distance objects below subkiloparsec or even 100 pc scales through its magnification effect. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10831.

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: mock galaxy catalogues for the BOSS Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Guo, Hong; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Tinker, Jeremy; McBride, Cameron; Reid, Beth; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Neyrinck, Mark; Beutler, Florian; Comparat, Johan; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    We reproduce the galaxy clustering catalogue from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Final Data Release (BOSS DR11&DR12) with high fidelity on all relevant scales in order to allow a robust analysis of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions. We have generated (6000) 12 288 MultiDark PATCHY BOSS (DR11) DR12 light cones corresponding to an effective volume of ˜192 000 [h-1 Gpc]3 (the largest ever simulated volume), including cosmic evolution in the redshift range from 0.15 to 0.75. The mocks have been calibrated using a reference galaxy catalogue based on the halo abundance matching modelling of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy clustering data and on the data themselves. The production follows three steps. First, we apply the PATCHY code to generate a dark matter field and an object distribution including non-linear stochastic galaxy bias. Secondly, we run the halo/stellar distribution reconstruction HADRON code to assign masses to the various objects. This step uses the mass distribution as a function of local density and non-local indicators (i.e. tidal field tensor eigenvalues and relative halo exclusion separation for massive objects) from the reference simulation applied to the corresponding patchy dark matter and galaxy distribution. Finally, we apply the SUGAR code to build the light cones. The resulting MultiDarkPATCHY mock light cones reproduce the number density, selection function, survey geometry, and in general within 1σ, for arbitrary stellar mass bins, the power spectrum up to k = 0.3 h Mpc-1, the two-point correlation functions down to a few Mpc scales, and the three-point statistics of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy samples.

  18. Cosmological constraints from a combination of galaxy clustering and lensing - III. Application to SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciato, Marcello; van den Bosch, Frank C.; More, Surhud; Mo, Houjun; Yang, Xiaohu

    2013-04-01

    We simultaneously constrain cosmology and galaxy bias using measurements of galaxy abundances, galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the conditional luminosity function (which describes the halo occupation statistics as a function of galaxy luminosity) combined with the halo model (which describes the non-linear matter field in terms of its halo building blocks) to describe the galaxy-dark matter connection. We explicitly account for residual redshift-space distortions in the projected galaxy-galaxy correlation functions, and marginalize over uncertainties in the scale dependence of the halo bias and the detailed structure of dark matter haloes. Under the assumption of a spatially flat, vanilla Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we focus on constraining the matter density, Ωm, and the normalization of the matter power spectrum, σ8, and we adopt 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) priors for the spectral index, n, the Hubble parameter, h, and the baryon density, Ωb. We obtain that Ωm = 0.278+ 0.023- 0.026 and σ8 = 0.763+ 0.064- 0.049 (95 per cent CL). These results are robust to uncertainties in the radial number density distribution of satellite galaxies, while allowing for non-Poisson satellite occupation distributions results in a slightly lower value for σ8 (0.744+ 0.056- 0.047). These constraints are in excellent agreement (at the 1σ level) with the cosmic microwave background constraints from WMAP. This demonstrates that the use of a realistic and accurate model for galaxy bias, down to the smallest non-linear scales currently observed in galaxy surveys, leads to results perfectly consistent with the vanilla ΛCDM cosmology.

  19. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Properties of galaxies with kinematically decoupled stellar and gaseous components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yifei; Chen, Yanmei; Shi, Yong; Tremonti, C. A.; Bershady, M. A.; Merrifield, M.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, Hai; Wake, D.; Bundy, K.; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, M.; Huang, Song; Stark, D. V.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Chisholm, J.; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Masters, K. L.; Malanushenko, E.; Pan, Kaike; Riffel, R. A.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Simmons, A.; Thomas, D.; Wang, Lan; Westfall, K.; Yan, Renbin

    2016-08-01

    We study the properties of 66 galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars from MaNGA survey. The fraction of kinematically misaligned galaxies varies with galaxy physical parameters, i.e. M★, SFR and sSFR. According to their sSFR, we further classify these 66 galaxies into three categories, 10 star-forming, 26 "Green Valley" and 30 quiescent ones. The properties of different types of kinematically misaligned galaxies are different in that the star-forming ones have positive gradient in Dn4000 and higher gas-phase metallicity, while the green valley/quiescent ones have negative Dn4000 gradients and lower gas-phase metallicity on average. There is evidence that all types of the kinematically misaligned galaxies tend to live in more isolated environment. Based on all these observational results, we propose a scenario for the formation of star forming galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars - the progenitor accretes misaligned gas from a gas-rich dwarf or cosmic web, the cancellation of angular momentum from gas-gas collisions between the pre-existing gas and the accreted gas largely accelerates gas inflow, leading to fast centrally-concentrated star-formation. The higher metallicity is due to enrichment from this star formation. For the kinematically misaligned green valley and quiescent galaxies, they might be formed through gas-poor progenitors accreting kinematically misaligned gas from satellites which are smaller in mass.

  20. VLT adaptive optics search for luminous substructures in the lens galaxy towards SDSS J0924+0219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, C.; Sluse, D.; Cantale, N.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Durrer, P.; Meylan, G.

    2011-12-01

    The anomalous flux ratios between quasar images are suspected of being caused by substructures in lens galaxies. We present new deep and high-resolution H and Ks imaging of the strongly lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 obtained using the ESO VLT with adaptive optics and the laser guide star system. SDSS J0924+0219 is particularly interesting because the observed flux ratio between the quasar images vastly disagree with the predictions from smooth mass models. With our adaptive optics observations we find a luminous object, Object L, located ~0.3'' to the north of the lens galaxy, but we show that it cannot be responsible for the anomalous flux ratios. Object L as well as a luminous extension of the lens galaxy to the south are seen in the archival HST/ACS image in the F814W filter. This suggests that Object L is part of a bar in the lens galaxy, as also supported by the presence of a significant disk component in the light profile of the lens galaxy. Finally, we find no evidence of any other luminous substructure that may explain the quasar images flux ratios. However, owing to the persistence of the flux ratio anomaly over time (~7 years), a combination of microlensing and millilensing is the favorite explanation for the observations. Based on observations obtained with the ESO VLT at Paranal observatory (Prog ID 084.A-0762(A); PI: Meylan). Also based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with the CASTLES (Cfa-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey) survey (ID: 9744, PI: C. S. Kochanek).

  1. GALAXY CLUSTERING IN THE COMPLETED SDSS REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE DEPENDENCE ON COLOR AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zehavi, Idit; Zheng Zheng; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Strauss, Michael A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Brinkmann, Jon; Frieman, Joshua A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Tegmark, Max; York, Donald G.

    2011-07-20

    We measure the luminosity and color dependence of galaxy clustering in the largest-ever galaxy redshift survey, the main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Seventh Data Release. We focus on the projected correlation function w{sub p} (r{sub p}) of volume-limited samples, extracted from the parent sample of {approx}700,000 galaxies over 8000 deg{sup 2}, extending up to redshift of 0.25. We interpret our measurements using halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling assuming a {Lambda}CDM cosmology (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). The amplitude of w{sub p} (r{sub p}) grows slowly with luminosity for L < L{sub *} and increases sharply at higher luminosities, with a large-scale bias factor b(> L) x ({sigma}{sub 8}/0.8) = 1.06 + 0.21(L/L{sub *}){sup 1.12}, where L is the sample luminosity threshold. At fixed luminosity, redder galaxies exhibit a higher amplitude and steeper correlation function, a steady trend that runs through the 'blue cloud' and 'green valley' and continues across the 'red sequence'. The cross-correlation of red and blue galaxies is close to the geometric mean of their autocorrelations, dropping slightly below at r{sub p} < 1 h{sup -1} Mpc. The luminosity trends for the red and blue galaxy populations separately are strikingly different. Blue galaxies show a slow but steady increase of clustering strength with luminosity, with nearly constant shape of w{sub p} (r{sub p}). The large-scale clustering of red galaxies shows little luminosity dependence until a sharp increase at L > 4 L{sub *}, but the lowest luminosity red galaxies (0.04-0.25 L{sub *}) show very strong clustering on small scales (r{sub p} < 2 h{sup -1} Mpc). Most of the observed trends can be naturally understood within the {Lambda}CDM+HOD framework. The growth of w{sub p} (r{sub p}) for higher luminosity galaxies reflects an overall shift in the mass scale of their host dark matter halos, in particular an increase in the minimum host halo mass M

  2. Image stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies with AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Taizo; Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Matsuura, Shuji; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    We perform image stacking analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies over the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm. The resulting image profiles are decomposed into the central galaxy component (single term) and the nearby galaxy component (clustering term), as a function of the r-band magnitude, mr, of the central galaxy. We find that the mean far-infrared (FIR) flux of a galaxy with magnitude mr is well fitted with f^s_{90μ m}=13× 10^{0.306(18-m_{ r})} [mJy]. The FIR amplitude of the clustering term is consistent with that expected from the angular-correlation function of the SDSS galaxies, but galaxy morphology dependence needs to be taken into account for a more quantitative conclusion. We also fit the spectral energy distribution of stacked galaxies at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm, and derive a mean dust temperature of ˜30 K. This is consistent with the typical dust temperature of galaxies that are FIR luminous and individually detected.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SPOGS. I. SDSS Shocked POststarburst Galaxy cand. (Alatalo+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, K.; Cales, S. L.; Rich, J. A.; Appleton, P. N.; Kewley, L. J.; Lacy, M.; Lanz, L.; Medling, A. M.; Nyland, K.

    2016-07-01

    There are many mechanisms by which galaxies can transform from blue, star-forming spirals, to red, quiescent early-type galaxies, but our current census of them does not form a complete picture. Recent observations of nearby case studies have identified a population of galaxies that quench "quietly". Traditional poststarburst searches seem to catch galaxies only after they have quenched and transformed, and thus miss any objects with additional ionization mechanisms exciting the remaining gas. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey (SPOGS) aims to identify transforming galaxies, in which the nebular lines are excited via shocks instead of through star formation processes. Utilizing the Oh-Sarzi-Schawinski-Yi (OSSY, 2011ApJS..195...13O) measurements on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, we applied Balmer absorption and shock boundary criteria to identify 1067 SPOG candidates (SPOGs*) within z=0.2. SPOGs* represent 0.2% of the OSSY sample galaxies that exceed the continuum signal-to-noise cut (and 0.7% of the emission line galaxy sample). SPOGs* colors suggest that they are in an earlier phase of transition than OSSY galaxies that meet an "E+A" selection. SPOGs* have a 13% 1.4GHz detection rate from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters Survey, higher than most other subsamples, and comparable only to low-ionization nuclear emission line region hosts, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SPOGs* also have stronger Na i D absorption than predicted from the stellar population, suggestive of cool gas being driven out in galactic winds. It appears that SPOGs* represent an earlier phase in galaxy transformation than traditionally selected poststarburst galaxies, and that a large proportion of SPOGs* also have properties consistent with disruption of their interstellar media, a key component to galaxy transformation. It is likely that many of the known pathways to transformation undergo a SPOG phase. Studying this

  4. ORIGIN OF 12 {mu}m EMISSION ACROSS GALAXY POPULATIONS FROM WISE AND SDSS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, E.; Yan Lin; Tsai, C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.; Leisawitz, D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Stanford, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    We cross-matched Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer sources brighter than 1 mJy at 12 {mu}m with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy spectroscopic catalog to produce a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} galaxies at (z) = 0.08, the largest of its kind. This sample is dominated (70%) by star-forming (SF) galaxies from the blue sequence, with total IR luminosities in the range {approx}10{sup 8}-10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. We identify which stellar populations are responsible for most of the 12 {mu}m emission. We find that most ({approx}80%) of the 12 {mu}m emission in SF galaxies is produced by stellar populations younger than 0.6 Gyr. In contrast, the 12 {mu}m emission in weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs; L{sub [Oiii]} < 10{sup 7} L{sub .}) is produced by older stars, with ages of {approx}1-3 Gyr. We find that L{sub 12{mu}m} linearly correlates with stellar mass for SF galaxies. At fixed 12 {mu}m luminosity, weak AGNs deviate toward higher masses since they tend to be hosted by massive, early-type galaxies with older stellar populations. SF galaxies and weak AGNs follow different L{sub 12{mu}m}-SFR (star formation rate) relations, with weak AGNs showing excess 12 {mu}m emission at low SFR (0.02-1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). This is likely due to dust grains heated by older stars. While the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of SF galaxies is nearly constant, the SSFR of weak AGNs decreases by {approx}3 orders of magnitude, reflecting the very different star formation efficiencies between SF galaxies and massive, early-type galaxies. Stronger type II AGNs in our sample (L[{sub Oiii]} > 10{sup 7} L{sub .}), act as an extension of massive SF galaxies, connecting the SF and weak AGN sequences. This suggests a picture where galaxies form stars normally until an AGN (possibly after a starburst episode) starts to gradually quench the SF activity. We also find that 4.6-12 {mu}m color is a useful first-order indicator of SF activity in a galaxy when no other data are available.

  5. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Greisel, N.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Saglia, R. P.; Snigula, J.; Drory, N.

    2013-05-10

    We describe the construction of a template set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the estimation of photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with a Bayesian template fitting method. By examining the color properties of several publicly available SED sets within a redshift range of 0 < z {approx}< 0.5 and comparing them to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 data, we show that only some of the investigated SEDs approximately match the colors of the LRG data throughout the redshift range, however not at the quantitative level required for precise photometric redshifts. This is because the SEDs of galaxies evolve with time (and redshift) and because at fixed redshift the LRG colors have an intrinsic spread such that they cannot be matched by one SED only. We generate new SEDs by superposing model SEDs of composite stellar populations with a burst model, allowing both components to be reddened by dust, in order to match the data in five different redshift bins. We select a set of SEDs which represents the LRG data in color space within five redshift bins, thus defining our new SED template set for photometric redshift estimates. The results we obtain with the new template set and our Bayesian template fitting photometric redshift code (PhotoZ) are nearly unbiased, with a scatter of {sigma}{sub {Delta}z} = 0.027 (including outliers), a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z{sub spec}) > 0.15) of {eta} = 0.12%, and a normalized median absolute rest frame deviation (NMAD) of {sigma}{sub NMAD} = 1.48 Multiplication-Sign MAD = 0.017 for non-outliers. We show that templates that optimally describe the brightest galaxies (-24.5 {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -22.7) indeed vary from z = 0.1 to z = 0.5, consistent with aging of the stellar population. Furthermore, we find that templates that optimally describe galaxies at z < 0.1 strongly differ as a function of the absolute magnitude of the galaxies, indicating an increase in

  6. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS Galaxy Clusters III: Mass-to-light Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, Erin S.; Johnston, David E.; Masjedi, Morad; McKay, Timothy A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Scranton, Ryan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Ben P.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Annis, James

    2007-09-28

    We present measurements of the excess mass-to-light ratio measured around MaxBCG galaxy clusters observed in the SDSS. This red sequence cluster sample includes objects from small groups with M{sub 200} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 12}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} to clusters with M{sub 200} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 15}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. Using cross-correlation weak lensing, we measure the excess mass density profile above the universal mean {Delta}{yields}(r) = {rho}(r) -- {bar {rho}} for clusters in bins of richness and optical luminosity. We also measure the excess {sup 0.25}i-band luminosity density {Delta}{ell}(r) = {ell}(r) -- {bar {ell}}. For both mass and light, we de-project the profiles to produce 3D mass and light profiles over scales from 25h{sup -1} kpc to 22h{sup -1} Mpc. From these profiles we calculate the cumulative excess mass {Delta}M(r) and excess light {Delta}L(r) as a function of separation from the BCG. On small scales, where {rho}(r) >> {bar {rho}}, the integrated mass-to-light profile ({Delta}M/{Delta}L)(r) may be interpreted as the cluster mass-to-light ratio. We find the ({Delta}M/{Delta}L){sub 200}, the mass-to-light ratio within r{sub 200}, scales with cluster mass as a power law with index 0.33{+-}0.02. On large scales, where {rho}(r) {approx} {bar {rho}}, the {Delta}M/{Delta}L approaches an asymptotic value independent of scale or cluster richness. For small groups, the mean ({Delta}M/{Delta}L){sub 200} is much smaller than the asymptotic value, while for large clusters ({Delta}M/{Delta}L)200 is consistent with the asymptotic value. This asymptotic value should be proportional to the mean mass-to-light ratio of the universe {l_angle}M/L{r_angle}. We find {l_angle}M/L{r_angle} b{sup -2}{sub M/L} = 362 {+-} 54h measured in the {sup 0.25}i-bandpass. The parameter b{sup 2}{sub M/L} is primarily a function of the bias of the L {approx}< L* galaxies used as light tracers, and should be of order unity. Multiplying by the luminosity density in

  7. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  8. SDSS IV MaNGA - spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams: a proof that many galaxies are LIERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Francesco; Maiolino, Roberto; Maraston, Claudia; Emsellem, Eric; Bershady, Matthew A.; Masters, Karen L.; Yan, Renbin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Boquien, Médéric; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Heckman, Timothy M.; Law, David R.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Stanghellini, Letizia; Thomas, Daniel; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the spatially resolved excitation properties of the ionized gas in a sample of 646 galaxies using integral field spectroscopy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) programme. Making use of Baldwin-Philips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams we demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of extended (kpc scale) low-ionization emission-line regions (LIERs) in both star-forming and quiescent galaxies. In star-forming galaxies LIER emission can be associated with diffuse ionized gas, most evident as extraplanar emission in edge-on systems. In addition, we identify two main classes of galaxies displaying LIER emission: `central LIER' (cLIER) galaxies, where central LIER emission is spatially extended, but accompanied by star formation at larger galactocentric distances, and `extended LIER' (eLIER) galaxies, where LIER emission is extended throughout the whole galaxy. In eLIER and cLIER galaxies, LIER emission is associated with radially flat, low H α equivalent width of line emission (<3 Å) and stellar population indices demonstrating the lack of young stellar populations, implying that line emission follows tightly the continuum due to the underlying old stellar population. The H α surface brightness radial profiles are always shallower than 1/r2 and the line ratio [O III] λ5007/[O II] λλ3727,29 (a tracer of the ionization parameter of the gas) shows a flat gradient. This combined evidence strongly supports the scenario in which LIER emission is not due to a central point source but to diffuse stellar sources, the most likely candidates being hot, evolved (post-asymptotic giant branch) stars. Shocks are observed to play a significant role in the ionization of the gas only in rare merging and interacting systems.

  9. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12: galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. The code used, designated MKSAMPLE, is released with this paper.

  10. Indirect Estimates of the Total Gas Content of SDSS-IV/MaNGA Galaxies from Optical Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremonti, Christina A.; Pace, Zachary; Andrews, Brett; Law, David R.; Li, Cheng; Martinsson, Thomas; Masters, Karen; Stark, David; Sanchez, Sebastian; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    To understand galaxy evolution it is critical to obtain a census of both the stellar and gaseous contents of galaxies. The SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will deliver exquisite stellar mass maps of ~10,000 nearby galaxies. However, radio surveys capable of providing matched resolution gas data for a large fraction of the MaNGA sample are a decade or more away. We are therefore exploring a new technique for obtaining maps of the total gas content directly from the MaNGA data. Following the method outlined in Brinchmann et al. 2013, we use the dust optical depth and the nebular metallicity measured from optical emission lines to estimate the total gas surface density in individual spaxels. We combine this with estimates of the stellar mass in each spaxel to produce spatially resolved estimates of the gas mass fraction. We compare trends in the global gas mass fraction with stellar mass and NUV-r color to those found in the literature. We explore how the radial gas mass fraction gradients of MaNGA galaxies correlate with other properties such as total stellar mass, specific star formation rate (SFR/M*), concentration, and environment.

  11. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  12. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; et al

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  13. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? I. The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density - metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David.; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density vs. gas metallicity (Σ★ - Z) relation for more than 500,000 spatially-resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disk galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of four in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disk galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ★ - Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star-formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disk galaxies.

  14. Properties of the most metal-poor gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies SDSS J0015+0104 and J2354-0005 residing in the Eridanus void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Martin, J.-M.; Lyamina, Y. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2013-07-01

    SDSS J0015+0104 is the lowest metallicity low surface brightness dwarf (LSBD) galaxy known. The oxygen abundance in its H II region SDSS J001520.70+010436.9 (at ˜1.5 kpc from the galaxy centre) is 12+log (O/H) = 7.07 (Guseva et al.). This galaxy, at the distance of 28.4 Mpc, appears to reside deeply in the volume devoid of luminous massive galaxies, known as the Eridanus void. SDSS J235437.29-000501.6 is another Eridanus void LSBD galaxy, with parameter 12+log (O/H) = 7.36 (also Guseva et al.). We present the results of their H I observations with the Nançay Radio Telescope revealing their high ratios of M(H I)/LB ˜ 2.3. Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey images, we derived for both galaxies their radial surface brightness profiles and the main photometric parameters. Their colours and total magnitudes are used to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and ages. The related gas mass fractions, fg ˜ 0.98 and ˜0.97, and the extremely low metallicities (much lower than for their more typical counterparts with the same luminosity) indicate their unevolved status. We compare these Eridanus void LSBDs with several extreme LSBD galaxies residing in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. Based on the combination of all their unusual properties, the two discussed LSBD galaxies are similar to the unusual LSBDs residing in the closer void. This finding presents additional evidence for the existence in voids of a sizeable fraction of low-mass unevolved galaxies. Their dedicated search might result in the substantial increase of the number of such objects in the local Universe and in the advancement of understanding their nature.

  15. SPIN ALIGNMENTS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE FROM SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; Van den Bosch, Frank C. E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  16. Spin Alignments of Spiral Galaxies within the Large-scale Structure from SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Luo, Wentao; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  17. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  18. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ~ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å-1 per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec-2, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M * >~ 109 M ⊙ using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  19. Velocity bias from the small-scale clustering of SDSS-III BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Zehavi, Idit; Dawson, Kyle; Skibba, Ramin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the measurements and modelling of the projected and redshift-space clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 11. For a volume-limited luminous red galaxy sample in the redshift range of 0.48 < z < 0.55, we perform halo occupation distribution modelling of the small- and intermediate-scale (0.1-60 h-1 Mpc) projected and redshift-space two-point correlation functions, with an accurate model built on high-resolution N-body simulations. To interpret the measured redshift-space distortions, the distribution of galaxy velocities must differ from that of the dark matter inside haloes of ˜1013-1014 h-1 M⊙, i.e. the data require the existence of galaxy velocity bias. Most notably, central galaxies on average are not at rest with respect to the core of their host haloes, but rather move around it with a 1D velocity dispersion of 0.22^{+0.03}_{-0.04} times that of the dark matter, implying a spatial offset from the centre at the level of ≲1 per cent of the halo virial radius. The luminous satellite galaxies move more slowly than the dark matter, with velocities 0.86^{+0.08}_{-0.03} times those of the dark matter, which suggests that the velocity and spatial distributions of these satellites cannot both be unbiased. The constraints mainly arise from the Fingers-of-God effect at non-linear scales and the smoothing to the Kaiser effect in the translinear regime; the robustness of the results is demonstrated by a variety of tests. We discuss the implications of the existence of galaxy velocity bias for investigations of galaxy formation and cosmology.

  20. Discovery of A Very Bright, Strongly-Lensed z=2 Galaxy in the SDSS DR5

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huan; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Diehl, H.Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN

    2008-09-30

    We report on the discovery of a very bright z = 2.00 star-forming galaxy that is strongly lensed by a foreground z = 0.422 luminous red galaxy (LRG). This system was found in a systematic search for bright arcs lensed by LRGs and brightest cluster galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. Follow-up observations on the Subaru 8.2m telescope on Mauna Kea and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A simple lens model for the system, assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass distribution, yields an Einstein radius of {theta}{sub Ein} = 3.82 {+-} 0.03{double_prime} or 14.8 {+-} 0.1h{sup -1} kpc at the lens redshift. The total projected mass enclosed within the Einstein radius is 2.10 {+-} 0.03 x 10{sup 12}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}, and the magnification factor for the source galaxy is 27 {+-} 1. Combining the lens model with our gVriz photometry, we find an (unlensed) star formation rate for the source galaxy of 32 h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} hr{sup -1}, adopting a fiducial constant star formation rate model with an age of 100 Myr and E(B-V) = 0.25. With an apparent magnitude of r = 19.9, this system is among the very brightest lensed z {ge} 2 galaxies, and provides an excellent opportunity to pursue detailed studies of the physical properties of an individual high-redshift star-forming galaxy.

  1. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Weinberg, David H.; Agol, Eric; Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F.; Arns, James A.; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barkhouser, Robert; /Johns Hopkins U. /Michigan State U.

    2011-01-01

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, a now-completed continuation of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {ge} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {micro}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {micro}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx} 15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx} 24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of January 2011, SDSS-III has obtained

  2. Alternative diagnostic diagrams and the `forgotten' population of weak line galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Fernandes, R.; Stasińska, G.; Schlickmann, M. S.; Mateus, A.; Vale Asari, N.; Schoenell, W.; Sodré, L.

    2010-04-01

    A numerous population of weak line galaxies (WLGs) is often left out of statistical studies on emission-line galaxies (ELGs) due to the absence of an adequate classification scheme, since classical diagnostic diagrams, such as [OIII]/Hβ versus [NII]/Hα (the BPT diagram), require the measurement of at least four emission lines. This paper aims to remedy this situation by transposing the usual divisory lines between star-forming (SF) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) hosts and between Seyferts and LINERs to diagrams that are more economical in terms of line quality requirements. By doing this, we rescue from the classification limbo a substantial number of sources and modify the global census of ELGs. More specifically, (1) we use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to constitute a suitable sample of 280000 ELGs, one-third of which are WLGs. (2) Galaxies with strong emission lines are classified using the widely applied criteria of Kewley et al., Kauffmann et al. and Stasińska et al. to distinguish SF galaxies and AGN hosts and Kewley et al. to distinguish Seyferts from LINERs. (3) We transpose these classification schemes to alternative diagrams keeping [NII]/Hα as a horizontal axis, but replacing Hβ by a stronger line (Hα or [OII]), or substituting the ionization-level sensitive [OIII]/Hβ ratio with the equivalent width of Hα (WHα). Optimized equations for the transposed divisory lines are provided. (4) We show that nothing significant is lost in the translation, but that the new diagrams allow one to classify up to 50 per cent more ELGs. (5) Introducing WLGs in the census of galaxies in the local Universe increases the proportion of metal-rich SF galaxies and especially LINERs. In the course of this analysis, we were led to make the following points. (i) The Kewley et al. BPT line for galaxy classification is generally ill-used. (ii) Replacing [OIII]/Hβ by WHα in the classification introduces a change in the philosophy of the distinction

  3. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Gavilán, M.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Hoyos, C.; Díaz, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity - the equivalent width of the Hα line and the (u - r) colour - with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of ˜82 500 galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. nature) is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. nurture) are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such events show little statistical significance in a probabilistic sense, and we find no evidence that galaxy interactions are, on average, a dominant driver of star formation. Although visually classified mergers tend to display systematically higher EW(Hα) and bluer (u - r) colours for a given luminosity, most galaxies with high SSFR have uncertain morphologies, which could be due to either internal or external processes. Field galaxies of early and late morphological types are consistent with the gradual `ageing' scenario, with no obvious signatures of a sudden decrease in their SSFR. In contrast, star formation is significantly reduced and sometimes completely quenched on a short time-scale in dense environments, where many objects are found on a `quenched sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane.

  4. THE GALEX ARECIBO SDSS SURVEY. VII. THE BIVARIATE NEUTRAL HYDROGEN-STELLAR MASS FUNCTION FOR MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David; Catinella, Barbara; Heckman, Timothy M.; Moran, Sean M.

    2013-10-20

    We present the bivariate neutral atomic hydrogen (H I)-stellar mass function (HISMF) φ(M{sub H{sub I}}, M{sub *}) for massive (log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} \\gt 10) galaxies derived from a sample of 480 local (0.025 < z < 0.050) galaxies observed in H I at Arecibo as part of the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey. We fit six different models to the HISMF and find that a Schechter function that extends down to a 1% H I gas fraction, with an additional fractional contribution below that limit, is the best parameterization of the HISMF. We calculate Ω{sub H{sub I,{sub M{sub *>10{sup 1}{sup 0}}}}} and find that massive galaxies contribute 41% of the H I density in the local universe. In addition to the binned HISMF, we derive a continuous bivariate fit, which reveals that the Schechter parameters only vary weakly with stellar mass: M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}}, the characteristic H I mass, scales as M{sub *}{sup 0.39}; α, the slope of the HISMF at moderate H I masses, scales as M{sub *}{sup 0.07}; and f, the fraction of galaxies with H I gas fraction greater than 1%, scales as M{sub *}{sup -0.24}. The variation of f with stellar mass should be a strong constraint for numerical simulations. To understand the physical mechanisms that produce the shape of the HISMF, we redefine the parameters of the Schechter function as explicit functions of stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) to produce a trivariate fit. This analysis reveals strong trends with SFR. While M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} varies weakly with stellar mass and SFR (M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} ∝ M{sub *}{sup 0.22}, M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} ∝ SFR{sup –0.03}), α is a stronger function of both stellar mass and especially SFR (α ∝ M{sub *}{sup 0.47}, α ∝ SFR{sup 0.95}). The HISMF is a crucial tool that can be used to constrain cosmological galaxy simulations, test observational predictions of the H I content of populations of galaxies, and identify galaxies whose properties deviate from average trends.

  5. Tracing the cosmic velocity field at z∼ 0.1 from galaxy luminosities in the SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, Martin; Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.il

    2014-09-01

    Spatial modulations in the distribution of observed luminosities (computed using redshifts) of ∼ 5× 10{sup 5} galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7, probe the cosmic peculiar velocity field out to z∼ 0.1. Allowing for luminosity evolution, the r-band luminosity function, determined via a spline-based estimator, is well represented by a Schechter form with M{sup *}(z)-5 log{sub 10} h = -20.52 -1.6(z-0.1)± 0.05 and α{sup *} = -1.1± 0.03. Bulk flows and higher velocity moments in two redshift bins, 0.02 < z < 0.07 and 0.07 < z < 0.22, agree with the predictions of the ΛCDM model, as obtained from mock galaxy catalogs designed to match the observations. Assuming a ΛCDM model, we estimate σ{sub 8} ≈ 1.1± 0.4 for the amplitude of the linear matter power spectrum, where the low accuracy is due to the limited number of galaxies. While the low z bin is robust against coherent photometric uncertainties, the bias of results from the second bin is consistent with the ∼1% magnitude tilt reported by the SDSS collaboration. The systematics are expected to have a significantly lower impact in future datasets with larger sky coverage and better photometric calibration.

  6. THE FAINT STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE RED GALAXIES FROM STACKS OF MORE THAN 42,000 SDSS LRG IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2011-04-20

    We study the properties of massive galaxies at an average redshift of z {approx} 0.34 through stacking more than 42,000 images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This is the largest data set ever used for such an analysis and it allows us to explore the outskirts of massive red galaxies at unprecedented physical scales. Our image stacks extend farther than 400 kpc, where the r-band profile surface brightness reaches 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. This analysis confirms that the stellar bodies of LRGs follow a simple Sersic profile out to 100 kpc. At larger radii, the profiles deviate from the best-fit Sersic models and exhibit extra light in the r-, i-, and z-band stacks. This excess light can probably be attributed to unresolved intragroup or intracluster light or a change in the light profile itself. We further show that standard analyses of SDSS-depth images typically miss 20% of the total stellar light and underestimate the size of LRGs by 10% compared to our best-fit r-band Sersic model of n = 5.5 and r{sub e} = 13.1 kpc. If the excess light at r > 100 kpc is considered to be part of the galaxy, the best-fit r-band Sersic parameters are n = 5.8 and r{sub e} = 13.6 kpc. In addition, we study the radially dependent stack ellipticity and find an increase with radius from {epsilon} = 0.25 at r = 10 kpc to {epsilon} = 0.3 at r = 100 kpc. This provides support that the stellar light that we trace out to at least 100 kpc is physically associated with the galaxies themselves and may confirm that the halos of individual LRGs have higher ellipticities than their central parts. Lastly, we show that the broadband color gradients of the stacked images are flat beyond roughly 40 kpc, suggesting that the stellar populations do not vary significantly with radius in the outer parts of massive ellipticals.

  7. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: selecting emission line galaxies using the Fisher discriminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, Ch.; Zou, H.; Abdalla, F. B.; Dawson, K.; de la Macorra, A.; Fan, X.; Fan, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Jing, Y.; Jouvel, S.; Lang, D.; Lesser, M.; Li, C.; Ma, J.; Newman, J. A.; Nie, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Percival, W. J.; Prada, F.; Shen, S.; Wang, J.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, T.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new selection technique of producing spectroscopic target catalogues for massive spectroscopic surveys for cosmology. This work was conducted in the context of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), which will use ~200 000 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6 ≤ zspec ≤ 1.0 to obtain a precise baryon acoustic oscillation measurement. Our proposed selection technique is based on optical and near-infrared broad-band filter photometry. We used a training sample to define a quantity, the Fisher discriminant (linear combination of colours), which correlates best with the desired properties of the target: redshift and [Oii] flux. The proposed selections are simply done by applying a cut on magnitudes and this Fisher discriminant. We used public data and dedicated SDSS spectroscopy to quantify the redshift distribution and [Oii] flux of our ELG target selections. We demonstrate that two of our selections fulfil the initial eBOSS/ELG redshift requirements: for a target density of 180 deg-2, ~70% of the selected objects have 0.6 ≤ zspec ≤ 1.0 and only ~1% of those galaxies in the range 0.6 ≤ zspec ≤ 1.0 are expected to have a catastrophic zspec estimate. Additionally, the stacked spectra and stacked deep images for those two selections show characteristic features of star-forming galaxies. The proposed approach using the Fisher discriminant could, however, be used to efficiently select other galaxy populations, based on multi-band photometry, providing that spectroscopic information isavailable. This technique could thus be useful for other future massive spectroscopic surveys such as PFS, DESI, and 4MOST.

  8. The `Green Bean' Galaxy SDSS J224024.1-092748: unravelling the emission signature of a quasar ionization echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Schirmer, Mischa; Turner, James E. H.

    2015-05-01

    `Green Bean' galaxies (GBs) are the most [O III]-luminous type-2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) at z ˜ 0.3. However, their infrared luminosities reveal AGN in very low activity states, indicating that their gas reservoirs must be ionized by photons from a recent high activity episode - we are observing quasar ionization echoes. We use integral field spectroscopy from the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph to analyse the 3D kinematics, ionization state, temperature and density of ionized gas in the GB SDSS J224024.1-092748. We model the emission-line spectrum of each spaxel as a superposition of up to three Gaussian components and analyse the physical properties of each component individually. Two narrow components, tracing the velocity fields of the disc and an ionized gas cloud, are superimposed over the majority of the galaxy. Fast shocks produce hot (Te ≥ 20 000 K), dense (ne ≥ 100 cm- 3), turbulent (σ ≥ 600 km s- 1), [O III]-bright regions with enhanced [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα ratios. The most prominent such spot is consistent with a radio jet shock-heating the interstellar medium. However, the AGN is still responsible for ≳ 82 per cent of the galaxy's total [O III] luminosity, strengthening the case for previous quasar activity. The ionized gas cloud has a strong kinematic link to the central AGN and is corotating with the main body of the galaxy, suggesting that it may be the remnant of a quasar-driven outflow. Our analysis of J224024.1-092748 indicates that GBs provide a unique fossil record of the transformation from the most luminous quasars to weak AGN.

  9. A milliparsec supermassive black hole binary candidate in the galaxy SDSS J120136.02+300305.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Li, Shuo; Komossa, S.

    2014-05-10

    Galaxy mergers play a key role in the evolution of galaxies and the growth of their central supermassive black holes (SMBHs). A search for (active) SMBH binaries (SMBHBs) at the centers of the merger remnants is currently ongoing. Perhaps the greatest challenge is to identify the inactive SMBHBs, which might be the most abundant, but are also the most difficult to identify. Liu et al. predicted characteristic drops in the light curves of tidal disruption events (TDEs), caused by the presence of a secondary SMBH. Here, we apply that model to the light curve of the optically inactive galaxy SDSS J120136.02+300305.5, which was identified as a candidate TDE with XMM-Newton. We show that the deep dips in its evolving X-ray light curve can be well explained by the presence of a SMBHB at its core. A SMBHB model with a mass of the primary of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, a mass ratio q ≅ 0.08, and a semi-major axis a {sub b} ≅ 0.6 mpc is in good agreement with the observations. Given that primary mass, introducing an orbital eccentricity is needed, with e {sub b} ≅ 0.3. Alternatively, a lower mass primary of M {sub BH} = 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} in a circular orbit fits the light curve well. Tight binaries like this one, which have already overcome the 'final parsec problem', are prime sources of gravitational wave radiation once the two SMBHs coalesce. Future transient surveys, which will detect TDEs in large numbers, will place tight constraints on the SMBHB fraction in otherwise non-active galaxies.

  10. Intrinsic Ellipticity Correlation of SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies and Misalignment with Their Host Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the orientation correlation of giant elliptical galaxies by measuring the intrinsic ellipticity correlation function of 83,773 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at redshifts 0.16-0.47 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have accurately determined the correlation up to 30 h-1 Mpc. Luminosity dependence of the ellipticity correlation is also detected although the error bars are large, while no evidence is found for its redshift evolution between z = 0.2 and z = 0.4. Then we use a cosmological N-body simulation to examine misalignment between the central LRGs and their parent dark matter halos. Central and satellite galaxies are assigned to simulated halos by employing a halo occupation distribution model for the LRGs. The ellipticity correlation is predicted to have the same shape as, but an amplitude about four times higher than, our observation if the central LRGs are perfectly aligned with their host halos. This indicates that the central LRG galaxies are preferentially but not perfectly aligned with their host halos. With the assumption that there is a misalignment angle between a central LRG and its host halo which follows a Gaussian distribution with a zero mean and a width σθ, we obtain a tight constraint on the misalignment parameter, σθ = 35.4+4.0 -3.3 deg. This type of intrinsic ellipticity correlation, if not corrected, can lead to contamination at 5% level to the shear power spectrum in weak lensing surveys of limiting magnitude RAB = 24.5 if the source central galaxies follow the same misalignment distribution as the LRGs.

  11. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Collins, C.; Dawson, K.; Kneib, J.-P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Brownstein, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; Schwope, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J.

    2016-09-01

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a program dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray AGN and galaxy clusters over a large area (˜7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the SDSS-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray selected, massive (˜1014 to 1015~M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ˜ 0.001) redshifts for 4,000-5,000 of these systems out to z ˜ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX - σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.

  12. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {<=} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sup +0.17+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.55{sup +0.13+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12} L {sup -1} {sub xsun} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sup +0.18+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.49{sup +0.15+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sup +1.99+0.07} {sub -1.11-0.04}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.36{sup +0.84+0.01} {sub -0.30-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sup +1.31+0.043} {sub -0.91-0.015} and 3.02{sup +1.31+0.062} {sub -1.03-0.048}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sup +0.15} {sub -0.14})+(0.91{sup +0.85} {sub -0.81}) x z] SNuB h {sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe

  13. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  14. A catalogue of 2D photometric decompositions in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic main galaxy sample: preferred models and systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Alan; Vikram, Vinu; Bernardi, Mariangela

    2015-02-01

    We present a catalogue of 2D, point spread function-corrected de Vacouleurs, Sérsic, de Vacouleurs+Exponential, and Sérsic+Exponential fits of ˜7 × 105 spectroscopically selected galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. Fits are performed for the SDSS r band utilizing the fitting routine GALFIT and analysis pipeline PYMORPH. We compare these fits to prior catalogues. Fits are analysed using a physically motivated flagging system. The flags suggest that more than 90 per cent of two-component fits can be used for analysis. We show that the fits follow the expected behaviour for early and late galaxy types. The catalogues provide a robust set of structural and photometric parameters for future galaxy studies. We show that some biases remain in the measurements, e.g. the presence of bars significantly affect the bulge measurements although the bulge ellipticity may be used to separate barred and non-barred galaxies, and about 15 per cent of bulges of two-component fits are also affected by resolution. The catalogues are available in electronic format. We also provide an interface for generating postage stamp images of the 2D model and residual as well as the 1D profile. These images can be generated for a user-uploaded list of galaxies on demand.

  15. THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION WITH THE DIRECT METHOD ON STACKED SPECTRA OF SDSS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Brett H.; Martini, Paul

    2013-03-10

    The relation between galaxy stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity is a sensitive diagnostic of the main processes that drive galaxy evolution, namely cosmological gas inflow, metal production in stars, and gas outflow via galactic winds. We employed the direct method to measure the metallicities of {approx}200,000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey that were stacked in bins of (1) stellar mass and (2) both stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) to significantly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the weak [O III] {lambda}4363 and [O II] {lambda}{lambda}7320, 7330 auroral lines required to apply the direct method. These metallicity measurements span three decades in stellar mass from log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 7.4-10.5, which allows the direct method mass-metallicity relation to simultaneously capture the high-mass turnover and extend a full decade lower in mass than previous studies that employed more uncertain strong line methods. The direct method mass-metallicity relation rises steeply at low mass (O/H {proportional_to} M{sub *} {sup 1/2}) until it turns over at log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 8.9 and asymptotes to 12 + log(O/H) = 8.8 at high mass. The direct method mass-metallicity relation has a steeper slope, a lower turnover mass, and a factor of two to three greater dependence on SFR than strong line mass-metallicity relations. Furthermore, the SFR-dependence appears monotonic with stellar mass, unlike strong line mass-metallicity relations. We also measure the N/O abundance ratio, an important tracer of star formation history, and find the clear signature of primary and secondary nitrogen enrichment. N/O correlates tightly with oxygen abundance, and even more so with stellar mass.

  16. NoSOCS in SDSS - V. Red disc and blue bulge galaxies across different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. A. A.; Rembold, S. B.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Nascimento, R. S.; Vajgel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of `red discs' and `blue bulges', comparing those to the `normal' objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at z ≤ 0.1, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where `blue discs' are transformed into `red discs' as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time-scale of ˜2-3 Gyr. We also find from the sSFR-M* plane that `red discs' gradually change as they move into clusters. The `blue bulges' have many similar properties than `blue discs', but some of the former show strong signs of asymmetry. The high asymmetry `blue bulges' display enhanced recent star formation compared to their regular counterparts. That indicates some of these systems may have increased their star formation due to mergers. None the less, there may not be a single evolutionary path for these blue early-type objects.

  17. The Mass-Metallicity Relation with the Direct Method on Stacked Spectra of SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Brett H.; Martini, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The relation between galaxy stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity is a sensitive diagnostic of the main processes that drive galaxy evolution, namely cosmological gas inflow, metal production in stars, and gas outflow via galactic winds. We employed the direct method to measure the metallicities of ~200,000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey that were stacked in bins of (1) stellar mass and (2) both stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) to significantly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the weak [O III] λ4363 and [O II] λλ7320, 7330 auroral lines required to apply the direct method. These metallicity measurements span three decades in stellar mass from log(M sstarf/M ⊙) = 7.4-10.5, which allows the direct method mass-metallicity relation to simultaneously capture the high-mass turnover and extend a full decade lower in mass than previous studies that employed more uncertain strong line methods. The direct method mass-metallicity relation rises steeply at low mass (O/H vprop M sstarf 1/2) until it turns over at log(M sstarf/M ⊙) = 8.9 and asymptotes to 12 + log(O/H) = 8.8 at high mass. The direct method mass-metallicity relation has a steeper slope, a lower turnover mass, and a factor of two to three greater dependence on SFR than strong line mass-metallicity relations. Furthermore, the SFR-dependence appears monotonic with stellar mass, unlike strong line mass-metallicity relations. We also measure the N/O abundance ratio, an important tracer of star formation history, and find the clear signature of primary and secondary nitrogen enrichment. N/O correlates tightly with oxygen abundance, and even more so with stellar mass.

  18. SDSS IV MaNGA: Gradients in Recent Star Formation Histories as Diagnostics for Galaxy Growth and Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The spatially resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA allows the radial gradients of recent star formation histories (SFH), as indicated by the 4000Å break (D4000) and the equivalent width of both Hδ absorption line and Hα emission line, to be obtained with high accuracy for a large sample of galaxies in the nearby universe. Analyses of both a dozen galaxies observed by the MaNGA prototype run (P-MaNGA) and ~700 galaxies in the current MaNGA sample have shown that the SFH gradients are useful for understanding disk growth and star formation cessation in local galaxies. We find the SFH gradient of a galaxy to strongly depend on the evolution stage of its central region. Centrally star-forming galaxies generally show very weak or no radial variations. In contrast, centrally quiescent galaxies present significant radial gradients in the sense that Dn(4000) decreases, while both EW(HδA) and EW(Hα) increase from the galactic center outward. This effect is seen mainly for high-mass galaxies with stellar mass above a few ×1010 M⊙, and depends weakly on galaxy morphology type. These results are consistent with a picture in which the cessation of star formation propagates from the center of a galaxy outward as it moves to the red sequence. In this talk I will present these analyses and discuss their implications on galaxy evolution.

  19. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity Lr = 8-14L* (4.3-7.5 × 1044 erg s-1). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57-134 kpc and stellar mass Mstars = 0.3-3.4 × 1011M⊙. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and Lr > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M⊙ yr-1 place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  20. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Signal of the maxBCG SDSS Galaxy Clusters in WMAP

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Rozo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The Planck Collaboration measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding that it falls significantly below expectations based on existing mass calibration of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Resolving this tension requires either the data to go up, or the theoretical expectations to come down. Here, we use data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to perform an independent estimate of the SZ decrement of maxBCG clusters. The recovered signal is consistent with that obtained using Planck, though with larger error bars due to WMAP's larger beam size and smaller frequency range. Nevertheless, this detection serves as an independent confirmation of the magnitude of the effect, and demonstrates that the observed discrepancy must be theoretical in origin.

  1. The power spectrum and bispectrum of SDSS DR11 BOSS galaxies - II. Cosmological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Verde, Licia; Noreña, Jorge; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Samushia, Lado; Percival, Will J.; Wagner, Christian; Manera, Marc; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-09-01

    We examine the cosmological implications of the measurements of the linear growth rate of cosmological structure obtained in a companion paper from the power spectrum and bispectrum monopoles of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 11, CMASS galaxies. This measurement was of f 0.43σ8, where σ8 is the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, and f is the linear growth rate, at the effective redshift of the survey, zeff = 0.57. In conjunction with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, interesting constraints can be placed on models with non-standard neutrino properties and models where gravity deviates from General Relativity on cosmological scales. In particular, the sum of the masses of the three species of the neutrinos is constrained to mν < 0.49 eV (at 95 per cent confidence level) when the f 0.43σ8 measurement is combined with state-of-the-art CMB measurements. Allowing the effective number of neutrinos to vary as a free parameter does not significantly change these results. When we combine the measurement of f 0.43σ8 with the complementary measurement of fσ8 from the monopole and quadrupole of the two-point correlation function, we are able to obtain an independent measurements of f and σ8. We obtain f = 0.63 ± 0.16 and σ8 = 0.710 ± 0.086 (68 per cent confidence level). This is the first time when these parameters have been able to be measured independently using the redshift-space power spectrum and bispectrum measurements from galaxy clustering data only.

  2. THE JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOW IN THE RADIO GALAXY SDSS J1517+3353: IMPLICATIONS FOR DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Taylor, G. B. E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.ed E-mail: krista@mail.utexas.ed

    2010-06-10

    We report on the study of an intriguing active galaxy that was selected as a potential multiple supermassive black hole merger in the early-type host SDSS J151709.20+335324.7 (z = 0.135) from a complete search for double-peaked [O III] lines from the SDSS spectroscopic quasi-stellar object (QSO) database. Ground-based SDSS imaging reveals two blue structures on either side of the photometric center of the host galaxy, separated from each other by about 5.7 kpc. From a combination of SDSS fiber and Keck/HIRES long-slit spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that, in addition to these two features, a third distinct structure surrounds the nucleus of the host galaxy. All three structures exhibit highly ionized line emission with line ratios characteristic of Seyfert II active galactic nuclei. The analysis of spatially resolved emission-line profiles from the HIRES spectrum reveal three distinct kinematic subcomponents, one at rest and the other two moving at -350 km s{sup -1} and 500 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the host galaxy. A comparison of imaging and spectral data confirm a strong association between the kinematic components and the spatial knots, which implies a highly disturbed and complex active region in this object. A comparative analysis of the broadband positions, colors, kinematics, and spectral properties of the knots in this system lead to two plausible explanations: (1) a multiple active galactic nucleus (AGN) produced due to a massive dry merger, or (2) a very powerful radio jet-driven outflow. Subsequent VLA radio imaging reveals a clear jet aligned with the emission-line gas, confirming the latter explanation. We use the broadband radio measurements to examine the impact of the jet on the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, and find that the energy in the radio lobes can heat a significant fraction of the gas to the virial temperature. Finally, we discuss tests that may help future surveys distinguish between jet

  3. At the survey limits: discovery of the Aquarius 2 dwarf galaxy in the VST ATLAS and the SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrealba, G.; Koposov, S. E.; Belokurov, V.; Irwin, M.; Collins, M.; Spencer, M.; Ibata, R.; Mateo, M.; Bonaca, A.; Jethwa, P.

    2016-08-01

    We announce the discovery of the Aquarius 2 dwarf galaxy, a new distant satellite of the Milky Way, detected on the fringes of the VST ATLAS and the SDSS surveys. The object was originally identified as an overdensity of Red Giant Branch stars, but chosen for subsequent follow-up based on the presence of a strong Blue Horizontal Branch, which was also used to measure its distance of ˜110 kpc. Using deeper imaging from the IMACS camera on the 6.5m Baade and spectroscopy with DEIMOS on Keck, we measured the satellite's half-light radius 5.1 ± 0.8 arcmin, or ˜160 pc at this distance, and its stellar velocity dispersion of 5.4^{+3.4}_{-0.9} km s-1. With μ = 30.2 mag arcsec-2 and MV = -4.36, the new satellite lies close to two important detection limits: one in surface brightness; and one in luminosity at a given distance, thereby making Aquarius 2 one of the hardest dwarfs to find.

  4. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  5. Gas in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn Joyce

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, and provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We investigate the neutral hydrogen properties (i.e. content, morphology, kinematics) of void galaxies, both individually and systematically, using a combination of observations and simulations, to form a more complete understanding of the nature of these systems. We investigate in detail the H I morphology and kinematics of two void galaxies. One is an isolated polar disk galaxy in a diffuse cosmological wall situated between two voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies. We also examine KK 246, the only confirmed galaxy located within the nearby Tully Void. It is a dwarf galaxy with an extremely extended H I disk and signs of an H I cloud with anomalous velocity. It also exhibits clear misalignment between the kinematical major and minor axes, and a general misalignment between the H I and optical major axes. The relative isolation and extreme underdense environment make these both very interesting cases for examining the role of gas accretion in galaxy evolution. To study void galaxies as a population, we have carefully selected a sample of 60 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS. We have imaged this new Void Galaxy Survey in H I at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope with a typical resolution of 8 kpc, probing a volume of 1.2 Mpc and 12,000 km s^-1 surrounding each galaxy. We reach H I mass limits of 2 x 10^8 M_sun and column density sensitivities of 5 x 10^19 cm^-2

  6. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  7. DISCOVERY OF DRAMATIC OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN SDSS J1100+4421: A PECULIAR RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Yuki; Itoh, Ryosuke; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Saito, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Stawarz, Łukasz; Gandhi, Poshak; Ali, Gamal; Essam, Ahmad; Hamed, Gamal; Aoki, Tsutomu; Contreras, Carlos; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Iwata, Ikuru; and others

    2014-10-01

    We present our discovery of dramatic variability in SDSS J1100+4421 by the high-cadence transient survey Kiso Supernova Survey. The source brightened in the optical by at least a factor of three within about half a day. Spectroscopic observations suggest that this object is likely a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at z = 0.840, however, with unusually strong narrow emission lines. The estimated black hole mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} implies bolometric nuclear luminosity close to the Eddington limit. SDSS J1100+4421 is also extremely radio-loud, with a radio loudness parameter of R ≅ 4 × 10{sup 2}-3 × 10{sup 3}, which implies the presence of relativistic jets. Rapid and large-amplitude optical variability of the target, reminiscent of that found in a few radio- and γ-ray-loud NLS1s, is therefore produced most likely in a blazar-like core. The 1.4 GHz radio image of the source shows an extended structure with a linear size of about 100 kpc. If SDSS J1100+4421 is a genuine NLS1, as suggested here, this radio structure would then be the largest ever discovered in this type of active galaxies.

  8. Galaxy masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courteau, Stéphane; Cappellari, Michele; de Jong, Roelof S.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Hoekstra, Henk; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mamon, Gary A.; Maraston, Claudia; Treu, Tommaso; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The different sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and gas-poor galaxies, with some attention paid to our Milky Way, and masses from weak and strong lensing methods all provide review material on galaxy masses in a self-consistent manner.

  9. Characterizing the chemically enriched circumgalactic medium of ˜38 000 luminous red galaxies in SDSS DR12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yun-Hsin; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Johnson, Sean D.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    We report a definitive detection of chemically enriched cool gas around massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 0.4-0.7. The result is based on a survey of 37 621 luminous red galaxy (LRG)-quasi-stellar object pairs in SDSS DR12 with projected distance d < 500 kpc. The LRGs are characterized by a predominantly old stellar population (age ≳ 1 Gyr) with 13 per cent displaying [O II] emission features and LINER-like spectra. Both passive and [O II]-emitting LRGs share the same stellar mass distribution with a mean of ≈ 11.4 and a dispersion of 0.2 dex. Both LRG populations exhibit associated strong Mg II absorbers out to d < 500 kpc. The mean gas covering fraction at d ≲ 120 kpc is < κ rangle _{Mg II} > 15 per cent and declines quickly to < κ rangle _{Mg II} ≈ 5 per cent at d ≲ 500 kpc. No clear dependence on stellar mass is detected for the observed Mg II absorption properties. The observed velocity dispersion of Mg II-absorbing gas relative to either passive or [O II]-emitting LRGs is merely 60 per cent of what is expected from virial motion in these massive haloes. While no apparent azimuthal dependence is seen for < κ rangle _{Mg II} around passive LRGs at all radii, a modest enhancement in < κ rangle _{Mg II} is detected along the major axis of [O II]-emitting LRGs at d < 50 kpc. The suppressed velocity dispersion of Mg II-absorbing gas around both passive and [O II]-emitting LRGs, together with an elevated < κ rangle _{Mg II} along the major axis of [O II]-emitting LRGs at d < 50 kpc, provides important insights into the origin of the observed chemically enriched cool gas in LRG haloes. We consider different scenarios and conclude that the observed Mg II absorbers around LRGs are best explained by a combination of cool clouds formed in thermally unstable LRG haloes and satellite accretion through filaments.

  10. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  11. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image is a Galaxy Evolution Explorer observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way. Andromeda is the nearest large galaxy to our own. The image is a mosaic of 10 separate Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken in September, 2003. The color image (with near ultraviolet shown by red and far ultraviolet shown by blue) shows blue regions of young, hot, high mass stars tracing out the spiral arms where star formation is occurring, and the central orange-white 'bulge' of old, cooler stars formed long ago. The star forming arms of Messier 31 are unusual in being quite circular rather than the usual spiral shape. Several companion galaxies can also be seen. These include Messier 32, a dwarf elliptical galaxy directly below the central bulge and just outside the spiral arms, and Messier 110 (M110), which is above and to the right of the center. M110 has an unusual far ultraviolet bright core in an otherwise 'red,' old star halo. Many other regions of star formation can be seen far outside the main body of the galaxy.

  12. MASS AND ENVIRONMENT AS DRIVERS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN SDSS AND zCOSMOS AND THE ORIGIN OF THE SCHECHTER FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yingjie; Lilly, Simon J.; Kovac, Katarina; Knobel, Christian; Maier, Christian; Carollo, C. Marcella; Silverman, John; Kampczyk, Pawel; Bolzonella, Micol; Pozzetti, Lucia; Zamorani, Gianni; Renzini, Alvio; Ilbert, Olivier; Cucciati, Olga; De Ravel, Loic; Iovino, Angela; Tasca, Lidia; Sanders, David; Scoville, Nicholas; Contini, Thierry

    2010-09-20

    We explore the simple inter-relationships between mass, star formation rate, and environment in the SDSS, zCOSMOS, and other deep surveys. We take a purely empirical approach in identifying those features of galaxy evolution that are demanded by the data and then explore the analytic consequences of these. We show that the differential effects of mass and environment are completely separable to z {approx} 1, leading to the idea of two distinct processes of 'mass quenching' and 'environment quenching'. The effect of environment quenching, at fixed over-density, evidently does not change with epoch to z {approx} 1 in zCOSMOS, suggesting that the environment quenching occurs as large-scale structure develops in the universe, probably through the cessation of star formation in 30%-70% of satellite galaxies. In contrast, mass quenching appears to be a more dynamic process, governed by a quenching rate. We show that the observed constancy of the Schechter M* and {alpha}{sub s} for star-forming galaxies demands that the quenching of galaxies around and above M* must follow a rate that is statistically proportional to their star formation rates (or closely mimic such a dependence). We then postulate that this simple mass-quenching law in fact holds over a much broader range of stellar mass (2 dex) and cosmic time. We show that the combination of these two quenching processes, plus some additional quenching due to merging naturally produces (1) a quasi-static single Schechter mass function for star-forming galaxies with an exponential cutoff at a value M* that is set uniquely by the constant of proportionality between the star formation and mass quenching rates and (2) a double Schechter function for passive galaxies with two components. The dominant component (at high masses) is produced by mass quenching and has exactly the same M* as the star-forming galaxies but a faint end slope that differs by {Delta}{alpha}{sub s} {approx} 1. The other component is produced by

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) blended spectra catalogue: strong galaxy-galaxy lens and occulting galaxy pair candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Baldry, I. K.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Conselice, C.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M. J.; Moffett, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high-resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its AUTOZ automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km s-1, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter `Ef' classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g. strong gravitational lens surveys.

  14. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  15. Mass reconstruction of galaxies clusters: Abell 2219, RXC J2248.7-4431, and SDSS J1004+4112 using strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaelani, Anton T.; Premadi, Premana W.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents mass reconstruction of galaxies cluster from strong lens analysis for Abell 2219 (z = 0.225), RXC J2248,7-4431 (z = 0.348), and SDSS J1004+4112 (z = 0.68) using parametric model sofware for strong gravitational lensing, glafic (Oguri 2010). We use assumptions of point source and source-plane approximation for minimization. We find that our parametric model well reproduces the positions of multiply imaged galaxies and quasars and time delays between quasar images. We find that the best-fit centroid of the dark halo (NFW) is quite consistent with the distribution of gas from observed X-ray. Radius enclosed mass profile and mass profile from hidrostatic assumption on distribution of gas from X-ray agree quite well with each other, including the radial slopes of the profiles with average discrepancies, Mlens/MX = 1.52 on the outer radius of images. Existence of dominant galaxy associate with compactness of cluster as lens. We find increasing of fraction of galaxies morphology from distribution of cluster members increase with redshift.

  16. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  17. Changing Ionization Conditions in SDSS Galaxies with Active Galactic Nuclei as a Function of Environment from Pairs to Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  18. THE QUASAR-GALAXY CROSS SDSS J1320+1644: A PROBABLE LARGE-SEPARATION LENSED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Iye, Masanori; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Shin, Min-Su; Sluse, Dominique; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-03-10

    We report the discovery of a pair of quasars at z = 1.487, with a separation of 8.''585 {+-} 0.''002. Subaru Telescope infrared imaging reveals the presence of an elliptical and a disk-like galaxy located almost symmetrically between the quasars, in a cross-like configuration. Based on absorption lines in the quasar spectra and the colors of the galaxies, we estimate that both galaxies are located at redshift z = 0.899. This, as well as the similarity of the quasar spectra, suggests that the system is a single quasar multiply imaged by a galaxy group or cluster acting as a gravitational lens, although the possibility of a binary quasar cannot be fully excluded. We show that the gravitational lensing hypothesis implies that these galaxies are not isolated, but must be embedded in a dark matter halo of virial mass {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1}{sub 70} M{sub Sun} assuming a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a concentration parameter of c{sub vir} = 6, or a singular isothermal sphere profile with a velocity dispersion of {approx}670 km s{sup -1}. We place constraints on the location of the dark matter halo, as well as the velocity dispersions of the galaxies. In addition, we discuss the influence of differential reddening, microlensing, and intrinsic variability on the quasar spectra and broadband photometry.

  19. Les galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering – towards an accurate model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chia -Hsun Chuang; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong Bo; Wang, Yuting; Antonio J. Cuesta; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; et al

    2016-08-08

    We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalised growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωmh2. In addition, we adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a `single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationallymore » expensive for advanced theoretical models, thus we develop a new methodology to speed up our analysis.« less

  1. Improved limit on the neutrino mass with CMB and redshift-dependent halo bias-mass relations from SDSS, DEEP2, and Lyman-break galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2008-10-15

    We use measurements of luminosity-dependent galaxy bias at several different redshifts, SDSS at z=0.05, DEEP2 at z=1, and LBGs at z=3.8, combined with WMAP 5-year cosmic microwave background anisotropy data and SDSS Red Luminous Galaxy survey three-dimensional clustering power spectrum to put constraints on cosmological parameters. Fitting this combined dataset, we show that the luminosity-dependent bias data that probe the relation between halo bias and halo mass and its redshift evolution are very sensitive to sum of the neutrino masses: in particular, we obtain the upper limit of at the 95% confidence level for a {lambda}CDM+m{sub {nu}} model, with a {sigma}{sub 8} equal to {sigma}{sub 8}=0.759{+-}0.025 (1{sigma}). When we allow the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w to vary, we find w=-1.30{+-}0.19 for a general wCDM+m{sub {nu}} model with the 95% confidence level upper limit on the neutrino masses at . The constraint on the dark energy equation of state further improves to w=-1.125{+-}0.092 when using also ACBAR and supernovae Union data, in addition to above, with a prior on the Hubble constant from the Hubble Space Telescope.

  2. Correlations among the properties of galaxies found in a blind HI survey, which also have SDSS optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Cortese, L.; Disney, M. J.

    2009-03-01

    We have used the Parkes Multibeam system and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assemble a sample of 195 galaxies selected originally from their HI signature to avoid biases against unevolved or low surface brightness objects. For each source nine intrinsic properties are measured homogeneously, as well as inclination and an optical spectrum. The sample, which should be almost entirely free of either misidentification or confusion, includes a wide diversity of galaxies ranging from inchoate, low surface brightness dwarfs to giant spirals. Despite this diversity there are five clear correlations among their properties. They include a common dynamical mass-to-light ratio within their optical radii, a correlation between surface brightness and luminosity and a common HI surface density. Such correlation should provide strong constrains on models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  3. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy is the closest SPIRAL GALAXY to the MILKY WAY, just visible to the naked eye on a dark night as a faint smudge of light in the constellation Andromeda. The earliest records of the Andromeda nebula, as it is still often referred to, date back to AD 964, to the `Book of the Fixed Stars' published by the Persian astronomer AL-SÛFI. The first European to officially note the Andro...

  4. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modelling the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Guo, Hong; Klypin, Anatoly; Behroozi, Peter; Hahn, Chang Hoon; Comparat, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Tinker, Jeremy; Gottlöber, Stefan; Favole, Ginevra; Shu, Yiping; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Bolton, Adam; Scoccimarro, Román; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7 drawn from the Final SDSS-III Data Release. We compare the BOSS results with the predictions of a halo abundance matching (HAM) clustering model that assigns galaxies to dark matter haloes selected from the large BigMultiDark N-body simulation of a flat Λ cold dark matter Planck cosmology. We compare the observational data with the simulated ones on a light cone constructed from 20 subsequent outputs of the simulation. Observational effects such as incompleteness, geometry, veto masks and fibre collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1σ errors the observed monopole of the two-point correlation function at all relevant scales: from the smallest scales, 0.5 h-1 Mpc, up to scales beyond the baryon acoustic oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1), and the three-point correlation function. The quadrupole of the correlation function presents some tensions with observations. We discuss possible causes that can explain this disagreement, including target selection effects. Overall, the standard HAM model describes remarkably well the clustering statistics of the CMASS sample. We compare the stellar-to-halo mass relation for the CMASS sample measured using weak lensing in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey with the prediction of our clustering model, and find a good agreement within 1σ. The BigMD-BOSS light cone including properties of BOSS galaxies and halo properties is made publicly available.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Modelling the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Guo, Hong; Klypin, Anatoly; Behroozi, Peter; Hahn, Chang Hoon; Comparat, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Tinker, Jeremy; Gottlöber, Stefan; Favole, Ginevra; Shu, Yiping; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Bolton, Adam; Scoccimarro, Román; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7 drawn from the Final SDSS-III Data Release. We compare the BOSS results with the predictions of a Halo Abundance Matching (HAM) clustering model that assigns galaxies to dark matter halos selected from the large BIGMULTIDARK N-body simulation of a flat ΛCDM Planck cosmology. We compare the observational data with the simulated ones on a light-cone constructed from 20 subsequent outputs of the simulation. Observational effects such as incompleteness, geometry, veto masks and fiber collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1-σ errors the observed monopole of the 2-point correlation function at all relevant scales: from the smallest scales, 0.5 h-1 Mpc, up to scales beyond the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1), and the Three-point correlation function. The quadrupole of the correlation function presents some tensions with observations. We discuss possible causes that can explain this disagreement, including target selection effects. Overall, the standard HAM model describes remarkably well the clustering statistics of the CMASS sample. We compare the stellar to halo mass relation for the CMASS sample measured using weak lensing in the CFHT Stripe 82 Survey with the prediction of our clustering model, and find a good agreement within 1-σ. The BIGMD-BOSS light-cone including properties of BOSS galaxies and halo properties is made publicly available.

  7. On the properties of the interstellar medium in extremely metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxies. GMOS-IFU spectroscopy and SDSS photometry of the double-knot galaxy HS 2236+1344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, P.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Vega, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: The main goal of this study is to carry out a spatially resolved investigation of the warm interstellar medium (ISM) in the extremely metal-poor blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy HS 2236+1344. Special emphasis is laid on analysis of the spatial distribution of chemical abundances, emission-line ratios, and the kinematics of the ISM, and to the recent star-forming (SF) activity in this galaxy. Methods: This study is based on optical integral field unit spectroscopy data from Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini North telescope and archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. The galaxy was observed at medium spectral resolution over the spectral range from ~4300 Å to 7300 Å. The data were obtained in two different positions across the galaxy, obtaining a total 4″ × 8″ field that encompasses most of its ISM. Results: Emission-line maps and broad-band images obtained in this study indicate that HS 2236+1344 hosts three giant H ii regions (GH iiRs). Our data also reveal some faint curved features in the BCD periphery that might be due to tidal perturbations or expanding ionized-gas shells. The ISM velocity field shows systematic gradients along the major axis of the BCD, with its southeastern and northwestern half differing by ~80 km s-1 in their recessional velocity over the field of view. The Hα and Hβ equivalent-width distribution in the central part of HS 2236+1344 is consistent with a very young (~3 Myr) burst. Our surface photometry analysis reveals an underlying low surface brightness component with moderately red colors, which suggest that the galaxy has undergone previous star formation. We derive an integrated oxygen abundance of 12 + log (O / H) = 7.53 ± 0.06 and a nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio of log (N / O) = -1.57 ± 0.19. Our results are consistent, within the uncertainties, with a homogeneous distribution of oxygen and nitrogen within the ISM of the galaxy. The high-ionization He ii λ4686 emission line is detected only in

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-08-01

    We measure and analyse the clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) relative to the line of sight (LOS), for LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples drawn from the final Data Release 12. The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zlowz = 0.32, and the CMASS sample 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zcmass = 0.57. From the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole moments around the LOS, we measure the growth of structure parameter f times the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations σ8 by modelling the redshift-space distortion signal. When the geometrical Alcock-Paczynski effect is also constrained from the same data, we find joint constraints on fσ8, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon-drag epoch H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon DA(z)/rs(zd). We find f(zlowz)σ8(zlowz) = 0.394 ± 0.062, DA(zlowz)/rs(zd) = 6.35 ± 0.19, H(zlowz)rs(zd) = (11.41 ± 0.56) 103 km s- 1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zcmass)σ8(zcmass) = 0.444 ± 0.038, DA(zcmass)/rs(zd) = 9.42 ± 0.15, H(zcmass)rs(zd) = (13.92 ± 0.44) 103 km s- 1 for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous BOSS DR11 measurements. Assuming the Hubble parameter and angular distance parameter are fixed at fiducial Λcold dark matter values, we find f(zlowz)σ8(zlowz) = 0.485 ± 0.044 and f(zcmass)σ8(zcmass) = 0.436 ± 0.022 for the LOWZ and CMASS samples, respectively.

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Shu Kitaura, Francisco-; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-05-01

    We measure and analyse the clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) relative to the line-of-sight (LOS), for LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples drawn from the final Data Release 12 (DR12). The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zlowz = 0.32, and the CMASS sample 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zcmass = 0.57. From the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole moments around the LOS, we measure the growth of structure parameter f times the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations σ8 by modeling the Redshift-Space Distortion signal. When the geometrical Alcock-Paczynski effect is also constrained from the same data, we find joint constraints on fσ8, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon DA(z)/rs(zd). We find f(zlowz)σ8(zlowz) = 0.394 ± 0.062, DA(zlowz)/rs(zd) = 6.35 ± 0.19, H(zlowz)rs(zd) = (11.41 ± 0.56) 103kms-1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zcmass)σ8(zcmass) = 0.444 ± 0.038, DA(zcmass)/rs(zd) = 9.42 ± 0.15, H(z_cmass)r_s(z_d)=(13.92 ± 0.44) {10^3km}s^{-1} for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous BOSS DR11 measurements. Assuming the Hubble parameter and angular distance parameter are fixed at fiducial ΛCDM values, we find f(zlowz)σ8(zlowz) = 0.485 ± 0.044 and f(zcmass)σ8(zcmass) = 0.436 ± 0.022 for the LOWZ and CMASS samples, respectively.

  10. Age-density relation of Main galaxies at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; Song, Jun; Chen, Yi-Qing; Jiang, Peng; Ding, Ying-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we examine the environmental dependence of galaxy age at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families. Statistical results show that the environmental dependence of galaxy age is stronger for late type galaxies, but can be still observed for the early types: the age of galaxies in the densest regime is preferentially older than that in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. We also find that the environmental dependence of galaxy age for red galaxies and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies is stronger, while the one for blue galaxies and High Stellar Mass ( HSM ) galaxies is very weak.

  11. The formation of bulges and black holes: lessons from a census of active galaxies in the SDSS.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Heckman, Timothy M

    2005-03-15

    We examine the relationship between galaxies, supermassive black holes and AGN using a sample of 23,000 narrow-emission-line ('type 2') active galactic nuclei (AGN) drawn from a sample of 123,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have studied how AGN host properties compare with those of normal galaxies and how they depend on the luminosity of the active nucleus. We find that AGN reside in massive galaxies and have distributions of sizes and concentrations that are similar to those of the early-type galaxies in our sample. The host galaxies of low-luminosity AGN have stellar populations similar to normal early types. The hosts of high- luminosity AGN have much younger mean stellar ages, and a significant fraction have experienced recent starbursts. High-luminosity AGN are also found in lower-density environments. We then use the stellar velocity dispersions of the AGN hosts to estimate black hole masses and their [OIII]lambda5007 emission-line luminosities to estimate black hole accretion rates. We find that the volume averaged ratio of star formation to black hole accretion is approximately 1000 for the bulge-dominated galaxies in our sample. This is remarkably similar to the observed ratio of stellar mass to black hole mass in nearby bulges. Most of the present-day black hole growth is occurring in black holes with masses less than 3 x 10(7)M(3). Our estimated accretion rates imply that low-mass black holes are growing on a time-scale that is comparable with the age of the Universe. Around 50% this growth takes place in AGN that are radiating within a factor of five of the Eddington luminosity. Such systems are rare, making up only 0.2% of the low-mass black hole population at the present day. The remaining growth occurs in lower luminosity AGN. The growth time-scale increases by more than an order of magnitude for the most massive black holes in our sample. We conclude that the evolution of the AGN luminosity function documented in recent optical

  12. Galaxy 'Hunting' Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Galaxies found under the Glare of Cosmic Flashlights Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have discovered in a single pass about a dozen otherwise invisible galaxies halfway across the Universe. The discovery, based on a technique that exploits a first-class instrument, represents a major breakthrough in the field of galaxy 'hunting'. ESO PR Photo 40a/07 ESO PR Photo 40a/07 Newly Found Galaxies (SINFONI/VLT) The team of astronomers led by Nicolas Bouché have used quasars to find these galaxies. Quasars are very distant objects of extreme brilliance, which are used as cosmic beacons that reveal galaxies lying between the quasar and us. The galaxy's presence is revealed by a 'dip' in the spectrum of the quasar - caused by the absorption of light at a specific wavelength. The team used huge catalogues of quasars, the so-called SDSS and 2QZ catalogues, to select quasars with dips. The next step was then to observe the patches of the sky around these quasars in search for the foreground galaxies from the time the Universe was about 6 billion years old, almost half of its current age. "The difficulty in actually spotting and seeing these galaxies stems from the fact that the glare of the quasar is too strong compared to the dim light of the galaxy," says Bouché. This is where observations taken with SINFONI on ESO's VLT made the difference. SINFONI is an infrared 'integral field spectrometer' that simultaneously delivers very sharp images and highly resolved colour information (spectra) of an object on the sky. ESO PR Photo 32e/07 ESO PR Photo 40b/07 Chasing 'Hidden' Galaxies (Artist's Impression) With this special technique, which untangles the light of the galaxy from the quasar light, the team detected 14 galaxies out of the 20 pre-selected quasar patches of sky, a hefty 70% success rate. "This high detection rate alone is a very exciting result," says Bouché. "But, these are not just ordinary galaxies: they are most notable ones, actively forming a lot of

  13. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: BAO measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-08-01

    [abridged] We present an anisotropic analysis of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale in the twelfth and final data release of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We independently analyse the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples: the LOWZ sample contains contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm LOWZ}=0.32$; the CMASS sample consists of 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm CMASS}=0.57$. We extract the BAO peak position from the monopole power spectrum moment, $\\alpha_0$, and from the $\\mu^2$ moment, $\\alpha_2$, where $\\mu$ is the cosine of the angle to the line-of-sight. The $\\mu^2$-moment provides equivalent information to that available in the quadrupole but is simpler to analyse. After applying a reconstruction algorithm to reduce the BAO suppression by bulk motions, we measure the BAO peak position in the monopole and $\\mu^2$-moment, which are related to radial and angular shifts in scale. We report $H(z_{\\rm LOWZ})r_s(z_d)=(11.60\\pm0.60)\\cdot10^3 {\\rm km}s^{-1}$ and $D_A(z_{\\rm LOWZ})/r_s(z_d)=6.66\\pm0.16$ with a cross-correlation coefficient of $r_{HD_A}=0.41$, for the LOWZ sample; and $H(z_{\\rm CMASS})r_s(z_d)=(14.56\\pm0.37)\\cdot10^3 {\\rm km}s^{-1}$ and $D_A(z_{\\rm CMASS})/r_s(z_d)=9.42\\pm0.13$ with a cross-correlation coefficient of $r_{HD_A}=0.47$, for the CMASS sample. We combine these results with the measurements of the BAO peak position in the monopole and quadrupole correlation function of the same dataset \\citep[][companion paper]{Cuestaetal2015} and report the consensus values: $H(z_{\\rm LOWZ})r_s(z_d)=(11.63\\pm0.69)\\cdot10^3 {\\rm km}s^{-1}$ and $D_A(z_{\\rm LOWZ})/r_s(z_d)=6.67\\pm0.15$ with $r_{HD_A}=0.35$ for the LOWZ sample; $H(z_{\\rm CMASS})r_s(z_d)=(14.67\\pm0.42)\\cdot10^3 {\\rm km}s^{-1}$ and $D_A(z_{\\rm CMASS})/r_s(z_d)=9.47\\pm0.12$ with $r_{HD_A}=0.52$ for the CMASS sample.

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-08-01

    We measure and analyse the clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) relative to the line-of-sight (LOS), for LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples drawn from the final Data Release 12 (DR12). The LOWZ sample contains 361\\,762 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm lowz}=0.32$, and the CMASS sample 777\\,202 galaxies with an effective redshift of $z_{\\rm cmass}=0.57$. From the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole moments around the LOS, we measure the growth of structure parameter $f$ times the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations $\\sigma_8$ by modeling the Redshift-Space Distortion signal. When the geometrical Alcock-Paczynski effect is also constrained from the same data, we find joint constraints on $f\\sigma_8$, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch $H(z)r_s(z_d)$, and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon $D_A(z)/r_s(z_d)$. We find $f(z_{\\rm lowz})\\sigma_8(z_{\\rm lowz})=0.394\\pm0.062$, $D_A(z_{\\rm lowz})/r_s(z_d)=6.35\\pm0.19$, $H(z_{\\rm lowz})r_s(z_d)=(11.41\\pm 0.56)\\,{10^3\\rm km}s^{-1}$ for the LOWZ sample, and $f(z_{\\rm cmass})\\sigma_8(z_{\\rm cmass})=0.444\\pm0.038$, $D_A(z_{\\rm cmass})/r_s(z_d)=9.42\\pm0.15$, $H(z_{\\rm cmass})r_s(z_d)=(13.92 \\pm 0.44)\\, {10^3\\rm km}s^{-1}$ for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous BOSS DR11 measurements. Assuming the Hubble parameter and angular distance parameter are fixed at fiducial $\\Lambda$CDM values, we find $f(z_{\\rm lowz})\\sigma_8(z_{\\rm lowz})=0.485\\pm0.044$ and $f(z_{\\rm cmass})\\sigma_8(z_{\\rm cmass})=0.436\\pm0.022$ for the LOWZ and CMASS samples, respectively.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: BAO measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-08-01

    We present an anisotropic analysis of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale in the twelfth and final data release of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We independently analyse the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples: the LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32; the CMASS sample consists of 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. We extract the BAO peak position from the monopole power-spectrum moment, α0, and from the μ2 moment, α2, where μ is the cosine of the angle to the line of sight. The μ2-moment provides equivalent information to that available in the quadrupole but is simpler to analyse. After applying a reconstruction algorithm to reduce the BAO suppression by bulk motions, we measure the BAO peak position in the monopole and μ2-moment, which are related to radial and angular shifts in scale. We report H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.60 ± 0.60) × 103 km s-1 and DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.66 ± 0.16 with a cross-correlation coefficient of r_{HD_A}=0.41, for the LOWZ sample; and H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.56 ± 0.37) × 103 km s-1 and DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.42 ± 0.13 with a cross-correlation coefficient of r_{HD_A}=0.47, for the CMASS sample. We demonstrate that our results are not affected by the fiducial cosmology assumed for the analysis. We combine these results with the measurements of the BAO peak position in the monopole and quadrupole correlation function of the same data set (Cuesta et al. 2016, companion paper) and report the consensus values: H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.63 ± 0.69) × 103 km s-1 and DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.67 ± 0.15 with r_{HD_A}=0.35 for the LOWZ sample; H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.67 ± 0.42) × 103 km s-1 and DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.47 ± 0.12 with r_{HD_A}=0.52 for the CMASS sample.

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: BAO measurement from the LOS-dependent power spectrum of DR12 BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ho, Shirley; Shu Kitaura, Francisco-; Maraston, Claudia; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-05-01

    We present an anisotropic analysis of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale in the twelfth and final data release of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We independently analyse the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples: the LOWZ sample contains contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32; the CMASS sample consists of 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. We extract the BAO peak position from the monopole power spectrum moment, α0, and from the μ2 moment, α2, where μ is the cosine of the angle to the line-of-sight. The μ2-moment provides equivalent information to that available in the quadrupole but is simpler to analyse. After applying a reconstruction algorithm to reduce the BAO suppression by bulk motions, we measure the BAO peak position in the monopole and μ2-moment, which are related to radial and angular shifts in scale. We report H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.60 ± 0.60) · 103 kms-1 and DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.66 ± 0.16 with a cross-correlation coefficient of r_{HD_A}=0.41, for the LOWZ sample; and H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.56 ± 0.37) · 103 kms-1 and DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.42 ± 0.13 with a cross-correlation coefficient of r_{HD_A}=0.47, for the CMASS sample. We demonstrate that our results are not affected by the fiducial cosmology assumed for the analysis. We combine these results with the measurements of the BAO peak position in the monopole and quadrupole correlation function of the same dataset (Cuesta et al. 2016, companion paper) and report the consensus values: H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.63 ± 0.69) · 103 kms-1 and DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.67 ± 0.15 with r_{HD_A}=0.35 for the LOWZ sample; H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.67 ± 0.42) · 103 kms-1 and DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.47 ± 0.12 with r_{HD_A}=0.52 for the CMASS sample.

  18. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  19. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  20. The Mass of the Galaxy from Large Samples of Field Horizontal-Branch Stars in the SDSS Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Chiba, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Wilhelm, R.; Allende Prieto, C.; Sommer-Larsen, J.; Newberg, H. J.; Yanny, B.; Marsteller, B.; Pier, J. R.

    2004-07-01

    We present a new estimate of the mass of the Milky Way, making use of a large sample of 955 field horizontal-branch (FHB) stars from the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This sample of stars has been classified on the basis of an automated analysis approach, in combination with other methods, in order to obtain estimates of the physical parameters of the stars, i.e., T_eff, log g, [Fe/H], and should be relatively free of contamination from halo blue stragglers. The stars all have measured radial velocities and photometric distance estimates, and the sample includes objects as distant as ˜ 75 kpc from the Galactic center. Application of a Bayesian likelihood method, for a specific model of the Galaxy, indicates that the total mass of the Galaxy lies in the range 1.5-4.0 x 1012 M⊙. Our sample appears to reveal a clear signature of a dual halo population of FHB stars, with the boundary between the inner and outer halo around 20 kpc, and the possibility of rather striking differences in the rotational properties of the Galaxy at low metallicity.

  1. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  2. Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

  3. The 8 O'Clock Arc: A Serendipitous Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Lyman Break Galaxy in the SDSS DR4 Imaging Data

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Lin, Huan; Diehl, H.Thomas; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2006-11-01

    We report on the serendipitous discovery of the brightest Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) currently known, a galaxy at z = 2.73 that is being strongly lensed by the z = 0.38 Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) SDSS J002240.91+143110.4. The arc of this gravitational lens system, which we have dubbed the ''8 o'clock arc'' due to its time of discovery, was initially identified in the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4); followup observations on the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system and led to the identification of the arc's spectrum as that of an LBG. The arc has a spectrum and a redshift remarkably similar to those of the previous record-holder for brightest LBG (MS 1512-cB58, a.k.a ''cB58''), but, with an estimated total magnitude of (g,r,i) = (20.0,19.2,19.0) and surface brightness of ({mu}{sub g}, {mu}{sub r}, {mu}{sub i}) = (23.3, 22.5, 22.3) mag arcsec{sup -2}, the 8 o'clock arc is thrice as bright. The 8 o'clock arc, which consists of three lensed images of the LBG, is 162{sup o}(9.6'') long and has a length-to-width ratio of 6:1. A fourth image of the LBG--a counter-image--can also be identified in the ARC 3.5m g-band images. A simple lens model for the system assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid potential yields an Einstein radius of {theta}{sub Ein} = 2.91'' {+-} 0.14'', a total mass for the lensing LRG (within the 10.6 {+-} 0.5 h{sup -1} kpc enclosed by the lensed images) of 1.04 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}, and a magnification factor for the LBG of 12.3{sub -3.6}{sup +15}. The LBG itself is intrinsically quite luminous ({approx} 6 x L{sub *}) and shows indications of massive recent star formation, perhaps as high as 160 h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}.

  4. Crashing galaxies, cosmic fireworks

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study of binary systems is reviewed. The history of the study of interacting galaxies, the behavior of gas in binary systems, studies to identify the processes that occur when galaxies interact, and the relationship of Seyfert galaxies and quasars to binary systems are discussed. The development of an atlas of peculiar galaxies (Arp, 1966) and methods for modeling galaxy interactions are examined.

  5. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS galaxy Clusters II: Cluster Density Profiles and the Mass--Richness Relation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Koester, Benjamin P.; Frieman, Joshua A.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James

    2007-09-28

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  6. A PUBLIC VOID CATALOG FROM THE SDSS DR7 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEYS BASED ON THE WATERSHED TRANSFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Weinberg, David H.

    2012-12-10

    We produce the most comprehensive public void catalog to date using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 main sample out to redshift z = 0.2 and the luminous red galaxy sample out to z = 0.44. Using a modified version of the parameter-free void finder ZOBOV, we fully take into account the presence of the survey boundary and masks. Our strategy for finding voids is thus appropriate for any survey configuration. We produce two distinct catalogs: a complete catalog including voids near any masks, which would be appropriate for void galaxy surveys, and a bias-free catalog of voids away from any masks, which is necessary for analyses that require a fair sampling of void shapes and alignments. Our discovered voids have effective radii from 5 to 135 h {sup -1} Mpc. We discuss basic catalog statistics such as number counts and redshift distributions and describe some additional data products derived from our catalog, such as radial density profiles and projected density maps. We find that radial profiles of stacked voids show a qualitatively similar behavior across nearly two decades of void radii and throughout the full redshift range.

  7. Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5galaxies from quiescent galaxies. Our method indicates that the inner stellar mass is the most correlated parameter of quenching, implying that the process that quenches galaxies must also buildup their inner structure. Second, we explore the relationship between galactic bars and their host galaxies with Galaxy Zoo 2 at z˜0. The correlations of bar properties and galaxy properties are consistent with simulations of bar formation and evolution, indicating that bars affect their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate whether bars can drive supermassive black hole growth with data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble at 0.2galaxies to a matched sample of inactive, control galaxies shows that there is no statistically significant excess of bars in active hosts. Our result shows that bars are not the primary fueling mechanism of supermassive black hole

  8. Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, A. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Universe was a more exciting place at moderate to high redshifts z˜3, after reionization took place, but before the present day galaxy properties were firmly established. From a wide variety of directions, we are gaining insight into the Universe at these epochs. Less gas was sequestered into stars and had been ejected into the interstellar medium as weakly emitting, slowly cooling debris, because a significant amount of star formation and supermassive blackhole growth in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was still to occur. Furthermore, the processes that shape today’s galaxies were at work, and can be seen in real time with the appropriate tools. The most active regions of galaxies at these redshifts are deeply obscured at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths by an opaque interstellar medium (ISM) that absorbs most of their radiation, and then re-emits at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths. This emission provides us with a very powerful probe of the regions within galaxies where the most intense activity takes place; both their total energy output, and from spectroscopy, about the physics and chemistry of the atomic and molecular gas that fuels, hides and surrounds these regions. This information is unique, but not complete: radio, mid- and near-IR, optical and X-ray observations each provide unique complementary views. Nevertheless, probing the obscured Universe, with the Atacama Large (Sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Herschel Space Observatory, Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and missions and telescopes that are not yet in construction, like an actively cooled sub-10-m class IR space telescope and a 25-m class ground-based submillimeter/THz telescope (CCAT) will provide a more complete picture of in which neighborhoods, by what means and how quickly the most vigorous bursts of activity take place.

  9. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  10. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  11. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

    A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

    This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  12. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the 'local group' of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

  13. O vi Emission Imaging of a Galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope: a Warm Gas Halo Surrounding the Intense Starburst SDSS J115630.63+500822.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Scarlata, Claudia; Lehnert, Matthew D.; Mannerström-Jansson, Gustav

    2016-09-01

    We report results from a new Hubble Space Telescope campaign that targets the O vi λ λ 1032,1038 Å doublet in emission around intensely star-forming galaxies. The program aims to characterize the energy balance in starburst galaxies and gas cooling in the difficult-to-map coronal temperature regime of 2{--}5× {10}5 K. We present the first resolved image of gas emission in the O vi line. Our target, SDSS J115630.63+500822.1, is very compact in the continuum but displays O vi emission to radii of 23 kpc. The surface brightness profile is well fit by an exponential with a scale length of 7.5 kpc. This is 10 times the size of the photoionized gas, and we estimate that about 1/6 the total O vi luminosity comes from resonantly scattered continuum radiation. Spectroscopy—which closely resembles a stacked sample of archival spectra—confirms the O vi emission, and determines the column density and outflow velocity from blueshifted absorption. The combination of measurements enables a large number of calculations with few assumptions. The O vi regions fill only ∼ {10}-3 of the volume. By comparing the cooling time with the cloud sound-crossing time, the cooling distance with the size, and the pressure in the O vi and nebular gas, we conclude that the O vi-bearing gas cannot have been lifted to the scale height at this temperature, and must be cooling in situ through this coronal temperature regime. The coronal phase contains ∼1% of the ionized mass, and its kinetic energy at a given instant is ∼1% of the budget set by supernova feedback. However, a much larger amount of the gas must have cooled through this phase during the star formation episode. The outflow exceeds the escape velocity and the gas may become unbound, but it will recombine before it escapes and become visible to Lyman (and O i) spectroscopy. The mapping of this gas represents a crucial step in further constraining galaxy formation scenarios and guiding the development of future astronomical

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III DR10 Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: no detectable colour dependence of distance scale or growth rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Burden, Angela; Percival, Will J.; Tojeiro, Rita; Manera, Marc; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Carnero, Aurelio; da Costa, Luiz A. N.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Montesano, Francesco; Muna, Demitri; Nichol, Robert C.; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Sobreira, Flávia; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Wake, David A.; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2014-01-01

    We study the clustering of galaxies, as a function of their colour, from Data Release Ten (DR10) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. DR10 contains 540 505 galaxies with 0.43 < z < 0.7; from these we select 122 967 for a `Blue' sample and 131 969 for a `Red' sample based on k + e corrected (to z = 0.55) r - i colours and i-band magnitudes. The samples are chosen such that both contain more than 100 000 galaxies, have similar redshift distributions and maximize the difference in clustering amplitude. The Red sample has a 40 per cent larger bias than the Blue (bRed/bBlue = 1.39 ± 0.04), implying that the Red galaxies occupy dark matter haloes with an average mass that is 0.5 log10 M⊙ greater. Spherically averaged measurements of the correlation function, ξ0, and the power spectrum are used to locate the position of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of both samples. Using ξ0, we obtain distance scales, relative to the distance of our reference Λ cold dark matter cosmology, of 1.010 ± 0.027 for the Red sample and 1.005 ± 0.031 for the Blue. After applying reconstruction, these measurements improve to 1.013 ± 0.020 for the Red sample and 1.008 ± 0.026 for the Blue. For each sample, measurements of ξ0 and the second multipole moment, ξ2, of the anisotropic correlation function are used to determine the rate of structure growth, parametrized by fσ8. We find fσ8, Red = 0.511 ± 0.083, fσ8, Blue = 0.509 ± 0.085 and fσ8, Cross = 0.423 ± 0.061 (from the cross-correlation between the Red and Blue samples). We use the covariance between the bias and growth measurements obtained from each sample and their cross-correlation to produce an optimally combined measurement of fσ8, comb = 0.443 ± 0.055. This result compares favourably to that of the full 0.43 < z < 0.7 sample (fσ8, full = 0.422 ± 0.051) despite the fact that, in total, we use less than half of the number of galaxies analysed in the

  16. Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  17. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  18. Galaxy dynamics in clustered environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Maria J. R. R.

    Galaxy orientations have been studied statistically for over 70 years now, but it is only recently that alignments have been found on scales larger than those of close interacting pairs. Large scale alignments between galaxies and their surrounding tidal fields are expected to occur during formation, but what happens when these galaxies fall into larger systems? Can their orientations tell us anything about the accretion process itself? In this dissertation I will focus on the radial alignment of satellite galaxies, in which a satellite's long axis points preferentially toward the center of its host. I present observational evidence for this type of galaxy alignment in the SDSS DR3 using a sample of X-ray selected massive clusters. Then, using results from N-body cosmological simulations, I will argue that this effect is the result of a secular tidal interaction between the galaxies and their host potential. The analysis shows that subhalos are effectively torqued by their host throughout their orbits, so that their major axes tend to be aligned with the gradient of the host potential. The significant discrepancy between the magnitude of the effect as seen in these simulations and that detected in observations motivates the work of the next chapter, where I perform numerical experiments on idealized, high resolution N-body models of elliptical galaxies. These experiments show that the more centrally concentrated luminous components of galaxies take longer to react to the external torque, and, in the particular case of mildly eccentric orbits, their orientations can figure rotate in periodic patterns that are not radially aligned on average. The mechanism is more effective on galaxies that have larger triaxialities, but the overall effect of torquing is to make galaxies rounder, since radially misaligned galaxies tend to become more spherical as they are torqued towards equilibrium. In the last chapter, I briefly discuss the impact of these results for galaxy

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-RM project: z<1 QSO host galaxies (Matsuoka+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Strauss, M. A.; Shen, Y.; Brandt, W. N.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Sun, M.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    We use the data acquired in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project, in which a single spectroscopic field was repeatedly observed to explore the variability of quasars. The full technical details of the project are found in Shen et al. (2015, J/ApJS/216/4). SDSS-RM was conducted during the dark/gray time in the final season (2013-2014) of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS; Dawson et al. 2013AJ....145...10D). The target field (centered at RAJ2000=14:14:49.00, DEJ2000=+53:05:00.0) coincides with the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1; Kaiser et al. 2010SPIE.7733E..0EK) Medium Deep Field MD07, which lies within the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey W3 field. (1 data file).

  20. Multiwavelength studies of Markarian galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.

    2013-10-01

    Markarian galaxies are the result of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) conducted in 1965-1980 by B.E. Markarian et al. The sample consists of 1515 UV-excess galaxies containing many active galaxies, both AGN and starburst (SB) galaxies that are interesting from the point of view of galaxy evolution and multiwavelength studies. Several catalogs of Markarian galaxies have been published; however, multiwavelength (MW) data were not provided and matched for more efficient investigations. Moreover, SDSS spectra now give possibility for better classification by activity types, and we have accomplished fine classification obtaining new types and subtypes for most of the objects. We have cross-correlated the Markarian catalogue with all available large-area MW catalogues at various wavelengths, from X-ray to radio: ROSAT BSC and FSC, GALEX, APM, MAPS, USNO B1.0, GSC 2.3.2, SDSS, 2MASS PSC and ESC, WISE, AKARI-IRC, IRAS PSC, FSC, and SSSC, AKARI-FIS, GB6, NVSS, FIRST, SUMSS, WENSS, and 7C providing 35 photometric data-points, as well as the Digitized FBS (DFBS, http://byurakan.phys.uniroma1.it/) and Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) low-dispersion spectra. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) services have been used for cross-correlations and extraction of DFBS spectra; MW SEDs have been built using the IVOA tools, and MW classification has been accomplished. Diagrams with MW flux ratios have been built to reveal objects with extreme characteristics. The classifications have been matched with these flux ratios. A MW catalog of Markarian galaxies has been compiled.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-IV eBOSS emission-line galaxy pilot survey (Comparat+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Jouvel, S.; Raichoor, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yeche, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Le Cras, C.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D. M.; Zhu, G.; Jullo, E.; Prada, F.; Schlegel, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, H.; Bautista, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A.; Brownstein, J. R.; Dawson, K. S.; Escoer, S.; Gaulme, P.; Kinemuchi, K.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Mariappan, V.; Newman, J. A.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Percival, W. J.; Prakash, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; ! Soares-Sa Ntos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    To select targets, we used photometry coming from the following surveys: SDSS (Alam et al., 2012ApJS..203...21A), WISE (Cutri et al., 2012, Cat. II/311) and SCUSS (Zou et al., 2015AJ....150..104Z). (1 data file).

  2. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji; Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Kilborn, Virginia

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  3. Ca II AND Na I QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SYSTEMS IN AN EMISSION-SELECTED SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7 GALAXY/QUASAR PROJECTIONS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this project is to identify low-redshift host galaxies of quasar absorption-line systems by selecting galaxies that are seen in projection onto quasar sightlines. To this end, we use the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct a parent sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters of up to 100 kpc to the foreground galaxy. We then search the quasar spectra for absorption-line systems of Ca II and Na I within {+-}500 km s{sup -1} of the galaxy's velocity. This yields 92 Ca II and 16 Na I absorption systems. We find that most of the Ca II and Na I systems are sightlines through the Galactic disk, through high-velocity cloud complexes in our halo, or Virgo Cluster sightlines. Placing constraints on the absorption line rest equivalent width significance ({>=}3.0{sigma}), the local standard of rest velocity along the sightline ({>=}345 km s{sup -1}), and the ratio of the impact parameter to the galaxy optical radius ({<=}5.0), we identify four absorption-line systems that are associated with low-redshift galaxies at high confidence, consisting of two Ca II systems (one of which also shows Na I) and two Na I systems. These four systems arise in blue, {approx}L*{sub r} galaxies. Tables of the 108 absorption systems are provided to facilitate future follow-up.

  4. Stellar Population Gradients in SO Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Leslie C.; Courteau, S.; McDonald, M.; Rose, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of S0 galaxies is a cornerstone of galaxy formation models. This work is a study of the mechanisms involved in the formation and evolution of S0 galaxies through the analysis of radial trends in stellar populations extending far into the galaxies' outskirts. Our analysis is based on new, deep, optical and NIR imaging of a large sample of S0 galaxies covering a wide range of properties. Color gradients, computed from SDSS griz and UH2.2m J & H band imaging beyond 4.5 Re, are matched with stellar population models to derive population ages and metallicity gradients. These trends are compared amongst galaxies of varying properties. The changes in stellar populations with galaxy components (bulge/disk/halo), environment, galaxy mass, concentration, and other structural properties will provide formation models with critical constraints. Intriguingly, we find that ages increase substantially with radius for a large sub-sample of S0 galaxies. In fact, in approximately 25% of our sample, the population age of the galaxies increases by more than 8 Gyr from the center out. We provide tentative interpretations for this and other observed trends, in the context of current galaxy formation scenarios.

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the full shape of the clustering wedges in the data release 10 and 11 galaxy samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Montesano, Francesco; Kazin, Eyal A.; Aubourg, Eric; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; White, Martin; Zehavi, Idit

    2014-05-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of the angle-averaged correlation function, ξ(s), and the clustering wedges, ξ⊥(s) and ξ∥(s), of the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples from Data Releases 10 and 11 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our results show no significant evidence for a deviation from the standard Λ cold dark matter model. The combination of the information from our clustering measurements with recent data from the cosmic microwave background is sufficient to constrain the curvature of the Universe to Ωk = 0.0010 ± 0.0029, the total neutrino mass to ∑mν < 0.23 eV (95 per cent confidence level), the effective number of relativistic species to Neff = 3.31 ± 0.27 and the dark energy equation of state to wDE = -1.051 ± 0.076. These limits are further improved by adding information from Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations from other samples. In particular, this data set combination is completely consistent with a time-independent dark energy equation of state, in which case we find wDE = -1.024 ± 0.052. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z) = Ωm(z)γ and obtain γ = 0.69 ± 0.15, consistent with the predictions of general relativity of γ = 0.55.

  6. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  7. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngsoo; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matt; Bridle, Sarah; Clampitt, Joseph; Crocce, Martin; Honscheid, Klaus; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Sanchez, Carles; Wechsler, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  8. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  9. A Zoo of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    We live in a universe filled with galaxies with an amazing variety of sizes and shapes. One of the biggest challenges for astronomers working in this field is to understand how all these types relate to each other in the background of an expanding universe. Modern astronomical surveys (like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) have revolutionised this field of astronomy, by providing vast numbers of galaxies to study. The sheer size of the these databases made traditional visual classification of the types galaxies impossible and in 2007 inspired the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org); starting the largest ever scientific collaboration by asking members of the public to help classify galaxies by type and shape. Galaxy Zoo has since shown itself, in a series of now more than 30 scientific papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this Invited Discourse I spoke a little about the historical background of our understanding of what galaxies are, of galaxy classification, about our modern view of galaxies in the era of large surveys. I finish with showcasing some of the contributions galaxy classifications from the Galaxy Zoo project are making to our understanding of galaxy evolution.

  10. Radio Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters: Feedback, Merger Signatures, and Signposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Ashby, Matthew; Brodwin, Mark; Bulbul, Esra; Clarke, Tracy E.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Johnson, Ryan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Wing, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Extended, double-lobed radio sources are often located in rich galaxy clusters. I will present results of an optical and X-ray analysis of two nearby clusters with such radio sources - one of the clusters is relaxed (A2029) and one of the clusters is undergoing a merger (A98). Because of their association with clusters, extended radio sources can be used to locate clusters at a wide range of distances. The number of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters with is very low compared to the number of well-studied low-redshift clusters. In the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) survey, we use bent, double-lobed radio sources as signposts to efficiently locate high-redshift clusters. Using a Spitzer Snapshot Survey of our sample of 653 bent, double-lobed radio sources (selected from the FIRST survey and with galaxy hosts too faint to be detected in the SDSS), we have the potential to identify approximately 400 new clusters and groups with redshifts. I will present results from the Spitzer observations regarding the efficiency of the method for finding new clusters. These newly identified clusters will be used to study galaxy formation and evolution, as well as the effect that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) has on galaxies and their environments.

  11. Asymmetry Between Galaxies with Clockwise Handedness and Counterclockwise Handedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2016-05-01

    While it is clear that spiral galaxies can have different handedness, galaxies with clockwise patterns are assumed to be symmetric to galaxies with counterclockwise patterns in all of their other characteristics. Here, we use data from SDSS DR7 to show that photometric data can distinguish between clockwise and counterclockwise galaxies. Pattern recognition algorithms trained and tested using the photometric data of a clean, manually crafted data set of 13,440 spiral galaxies with z\\lt 0.25 can predict the handedness of a spiral galaxy in ˜64% of the cases, which is significantly higher than the mere chance accuracy of 50% (P\\lt {10}-5). Experiments with a different data set of 10,281 automatically classified galaxies showed similar results of ˜65% classification accuracy, suggesting that the observed asymmetry is also consistent in data sets annotated in a fully automatic process, without human intervention. That shows that the photometric data collected by SDSS is sensitive to the handedness of the galaxy. Analysis of the number of galaxies classified as clockwise and counterclockwise by crowdsourcing shows that manual classification between spiral and elliptical galaxies can be affected by the handedness of the galaxy, and therefore the galaxy morphology analyzed by citizen science campaigns might be biased by the galaxy handedness. The code and data used in the experiment are publicly available, and the experiment can be easily replicated.

  12. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  13. Experimenting with galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    A study to demonstrate how the dynamics of galaxies may be investigated through the creation of galaxies within a computer model is presented. The numerical technique for simulating galaxies is shown to be both highly efficient and highly robust. Consideration is given to the anatomy of a galaxy, the gravitational N-body problem, numerical approaches to the N-body problem, use of the Poisson equation, and the symplectic integrator.

  14. SPATIAL ANISOTROPY OF GALAXY KINEMATICS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Skielboe, Andreas; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Pedersen, Kristian; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.

    2012-10-10

    Measurements of galaxy cluster kinematics are important in understanding the dynamical state and evolution of clusters of galaxies, as well as constraining cosmological models. While it is well established that clusters exhibit non-spherical geometries, evident in the distribution of galaxies on the sky, azimuthal variations of galaxy kinematics within clusters have yet to be observed. Here we measure the azimuthal dependence of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile in a stacked sample of 1743 galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The clusters are drawn from the SDSS DR8 redMaPPer catalog. We find that the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of galaxies lying along the major axis of the central galaxy is larger than those that lie along the minor axis. This is the first observational detection of anisotropic kinematics of galaxies in clusters. We show that the result is consistent with predictions from numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find that the degree of projected anisotropy is strongly dependent on the line-of-sight orientation of the galaxy cluster, opening new possibilities for assessing systematics in optical cluster finding.

  15. Observing dynamical friction in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Susmita; Dalal, Neal; Clampitt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel method to detect the effects of dynamical friction in observed galaxy clusters. Following accretion into clusters, massive satellite galaxies will backsplash to systematically smaller radii than less massive satellites, an effect that may be detected by stacking the number density profiles of galaxies around clusters. We show that this effect may be understood using a simple toy model which reproduces the trends with halo properties observed in simulations. We search for this effect using SDSS redMaPPer clusters with richness 10 < λ < 20, and find that bright (Mi < ‑21.5) satellites have smaller splashback radii than fainter (Mi > ‑20) satellites at 99% confidence.

  16. A New Catalog of Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young

    2010-05-01

    We present a new catalog of isolated galaxies (coined as UNAM-KIAS) obtained through an automated systematic search. The 1520 isolated galaxies were found in ~ 1.4 steradians of the sky in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5) photometry. The selection algorithm was implemented from a variation of the criteria developed by Karachentseva (1973), with full redshift information. This new catalog is aimed to carry out comparative studies of environmental effects and constraining the currently competing scenarios of galaxy formation and evolution.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-DR8 galaxies classified by WND-CHARM (Kuminski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuminski, E.; Shamir, L.

    2016-06-01

    The image analysis method used to classify the images is WND-CHARM (wndchrm; Shamir et al. 2008, BMC Source Code for Biology and Medicine, 3: 13; 2010PLSCB...6E0974S; 2013ascl.soft12002S), which first computes 2885 numerical descriptors from each SDSS image such as textures, edges, shapes), the statistical distribution of the pixel intensities, the polynomial decomposition of the image, and fractal features. These features are extracted from the raw pixels, as well as the image transforms and multi-order image transforms. See section 2 for further explanations. In a similar way than the catalog we also compiled a catalog of all objects with spectra in DR8. For each object, that catalog contains the spec ObjID, the R.A., the decl., the z, z error, the certainty of classification as elliptical, the certainty of classification as spiral, and the certainty of classification as a star. See section 3.1 for further explanations. (2 data files).

  18. Modelling the UV spectrum of SDSS-III/BOSS galaxies: hints towards the detection of the UV upturn at high-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cras, Claire; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; York, Donald G.

    2016-05-01

    We exploit stellar population models of absorption line indices in the ultraviolet (from 2000 - 3200Å) to study the spectra of massive galaxies. Our central aim is to investigate the occurrence at high-redshift of the UV upturn, i.e. the increased UV emission due to old stars observed in massive galaxies and spiral bulges in the local Universe. We use a large (˜275, 000) sample of z ˜ 0.6 massive (M★/M⊙ > 11.5) galaxies using both individual spectra and stacks and employ a suite of models including a UV contribution from old populations, spanning various effective temperatures, fuel consumptions and metallicities. We find that a subset of our indices; Mg I, Fe I, and BL3096, are able to differentiate between old and young UV ages. We find evidence for old stars contributing to the UV in massive galaxies, rather than star formation. The data favour models with low/medium upturn temperatures (10,000 - 25,000K) consistent with local galaxies, depending on the assumed metallicity, and with a larger fuel (f ˜ 6.5\\cdot 10^{-2} M_{⊙}). Models with one typical temperature are favoured over models with a temperature range, which would be typical of an extended horizontal branch. Old UV-bright populations are found in the whole galaxy sample (92%), with a mass fraction peaking around 20-30%. Upturn galaxies are massive and have redder colours, in agreement with findings in the local Universe. We find that the upturn phenomenon appears at z ˜ 1 and its frequency increases towards lower redshift, as expected by stellar evolution of low mass stars. Our findings will help constrain stellar evolution in the exotic UV upturn phase.

  19. Modelling the UV spectrum of SDSS-III/BOSS galaxies: hints towards the detection of the UV upturn at high-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cras, Claire; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; York, Donald G.

    2016-09-01

    We exploit stellar population models of absorption line indices in the ultraviolet (from 2000 to 3200 Å) to study the spectra of massive galaxies. Our central aim is to investigate the occurrence at high redshift of the UV upturn, i.e. the increased UV emission due to old stars observed in massive galaxies and spiral bulges in the local Universe. We use a large (˜275 000) sample of z ˜ 0.6 massive (M*/M⊙ > 11.5) galaxies using both individual spectra and stacks and employ a suite of models including a UV contribution from old populations, spanning various effective temperatures, fuel consumptions and metallicities. We find that a subset of our indices; Mg I, Fe I, and BL3096, are able to differentiate between old and young UV ages. We find evidence for old stars contributing to the UV in massive galaxies, rather than star formation. The data favour models with low/medium upturn temperatures (10 000-25 000 K) consistent with local galaxies, depending on the assumed metallicity, and with a larger fuel (f ˜ 6.5× 10^{-2} {M}_{⊙}). Models with one typical temperature are favoured over models with a temperature range, which would be typical of an extended horizontal branch. Old UV-bright populations are found in the whole galaxy sample (92 per cent), with a mass fraction peaking around 20-30 per cent. Upturn galaxies are massive and have redder colours, in agreement with findings in the local Universe. We find that the upturn phenomenon appears at z ˜ 1 and its frequency increases towards lower redshift, as expected by stellar evolution of low-mass stars. Our findings will help constrain stellar evolution in the exotic UV upturn phase.

  20. Segregation properties of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, B.X.; Da Costa, L.N. )

    1990-10-01

    Using the recently completed Southern Sky Redshift Survey, in conjunction with measurements of the central surface brightness, the existence of segregation in the way galaxies of different morphology and surface brightness are distributed in space is investigated. Results indicate that there is some evidence that low surface brightness galaxies are more randomly distributed than brighter ones and that this effect is independent of the well-known tendency of early-type galaxies to cluster more strongly than spirals. Presuming that the observed clustering was established at the epoch of galaxy formation, it may provide circumstantial evidence for biased galaxy formation. 24 refs.

  1. Tidal Disruption Events Prefer Unusual Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, K. Decker; Arcavi, Iair; Zabludoff, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) are transient events observed when a star passes close enough to a supermassive black hole to be tidally destroyed. Many TDE candidates have been discovered in host galaxies whose spectra have weak or no line emission yet strong Balmer line absorption, indicating a period of intense star formation that has recently ended. As such, TDE host galaxies fall into the rare class of quiescent Balmer-strong galaxies. Here, we quantify the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with spectral properties like those of TDE hosts, determining the extent to which TDEs are over-represented in such galaxies. Galaxies whose spectra have Balmer absorption {{H}}{δ }{{A}} - σ(H{δ }{{A}}) > 4 Å (where σ(H{δ }{{A}}) is the error in the Lick {{H}}{δ }{{A}} index) and Hα emission equivalent width (EW) < 3 Å have had a strong starburst in the last ˜Gyr. They represent 0.2% of the local galaxy population, yet host 3 of 8 (37.5%) optical/UV-selected TDE candidates. A broader cut, {{H}}{δ }{{A}}\\quad \\gt 1.31 Å and Hα EW < 3 Å, nets only 2.3% of SDSS galaxies, but 6 of 8 (75%) optical/UV TDE hosts. Thus, quiescent Balmer-strong galaxies are over-represented among the TDE hosts by a factor of 33-190. The high-energy-selected TDE Swift J1644 also lies in a galaxy with strong Balmer lines and weak Hα emission, implying a \\gt 80× enhancement in such hosts and providing an observational link between the γ/X-ray-bright and optical/UV-bright TDE classes.

  2. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  3. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; Miquel, Ramon; Oestman, Linda; Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Cinabro, David; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Nichol, Robert C.; Frieman, Joshua; Jha, Saurabh W.; Marriner, John; Nordin, Jakob; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; and others

    2012-08-20

    We use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host-galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light curves using both MLCS2K2 and SALT2, and determine color (A{sub V} , c) and light-curve shape ({Delta}, x{sub 1}) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4{sigma} level) finding is that the average fitted A{sub V} from MLCS2K2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that supernovae (SNe) in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  4. Dense cores in galaxies out to z = 2.5 in SDSS, UltraVISTA, and the five 3D-HST/Candels fields

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Nelson, Erica June; Momcheva, Ivelina; Leja, Joel; Oesch, Pascal; Bezanson, Rachel; Van der Wel, Arjen; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Labbé, Ivo; Muzzin, Adam; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Fumagalli, Mattia; Wuyts, Stijn; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo

    2014-08-10

    The dense interiors of massive galaxies are among the most intriguing environments in the universe. In this paper,we ask when these dense cores were formed and determine how galaxies gradually assembled around them. We select galaxies that have a stellar mass >3 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} inside r = 1 kpc out to z = 2.5, using the 3D-HST survey and data at low redshift. Remarkably, the number density of galaxies with dense cores appears to have decreased from z = 2.5 to the present. This decrease is probably mostly due to stellar mass loss and the resulting adiabatic expansion, with some contribution from merging. We infer that dense cores were mostly formed at z > 2.5, consistent with their largely quiescent stellar populations. While the cores appear to form early, the galaxies in which they reside show strong evolution: their total masses increase by a factor of 2-3 from z = 2.5 to z = 0 and their effective radii increase by a factor of 5-6. As a result, the contribution of dense cores to the total mass of the galaxies in which they reside decreases from ∼50% at z = 2.5 to ∼15% at z = 0. Because of their early formation, the contribution of dense cores to the total stellar mass budget of the universe is a strong function of redshift. The stars in cores with M{sub 1{sub kpc}} > 3 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} make up ∼0.1% of the stellar mass density of the universe today but 10%-20% at z ∼ 2, depending on their initial mass function. The formation of these cores required the conversion of ∼10{sup 11} M{sub ☉} of gas into stars within ∼1 kpc, while preventing significant star formation at larger radii.

  5. A catalogue of two-dimensional photometric decompositions in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic main galaxy sample: extension to g and i bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Alan; Vikram, Vinu; Bernardi, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    We extend the catalogue of two-dimensional, Point-Spread-Function-corrected de Vacouleurs, Sérsic, de Vacouleurs+Exponential, and Sérsic+Exponential fits of ˜7 × 105galaxies presented in Meert et al. to include the g and i bands. Fits are analysed using the physically motivated flagging system presented in the original text, making adjustments for the differing signal to noise when necessary. We compare the fits in each of the g, r, and i bands. Fixed aperture magnitudes and colours are also provided for all galaxies. The catalogues are available in electronic format.

  6. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  7. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  8. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z∼ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  9. Isolated galaxies, pairs, and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuneva, I.; Kalinkov, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors searched for isolated galaxies, pairs and groups of galaxies in the CfA survey (Huchra et al. 1983). It was assumed that the distances to galaxies are given by R = V/H sub o, where H sub o = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1) and R greater than 6 Mpc. The searching procedure is close to those, applied to find superclusters of galaxies (Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986). A sphere with fixed radius r (asterisk) is described around each galaxy. The mean spatial density in the sphere is m. Let G (sup 1) be any galaxy and G (sup 2) be its nearest neighbor at a distance R sub 2. If R sub 2 exceeds the 95 percent quintile in the distribution of the distances of the second neighbors, then G (sup 1) is an isolated galaxy. Let the midpoint of G (sup 1) and G (sup 2) be O sub 2 and r sub 2=R sub 2/2. For the volume V sub 2, defined with the radius r sub 2, the density D sub 2 less than k mu, the galaxy G (sup 2) is a single one and the procedure for searching for pairs and groups, beginning with this object is over and we have to pass to another object. Here the authors present the groups - isolated and nonisolated - with n greater than 3, found in the CfA survey in the Northern galactic hemisphere. The parameters used are k = 10 and r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc. Table 1 contains: (1) the group number, (2) the galaxy, nearest to the multiplet center, (3) multiplicity n, (4) the brightest galaxy if it is not listed in (2); (5) and (6) are R.A. and Dec. (1950), (7) - mean distance D in Mpc. Further there are the mean density rho (8) of the multiplet (galaxies Mpc (exp -3), (9) the density rho (asterisk) for r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc and (10) the density rho sub g for the group with its nearest neighbor. The parenthesized digits for densities in the last three columns are powers of ten.

  10. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.