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Sample records for galaxy mcg-6-30-15 observed

  1. Long-term monitoring of the archetype Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15: X-ray, optical and near-IR variability of the corona, disc and torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, P.; Arévalo, P.; Uttley, P.; McHardy, I. M. M.; Videla, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present long-term monitoring of MCG-6-30-15 in X-rays, optical and near-IR wavelengths, collected over 5 yr of monitoring. We determine the power spectrum density of all the observed bands and show that after taking into account the host contamination similar power is observed in the optical and near-IR bands. There is evidence for a correlation between the light curves of the X-ray photon flux and the optical B band, but it is not possible to determine a lag with certainty, with the most likely value being around 0 d. Strong correlation is seen between the optical and near-IR bands. Cross-correlation analysis shows some complex probability distributions and lags that range from 10 to 20 d, with the near-IR following the optical variations. Filtering the light curves in frequency space shows that the strongest correlations are those corresponding to the shortest time-scales. We discuss the nature of the X-ray variability and conclude that this is intrinsic and cannot be accounted for by absorption episodes due to material intervening in the line of sight. It is also found that the lags agree with the relation τ ∝ λ4/3, as expected for an optically thick geometrically thin accretion disc, although for a larger disc than that predicted by the estimated black hole mass and accretion rate in MCG-6-30-15. The cross-correlation analysis suggests that the torus is located at ˜20 light-days from the central source and at most at ˜50 light-days from the central region. This implies an active galactic nucleus bolometric luminosity of ˜3 × 1043 erg s-1 cm-2.

  2. An absorption origin for the X-ray spectral variability of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.

    2008-05-01

    Context: The Seyfert I galaxy MCG-6-30-15 shows one of the best examples of a broad “red wing” of emission in its X-ray spectrum at energies 2 < E < 6.4 keV, commonly interpreted as being caused by relativistically-blurred reflection close to the event horizon of the black hole. Aims: We aim to test an alternative model in which absorption creates the observed spectral shape, explains the puzzling lack of variability of the red wing and reduces the high reflection albedo, substantially greater than unity, that is otherwise inferred at energies E > 20 keV. Methods: We compiled all the available long-exposure, high-quality data for MCG-6-30-15: 522 ks of Chandra hetgs, 282 ks of XMM-Newton pn/rgs and 253 ks of Suzaku xis/pin data. This is the first analysis of this full dataset. We investigated the spectral variability on timescales >20 ks using principal components analysis and fitted spectral models to “flux state” and mean spectra over the energy range 0.5-45 keV (depending on detector). The absorber model was based on the zones previously identified in the high-resolution grating data. Joint fits were carried out to any data that were simultaneous. Results: Multiple absorbing zones covering a wide range of ionisation are required by the grating data, including a highly ionised outflowing zone. A variable partial-covering zone plus absorbed low-ionisation reflection, distant from the source, provides a complete description of the variable X-ray spectrum. A single model fits all the data. We conclude that these zones are responsible for the red wing, its apparent lack of variability, the absorption structure around the Fe Kα line, the soft-band “excess” and the high flux seen in the hard X-ray band. A relativistically-blurred Fe line is not required in this model. We suggest the partial covering zone is a clumpy wind from the accretion disk.

  3. Implications of the X-Ray Variability for the Mass of MCG -6-30-15.

    PubMed

    Nowak; Chiang

    2000-03-01

    The bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG -6-30-15 shows large variability on a variety of timescales. We study the less, similar3 day timescale variability using a set of simultaneous archival observations that were obtained from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA). The RXTE observations span nearly 106 s and indicate that the X-ray Fourier power spectral density has an rms variability of 16%, is flat from approximately 10-6 to 10-5 Hz, and then steepens into a power law proportional to f-alpha with alpha greater, similar1. A further steepening to alpha approximately 2 occurs between 10-4 and 10-3 Hz. The shape and rms amplitude are comparable to what has been observed in NGC 5548 and Cyg X-1, albeit with break frequencies that differ by a factor of 10-2 and 104, respectively. If the break frequencies are indicative of the central black hole mass, then this mass may be as low as 106 M middle dot in circle. An upper limit of approximately 2 ks for the relative lag between the 0.5-2 keV ASCA band compared to the 8-15 keV RXTE band was also found. Again by analogy with NGC 5548 and Cyg X-1, this limit is consistent with a relatively low central black hole mass. PMID:10673403

  4. An Extended Multi-Zone Model for the MCG-6-30-15 Warm Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, R.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    The variable warm absorber seen with ASCA in the X-ray spectrum of MCG 6-30-15 shows complex time behaviour in which the optical depth of O VIII anticorrelates with the flux whereas that of O VII is unchanging. The explanation in terms of a two zone absorber has since been challenged by BeppoSAX observations. These present a more complicated behaviour for the O VII edge. The explanation we offer for both ASCA and BeppoSAX observations requires a very simple photoionization model together with the presence of a third, intermediate, zone and a period of very low luminosity. In practice warm absorbers are likely to be extended, multi-zone regions of which only part causes directly observable absorption edges at any given time depending on the value of the luminosity.

  5. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from a Relativistic Accretion Disk in MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Page, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766 are physically and spectroscopically inconsistent with standard models comprising a power-law continuum absorbed by either cold or ionized matter. We propose that the remarkably similar features detected in both objects in the 5 - 35 A band are H-like oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon emission lines, gravitation- ally redshifted and broadened by relativistic effects in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We discuss the implications of our interpretation, and demonstrate that the derived parameters can be physically self-consistent.

  6. Warm absorber in Seyfert-1 galaxies observed with ASCA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, C.; Kii, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Iwasawa, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Matsuoka, M.

    1996-02-01

    The authors present the results of ASCA observations of the warm absorber in five Seyfert-1 galaxies and one quasar. The most important result is the detection of the continuous increase in O VIII absorption depth in MCG -6-30-15 within half a day with the continuum decrease. If this change is due to the recombination of O IX ions, the density and radius for increased O VIII ions should be n ⪆ 106cm-3 and R ⪉ 1017cm, respectively. It is also shown that the filling factor of the matter should be very small, implying that the warm absorber is probably clumpy. These results suggest this warm absorber as some link to the broad line region (BLR). On the other hand, no significant change in O VII was observed in MCG -6-30-15. These results are explained by two distinct warm absorbers in the line-of-sight unless some unknown reason causes the stability of O VII near the BLR; one of them corresponding to O VIII is located near the BLR, and another corresponding to O VII is located far outside from the BLR.

  7. Broad line emission from iron K- and L-shell transitions in the active galaxy 1H 0707-495.

    PubMed

    Fabian, A C; Zoghbi, A; Ross, R R; Uttley, P; Gallo, L C; Brandt, W N; Blustin, A J; Boller, T; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Larsson, J; Miller, J M; Miniutti, G; Ponti, G; Reis, R C; Reynolds, C S; Tanaka, Y; Young, A J

    2009-05-28

    Since the 1995 discovery of the broad iron K-line emission from the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 (ref. 1), broad iron K lines have been found in emission from several other Seyfert galaxies, from accreting stellar-mass black holes and even from accreting neutron stars. The iron K line is prominent in the reflection spectrum created by the hard-X-ray continuum irradiating dense accreting matter. Relativistic distortion of the line makes it sensitive to the strong gravity and spin of the black hole. The accompanying iron L-line emission should be detectable when the iron abundance is high. Here we report the presence of both iron K and iron L emission in the spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0707-495. The bright iron L emission has enabled us to detect a reverberation lag of about 30 s between the direct X-ray continuum and its reflection from matter falling into the black hole. The observed reverberation timescale is comparable to the light-crossing time of the innermost radii around a supermassive black hole. The combination of spectral and timing data on 1H 0707-495 provides strong evidence that we are witnessing emission from matter within a gravitational radius, or a fraction of a light minute, from the event horizon of a rapidly spinning, massive black hole. PMID:19478778

  8. Origin of the broad iron line feature and the soft X-ray variation in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Naoki; Ebisawa, Ken; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Mizumoto, Misaki; Miyakawa, Takehiro; Inoue, Hajime; Yamasaki, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Many Seyfert galaxies are known to exhibit significant X-ray spectral variations and seemingly broad iron K-emission line features. In this paper, we show that the "variable partial covering model," which has been successfully proposed for MCG -6-30-15 (Miyakawa et al. 2012, PASJ, 64, 140) and 1H 0707-495 (Mizumoto et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 122), can also explain the spectral variations in 2-10 keV as well as the broad iron line features in 20 other Seyfert galaxies observed with Suzaku. In this model, the absorbed spectral component through the optically thick absorbing clouds has a significant iron K-edge, which primarily accounts for the observed, seemingly broad iron line feature. Fluctuation of the absorbing clouds in the line of sight of the extended X-ray source results in variation of the partial covering fraction, which causes an anti-correlation between the direct (not covered) spectral component and the absorbed (covered) spectral component below ˜10 keV. Observed spectral variation in 2-10 keV in a timescale of less than ˜1 day is primarily explained by such variations of the partial covering fraction, while the intrinsic soft X-ray luminosity is hardly variable.

  9. Theoretical and Observational Studies of the Central Engines of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivron, Ran

    1995-01-01

    In Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) the luminosity is so intense that the effect of radiation pressure on a particle may exceed the gravitational attraction. It was shown that when such luminosities are reached, relatively cold (not completely ionized) thermal matter clouds may form in the central engines of AGN, where most of the luminosity originates. We show that the spectrum of emission from cold clouds embedded in hot relativistic matter is similar to the observed spectrum. We also show that within the hot relativistic matter, cold matter moves faster than the speed of sound or the Alfven speed, and shocks form. The shocks provide a mechanism by which a localized perturbation can propagate throughout the central engine. The shocked matter can emit the observed luminosity, and can explain the flux and spectral variability. It may also provide an efficient mechanism for the outward transfer of angular momentum and provide the outward flow of winds. With observations from X-ray satellites, emission features from the cold and hot matter may be revealed. Our analysis of X-ray data from the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG - 6-30-15 over five years using detectors on the Ginga and Rosat satellites, revealed some interesting variable features. A source with hot matter emits non-thermal radiation which is Compton reflected from cold matter and then absorbed by warm (partially ionized) absorbing matter in the first model, which can be fit to the data if both the cold and warm absorbers are near the central engine. An alternative model in which the emission from the hot matter is partially covered by very warm matter (in which all elements except Iron are mostly ionized) is also successful. In this model the cold and warm matter may be at distances of up to 100 times the size of the central engine, well within the region where broad optical lines are produced. The flux variability is more naturally explained by the second model. Our results support the existence of cold matter in, or

  10. The Relativistic Iron Line Profile in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy IC4329a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Done, C.; Madejski, G. M.; Zycki, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    We present simultaneous ASCA and RXTE data on the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy IC4329a. The iron line is significantly broadened, but not to the extent expected from an accretion disk which extends down to the last stable orbit around a black hole. We marginally detect a narrow line component, presumably from the molecular torus, but, even including this gives a line profile from the accretion disk which is significantly narrower that that seen in MCG-6-30-15, and is much more like that seen from the low/hard state galactic black hole candidates. This is consistent with the inner disk being truncated before the last stable orbit, forming a hot flow at small radii as in the ADAF models. However. we cannot rule out the presence of an inner disk which does not contribute to the reflected spectrum. either because of extreme ionisation suppressing the characteristic atomic features of the reflected spectrum or because the X-ray source is intrinsically anisotropic, so it does not illuminate the inner disk. The source was monitored by RXTE every 2 days for 2 months, and these snapshot spectra show that there is intrinsic spectral variability. The data are good enough to disentangle the power law from the reflected continuum and we see that the power law softens as the source brightens. The lack of a corresponding increase in the observed reflected spectrum implies that either the changes in disk inner radial extent/ionization structure are small, or that the variability is actually driven by changes in the seed photons which are decoupled from the hard X-ray mechanism.

  11. IRAS observations of irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Rice, W.; Gallagher, J.; Gillett, F.

    1987-01-01

    Normal irregular galaxies seem to be unusual in having vigorous star formation yet lacking the many dark nebulae typical of spirals. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of a large sample of irregulars are used to explore the dust contents of these galaxies. Compared to normal spirals, the irregulars generally have higher L sub IR/L sub B ratios, warmer f(100)/f(60) dust color temperatures, and lower globally-averaged dust/gas ratios. The relationship between the infrared data and various global optical properties of the galaxies is discussed.

  12. ROSAT observations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1993-12-01

    First results of pointed and All Sky Survey observations of galaxies with the X-ray observatory satellite ROSAT are reported. During observations of the Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda galaxy new super-soft X-ray sources have been detected. This new class of luminous X-ray sources may help to solve the millisecond pulsar progenitor problem. Due to the improved sensitivity and longer observation times of ROSAT new X-ray point sources have been resolved in several nearby galaxies. The diffuse emission of the Large Magellanic Cloud that was already reported by HEAO 2 (EINSTEIN) has been mapped in detail. It shows a lot of fine structure and temperatures around 5 x 106 K. The improved low energy response of ROSAT led to the discovery of 106 K gas from the spiral galaxy M101 and the halo of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. No diffuse emission was detected from the halo of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 5907.

  13. IRAS observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The IRAS survey gives an unbiased view of the infrared properties of the active galaxies. Seyfert galaxies occupy much the same area in color-color plots as to normal infrared bright galaxies, but extend the range towards flatter 60 to 25 mm slopes. Statistically the Seyfert 1 galaxies can be distinguished from the Seyfert 2 galaxies, lying predominantly closer to the area with constant slopes between 25 and 200 mm. The infrared measurements of the Seyfert galaxies cannot distinguish between the emission mechanisms in these objects although they agree with the currently popular ideas; they do provide a measure of the total luminosity of the Seyferts. The quasar's position in the color-color diagrams continue the trend of the Seyferts. The quasar 3C48 is shown to be exceptional among the radio loud quasars in that it has a high infrared luminosity which dominates the power output of the quasar and is most likely associated with the underlying host galaxy.

  14. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

  15. Galaxy Alignments: Observations and Impact on Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Donnacha; Brown, Michael L.; Hoekstra, Henk; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kitching, Thomas D.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Sifón, Cristóbal; Cacciato, Marcello; Choi, Ami; Kiessling, Alina; Leonard, Adrienne; Rassat, Anais; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2015-11-01

    Galaxy shapes are not randomly oriented, rather they are statistically aligned in a way that can depend on formation environment, history and galaxy type. Studying the alignment of galaxies can therefore deliver important information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution as well as the growth of structure in the Universe. In this review paper we summarise key measurements of galaxy alignments, divided by galaxy type, scale and environment. We also cover the statistics and formalism necessary to understand the observations in the literature. With the emergence of weak gravitational lensing as a precision probe of cosmology, galaxy alignments have taken on an added importance because they can mimic cosmic shear, the effect of gravitational lensing by large-scale structure on observed galaxy shapes. This makes galaxy alignments, commonly referred to as intrinsic alignments, an important systematic effect in weak lensing studies. We quantify the impact of intrinsic alignments on cosmic shear surveys and finish by reviewing practical mitigation techniques which attempt to remove contamination by intrinsic alignments.

  16. Observational properties of compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickson, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of galaxies with projected separations comparable to the diameters of the galaxies themselves. Two well-known examples are Stephan's Quintet (Stephan, 1877) and Seyfert's Sextet (Seyfert 1948a,b). In groups such as these, the apparent space density of galaxies approaches 10(exp 6) Mpc(sub -3), denser even than the cores of rich clusters. The apparent unlikeliness of the chance occurrence of such tight groupings lead Ambartsumyan (1958, 1975) to conclude that compact groups must be physically dense systems. This view is supported by clear signs of galaxy interactions that are seen in many groups. Spectroscopic observations reveal that typical relative velocities of galaxies in the groups are comparable to their internal stellar velocities. This should be conducive to strong gravitational interactions - more so than in rich clusters, where galaxy velocities are typically much higher. This suggests that compact groups could be excellent laboratories in which to study galaxy interactions and their effects. Compact groups often contain one or more galaxies whose redshift differs greatly from those of the other group members. If these galaxies are at the same distance as the other members, either entire galaxies are being ejected at high velocities from these groups, or some new physical phenomena must be occurring. If their redshifts are cosmological, we must explain why so many discordant galaxies are found in compact groups. In recent years much progress has been made in addressing these questions. Here, the author discusses the current observational data on compact groups and their implications.

  17. Observing dynamical friction in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Susmita; Dalal, Neal; Clampitt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel method to detect the effects of dynamical friction in observed galaxy clusters. Following accretion into clusters, massive satellite galaxies will backsplash to systematically smaller radii than less massive satellites, an effect that may be detected by stacking the number density profiles of galaxies around clusters. We show that this effect may be understood using a simple toy model which reproduces the trends with halo properties observed in simulations. We search for this effect using SDSS redMaPPer clusters with richness 10 < λ < 20, and find that bright (Mi < ‑21.5) satellites have smaller splashback radii than fainter (Mi > ‑20) satellites at 99% confidence.

  18. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  19. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas; Bell, Eric F.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  20. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, L.; Masters, K.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Zoo, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    In this talk, I use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR), and inner galactic structure, i.e., the prominence of the bulge as parameterized by Sérsic index and central surface stellar mass density. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 ± 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. I find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anti-correlated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. I find that the trends of bar likelihood with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR, i.e., in star-forming galaxies, bulges are more prominent in galaxies more likely to host bars, while in quiescent disk galaxies, bars are less frequent where there are prominent bulges. Our observations of bar length reveal a complex picture. In star-forming disks, longer bars are found where the bulges are more prominent, while in quiescent disks there is a maximum in the average bar length as a function of bulge prominence. I interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution which include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. I suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks; a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. I interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution, and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies, but are a critical evolutionary driver of their

  1. Erratum: IRAS observations of irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    In Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of irregular galaxies, galactic blue luminosities were based on standard optical definitions. The blue luminosities (L sub B) were derived from the blue absolute magnitude (M sub B) or form the in band flux. However, the L sub B system for spiral galaxies was based on quasi-bolometric (rather than in band) fluxes. The formulation and resulting statements are corrected.

  2. ROSAT observations of compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pildis, Rachel A.; Bregman, Joel N.; Evrard, August E.

    1995-01-01

    We have systematically analyzed a sample of 13 new and archival ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of compact groups of galaxies: 12 Hickson compact groups plus the NCG 2300 group. We find that approximately two-thirds of the groups have extended X-ray emission and, in four of these, the emission is resolved into diffuse emission from gas at a temperature of kT approximately 1 keV in the group potential. All but one of the groups with extended emission have a spiral fraction of less than 50%. The baryon fraction of groups with diffuse emission is 5%-19%, similar to the values in clusters of galaxies. However, with a single exception (HCG 62), the gas-to-stellar mass ratio in our groups has a median value near 5%, somewhat greater than the values for individual early-type galaxies and two orders of magnitude than in clusters of galaxies. The X-ray luminosities of individual group galaxies are comparable to those of similar field galaxies, although the L(sub X)-L(sub B) relation for early-type galaxies may be flatter in compact groups than in the field.

  3. AMOS Galaxy 15 Satellite Observations and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.

    2011-09-01

    In early April 2010, the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite experienced an on-orbit anomaly. Even though the satellite's transmitters and articulating solar panel were still functioning, ground controllers lost the ability to command and maneuver the satellite. With its orbital position no longer maintained, Galaxy 15 began to drift eastward. This forced several other satellites to make collision avoidance maneuvers during the following months. Soon after the initial anomaly, Galaxy 15's operators predicted that the satellite’s reaction wheels would eventually become saturated, causing a loss of both spacecraft attitude and proper sunward orientation of the solar panels. This "off-pointing" event finally occurred in late December, ultimately leading to a depletion of Galaxy 15's batteries. This near-death experience had a fortunate side effect, however, in that it forced the satellite’s command unit to reboot and once again be able to both receive and execute ground commands. The satellite operators have since recovered control of the satellite. AMOS conducted non-resolved photometric observations of Galaxy 15 before, during and after these events. Similar observations were conducted of Galaxy 12, the nearly-identical replacement satellite. This presentation presents and discusses these temporal brightness signatures in detail, comparing the changing patterns in the observations to the known sequence of events.

  4. ROSAT observations of Coma Cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, K. L.; White, S. D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The approximately 86 ks ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the Coma Cluster is deeper than any previous X-ray observation of a galaxy cluster. We search for X-ray emission from 35 individual galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample, all of which lie within 20 arcmins of the optical axis in at least one of the four Coma pointings. We detect seven galaxies in the 0.4-2.4 keV band at a significance level exceeding 3 sigma, and a further four at above 2 sigma. Although we can set only upper limits on the individual flux from each of the other galaxies, we are able to measure their mean flux by stacking the observations. The X-ray luminosities of the seven detections range from 6.2 x 10(exp 40) to 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs/s (0.4-2.4 keV for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc). For galaxies with a blue absolute magnitude of about -21 we find a mean X-ray luminosity of 1.3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is substantially smaller for such subjects than for the brightest galaxies in the cluster. The X-ray luminosities of the four brightest galaxies are ill-defined, however, because of ambiguity in distinguishing galaxy emission from cluster emission. Each object appears to be related to significant structure in the diffuse intracluster medium. We also investigate emission in the softer 0.2-0.4 keV band where detections are less significant because of the higher background, and we discuss the properties of a number of interesting individual sources. The X-ray luminosities of the Coma galaxies are similar to those of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster and in other regions with relatively low galaxy density. We conclude that large-scale environmental effects do not significantly enhance or suppress the average X-ray emission from galaxies, but that individual objects vary in luminosity substantially in a way which may depend on the detailed history of their environment.

  5. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of several galaxies were obtained during the ASTRO-1 shuttle mission in December, 1990. The images have a FWHM angular resolution of approximately 3 arcsecond and are of circular fields approximately 40 arcminutes in diameter. Most galaxies were observed in at least two and sometimes as many as four broad bands. A very few fields were observed with narrower band filters. The most basic result of these observations is that most systems look dramatically different in the UV from their well-known optical appearances. Preliminary results of these studies will be presented. Information will be available on fields observed by the UTI during the ASTRO 1 mission; when that data becomes public it can be obtained from the NSSDC. The ASTRO observatory is expected to fly again in 1994 with approximately half of the observing time from that mission devoted to guest observers. The Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT term is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers. Ultraviolet Imaging telescope is extremely well suited for galaxy studies, and the UIT team is interested in encouraging a wide range of scientific studies by guest observers.

  6. Observing Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are key probes of both dark matter and galaxy formation. They are the smallest, oldest, most dark matter-dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems currently known. However, despite two decades of major computational, theoretical, and observational advances in this field, we are still working toward a complete understanding of star and galaxy formation at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In the last year, large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS have made an unprecedented series of discoveries, nearly doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies that was known at the start of 2015. This increase in the number of nearby dwarfs may significantly improve the sensitivity of searches for dark matter annihilation radiation. Many of these new dwarfs are likely to have originated as satellites of the Magellanic Clouds, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect of galactic environment on the formation of the faintest dwarfs. I will provide an overview of recent discoveries and how they fit in to the previously known population of nearby dwarf galaxies, highlighting a few of the most interesting objects from the perspective of dark matter and stellar nucleosynthesis.

  7. Observations of Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armus, Lee

    2014-01-01

    A major result of the IRAS survey was the discovery of a large population of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) which emit a significant fraction of their bolometric luminosity in the far-infrared. LIRGs cover the full range of morphologies from isolated disk galaxies, to advanced mergers, exhibiting enhanced star-formation rates and a higher fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) compared to less luminous galaxies. A detailed study of low-redshift LIRGs is critical for our understanding of the cosmic evolution of galaxies and black holes, since LIRGs comprise the bulk of the cosmic far-infrared background and dominate the star-formation between 0.5 < z < 1. With ISO, it was possible to measure the full suite of infrared diagnostic lines in local normal and luminous infrared galaxies for the first time, but samples were small and observations challenging. With Herschel, we have been able to study large samples of low-redshift LIRGs, and even probe the physical conditions in poweful starburst galaxies out to significant redshifts. By combining the Herschel data with those from Spitzer, it is now possible to understand the heating and cooling of the dust and gas in complete samples of LIRGs for the first time. I will review recent results from a number of GTO, OTKP and GO programs in an attempt to summarize the advances we have made in understanding star formation and black hole accretion in LIRGs as a direct result of the Herschel mission.

  8. Variability Statistics for Galaxies Observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Michael N.; Marcum, Pamela M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler / K2 telescope combines high photometric precision with near-continuous observing cadence, permitting a unique perspective on the optical / near-IR variability of galactic systems. In particular, Kepler / K2 data can be exploited to quantify the amplitude of AGN signals in galaxy cores, to directly address this question - What fraction of galactic nuclei are active at any given time ? Alternatively stated, this question becomes - What is the duty cycle for supermassive black hole accretion of sufficient strength to produce a detectable optical signal ? Additionally, the quasi-continuous cadence provides the capability to detect low-level episodic variations from the central AGN, highly luminous stars and other compact objects.Previously we reported on analysis of a subset of the complete galaxy dataset observed during the Kepler prime mission: ~1200 individual light curves of ~150 targeted galaxies observed during Quarters 3-10 and ~1000 light curves of galaxies observed serendipitously by the exoplanet program from Q2 through Q16. Based on an average of 8 quarters of data for ~300 systems and excluding systems specifically targeted as AGNs, we found that the observed occurrence rate of nuclear variability in galaxies with amplitude > 1 millimag is ~2-3%, a value which is ~ 2-3 times smaller than previous estimates from ground-based monitoring.Here we provide an update on galactic nuclear variability statistics using an expanded dataset from the Kepler Prime mission. We combine the previous data with 1200 light curves for ~200 targeted systems from Q11-16 and ~800 additional light curves found in the exoplanet program. These data are the longest continuous time series for galaxies ever obtained - some systems were observed for the entire mission (Q2-16). Our previous result is confirmed using this expanded dataset; only a few percent of galaxies show variability above 0.5 millimag. Several systems exhibiting activity in other bands, or via their optical

  9. Multi-waveband observations of colliding galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Robson, E. I.; Schombert, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Colliding galaxies represent a major challenge to both theorists and observers because of the large variety of phenomena which are expected to come into play during the interaction. Strong gravitational fluctuations may drive non-linear waves and instabilities throughout the stars and gas leading to enhanced star formation, nuclear activity and ultimately a mixing of the morphological components of the original galaxies. One relatively uncomplicated class of colliding galaxy where stellar waves play an important role in star formation are ring galaxies. Ring galaxies are probably formed when a companion galaxy passes through the center of a disk system driving circular waves through the disk (Lynds and Toomre 1976, Toomre 1978, Struck-Marcell 1990). Off-center collisions can generate non-circular waves and can be loosely described as banana-shaped although they may exhibit more complex forms as the waves expand into the disk. The propagation of such stellar and gaseous waves through the disk leads to enhanced star formation (e.g., Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987a; Jeske 1986) and provides a unique probe of the response of the interstellar medium (ISM) to a propagating wave (see Appleton and Struck-Marcell 1987b). Here, the authors report results for 3 systems; the irregular ring Arp 143 (=VV 117); Wakamatsu's Seyfert ring (A0959-755; see Wakamatsu and Nishida 1987) and the brighter member of the pair of ring galaxies comprising of AM 1358-221. The most complete multi-wavelength data is for Arp 143. Optical charge coupled device (CCD) observations made with the 60 inch Palomar telescope at BV and r band, near-IR images at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns) and k (2.2 microns) bands from the infrared camera (IRCAM) InSb array camera on the 3.8m United Kingdon Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) telescope and very large array (VLA) observations at 20cm in both the neutral hydrogen line and radio continuum are described. The observations of Wakamatsu's ring and AM 1358 were

  10. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  11. Observationally-Motivated Analysis of Simulated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M. S.; Macfarlane, B. A.; Gibson, B. K.

    The spatial and temporal relationships between stellar age, kinematics, and chemistry are a fundamental tool for uncovering the physics driving galaxy formation and evolution. Observationally, these trends are derived using carefully selected samples isolated via the application of appropriate magnitude, colour, and gravity selection functions of individual stars; conversely, the analysis of chemodynamical simulations of galaxies has traditionally been restricted to the age, metallicity, and kinematics of 'composite' stellar particles comprised of open cluster-mass simple stellar populations. As we enter the Gaia era, it is crucial that this approach changes, with simulations confronting data in a manner which better mimics the methodology employed by observers. Here, we use the SynCMD synthetic stellar populations tool to analyse the metallicity distribution function of a Milky Way-like simulated galaxy, employing an apparent magnitude plus gravity selection function similar to that employed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE); we compare such an observationally-motivated approach with that traditionally adopted - i.e., spatial cuts alone - in order to illustrate the point that how one analyses a simulation can be, in some cases, just as important as the underlying sub-grid physics employed.

  12. Morphology of High Redshifted Galaxies using GALEX Ultraviolet Observations of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bum-Suk; Kim, Y.; Rey, S.; Kim, S.; Joe, Y.; Gil de Paz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy morphology provides clues about the processes in the understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this respect, the prediction of optical-band morphologies at high redshifts requires ultraviolet (UV) images of local galaxies with various morphologies. We simulated optical images at high redshifts using more diverse and high-quality nearby galaxies obtained through the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV observations. We present a quantitative analysis of the morphology of galaxies at near-ultraviolet (NUV) and simulated optical images. We also present a correlation between the isophotal-shape parameter and UV colors for nearby early-type galaxies.

  13. NuSTAR Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Maccarone, Tom; Venters, Tonia M.; Antoniou, Vallia; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2016-01-01

    NuSTAR, the first satellite with hard X-ray focusing optics, opens up the possibility to not only detect starburstn galaxies above 10 keV for the first time but also characterize their hard X-ray properties. Here we present an overview of a NuSTAR program to survey seven normal/starburst galaxies: NGC 253, M82, M83, NGC 3256, NGC 3310, Arp 299, and M31. We also discuss data analysis strategies. All galaxies have been observed coordinated with either Chandra or XMM-Newton or both. The main results of these observations were: we characterized the typical starburst spectrum above 10 keV and showed that the spectrum is soft (photon index ~ 3) above 7 keV and determined that individually detected sources are generally black holes in a "transition" accretion state or neutron star systems accreting near the Eddington rate, and variability on time scales of weeks to months is typically detected. In the case of NGC 253 we decomposed the unresolved hard X-ray emission between background, unresolved binaries and truly diffuse flux and found that the diffuse flux upper limit is marginally above model predictions for inverse-Compton scattering of IR photons by cosmic rays.

  14. ROSAT PSPC observations of two starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkes, N.; Pietsch, W.; Hensler, G.

    1993-12-01

    We present results from ROSAT observations of NGC 1808 and NGC 2903. Exposures of 10 ksec each with the Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) detector show X-ray sources at the central positions of both galaxies which are classified as nuclear starburst galaxies. Both targets, NGC 1808 and NGC 2903 appear slightly extended in X-ray maps in the energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. The X-ray spectrum of NGC 1808 shows almost complete absorption below 0.5 keV, indicating an extremely high hydrogen column density towards that source (NH approx. = 8 x 1021/sq cm resulting from model fits on the PSPC spectrum). In the case of NGC 2903, the number of counts in the ROSAT band is significantly lower than expected from a previous EINSTEIN (HEAO 2) investigation of the source.

  15. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  16. Spiderwebs and Flies: Observing Massive Galaxy Formation in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George

    2009-07-01

    Distant luminous radio galaxies are among the brightest known galaxies in the early Universe, pinpoint likely progenitors of dominant cluster galaxies and are unique laboratories for studying massive galaxy formation. Spectacular images with the ACS and NICMOS of one such object, the "Spiderweb Galaxy" at z = 2.2, show in exquisite detail, hierarchical merging occurring 11 Gyr ago. By imaging 3 additional Spiderweb-like galaxies we wish to study this potentially crucial phase of massive galaxy evolution, when hierarchical merging, galaxy downsizing and AGN feedback are all likely to be occurring. Properties of the complete sample of Spiderweb galaxies will be used to {i} constrain models for the formation and evolution of the most massive galaxies that dominate rich clusters and {ii} investigate the nature of chain and tadpole galaxies, a fundamental but poorly understood constituent of the early Universe. We shall image rest-frame UV and optical continuum emission from 3 radio galaxies with 2.4 < z < 3.8 that appear clumpy and large in shallow WFPC/PC observations. The new observations will typically reach 2 magnitudes fainter over 20-40 times larger area than previously. Photometric and morphological parameters will be measured for satellite galaxies {"flies"} in the clumpy massive hosts and for galaxies in 1.5 Mpc x 1.5 Mpc regions of surrounding protoclusters. Locations, sizes, elongations, clumpiness, masses, and star formation rates of the merging satellite and protocluster galaxies will be compared with new state of the art simulations. Combination of ACS and WFC3 images will help disentangle the properties of the young and old populations.Specific goals include: {i} investigating star formation histories of the satellite galaxies and the extended emission, {ii} studying "downsizing" and merging scenarios and {iii} measuring the statistics of linear galaxies and relating them to models for the formation of massive galaxies and to the properties of the

  17. Einstein observations of active galaxies and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreier, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The radio galaxies Centaurus A and Signus B are discussed. In both these sources, a comparison of the radio and imaged X-ray flux is allowed for the measurement of the magnetic fields. Einstein observations of quasars are discussed. The number of known X-ray emitting QSO's was increased from 3 to 22 and the distances where these QSO's were seen to correspond to an age of 15 billion years. It was shown that these quasars contributed significantly to the X-ray background.

  18. IUE observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hjellming, M. S.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hunter, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Blue amorphous galaxies are star-forming, irregularlike systems which lack the spatially distinct OB stellar groups that are characteristic of most late-type galaxies. In order to better understand the nature of star-formation processes in these unusual galaxies, short-wavelength IUE spectra of the amorphous galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 have been obtained. It is found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star-formation rate inferred from new optical data. NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar populations. The UV spectra of these galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems in fact have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations are often homogeneous in their properties.

  19. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  20. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  1. How Supernova Feedback Affects Observed Galaxy Sizes and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M. K. Ryan; Cen, R.; Bryan, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is perhaps the least understood aspect of galaxy formation. Based on adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations and stellar population synthesis models, we compute half-light radii of high redshift galaxies and use them to compare simulated and observed size-mass and size-luminosity relations in the rest-frame UV/optical. The sizes of the simulated galaxies depend on the assumed strength of supernova feedback; we investigate the origin of this relation. We discuss minimum requirements for correct numerical modeling of supernova feedback in starburst galaxies.

  2. Observations of the andromeda galaxy at 11-centimeter wavelength.

    PubMed

    Cooley, R C; Roberts, M S; Swenson, G W

    1967-05-26

    Observations of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) at 2695 megahertz reveal more detail than do earlier measurements at lower frequency. The region is highly confused but there is apparently a more dense clustering of sources within the optical outline of the galaxy than without. One source (OA33) near M31 has an interesting. flat spectrum. PMID:17774052

  3. ESTIMATION OF RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION DISK PARAMETERS FROM IRON LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    V. PARIEV; B. BROMLEY; W. MILLER

    2001-03-01

    The observed iron K{alpha} fluorescence lines in Seyfert I galaxies provide strong evidence for an accretion disk near a supermassive black hole as a source of the emission. Here we present an analysis of the geometrical and kinematic properties of the disk based on the extreme frequency shifts of a line profile as determined by measurable flux in both the red and blue wings. The edges of the line are insensitive to the distribution of the X-ray flux over the disk, and hence provide a robust alternative to profile fitting of disk parameters. Our approach yields new, strong bounds on the inclination angle of the disk and the location of the emitting region. We apply our method to interpret observational data from MCG-6-30-15 and find that the commonly assumed inclination 30{degree} for the accretion disk in MCG-6-30-15 is inconsistent with the position of the blue edge of the line at a 3{sigma} level. A thick turbulent disk model or the presence of highly ionized iron may reconcile the bounds on inclination from the line edges with the full line profile fits based on simple, geometrically thin disk models. The bounds on the innermost radius of disk emission indicate that the black hole in MCG-6-30-15 is rotating faster than 30% of theoretical maximum. When applied to data from NGC 4151, our method gives bounds on the inclination angle of the X-ray emitting inner disk of 50 {+-} 10{degree}, consistent with the presence of an ionization cone grazing the disk as proposed by Pedlar et al. (1993). The frequency extrema analysis also provides limits to the innermost disk radius in another Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC 3516, and is suggestive of a thick disk model.

  4. The ergodicity bias in the observed galaxy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jun; Zhang, Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2010-08-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies we observed is subject to the given condition that we, human beings are sitting right in a galaxy — the Milky Way. Thus the ergodicity assumption is questionable in interpretation of the observed galaxy distribution. The resultant difference between observed statistics (volume average) and the true cosmic value (ensemble average) is termed as the ergodicity bias. We perform explicit numerical investigation of the effect for a set of galaxy survey depths and near-end distance cuts. It is found that the ergodicity bias in observed two- and three-point correlation functions in most cases is insignificant for modern analysis of samples from galaxy surveys and thus close a loophole in precision cosmology. However, it may become non-negligible in certain circumstances, such as those applications involving three-point correlation function at large scales of local galaxy samples. Thus one is reminded to take extra care in galaxy sample construction and interpretation of the statistics of the sample, especially when the characteristic redshift is low.

  5. FISICA observations of the starburst galaxy, NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Raines, S. N.; Gruel, N.; Elston, R.; Guzman, R.; Julian, J.; Boreman, G.; Glenn, P. E.; Hull-Allen, C. G.; Hoffman, J.; Rodgers, M.; Thompson, K.; Flint, S.; Comstock, L.; Myrick, B.

    2006-06-01

    Using the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) we obtained observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. We present our JH band spectra, particularly noting the existence of extended emission in Paschen β and He I.

  6. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.R.; Patten, B.M. Hawaii, University, Honolulu )

    1991-05-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals. 55 refs.

  7. A statistical study of merging galaxies: Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the expected frequency of merging galaxies is conducted, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate that if we consider mergers involving galaxy pairs without halos in a single crossing time or orbital period, the expected frequency of mergers is two orders of magnitude below the observed value for the present epoch. If we consider mergers involving several orbital periods or crossing times, the expected frequency goes up by an order of magnitude. Preliminary calculation indicate that if we consider galaxy mergers between pairs with massive halos, the merger is very much hastened.

  8. X-Shooter slit observations of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, Silvia; Vergani, Susanna D.

    Considering that Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) are supposed to explode in faint star forming galaxies they represent a very powerful way to investigate these kind of galaxies which seemed to be the bulk of galaxies at high redshift and to obtain a better estimate of the star formation density value. Currently observational estimates could underpredict ther real value of cosmic star formation density, because of their inability to observe this population of galaxies. The Italian-French X-shooter GRB host galaxies program which started at the end of 2009 allowed us to collect the spectra of about 30 GRB host galaxies in the 300-2400nm range from a redshift of about z=0.1 to z=2.7. We are using these spectra to retrieve information on the host metallicities, star formation rates and extinctions. In this talk I will show the state of the art of this work and which is the information on GRB hosts that we are collecting from the slit observations.

  9. Biases and systematics in the observational derivation of galaxy properties: comparing different techniques on synthetic observations of simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Giovanni; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Walcher, C. Jakob

    2015-12-01

    We study the sources of biases and systematics in the derivation of galaxy properties from observational studies, focusing on stellar masses, star formation rates, gas and stellar metallicities, stellar ages, magnitudes and colours. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, for which the real quantities are known, and apply observational techniques to derive the observables. We also analyse biases that are relevant for a proper comparison between simulations and observations. For our study, we post-process the simulation outputs to calculate the galaxies' spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using stellar population synthesis models and also generate the fully consistent far-UV-submillimetre wavelength SEDs with the radiative transfer code SUNRISE. We compared the direct results of simulations with the observationally derived quantities obtained in various ways, and found that systematic differences in all studied galaxy properties appear, which are caused by: (1) purely observational biases, (2) the use of mass-weighted and luminosity-weighted quantities, with preferential sampling of more massive and luminous regions, (3) the different ways of constructing the template of models when a fit to the spectra is performed, and (4) variations due to different calibrations, most notably for gas metallicities and star formation rates. Our results show that large differences can appear depending on the technique used to derive galaxy properties. Understanding these differences is of primary importance both for simulators, to allow a better judgement of similarities and differences with observations, and for observers, to allow a proper interpretation of the data.

  10. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Gallac gher, J. S.; Hjellming, M.; Hunter, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of star formation processes in amorphous galaxies, short wavelength International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 were obtained. The IUE data for NGC 1705 were of excellent quality while the low signal-to-noise NGC 1800 observation was useful only as a rough guide to the ultraviolet energy distribution. It was found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star formation rate inferred from new optical data. The NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar mass distributions. The UV spectra of amorphous galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations often are homogeneous in their properties.

  11. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.A.; Gallagher, J.S. III; Hjellming, M.S.; Hunter, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    In order to better understand the nature of star formation processes in amorphous galaxies, short wavelength International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 were obtained. The IUE data for NGC 1705 were of excellent quality while the low signal-to-noise NGC 1800 observation was useful only as a rough guide to the ultraviolet energy distribution. It was found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star formation rate inferred from new optical data. The NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar mass distributions. The UV spectra of amorphous galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations often are homogeneous in their properties.

  12. Far-infrared observations of Circinus and NGC 4945 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisht, R. S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Iyengar, K. V. K.; Rengarajan, T. N.; Tandon, S. N.; Verma, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Circinus and NGC 4945 are two galaxies luminous in the infrared and are characterized by compact non thermal radio nuclei, deep silicate absorption features and unusually strong water vapor maser luminosities. Moorwood and Glass (1984) have observed these galaxies extensively in the 1 to 20 micron range. In the far-infrared, observations up to 100 microns are available from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). In order to study the cool dust component of these galaxies, researchers observed them at 150 microns using the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) 100 cm balloon-borne telescope. Here, they report observations along with deconvolved maps at 50 and 100 microns obtained from the Chopped Photometric Channel (CPC) on board IRAS.

  13. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Interpreting Observations of Galaxies through Simulations with Realistic ISM Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Patrik

    To get a complete view of galaxy formation, multiwavelength studies are essential. Such data are now obtainable across a wide range of redshifts. However, to make definitive comparisons between observations and theory, we need to directly connect simulations of galaxy formation to observables. The aim of the proposed research is to advance the state of the art for making observationally testable predictions of theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution through hydrodynamic simulations of galaxies combined with radiation-transfer models. We will go beyond current ``sub-resolution'' recipes for star formation, feedback, and small-scale dust attenuation used in current simulations and replace these with explicit physics, making it possible to directly test galaxy formation theory against observations. The simulations run with the proposed model will be used to address the following questions: * What processes set the morphologies of star-forming galaxies at redshifts around 2? * Is the Kennicutt-Schmidt law expected to evolve with redshift? * Which processes are responsible for driving galactic winds? * Are observations of dust in high-redshift quasars consistent with theories of where dust grains are produced and destroyed? * How are dust grains transported into galactic halos, and is their survival there consistent with theory? We will accomplish this by augmenting the new Lagrangian unstructured-mesh hydrodynamics code Arepo with the relevant ISM physics: an accurate treatment of gas, metal, and energy return from stars, including supernovae types Ia and II, and AGB stars; a self-consistent estimate of the interstellar radiation field, including radiation pressure; a model for the formation and dissociation of molecular hydrogen; and tracking of the processes responsible for the production and destruction of dust grains. With this new code, we will be able to run simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context while resolving the structure of the

  15. Neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.R.; Tully, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    A sample of 1787 nearby galaxies has been observed in the 21 cm line with the NRAO 91 m and 43 m telescopes and the Bonn 100 m telescope. A total of 1171 galaxies were detected. The radio observations provide an accurate heliocentric velocity, an H I flux, and a line profile width for each detection. Literature optical magnitudes, dimensions, and morphological types are reduced to common systems and tabulated. Intrinsic luminosities, dimensions, H I masses, and total masses are determined, assuming distances derived from redshifts.

  16. Reconstructing magnetic fields of spiral galaxies from radiopolarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, C.

    2015-12-01

    We live in a magnetic universe with magnetic fields spanning an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, magnetic fields at the scale of a galaxy are known as galactic magnetic fields and are the focus of this PhD thesis. These galactic magnetic fields are very important since they affect the dynamics of the interstellar gas as well as the gas distribution. The presence of these magnetic fields induces a certain type of radiation to occur at radio frequencies known as synchrotron radiation. The observed polarization properties of this synchrotron radiation then serves to record the imprint of these magnetic fields. The goal of this thesis has been to infer the structure of the magnetic field across various spatial scales in our own Galaxy as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field in other galaxies using radiopolarimetric observations.

  17. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE COLLISIONAL RING GALAXY NGC 922

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, A. H.; Galache, J. L.; Zezas, A.; Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Roberts, T. P.; Kilgard, R.; Wolter, A.; Trinchieri, G.

    2012-03-10

    In this paper, we report on Chandra observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 922. NGC 922 is a drop-through ring galaxy with an expanding ring of star formation, similar in many respects to the Cartwheel galaxy. The Cartwheel galaxy is famous for hosting 12 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), most of which are in the star-forming ring. This is the largest number of ULXs seen in a single system and has led to speculation that the low metallicity of the Cartwheel (0.3 Z{sub Sun }) may optimize the conditions for ULX formation. In contrast, NGC 922 has metallicity near solar. The Chandra observations reveal a population of bright X-ray sources, including seven ULXs. The number of ULXs in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel scales with the star formation rate: we do not find any evidence for an excess of sources in the Cartwheel. Simulations of the binary population in these galaxies suggest that the ULX population in both systems is dominated by systems with strong wind accretion from supergiant donors onto direct-collapse black holes. The simulations correctly predict the ratio of the number of sources in NGC 922 and the Cartwheel. Thus, it would appear that the metallicity of the Cartwheel is not low enough to see a difference in the ULX population compared to NGC 922.

  18. OBSERVABILITY OF DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MERGING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wassenhove, Sandor; Volonteri, Marta; Bellovary, Jillian; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone; Dotti, Massimo

    2012-03-20

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have been detected in the centers of most nearby massive galaxies. Galaxies today are not only the products of billions of years of galaxy mergers, but also billions of years of SMBH activity as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that is connected to galaxy mergers. In this context, detection of AGN pairs should be relatively common. Observationally, however, dual AGNs are scant, being just a few percent of all AGNs. In this Letter, we investigate the triggering of AGN activity in merging galaxies via a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We follow the dynamics and accretion onto the SMBHs as they move from separations of tens of kiloparsecs to tens of parsecs. Our resolution, cooling, and star formation implementation produce an inhomogeneous, multi-phase interstellar medium, allowing us to accurately trace star formation and accretion onto the SMBHs. We study the impact of gas content, morphology, and mass ratio, focusing on AGN activity and dynamics across a wide range of relevant conditions. We test when the two AGNs are simultaneously detectable, for how long and at which separations. We find that strong dual AGN activity occurs during the late phases of the mergers, at small separations (<1-10 kpc) below the resolution limit of most surveys. Much of the SMBH accretion is not simultaneous, limiting the dual AGN fraction detectable through imaging and spectroscopy to a few percent, in agreement with observational samples.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Lin, L.; Li, J. R.; Zhou, X.; Zou, H.; Li, H. Y.; Chen, F. Z.; Du, W.; Fan, Z.; Mao, Y. W.; Wang, J.; Zhu, Y. N.; Zhou, Z. M.

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the 8˜10 m scale ground-based telescopes are helping astronomers learn much more about how galaxies develop. The existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes become less important for astrophysical researches. To use the existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes to address important issues in cosmology and extragalactic and galactic astronomy, we have to consider very carefully which kind of things we can do, and which we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee (TAC) of the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) 2.16 m telescope decides to support some key projects since 2013. Nearby galaxies supply us with the opportunity to study galaxy dynamics and star formation on large scales, yet are close enough to reveal the details. Star formation regions in nearby galaxies provide an excellent laboratory to study the star formation processes, the evolution of massive stars, and the properties of the surrounding interstellar medium. A wealth of information can be obtained from the spectral analysis of the bright emission lines and the stellar continuum. Considering these, we proposed a long-term project ``Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies'', and it becomes the key project of the NAOC 2.16 m telescope since 2013, supported with 30 dark/grey nights per year. The primary goal of this project is to observe the spectroscopy of star formation regions in 20 nearby galaxies, with the NAOC 2.16 m telescope and the Hectospec/MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) multifiber spectrograph by Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can investigate, understand, and quantify the nature of the deviation from the starbursts' IRX-β (the IR/UV ratio ``IRX'' versus the UV color ``β'') correlation. It will be important for a better understanding of the interaction of dust and

  20. IUE observations of luminous blue star associations in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    1987-01-01

    Two regions of recent star formation in blue irregular galaxies were observed with the IUE in the short wavelength, low dispersion mode. The spectra indicate that the massive star content is similar in these regions and is best fit by massive stars formed in a burst and now approximately 2.5 to 3.0 million years old.

  1. HEAO 2 X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of results of Einstein satellite observations of clusters of galaxies is provided, and X-ray luminosities or upper limits for 27 clusters are reported. Newly reported clusters with interesting morphologies are presented, and a brief discussion of the data in relation to theories of cluster formation and evolution is given.

  2. Herschel Spectroscopic Observations of Little Things Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Hunter, Deidre; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce; Schruba, Andreas; Heesen, Volker; the Little Things Team

    2016-01-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) spectral line observations of five galaxies from the Little Things sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [C ii] 158 μm, [O i] 63 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, and [N ii] 122 μm emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the FIR properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate photodissociation regions (PDRs) in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [C ii] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared (TIR) budget—higher than in solar-metallicity galaxies of other types. [N ii] is weak, suggesting that the [C ii] emission in our galaxies comes mostly from PDRs instead of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM). These systems exhibit efficient cooling at low dust temperatures, as shown by ([O i]+[C ii])/TIR in relation to 60 μm/100 μm, and low [O i]/[C ii] ratios which indicate that [C ii] is the dominant coolant of the ISM. We observe [O iii]/[C ii] ratios in our galaxies that are lower than those published for other dwarfs, but similar to levels noted in spirals.

  3. Observing simulations: molecular clouds and their journey in the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Dobbs, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    In order to have a global picture of the cycle of matter in galaxies, we need to understand the interplay of large-scale galactic phenomena with the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and, ultimately, their subsequent star formation (SF). In this work, we study the population of GMCs within a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation of a spiral galaxy, and investigate the link between the GMC properties and position with respect to spiral arms, both directly from the simulation (with the 3D densities of H2 and CO) and from an observer's perspective (with CO emission in PPV space).

  4. Ionized Gas Observation Toward a Nearby Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kuno, N.; Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observation of a hydrogen recombination emission line toward NGC 253 was performed. NGC 253 is a prototypical starburst galaxy in the nearby universe. The recombination line was clearly detected in the central region of NGC 253 with a spatial resolution of few dozens of parsecs at the galaxy. The line and thermal free-free continuum emission show quite similar spatial distribution, and this fact shows the recombination line certainly traces ionized gas formed by young massive stars. Estimated electron temperature (6500-9000K) from the data are similar to those of Galactic HII regions. The recombination line has large velocity width at the center of the galaxy, and the velocity structure is quite different from that of molecular emission line.

  5. First Stars and Galaxies, the Roadmap Ahead: Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    A complete observational understanding of the first stars and galaxies will require four facilities: JWST, 30m ground-based telescopes, ALMA, and the SKA. Each provides complementary capabilities. JWST is our best hope for looking to very high redshift. 30m-class ground-based telescopes provide sensitivity to the rest-frame ultraviolet with high-resolution imaging and high-resolution NIR spectroscopy, possibly reaching as far as z approx.15. They will also allow us to study stellar populations in nearby galaxies and examine the fossil record of the first stars. ALMA will image the redshifted dust continuum emission from evolving galaxies out to z approx.10. The SKA will do cosmic tomography, mapping the process of reionization.

  6. ROSAT observations of the galaxy group AWM 7.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, D. M.; Boehringer, H.

    1995-09-01

    We present results of ROSAT/PSPC and HRI observations of the AWM 7 group of galaxies, which is a poor galaxy cluster and forms part of the Perseus-Pisces filament. The X-ray emission originates from intracluster gas at temperatures of 1.7 to 4.5keV. The cluster obviously is elliptical with a position angle perpendicular to the position angle of the dominant elliptical galaxy NGC 1129, which is offset from the cluster X-ray centre by 30kpc. The analysis of the PSPC imaging and spectral data yield a gravitational mass of 2-5x10^14^Msun_within a radius of 1.2Mpc and a cooling flow with a mass deposition rate of up to 60-66Msun_/yr.

  7. CONFRONTING COLD DARK MATTER PREDICTIONS WITH OBSERVED GALAXY ROTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Obreschkow, Danail; Meyer, Martin; Power, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Ma, Xiangcheng; Zwaan, Martin; Drinkwater, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    The rich statistics of galaxy rotations as captured by the velocity function (VF) provide invaluable constraints on galactic baryon physics and the nature of dark matter (DM). However, the comparison of observed galaxy rotations against cosmological models is prone to subtle caveats that can easily lead to misinterpretations. Our analysis reveals full statistical consistency between {approx}5000 galaxy rotations, observed in line-of-sight projection, and predictions based on the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at the mass-resolution of the Millennium simulation (H I line-based circular velocities above {approx}50 km s{sup -1}). Explicitly, the H I linewidths in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) are found to be consistent with those in S{sup 3}-SAX, a post-processed semi-analytic model for the Millennium simulation. Previously found anomalies in the VF can be plausibly attributed to (1) the mass-limit of the Millennium simulation, (2) confused sources in HIPASS, (3) inaccurate inclination measurements for optically faint sources, and (4) the non-detectability of gas-poor early-type galaxies. These issues can be bypassed by comparing observations and models using linewidth source counts rather than VFs. We investigate if and how well such source counts can constrain the temperature of DM.

  8. New Galaxies From Old? VLA Observations Strengthen the Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronomers using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have found some of the best evidence to date that small, new galaxies can form from material pulled out of older galaxies. The new observations seriously weaken models of galactic evolution that attempt to explain the various types of galaxies seen in the universe as the result of different, but independent, processes. Steve Gottesman of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Tim Hawarden of the Joint Astronomy Center in Hilo, Hawaii, Caroline Simpson of Florida International University in Miami and Benjamin Malphrus of Morehead State University in Morehead, Kentucky, presented the results today to the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Antonio, TX. The astronomers used the VLA, a facility of the National Science Foundation, to study a galaxy system some 180 million light-years distant in the constellation Centaurus called NGC 5291. NGC 5291 is a peculiar spiral galaxy that appears to be interacting with a nearby object called the Seashell. The VLA observations show a large, elongated cloud of neutral hydrogen gas surrounding NGC 5291 and the Seashell. Within that gas cloud there are several concentrations. These mostly coincide with faint "knots" which were first seen on optical photographs taken twenty years ago with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia for the ESO/SRC Southern Sky Survey. In a detailed study at that time, using the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the 65m Parkes radio telescope, the knots were shown to be giant star-forming regions and the system was found to contain an extremely large cloud of gas. Though details were lacking then, astronomers suggested that the larger knots would turn out to be galaxies either in the process of formation or recently formed from the material of the parent system. Subsequently, similar suggestions were made about concentrations of material in the "tidal tails" ejected by galactic collisions elsewhere in the sky, but it was not

  9. Special observations of the galaxy M 82, 11

    SciTech Connect

    Amirkhanyan, A.S.; Gagen-Torn, V.A.; Reshetnikov, V.P.

    1985-09-01

    The results are given of spectral observations of the peculiar galaxy M 82. A study is made of the splitting of the emission lines in the southern filaments, and the electron density in the gaseous clouds which compose them is found. For six positions the radial velocity curves are determined. New data enable us to return to the explanation of the polarization observed in filaments as due to the scattering of the radiation of the central regions by dust and free electrons.

  10. PSPC soft x-ray observations of Seyfert 2 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Urry, C. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT PSPC soft x-ray (0.1-2.0 keV) observations of six Seyfert 2 galaxies, chosen from the brightest Seyfert 2s detected with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. All of the targets were detected with the ROSAT PSPC. Spatial analysis shows that the source density within a few arcmin of each Seyfert 2 galaxy is a factor of approximately eight higher than in the rest of the inner field of view of the PSPC images. In NGC1365 it appears that the serendipitous sources may be x-ray binary systems in the host galaxy. The proximity of the serendipitous sources, typically within a few arcmin of the target Seyfert 2, means that previous x-ray observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxies have been significantly contaminated, and that source confusion is important on a spatial scale of approximately 1 arcmin. Some spectra, most notably Mrk3 and NGC1365, indicate the presence of a high equivalent width soft x-ray line blend consistent with unresolved iron L and oxygen K emission.

  11. A homogeneous sample of binary galaxies: Basic observational properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of optical characteristics for 585 binary systems, satisfying a condition of apparent isolation on the sky, is presented. Influences of various selection effects distorting the average parameters of the sample are noted. The pair components display mutual similarity over all the global properties: luminosity, diameter, morphological type, mass-to-luminosity ratio, angular momentum etc., which is not due only to selection effects. The observed correlations must be caused by common origin of pair members. Some features (nuclear activity, color index) could acquire similarity during synchronous evolution of double galaxies. Despite the observed isolation, the sample of double systems is seriously contaminated by accidental pairs, and also by members of groups and clusters. After removing false pairs estimates of orbital mass-to-luminosity ratio range from 0 to 30 f(solar), with the mean value (7.8 plus or minus 0.7) f(solar). Binary galaxies possess nearly circular orbits with a typical eccentrity e = 0.25, probably resulting from evolutionary selection driven by component mergers under dynamical friction. The double-galaxy population with space abundance 0.12 plus or minus 0.02 and characteristic merger timescale 0.2 H(exp -1) may significantly influence the rate of dynamical evolution of galaxies.

  12. Evidence of Spin and Energy Extraction in a Galactic Black Hole Candidate: The XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn Spectrum of XTE J1650-500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ehle, M.; Freyberg, M. J.; van der Klis, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    We observed the Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1650-500 early in its fall of 2001 outburst with the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging pn Camera (EPIC-pn). The observed spectrum is consistent with the source having been in the ``very high'' state. We find a broad, skewed Fe Kα emission line that suggests the primary in this system may be a Kerr black hole and that indicates a steep disk emissivity profile that is hard to explain in terms of a standard accretion disk model. These results are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG -6-30-15. The steep emissivity in MCG -6-30-15 may be explained by the extraction and dissipation of rotational energy from a black hole with nearly maximal angular momentum or from material in the plunging region via magnetic connections to the inner accretion disk. If this process is at work in both sources, an exotic but fundamental general relativistic prediction may be confirmed across a factor of 106 in black hole mass. We discuss these results in terms of the accretion flow geometry in stellar-mass black holes and the variety of enigmatic phenomena often observed in the very high state.

  13. Evidence of Spin and Energy Extraction in a Galactic Black Hole Candidate: The XMM-NEWTON/EPIC SPECTRUM of XTE 11650-500

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Wunands, R.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ehle, M.; Freyberg, M. J.; VanDerKlis, M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    We observed the Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1650-500 early in its fall of 2001 outburst with the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging pn Camera (EPIC-pn). The observed spectrum is consistent with the source having been in the very high state. We h d a broad, skewed Fe Kar emission line that suggests the primary in this system may be a Kerr black hole and that indicates a steep disk emissivity profile that is hard to explain in terms of a standard accretion disk model. These results are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG -6-30-15. The steep emissivity in MCG -6-30-15 may be explained by the extraction and dissipation of rotational energy from a black hole with nearly maximal angular momentum or from material in the plunging region via magnetic connections to the inner accretion disk. If this process is at work in both sources, an exotic but fundamental general relativistic prediction may be confirmed across a factor of l0(exp 6) in black hole mass. We discuss these results in terms of the accretion flow geometry in stellar-mass black holes and the variety of enigmatic phenomena often observed in the very high state.

  14. Brackett alpha and gamma Observations of Starburst and Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawara, Kimiaki; Nishida, Minoru; Phillips, M. M.

    1989-02-01

    Br (Brackett) α and γ line fluxes of starburst and Seyfert galaxies are presented. The Bra line has been detected in seven of 12 galaxies. These data are combined with published Brackett line fluxes of M82 and NGC 253 to examine the relation between the extinction, A_v_, derived from the Brα/Brγ ratio and the optical depth, τ(10), of the silicate absorption at 10 microns. Generally speaking, a line of slope A_v_/τ(10) = 14 fits the data well, which is the same relation as found in the Milky Way. In the type 2 Seyferts NGC 1068 and NGC 5506, the observed Brα/Brγ ratios may not be simply explained by case B recombination with heavy extinction. The extinction values derived from Brα/Brγ are compared with those determined from optical and X-ray observations, and the implications are discussed.

  15. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  16. A Statistical Approach to Galaxy Cluster Gas Inhomogeneity: Chandra Observations of Nearby Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Erik D.; Kawahara, H.; Kitayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Suto, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, the intracluster medium (ICM) inhomogeneity of galaxy clusters is modeled statistically with a lognormal model for density inhomogeneity. Through mock observations of synthetic clusters the relationship between density inhomogeneities and that of the X-ray surface brightness has been developed. This enables one to infer the statistical properties of the fluctuations of the underlying three-dimensional density distribution of real galaxy clusters from X-ray observations. We explore inhomogeneity in the intracluster medium by applying the above methodology to Chandra observations of a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. We also consider extensions of the model, including Poissonian effects and compare this hybrid lognormal-Poisson model to the nearby cluster Chandra data. EDR gratefully acknowledges support from JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Postdoctoral Fellowhip for Foreign Researchers award P07030. HK is supported by Grands-in-Aid for JSPS of Science Fellows. This work is also supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific research of Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (Nos. 20.10466, 19.07030, 16340053, 20340041, and 20540235) and by JSPS Core-to-Core Program "International Research Network for Dark Energy".

  17. Observations of CO in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heithausen, Andreas; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen

    1990-01-01

    The content of molecular gas in galaxies, mainly H2, is one of the key observations necessary for the understanding of star formation processes and history. As the CO molecule is the most widely distributed molecule after H2 and has easily observable mm lines, it is used as a tracer for the molecular gas. CO was detected towards the direction where the H alpha and 6 cm radio continuum emission is strongest (Hummel et al. 1986). Here, researchers present the Gaussian line parameters in tabular form. The distribution of CO corresponds well with the intense HI cloud near the bar of NGC 55. The extent of the CO cloud is about 975 pc perpendicular to the major axis. As the radio continuum and the H alpha emission also peaks in this region, it is most probably associated with the star forming region in NGC 55. Assuming that the molecular gas is in virial equilibrium, researchers derive a mass of about 8 times 10(exp 7) solar magnitude. The molecular mass found indicates that the conversion factor for the molecular mass in Irr galaxies as inferred from CO line emission is indeed higher by up to a factor of 20 compared to the canonical value for the Galaxy.

  18. IRAS observations of a small sample of blue irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D. A.; Gillett, F. C.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Rice, W. L.; Low, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    IRAS satellite IR observations are presently used to investigate the properties of the dust in a small sample of irregular galaxies chosen to cover a wide range in levels of star formation activity. The irregulars are found to have comparatively normal IR properties; the only exception is NGC 1569, an irregular galaxy with intense global star formation which seems to have a larger dust fraction at temperatures whose energies peak at 25-60 microns, by comparison with other irregulars. DDO 47, the system with lowest star formation activity, has the lowest far-IR color temperature and highest ratio of IR to H-alpha flux; this is suggested to be due to the decreased importance of radiation from young stars in heating the dust.

  19. Integral field observations of damped Lyman-α galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Jahnke, K.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.

    2004-02-01

    We report preliminary results from a targeted investigation on quasars containing damped Lyman-α absorption (DLA) lines as well strong metal absorption lines, carried out with the Potsdam Multi Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). We search for line-emitting objects at the same redshift as the absorption lines and close to the line of sight of the QSOs. We have observed and detected the already confirmed absorbing galaxies in Q2233+131 (zabs=3.15) and Q0151+045 (zabs=0.168), while failing to find spectral signatures for the z=0.091 absorber in Q0738+313. From the Q2233+131 DLA galaxy, we have detected extended Lyα emission from an area of 3″×5″.

  20. Spitzer Observations of Extraplanar PAH Emission from Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J.

    We present Spitzer/IRAC observations of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from interstellar material in the thick disks of normal spiral galaxies. These data show PAHs to be a common constituent of extraplanar material in spirals. The processes that displace this material from the interstellar disks of these systems do not destroy these very small grains. The dust emission features are present far above the galactic planes, extended up to about 2-4 kpc above the midplanes of the galaxies presented in this work. The total extent for which dust can be traced is about half the extent of the DIG. If it is not a sensitivity effect, this suggests that PAHs may be associated with a cold neutral medium that can not be supported at high z.

  1. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can

  2. New Observations Deepen Mystery Surrounding Water Masers in Elliptical Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New observations with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have deepened the mystery surrounding water molecules in a galaxy 65 million light- years away. The water molecules are acting as natural masers -- amplifiers of microwave radio emissions -- and these cosmic masers within the galaxy NGC 1052 are raising difficult questions for astronomers trying to explain them. Results of the new observations, which pinpoint the location of water masers in NGC 1052, were announced today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Toronto, Ontario. The researchers are: Jim Braatz of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Mark Claussen and Phil Diamond of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico, Andrew Wilson of the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, and Christian Henkel of the Max Planck Institute fur Radioastronomie in Bonn, Germany. Water masers have been detected in several other galaxies. However, most galaxies containing water "megamasers" such as those in NGC 1052 are spiral galaxies. NGC 1052 is one of only two elliptical galaxies in which water megamasers have been detected. Because ellipticals tend to have much less gas and dust than spirals, the existence of the water masers in NGC 1052 is surprising by itself, though that galaxy does have more gas and dust than the typical elliptical. Located in the constellation Cetus, NGC 1052 also has an active nucleus, believed to be powered by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole at its core. The new VLBA observations produced an additional mystery. In other galaxies with water megamasers, the masers are believed to lie within a disk of molecules orbiting the galaxy's central black hole. This is the case, for example, in the now-famous galaxy NGC 4258, where the movement of the orbiting disk can be traced by measuring both the Doppler shift of radio emission from the masers and by tracking the motion of

  3. Observational tests of nonlocal gravity: Galaxy rotation curves and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, S.; Mashhoon, B.

    2014-05-01

    A classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed via the introduction of a scalar causal "constitutive" kernel that must ultimately be determined from observational data. It turns out that the nonlocal aspect of gravity in this theory can simulate dark matter; indeed, in the Newtonian regime of nonlocal gravity, we recover the phenomenological Tohline-Kuhn approach to modified gravity. A simple generalization of the Kuhn kernel in the context of nonlocal general relativity leads to a two-parameter modified Newtonian force law that involves an additional repulsive Yukawa-type interaction. We determine the parameters of our nonlocal kernel by comparing the predictions of the theory with observational data regarding the rotation curves of spiral galaxies. The best-fitting stellar mass-to-light ratio turns out to be in agreement with astrophysical models; moreover, our results are consistent with the Tully-Fisher relation for spiral galaxies. Light deflection in nonlocal gravity is consistent with general relativity at solar-system scales, while beyond galactic scales, an enhanced deflection angle is predicted that is compatible with lensing by the effective "dark matter." Furthermore, we extend our results to the internal dynamics of rich clusters of galaxies and show that the dynamical mass of the cluster obtained from nonlocal gravity is consistent with the measured baryonic mass.

  4. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  5. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately < 2 Gyr. While we may have missed minor younger stellar populations due to the small field-of-view of the WFPC2 instrument, these observations clearly show that most of the stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf

  6. Some implications of ultraviolet observations of quasars and active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of the order of magnitude discrepancy in the expected and observed ratios of the Lyman and Balmer lines in quasars and active galaxies is reviewed. Whereas early photoionization models for the emission line regions predicted F(L-alpha)/F(H-beta) not less than 40, the observations give values for this ratio in the range 3-8. Attempts at explaining the observations have involved dust, both external and internal to the emission line regions, and improved treatments of the collisional processes and radiative transfer effects in dense (Ne about 10 to the 10th/cu cm), optically thick clouds. None of the effects considered is, by itself, able to explain all the observations, and a combination of several of them is probably required.

  7. Observing the First Stars in Luminous, Red Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2010-01-01

    Modern cosmological simulations predict that the first stars are to be found today in luminous, red galaxies. Although observing such stars individually against a background of younger, metal-rich stars is impossible, the first stars should make their presence known by their strong, line-free ultraviolet flux. We have found evidence for a UV-bright stellar population in Sloan spectra of LRG's at z=0.4-0.5. We present arguments for interpreting this UV-bright stellar population as the oldest stars, rather than other types of stellar populations (e.g. young stars or blue straggler stars in the dominant, metal-rich stellar population

  8. Near infrared observations of galaxies in the Coma supercluster and in the Cancer cluster. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Boselli, A.

    1990-11-01

    New near infrared observations of 110 galaxies in the Coma/A1367 supercluster region, and 40 galaxies in the Cancer cluster are presented. These observations are part of an ongoing investigation of the properties of normal galaxies and of their near-IR emission, which aims at obtaining homogeneous, multifrequency data for a large sample of galaxies in different density environments. The addition of these observations to the sample presented in Gavazzi and Trinchieri (1989) raises the number of Coma/A1367 galaxies with near-IR data to 275. The measurements, together with data published by Bothun et al. (1985), give a sample of 45 spirals in the Cancer cluster.

  9. STIS UV Observations of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy Mrk 766

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. E.; Reynolds, C. S.; Wilms, J.

    2002-12-01

    We present ultraviolet spectra of the z=0.0129 Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 766. For wavelengths extending from ~1150-3100 Å we have obtained low spectral resolution, ~1-2 Å, observations with HST/STIS. Our STIS spectrum of Mrk 766 exhibits emission from Lyman α , NV λ 1240, CIVλ 1549, CIII]λ 1909, and MgII λ 2800. We will present results for fits to an intrinsic absorber and discuss our results in the context of the standard warm absorber model and an alternative model presented by Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) for the XMM-Newton X-ray observations along this line of sight. Support for these observations was provided by contract NAS5-30403.

  10. Observational and research progress of the M51 galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Williams, Peter

    2006-12-01

    The M51 system consists of a grand-design spiral galaxy and a relatively large close companion, NGC 5195. Because M51 (=NGC 5194) is nearby and nearly face-on to us, its structure can be observed in great detail and with a minimum of obscuration from dust. As a result, this galaxy has been thoroughly observed at wavelengths from radio to X-ray. Due to the rich archive of observational data, its structure, dynamical process, star formation mechanism and some other important properties have been analyzed by many authors. In the center of M51, there is a Seyfert 2 or LINER type AGN which radius is 100 pc. The mass within 70 pc in the center is (4~7)×106 Msun, this indicates there may be a black hole there. The disk of M51 can be divided into two parts, the inner disk around the nucleus cuts off at 1350 pc, from this radius to 10 kpc is the outer disk. In contrast, the companion, NGC 5195 is small and faint, and heavy dust from the arm of M51 in the foreground obscures its optical radiation. M51 has many interesting properties different from other normal galaxies, such as the wide open spiral arm, the long HI tidal tail and the huge distorted gas ring around the outer disk, these may be related to the interaction effects. Actually, the dynamical modeling history of M51 is long, in the early stage of astronomical numerical simulation, Toomre & Toomre have given a simple simulation of M51 to study its tidal effect. In 1990, the discovery of M51's long HI tidal tail made the astrophysicists shift the preferred collision time of M51 and NGC 5195 to somewhat later times in order to give the tail more time to develop. More recently, Salo and Laurikainen suggested that a multiple-passage model might be more appropriate for the system, such a scenario appears to do a better job of explaining NGC 5194's HI velocity field, but the predicted structure of the HI tidal tail is more complex than its observation. In this paper, the authers review literature of multi

  11. Observational Evidence for Galaxy Evolution in the Local Group (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, E.

    This review aims to give a summary of our understanding of galaxy evolution as infered from studies of nearby galaxies; how observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope have contributed significantly to our detailed understanding of the older stellar populations in Local Group dwarf galaxies. Recent results from VLT are also promising interesting future prospects for the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies.

  12. Constraining Galaxy Evolution Using Observed UV-Optical Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of galaxy evolution depends on model spectra of stellar populations, and the models are only as good as the observed spectra and stellar parameters that go into them. We are therefore evaluating modem UV-optical model spectra using Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) as the reference standard. The NGSL comprises intermediate-resolution (R is approximately 1000) STIS spectra of 378 stars having a wide range in metallicity and age. Unique features of the NGSL include its broad wavelength coverage (1,800-10,100 A) and high-S/N, absolute spectrophotometry. We will report on a systematic comparison of model and observed UV-blue spectra, describe where on the HR diagram significant differences occur, and comment on current approaches to correct the models for these differences.

  13. Low-frequency radio observations of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; White, R. A.

    1981-06-01

    Observations have been made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory of 16 poor clusters of galaxies at 34.3 MHz. Four of the poor clusters were detected at flux densities greater than 20 Jy. The spectra of the four detected clusters are all rather steep. Two of the detected clusters, AWM 4 and AWM 5, are also known to be X-ray sources. The possibility that the X-ray-emitting gas is heated by Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the radio emission is investigated, and it is found that the observed X-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the electron energy spectrum extends to very low energies (gamma approximately 1-10). Collective plasma effects may increase the heating efficiency and eliminate the need to extrapolate the electron energy spectrum to such low values.

  14. Low-frequency radio observations of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; White, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations have been made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory of 16 poor clusters of galaxies at 34.3 MHz. Four of the poor clusters were detected at flux densities greater than 20 Jy. The spectra of the four detected clusters are all rather steep. Two of the detected clusters, AWM 4 and AWM 5, are also known to be X-ray sources. The possibility that the X-ray-emitting gas is heated by Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the radio emission is investigated, and it is found that the observed X-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the electron energy spectrum extends to very low energies (gamma approximately 1-10). Collective plasma effects may increase the heating efficiency and eliminate the need to extrapolate the electron energy spectrum to such low values.

  15. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  16. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  17. XMM-Newton observations of three interacting luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, Dale; Mathur, Smita; Guainazzi, Matteo; Piconcelli, Enrico; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Stefano; Komossa, S.; Vignali, Cristian; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Maiolino, Roberto

    2014-05-20

    We investigate the X-ray properties of three interacting luminous infrared galaxy systems. In one of these systems, IRAS 18329+5950, we resolve two separate sources. A second and third source, IRAS 19354+4559 and IRAS 20550+1656, have only a single X-ray source detected. We compare the observed emission to point-spread function (PSF) profiles and determine that they are all consistent with the PSF, albeit with large uncertainties for some of our sources. We then model the spectra to determine soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) luminosities for the resolved sources and compare these to relationships found in the literature between infrared and X-ray luminosities for starburst galaxies. We obtain luminosities (0.5-10 keV) ranging from 1.7 to 7.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} for our systems. These X-ray luminosities are consistent with predictions for star-formation-dominated sources and thus are most likely due to starbursts, but we cannot conclusively rule out active galactic nuclei.

  18. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  19. THE ARECIBO GALAXY ENVIRONMENT SURVEY. III. OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE GALAXY PAIR NGC 7332/7339 AND THE ISOLATED GALAXY NGC 1156

    SciTech Connect

    Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Auld, R.; Davies, J. I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Taylor, R.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Van Driel, W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Henning, P. A.; O'Neil, K. L.

    2010-10-15

    Two 5 deg{sup 2} regions around the NGC 7332/9 galaxy pair and the isolated galaxy NGC 1156 have been mapped in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H I) with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array out to a redshift of {approx}0.065 ({approx}20,000 km s{sup -1}) as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. One of the aims of this survey is to investigate the environment of galaxies by identifying dwarf companions and interaction remnants; both of these areas provide the potential for such discoveries. The neutral hydrogen observations were complemented by optical and radio follow-up observations with a number of telescopes. A total of 87 galaxies were found, of which 39 (45%) were previously cataloged and 15 (17%) have prior redshifts. Two dwarf galaxies have been discovered in the NGC 7332 group and a single dwarf galaxy in the vicinity of NGC 1156. A parallel optical search of the area revealed one further possible dwarf galaxy near NGC 7332.

  20. Observational and Numerical Diagnostics of Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r(sub 200) and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to several recent results, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We note a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. The general trend of steepening density around the virial radius indicates that the shallow density profiles found in several recent works were probably obtained along particular directions (e.g., filaments) and are not representative of the

  1. LBT/LUCI Spectroscopic Observations of z≃7 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Stark, Daniel P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Clément, Benjamin; Egami, Eiichi; Frye, Brenda; Green, Richard F.; McGreer, Ian D.; Cai, Zheng

    2015-06-01

    We present deep near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 13 luminous z≃ 7 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) ({{M}UV}≃ -21) and a z≃ 9.6 lensed LBG candidate, MACS1149-JD1, using the LBT/LUCI spectrograph in the multi-object mode and long-slit mode, respectively. The z˜ 7 galaxies are selected in one of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey/WIDE survey observations, the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Ultra Deep Survey field, and MACS1159-JD1 is selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble survey observations. With ˜4-5 hr integrations, the LBT spectra are sensitive to Lyα emission, with rest-frame equivalent width greater than 55 Å (E{{W}0}\\gt 55 Å) at z˜ 7 and 90 Å (E{{W}0}\\gt 90 Å) at z˜ 9.5. No Lyα emission is observed in any of the z≃ 7 LBGs. After correcting the spectroscopic incompleteness, our measurements place an upper limit on the Lyα emission fraction of {{X}Lyα }(E{{W}0}\\gt 55 { {\\mathring{{A}} }},z≃ 7)\\lt 9.8% in luminous LBGs at z≃ 7. This result is consistent with the lack of Lyα emission in z\\gt 7 LBGs in previous studies. Together with other measurements of the Lyα emission fraction in LBGs at z≃ 7, this study puts a strong constraint on the fraction of luminous z≃ 7 LBGs with large EW Lyα, {{X}Lyα }(E{{W}0}\\gt 55 { {\\mathring{{A}} }},z≃ 7)=2.6-2.6+3.2%. We estimate the expected Lyα emission fraction at z≃ 7 by extrapolating the evolution of the fraction at low redshifts and find that the observed Lyα emission fraction is lower than the expected Lyα emission fraction at the 89% significance level, consistent with expectations if Lyα emission in z≃ 7 LBGs has been suppressed by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium or optically thick absorbers around the galaxies. We do not find any strong Lyα emission feature at the redshift range of z ≃ 7.3-9.7 in the MACSJ1159-JD1 spectrum, either. This is consistent with the conclusion that Lyα emission in

  2. Chandra ACIS-S Observations of Abell 4059: Signs of Dramatic Interaction between a Radio Galaxy and a Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian; Choi, Yun-Young; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2002-04-01

    We present Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster A4059. We find strong evidence that the FR I radio galaxy PKS 2354-35 at the center of A4059 is inflating cavities with radii ~20 kpc in the intracluster medium (ICM), similar to the situation seen in Perseus A and Hydra A. We also find evidence for interaction between the ICM and PKS 2354-35 on small scales in the very center of the cluster. Arguments are presented suggesting that this radio galaxy has faded significantly in radio power (possibly from an FR II state) over the past 108 yr.

  3. SATELLITES AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2: CONFRONTING THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2012-06-20

    Minor merging has been postulated as the most likely evolutionary path to produce the increase in size and mass observed in the massive galaxies since z {approx} 2. In this Letter, we directly test this hypothesis, comparing the population of satellites around massive galaxies in cosmological simulations versus the observations. We use state-of-the-art, publically available, Millennium I and II simulations, and the associated semi-analytical galaxy catalogs to explore the time evolution of the fraction of massive galaxies that have satellites, the number of satellites per galaxy, the projected distance at which the satellites locate from the host galaxy, and the mass ratio between the host galaxies and their satellites. The three virtual galaxy catalogs considered here overproduce the fraction of galaxies with satellites by a factor ranging between 1.5 and 6 depending on the epoch, whereas the mean projected distance and ratio of the satellite mass over host mass are in closer agreement with data. The larger pull of satellites in the semi-analytical samples could suggest that the size evolution found in previous hydrodynamical simulations is an artifact due to the larger number of infalling satellites compared to the real universe. These results advise us to revise the physical ingredients implemented in the semi-analytical models in order to reconcile the observed and computed fraction of galaxies with satellites, and eventually, it would leave some room for other mechanisms explaining the galaxy size growth not related to the minor merging.

  4. Gas Kinematics In and Around Edge-on Galaxies from MaNGA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, D.

    2016-06-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) is a massive Integral Field Unit survey of a large number of relatively nearby galaxies that started in 2014 as a part of SDSS-IV at the Apache Point Observatory. After the first year of observations MaNGA has obtained IFU spectra of about a thousand of objects, with several dozens of edge-on galaxies among them. The two-dimensional spectra help us constrain parameters of galactic components with superior rotation curves. There is a significant fraction of galaxies in which the extra-planar gas emission is confidently detected. The extra-planar gas velocity fields in several galaxies show signs of lagging rotation with respect to the gas motion close to the galactic plane. We show progress of MaNGA survey in observations of edge-on galaxies and discuss their impact on our understanding of gas kinematics in and around spiral galaxies after finishing the survey.

  5. Diffuse continuum gamma rays from the Galaxy observed by COMPTEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.; Morris, D.; Schonfelder, V.; Stacy, J. G.; De Vries, C.; Varendorff, M.

    1994-01-01

    The diffuse Galactic continuum gamma-ray emission has been studied using the full Sky Survey from COMPTEL on the Compton Observatory CGRO. The diffuse emission appears to be visible in the whole 0.75-30 MeV range covered by the instrument, although a considerable contribution from unresolved point sources cannot be excluded. A correlation analysis using HI and CO surveys of the Galaxy is used to derive the Galactic emissivity spectrum, and this is consistent with a smooth continuation to the spectrum at higher energies derived by a similar analysis of COS-B data. The apparent conversion factor from integrated CO temperature to molecular hydrogen column density can also be determined from the correlation analysis. The value obtained is consistent with results from COS-B and other non-gamma-ray methods. Calculations of the emissivity spectrum from bremsstrahlung from a cosmic-ray electron spectrum based on propagation models are compared with the observations.

  6. Cosmological Implications of ROSAT Observations of Distant Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Donnally, R. H.; Rines, K. J.

    1996-12-01

    We have used ROSAT HRI observations to study the structure and properties of clusters of galaxies at redshifts of z = 0.2 - 0.33. In our sample of thirteen clusters, seven show obvious substructure in the form of double peaked emission, elliptical iso-intensity contours, and offset centers. For a subset of nine clusters in our sample, the standard isothermal-hydrostatic model has been used to determine physical properties of the hot gas distribution of the clusters. From the measured high, central gas densities and short cooling times, we conclude that at least six of these nine clusters possess cooling flows in their cores. The gas density distributions were used to determine the gas masses of the clusters. With temperatures determined from ASCA observations (Rines, 1997), the total gravitational masses for Abell 963, CL 1358+6245, Abell 2219, Abell 115, and Abell 2390 have been computed within 1 Mpc (H_0 = 50 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) . The gas mass fractions within 1 Mpc measured for these clusters average ~ 25%, and range from 0.16% to 0.32%. As galaxies only contribute a small fraction of the total mass of the clusters, we can essentially take this to be the baryon fraction, f_b. Assuming light-element nucleosynthesis, the f_b for these clusters, and others (e.g. David et al. 1995), requires Omega to be much smaller than unity, and thus does not support the standard inflationary model for a closed universe. In a comparison with a sample of nearby clusters we find that the weighted average core radius for the clusters in our sample falls below the average nearby core radius. But, scatter in our sample and a strong possibility of sample bias towards clusters with small core radii (cooling flow clusters) places doubt on an actual increase in core radius size from z = 0.2 to the present. The cosmological implications of these results will be discussed.

  7. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey: Observations towards the NGC 7817/7798 Galaxy Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Amanda; Robert Minchin

    2016-01-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) examines the environment of neutral hydrogen gas in the interstellar medium. AGES uses the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope and the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array to create a deep field neutral hydrogen survey which we used to detect galaxies in an area five square degrees around the galaxy pair NGC 7817/7798. By finding and investigating hydrogen rich galaxies we hope to gain a better understanding of how the environment affects galaxy evolution. H1 line profiles were made for the detected H1 emission and ten galaxies which had the characteristic double-horned feature were found. NGC 7798 was not detected, but NGC 7817 and the other galaxies were cross-identified in NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database as well as in Sloan Digital Sky Survey to obtain optical data. Out of the ten, two of the sources were uncatalogued. We analyzed the hydrogen spectra and aperture photometry to learn about the characteristics of these galaxies such as their heliocentric velocity, flux, and mass of the neutral hydrogen. Furthermore, we graphed the Tully-Fisher and the Baryonic Tully-Fisher of the ten sources and found that most followed the relation. One that is the biggest outlier is suspected be a galaxy cluster while other outliers may be caused by ram pressure stripping deforming the galaxy.

  8. Space Interferometry Mission: Dynamical Observations of Galaxies (SIMDOG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Borne, Kirk D.; Nusser, Adi; Peebles, P. J. E.; Tonry, John; Tully, Brent R.; Vogel, Stuart; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be used to obtain proper motions for a sample of 27 galaxies; the first proper motion measurements of galaxies beyond the satellite system of the Milky Way. SIM measurements lead to knowledge of the full 6-dimensional position and velocity vector of each galaxy. In conjunction with new gravitational flow models, the result will be the first total mass measurements of individual galaxies. The project, includes developnient of powerful theoretical methods for orbital calculations. This SIM study will lead to vastly improved determinations of individual galaxy masses, halo sizes, and the fractional contribution of dark matter. Astronomers have struggled to calculate the orbits of galaxies with only position and redshift information. Traditional N-body techniques are unsuitable for an analysis backward in time from a present distribution if any components of velocity or position are not very precisely known.

  9. Sufficient observables for large-scale structure in galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, J.; Szapudi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Beyond the linear regime, the power spectrum and higher order moments of the matter field no longer capture all cosmological information encoded in density fluctuations. While non-linear transforms have been proposed to extract this information lost to traditional methods, up to now, the way to generalize these techniques to discrete processes was unclear; ad hoc extensions had some success. We pointed out in Carron and Szapudi's paper that the logarithmic transform approximates extremely well the optimal `sufficient statistics', observables that extract all information from the (continuous) matter field. Building on these results, we generalize optimal transforms to discrete galaxy fields. We focus our calculations on the Poisson sampling of an underlying lognormal density field. We solve and test the one-point case in detail, and sketch out the sufficient observables for the multipoint case. Moreover, we present an accurate approximation to the sufficient observables in terms of the mean and spectrum of a non-linearly transformed field. We find that the corresponding optimal non-linear transformation is directly related to the maximum a posteriori Bayesian reconstruction of the underlying continuous field with a lognormal prior as put forward in the paper of Kitaura et al.. Thus, simple recipes for realizing the sufficient observables can be built on previously proposed algorithms that have been successfully implemented and tested in simulations.

  10. The Color-Magnitude Relation of Cluster Galaxies: Observations and Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, N.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Cora, S. A.; Bassino, L. P.

    We investigate the origin of the color-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of cosmological N-body/SPH simulations of galaxy clusters, and a semi-analaytic model of galaxy formation (Lagos, Cora & Padilla 2008). Simulated results are compared with the photometric properties of early-type galaxies in the Antlia cluster (Smith Castelli et al. 2008). The good agreement obtained between observations and simulations allows us to use the information provided by the model for unveiling the physical processes that yield the tigh observed CMR.

  11. FUSE Observations of QSOs behind Galaxy Clusters and of Galactic O VI Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.

    2005-01-01

    We observed five quasars located behind clusters of galaxies with the goal of detecting resonant O VI absorption from warm (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) gas in the clusters' intracluster medium. The presence of such warm gas is predicted by cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and is observationally supported by the detection of "soft excess" emission in several galaxy clusters. A second goal was the detection of diffuse O VI emission from warm gas in our own Galaxy.

  12. CO observations of galaxies with the Nobeyama 45-M telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.; Hayashi, M.; Nakai, N.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution (15 inch), filled aperture maps of the CO (J = 1-0) line emission were obtained for several nearby, CO-bright galaxies like M82, M83, IC342, and NGC891 in order to study star forming activity in these galaxies.

  13. Chandra Observes Cloud Powered by Black Hole in Distant Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has shown that a large gas cloud is being blasted by X rays from the vicinity of a giant black hole which lurks in its center. The observation is of special interest because it shows the disruptive effects that a massive black hole can have over thousands of light years. The results are being presented today by Drs. Patrick M. Ogle, Herman L. Marshall, Julia C. Lee, and Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, NY. The observation also demonstrates that the searchlight beam of X rays from the black hole can be used to probe the environment around a black hole. The galaxy NGC 4151 is located at a distance of 50 million light years in a direction just south of the Big Dipper. It is a prominent example of a class of galaxies that show unusual energetic activity in their nucleus. This activity is now known to be due to the presence of a giant black hole in the nucleus with an estimated mass 10 million times that of the Sun. As matter swirls toward the black hole, it releases a prodigious amount of energy, much of it in X rays. Previous observations showed that X rays are also coming from an enormous cloud 3000 light years across that surrounds the black hole. The precise mirrors of Chandra allowed astronomers to make an X-ray image showing unprecedented detail of the massive cloud in the center of NGC 4151. The brightest regions in the cloud correspond to wisps that were previously observed in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope. The shape of the cloud confirms that X rays from the black hole are collimated into a narrow beam, and illuminate only certain quadrants of the galaxy. "The black hole is shining an X-ray searchlight which illuminates the clouds in the night sky of NGC 4151" said Ogle. By using the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG), astronomers were able to resolve the X-ray spectrum from the

  14. Near-infrared observations of IRAS minisurvey galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carico, D. P.; Soifer, B. T.; Elias, J. H.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Beichman, C.

    1986-01-01

    Near-infrared photometry was obtained for 82 galaxies from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) minisurvey, a sample of infrared selected galaxies. The near-infrared colors of these galaxies are similar to those of normal field spiral galaxies, but cover a larger range in J - H and H - K. There is evidence of a tighter correlation between the near and far infrared emission than exists between far-infrared and the visible emission. These results suggest that hot dust emission contributes to the 2.2 micron luminosity, and extinction by dust affects both the near-infrared colors and the visible luminosities. In addition, there is an indication that the far-infrared emission in many of the minisurvey galaxies is coming from a strong nuclear component.

  15. A Catalog of Galaxy Clusters Observed by XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mushotzky, R. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Davis, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Images and the radial profiles of the temperature, abundance, and brightness for 70 clusters of galaxies observed by XMM-Newton are presented along with a detailed discussion of the data reduction and analysis methods, including background modeling, which were used in the processing. Proper consideration of the various background components is vital to extend the reliable determination of cluster parameters to the largest possible cluster radii. The various components of the background including the quiescent particle background, cosmic diffuse emission, soft proton contamination, and solar wind charge exchange emission are discussed along with suggested means of their identification, filtering, and/or their modeling and subtraction. Every component is spectrally variable, sometimes significantly so, and all components except the cosmic background are temporally variable as well. The distributions of the events over the FOV vary between the components, and some distributions vary with energy. The scientific results from observations of low surface brightness objects and the diffuse background itself can be strongly affected by these background components and therefore great care should be taken in their consideration.

  16. Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano; Jeltema, Tesla E. E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

  17. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  18. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. I. OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the first of two analyses about the influence of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies observed in the nearby universe. For our study, we used three different samples representing different density environments: galaxies in Compact Groups (HCGs), Isolated Pairs of Galaxies (KPGs), and Isolated Galaxies (KIGs), which were taken as references. Usingboth characteristic isophotal parameters and evidence of asymmetries in the optical and the near-infrared, we are able to establish differences in the characteristics of galaxies with different morphologies in different environments, allowing us to better understand their different formation histories. In this first paper, we present the isophotal and asymmetry analyses of a sample of 214 galaxies in different environments observed in the optical (V and I images). For each galaxy, we have determined different characteristic isophotal parameters and V - I color profiles, as a function of semi-major axis, and performed a full asymmetry analysis in residual images using the V filter. Evidence of asymmetry in the optical is almost missing in the KIG sample and significantly more common in the KPG than in the HCG samples. Our isophotal analysis suggests that the stellar populations in the HCG galaxies are older and more dynamically relaxed than in the KPG. The HCG galaxies seem to be at a more advanced stage of interaction than the KPGs. One possible explanation is that these structures formed at different epochs: compact groups of galaxies would have formed before close pairs of galaxies, which only began interacting recently. However, similarities in the formation process of galaxies with same morphology suggest CGs and close pairs of galaxies share similar conditions; they are new structures forming relatively late in low-density environments.

  19. Observations of supershells in the interstellar medium of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, Elias; Bagetakos, Ioannis; Walter, Fabian; de Blok, Erwin

    The formation of massive stars in a gas-rich spiral or dwarf galaxy has a dramatic effect on the surrounding Interstellar Medium (ISM). Newly formed massive stars (M > 8 M[⊙]) will have a major impact, first of all through their ionizing flux and stellar winds and, when they eventually have exhausted their fuel supply, as supernovae (SNe). Because massive stars usually form in clusters or associations a large amount of energy is dumped into the ISM within a small volume and within a short time span, creating large scale structures known as supergiant shells and superbubbles. These structures are filled with metal-enriched, coronal gas from SNe which, through overpressure, powers their expansion. Material swept up by these expanding shells can go "critical" and form the sites of subsequent (secondary or propagating) star formation. Shells that grow larger than the thickness of the gas layer will blow out of the disk, spilling enriched material into the halo (or in the case of violent starbursts, the Intergalactic Medium). In this paper I will critically review the observational evidence which has been accumulating and which is underpinning the picture painted above, I will highlight the importance of imaging surveys of the neutral, atomic gas (via its 21-cm hydrogen line emission), and mention some of the exciting projects which are currently underway that link the large scale structure of the ISM with "Triggered Star Formation in a Turbulent ISM".

  20. IUE and Einstein observations of the LINER galaxy NGC 4579

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, G. A.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.; Mason, K. O.

    1990-01-01

    Results of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and Einstein observations of the LINER galaxy NGC 4579 are reported. Spatial profiles of the long wavelength IUE emission show a two component structure, with an unresolved core superimposed on broader underlying emission. The core spectrum shows strong C II lambda 2326 and broad Mg II lambda 2800 emission, and perhaps emission due to blends of Fe II multiplets (2300 to 23600 angstrom). The short wavelength emission is spatially unresolved, and shows C II lambda 1335, C III lambda 1909 broad C IV lambda 1550 emission, and a broad feature at approximately 1360 angstrom which may be due to 0.1 lambda 1356. Contrary to previous reports no evidence for He II lambda 1640 is found in the spectrum. An unresolved x ray source is detected at the location of the nucleus; its spectrum is well fitted by a power law of energy slope alpha approximately -0.5. These results further support the idea that NGC 4579 may contain a dwarf Seyfert nucleus.

  1. Fermi LAT Observation of Centaurus a Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    The results of analysis of approximately 3 year gamma-ray observations (August 2008-July 2011) of the core of radio galaxy Centaurus A with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT) are presented. Binned likelihood analysis method applying to the data shows that below several GeV the spectrum can be described by a single power-law with photon index Γ = 2.73 ± 0.06. However, at higher energies the new data show significant excess above the extrapolation of the energy spectrum from low energies. The comparison of the corresponding Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) at GeV energies with the SED in the TeV energy band reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration shows that we deal with two or perhaps even three components of gamma-radiation originating from different regions located within the central 10 kpc of Centaurus A. The analysis of gamma-ray data of Centaurus A lobe accumulated from the beginning of the operation until November 14, 2011 show extension of the HE gamma-ray emission beyond the WMAP radio image in the case of the Northern lobe [9]. The possible origins of gamma-rays from giant radio lobes of Centaurus A are discussed in the context of hadronic and leptonic scenarios.

  2. Observations of the impact of starbursts on the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Schommer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a crucial role in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, and the concept of supernova-driven mass outflows is a vital ingredient in theories of the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies. Despite the theoretical importance of these outflows, there is a very limited amount of direct observational evidence for their existence. We have therefore begun a detailed multi-wave-band search for outflows in dwarf (M(sub B) greater than or = -18) galaxies with extensive recent or ongoing centrally concentrated star formation. We report the first results of this search in the present paper. Observations of the ionized gas in dwarf amorphous galaxies with centrally concentrated populations of massive stars provide evidence for the large-scale expansion of their expansion of their ionized interstellar media. Fabry-Perot H alpha images reveal the presence of kiloparsec-scale 'superbubbles' and filaments which tend to be oriented along the galaxy minor axis. These structures are comparable in size to the chracteristic optical sizes of the galaxies, and dominate the morphology of the galaxies at low surface brightness in H alpha. Since expanding structure of this size and velocity are not observed in all low-mass galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation, we suggest that we are witnessing transient events that likely have a relatively low 'duty cycle' in such galaxies. That is, we argue that the particular galaxies in the present paper have had significantly elevated star formation rates over the past 10(exp 7)-10(exp 8) yr (i.e., these are starburst or young poststarburst systems). This interpretation is consistent with the optical colors and emission-line properties of these galaxies.

  3. GALAXY SPIN ALIGNMENT IN FILAMENTS AND SHEETS: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, Elmo; Libeskind, Noam I. E-mail: nlibeskind@aip.de

    2013-10-01

    The properties of galaxies are known to be affected by their environment. One important question is how their angular momentum reflects the surrounding cosmic web. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the spin axes of spiral and elliptical galaxies relative to their surrounding filament/sheet orientations. To detect filaments, a marked point process with interactions (the {sup B}isous model{sup )} is used. Sheets are found by detecting 'flattened' filaments. The minor axes of ellipticals are found to be preferentially perpendicular to hosting filaments. A weak correlation is found with sheets. These findings are consistent with the notion that elliptical galaxies formed via mergers, which predominantly occurred along the filaments. The spin axis of spiral galaxies is found to align with the host filament, with no correlation between spiral spin and sheet normal. When examined as a function of distance from the filament axis, a much stronger correlation is found in the outer parts, suggesting that the alignment is driven by the laminar infall of gas from sheets to filaments. When compared with numerical simulations, our results suggest that the connection between dark matter halo and galaxy spin is not straightforward. Our results provide an important input to the understanding of how galaxies acquire their angular momentum.

  4. CO observations of nearby galaxies and the efficiency of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    The CO distributions and total molecular content of 160 galaxies were observed using the 14 meter millimeter telescope of the FCRAO. For the luminous, relatively face-on Sc galaxies, the azimuthally averaged CO distributions are centrally peaked, while for the Sb and Sa galaxies the Co distributions often exhibit central CO holes up to 5 kpc across. None of the Sc galaxies have CO distributions which resemble the Milky Way. A general correlation was found between total CO and IR luminosities in galaxies. The scatter in this relation is highly correlated with dust temperature. No strong correlation of IR luminosities was found with HI masses, and it was thereby concluded that the infrared emission is more directly tied to the molecular content of galaxies. It is suggested that galaxies which have high Star Formation Effiencies (SFEs) produce more stars per unit molecular mass, thereby increasing the average temperature of the dust in the star forming regions. Irregular galaxies and galaxies previously identified as mergers have the highest observed star formation efficiencies. For the mergers, evidence was found that the IR/CO luminosity ratio increases with the merger age estimated by Joseph and Wright (1985).

  5. UNIFICATION SCHEME OF RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS FALSIFIED BY THEIR OBSERVED SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.; Singh, Raj Laxmi

    2013-03-20

    In the currently popular orientation-based unified scheme, a radio galaxy appears as a quasar when its principal radio-axis happens to be oriented within a certain cone opening angle around the observer's line of sight. Due to geometrical projection, the observed sizes of quasars should therefore appear smaller than those of radio galaxies. We show that this simple, unambiguous prediction of the unified scheme is not borne out by the actually observed angular sizes of radio galaxies and quasars. Except in the original 3CR sample, based on which the unified scheme was proposed, in other much larger samples no statistically significant difference is apparent in the size distributions of radio galaxies and quasars. The population of low-excitation radio galaxies with apparently no hidden quasars inside, which might explain the observed excess number of radio galaxies at low redshifts, cannot account for the absence of any foreshortening of the sizes of quasars at large redshifts. On the other hand, from infrared and X-ray studies, there is evidence of a hidden quasar within a dusty torus in many radio galaxies, at z > 0.5. It is difficult to reconcile this with the absence of foreshortening of quasar sizes at even these redshifts, and perhaps one has to allow that the major radio axis may not have anything to do with the optical axis of the torus. Otherwise, to resolve the dichotomy of radio galaxies and quasars, a scheme quite different from the present might be required.

  6. Panchromatic observations of dwarf starburst galaxies: Infant super star clusters and a low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Globular star clusters and supermassive black holes are fundamental components of today's massive galaxies, with origins dating back to the very early universe. Both globular clusters and the seeds of supermassive black holes are believed to have formed in the progenitors of modern massive galaxies, although the details are poorly understood. Direct observations of these low-mass, distant, and hence faint systems are unobtainable with current capabilities. However, gas-rich dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, analogous in many ways to protogalaxies at high-redshift, can provide critical insight into the early stages of galaxy evolution including the formation of globular clusters and massive black holes. This thesis presents a panchromatic study of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies harboring nascent globular clusters still embedded in their birth material. Infant clusters are identified via their production of thermal radio emission at centimeter wavelengths, which comes from dense gas ionized by young massive stars. By combining radio observations with complementary data at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths, we obtain a comprehensive view of massive clusters emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. This thesis also presents the first example of a nearby dwarf starburst galaxy hosting an actively accreting massive central black hole. The black hole in this dwarf galaxy is unusual in that it is not associated with a bulge, a nuclear star cluster, or any other well-defined nucleus, likely reflecting an early phase of black hole and galaxy evolution that has not been previously observed.

  7. Metal-poor dwarf galaxies in the SIGRID galaxy sample. I. H II region observations and chemical abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kewley, Lisa J.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-05-10

    In this paper we present the results of observations of 17 H II regions in thirteen galaxies from the SIGRID sample of isolated gas-rich irregular dwarf galaxies. The spectra of all but one of the galaxies exhibit the auroral [O III] 4363 Å line, from which we calculate the electron temperature, T{sub e} , and gas-phase oxygen abundance. Five of the objects are blue compact dwarf galaxies, of which four have not previously been analyzed spectroscopically. We include one unusual galaxy which exhibits no evidence of the [N II] λλ 6548,6584 Å lines, suggesting a particularly low metallicity (< Z {sub ☉}/30). We compare the electron temperature based abundances with those derived using eight of the new strong-line diagnostics presented by Dopita et al. Using a method derived from first principles for calculating total oxygen abundance, we show that the discrepancy between the T{sub e} -based and strong-line gas-phase abundances have now been reduced to within ∼0.07 dex. The chemical abundances are consistent with what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation. We derive estimates of the electron densities and find them to be between ∼5 and ∼100 cm{sup –3}. We find no evidence for a nitrogen plateau for objects in this sample with metallicities 0.5 > Z {sub ☉} > 0.15.

  8. A UNIFIED EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR INFRARED GALAXY COUNTS BASED ON THE OBSERVED PHYSICAL EVOLUTION OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bethermin, Matthieu; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.; Elbaz, David; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Hezaveh, Yashar; Le Borgne, Damien; Buat, Veronique; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Lagache, Guilaine; Scott, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    We reproduce the mid-infrared to radio galaxy counts with a new empirical model based on our current understanding of the evolution of main-sequence (MS) and starburst (SB) galaxies. We rely on a simple spectral energy distribution (SED) library based on Herschel observations: a single SED for the MS and another one for SB, getting warmer with redshift. Our model is able to reproduce recent measurements of galaxy counts performed with Herschel, including counts per redshift slice. This agreement demonstrates the power of our 2-Star-Formation Modes (2SFM) decomposition in describing the statistical properties of infrared sources and their evolution with cosmic time. We discuss the relative contribution of MS and SB galaxies to the number counts at various wavelengths and flux densities. We also show that MS galaxies are responsible for a bump in the 1.4 GHz radio counts around 50 {mu}Jy. Material of the model (predictions, SED library, mock catalogs, etc.) is available online.

  9. Weighing Young Galaxies - An Occasional Observer Goes to Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S.

    1999-12-01

    “The VLT is Europe's great leap forward, heralded as a new window on the distant universe. Surely we can think of some joint projects that will turn the Americans green!” Trying to rally the troops at the annual meeting of our ECfunded “Galaxy Formation” network forced me to think about where the VLT pay-off might really come. A talk from Alan Moorwood provided some valuable ideas. The first efficient near-IR spectrograph on an 8-metre telescope could detect Ha past redshift 2 and [OII] 3727 to redshift 5. How about getting kinematics for distant galaxies like those in the Hubble Deep Fields or the infamous “Steidel” objects? This would have to clarify their relation to nearer, dearer, but (perhaps) more boring galaxies. Of course, I'd never taken an infrared spectrum of anything, but why not start now?

  10. Observing the Earliest Galaxies: Looking for the Sources of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2015-04-01

    Systematic searches for the earliest galaxies in the reionization epoch finally became possible in 2009 when the Hubble Space Telescope was updated with a powerful new infrared camera during the final Shuttle servicing mission SM4 to Hubble. The reionization epoch represents the last major phase transition of the universe and was a major event in cosmic history. The intense ultraviolet radiation from young star-forming galaxies is increasingly considered to be the source of the photons that reionized intergalactic hydrogen in the period between the ``dark ages'' (the time before the first stars and galaxies at about 100-200 million years after the Big Bang) and the end of reionization around 800-900 million years. Yet finding and measuring the earliest galaxies in this era of cosmic dawn has proven to a challenging task, even with Hubble's new infrared camera. I will discuss the deep imaging undertaken by Hubble and the remarkable insights that have accrued from the imaging datasets taken over the last decade on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF, HUDF09/12) and other regions. The HUDF datasets are central to the story and have been assembled into the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF), the deepest image ever from Hubble data. The XDF, when combined with results from shallower wide-area imaging surveys (e.g., GOODS, CANDELS) and with detections of galaxies from the Frontier Fields, has provided significant insights into the role of galaxies in reionization. Yet many questions remain. The puzzle is far from being fully solved and, while much will done over the next few years, the solution likely awaits the launch of JWST. NASA/STScI Grant HST-GO-11563.

  11. CANDELS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE OBSERVED GALAXY POPULATION TO COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.; Dickinson, Mark; Finlator, Kristian; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cooray, Asantha; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2012-10-20

    We present measurements of the specific ultraviolet luminosity density from a sample of 483 galaxies at 6 {approx}< z {approx}< 8. These galaxies were selected from new deep near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, Hubble UltraDeep Field 2009, and Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science programs. We investigate the contribution to reionization from galaxies that we observe directly, thus sidestepping the uncertainties inherent in complementary studies that have invoked assumptions regarding the intrinsic shape or the faint-end cutoff of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function. Due to our larger survey volume, wider wavelength coverage, and updated assumptions about the clumping of gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM), we find that the observable population of galaxies can sustain a fully reionized IGM at z = 6, if the average ionizing photon escape fraction (f {sub esc}) is {approx}30%. Our result contrasts with a number of previous studies that have measured UV luminosity densities at these redshifts that vary by a factor of five, with many concluding that galaxies could not complete reionization by z = 6 unless a large population of galaxies fainter than the detection limit were invoked, or extremely high values of f {sub esc} were present. The specific UV luminosity density from our observed galaxy samples at z = 7 and 8 is not sufficient to maintain a fully reionized IGM unless f {sub esc} > 50%. We examine the contribution from galaxies in different luminosity ranges and find that the sub-L* galaxies we detect are stronger contributors to the ionizing photon budget than the L > L* population, unless f {sub esc} is luminosity dependent. Combining our observations with constraints on the emission rate of ionizing photons from Ly{alpha} forest observations at z = 6, we find that we can constrain f {sub esc} < 34% (2{sigma}) if the observed galaxies are the only contributors to

  12. CANDELS: The Contribution of the Observed Galaxy Population to Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E.; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C.; Finlator, Kristian; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cooray, Asantha; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2012-10-01

    We present measurements of the specific ultraviolet luminosity density from a sample of 483 galaxies at 6 <~ z <~ 8. These galaxies were selected from new deep near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, Hubble UltraDeep Field 2009, and Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science programs. We investigate the contribution to reionization from galaxies that we observe directly, thus sidestepping the uncertainties inherent in complementary studies that have invoked assumptions regarding the intrinsic shape or the faint-end cutoff of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function. Due to our larger survey volume, wider wavelength coverage, and updated assumptions about the clumping of gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM), we find that the observable population of galaxies can sustain a fully reionized IGM at z = 6, if the average ionizing photon escape fraction (f esc) is ~30%. Our result contrasts with a number of previous studies that have measured UV luminosity densities at these redshifts that vary by a factor of five, with many concluding that galaxies could not complete reionization by z = 6 unless a large population of galaxies fainter than the detection limit were invoked, or extremely high values of f esc were present. The specific UV luminosity density from our observed galaxy samples at z = 7 and 8 is not sufficient to maintain a fully reionized IGM unless f esc > 50%. We examine the contribution from galaxies in different luminosity ranges and find that the sub-L* galaxies we detect are stronger contributors to the ionizing photon budget than the L > L* population, unless f esc is luminosity dependent. Combining our observations with constraints on the emission rate of ionizing photons from Lyα forest observations at z = 6, we find that we can constrain f esc < 34% (2σ) if the observed galaxies are the only contributors to reionization, or <13% (2σ) if the luminosity function

  13. Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Clusters: Main Goals, Sample Selection, Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, José Luis; Alonso, M. Victoria; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; O’ Mill, Ana Laura; Cuevas, Héctor; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Ramírez, Amelia; Astudillo, José M.; Ramos, Felipe; Jaque Arancibia, Marcelo; Ulloa, Natalie; Órdenes, Yasna

    2016-06-01

    We present our study of 19 low X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters (L{}X ∼ 0.5–45 × 1043 erg s‑1), selected from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters Pointed Observations and the revised version of Mullis et al. in the redshift range of 0.16–0.7. This is the introductory paper of a series presenting the sample selection, photometric and spectroscopic observations, and data reduction. Photometric data in different passbands were taken for eight galaxy clusters at Las Campanas Observatory; three clusters at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory; and eight clusters at the Gemini Observatory. Spectroscopic data were collected for only four galaxy clusters using Gemini telescopes. Using the photometry, the galaxies were defined based on the star-galaxy separation taking into account photometric parameters. For each galaxy cluster, the catalogs contain the point-spread function and aperture magnitudes of galaxies within the 90% completeness limit. They are used together with structural parameters to study the galaxy morphology and to estimate photometric redshifts. With the spectroscopy, the derived galaxy velocity dispersion of our clusters ranged from 507 km s‑1 for [VMF98]022 to 775 km s‑1 for [VMF98]097 with signs of substructure. Cluster membership has been extensively discussed taking into account spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In this sense, members are the galaxies within a projected radius of 0.75 Mpc from the X-ray emission peak and with clustercentric velocities smaller than the cluster velocity dispersion or 6000 km s‑1, respectively. These results will be used in forthcoming papers to study, among the main topics, the red cluster sequence, blue cloud and green populations, the galaxy luminosity function, and cluster dynamics.

  14. IRAS high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies. Galaxy collisions: Infrared observations and analysis of numerical models. UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Technical Report covering the period from 15 Aug. 1989 to 14 Aug. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies; galaxy collisions: infrared observations and analysis of numerical models; and UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies. Both observational studies and theoretical modelling of interacting galaxies are covered. As a consequence the report is divided into two parts, one on each aspect of the overall project.

  15. IRAS observations of a large sample of normal irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Gallagher, John S., III; Rice, Walter L.; Gillett, Fred C.

    1989-01-01

    IRAS 12, 25, 60, and 100 micron data are presented for a sample of Irr galaxies which span a large range in star-formation activity. It is found that the dwarf, giant, and amorphous Irr's generally have similar IR properties. The typical L(IR)/L(H-alpha) ratios of most classes of Irr's, except for many of the luminous blue galaxies, are low compared with those of spiral galaxies and are consistent with the Irr's being relatively transparent systems without large amounts of optically hidden star formation. Compared with spiral galaxies, the Irr's have similar L(IR)/L(B) ratios, warmer S(100)/S(60) ratios, cooler S(25)/S(12) ratios, and lower dust-to-H I gas mass ratios. The temperature, dust-to-H I gas mass ratios, and L(IR)/L(B) ratios do not correlate with the metallicity of the ionized gas of the Irr's. A correlation between the IR fluxes and both the H-alpha and the blue stellar fluxes is found for the Irr's.

  16. NIR SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES IN THE PROTOCLUSTER AT z = 3.09

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Mariko; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tanaka, Ichi

    2015-01-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the K-band-selected candidate galaxies in the protocluster at z = 3.09 in the SSA22 field. We observed 67 candidates with K {sub AB} < 24 and confirmed redshifts of the 39 galaxies at 2.0 < z {sub spec} < 3.4. Of the 67 candidates, 24 are certainly protocluster members with 3.04 ≤ z {sub spec} ≤ 3.12, which are massive red galaxies that have been unidentified in previous optical observations of the SSA22 protocluster. Many distant red galaxies (J – K {sub AB} > 1.4), hyper extremely red objects (J – K {sub AB} > 2.1), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm sources, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as well as the counterparts of Lyα blobs and the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm sources in the SSA22 field are also found to be protocluster members. The mass of the SSA22 protocluster is estimated to be ∼2-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}, and this system is plausibly a progenitor of the most massive clusters of galaxies in the current universe. The reddest (J – K {sub AB} ≥ 2.4) protocluster galaxies are massive galaxies with M {sub star} ∼ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} showing quiescent star formation activities and plausibly dominated by old stellar populations. Most of these massive quiescent galaxies host moderately luminous AGNs detected by X-ray. There are no significant differences in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratios and [O III] λ5007 line widths and spatial extents of the protocluster galaxies from those of massive galaxies at z ∼ 2-3 in the general field.

  17. NIR Spectroscopic Observation of Massive Galaxies in the Protocluster at z = 3.09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Mariko; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tanaka, Ichi

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the K-band-selected candidate galaxies in the protocluster at z = 3.09 in the SSA22 field. We observed 67 candidates with K AB < 24 and confirmed redshifts of the 39 galaxies at 2.0 < z spec < 3.4. Of the 67 candidates, 24 are certainly protocluster members with 3.04 <= z spec <= 3.12, which are massive red galaxies that have been unidentified in previous optical observations of the SSA22 protocluster. Many distant red galaxies (J - K AB > 1.4), hyper extremely red objects (J - K AB > 2.1), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm sources, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as well as the counterparts of Lyα blobs and the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm sources in the SSA22 field are also found to be protocluster members. The mass of the SSA22 protocluster is estimated to be ~2-5 × 1014 M ⊙, and this system is plausibly a progenitor of the most massive clusters of galaxies in the current universe. The reddest (J - K AB >= 2.4) protocluster galaxies are massive galaxies with M star ~ 1011 M ⊙ showing quiescent star formation activities and plausibly dominated by old stellar populations. Most of these massive quiescent galaxies host moderately luminous AGNs detected by X-ray. There are no significant differences in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratios and [O III] λ5007 line widths and spatial extents of the protocluster galaxies from those of massive galaxies at z ~ 2-3 in the general field.

  18. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF DARK AND LUMINOUS MATTER: THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SATELLITE GALAXIES AROUND MASSIVE RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2012-05-20

    We study the projected radial distribution of satellite galaxies around more than 28,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at 0.28 < z < 0.40 and trace the gravitational potential of LRG groups in the range 15 < r/kpc < 700. We show that at large radii the satellite number-density profile is well fitted by a projected Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile with r{sub s} {approx} 270 kpc and that at small radii this model underestimates the number of satellite galaxies. Utilizing the previously measured stellar light distribution of LRGs from deep imaging stacks, we demonstrate that this small-scale excess is consistent with a non-negligible baryonic mass contribution to the gravitational potential of massive groups and clusters. The combined NFW+scaled stellar profile provides an excellent fit to the satellite number-density profile all the way from 15 kpc to 700 kpc. Dark matter dominates the total mass profile of LRG halos at r > 25 kpc whereas baryons account for more than 50% of the mass at smaller radii. We calculate the total dark-to-baryonic mass ratio and show that it is consistent with measurements from weak lensing for environments dominated by massive early-type galaxies. Finally, we divide the satellite galaxies in our sample into three luminosity bins and show that the satellite light profiles of all brightness levels are consistent with each other outside of roughly 25 kpc. At smaller radii we find evidence for a mild mass segregation with an increasing fraction of bright satellites close to the central LRG.

  20. The Evolutionary History of Lyman Break Galaxies Between Redshift 4 and 6: Observing Successive Generations of Massive Galaxies in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Bunker, Andrew; Bundy, Kevin; Targett, Tom; Benson, Andrew; Lacy, Mark

    2009-06-01

    We present new measurements of the evolution in the Lyman break galaxy (LBG) population between z sime 4 and z sime 6. By utilizing the extensive multiwavelength data sets available in the GOODS fields, we identify 2443 B, 506 V, and 137 i'-band dropout galaxies likely to be at z ≈ 4, 5, and 6. For the subset of dropouts for which reliable Spitzer IRAC photometry is feasible (roughly 35% of the sample), we estimate luminosity-weighted ages and stellar masses. With the goal of understanding the duration of typical star formation episodes in galaxies at z gsim 4, we examine the distribution of stellar masses and ages as a function of cosmic time. We find that at a fixed rest-UV luminosity, the average stellar masses and ages of galaxies do not increase significantly between z sime 6 and 4. In order to maintain this near equilibrium in the average properties of high-redshift LBGs, we argue that there must be a steady flux of young, newly luminous objects at each successive redshift. When considered along with the short duty cycles inferred from clustering measurements, these results may suggest that galaxies are undergoing star formation episodes lasting only several hundred million years. In contrast to the unchanging relationship between the average stellar mass and rest-UV luminosity, we find that the number density of massive galaxies increases considerably with time over 4 lsim z lsim 6. Given this rapid increase of UV luminous massive galaxies, we explore the possibility that a significant fraction of massive (1011 M sun) z sime 2-3 distant red galaxies (DRGs) were in part assembled in an LBG phase at earlier times. Integrating the growth in the stellar mass function of actively forming LBGs over 4 lsim z lsim 6 down to z sime 2, we find that z gsim 3 LBGs could have contributed significantly to the quiescent DRG population, indicating that the intense star-forming systems probed by submillimeter observations are not the only route toward the assembly of DRGs

  1. A Sneak Peek at the JWST Era: Observing Galaxies Below the Hubble Limit with Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.

    2016-01-01

    The installation of WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope pushed the frontier of high-redshift galaxy studies to only 500 Myr after the Big Bang. However, observations in this epoch remain challenging and are limited to the brightest galaxies; the fainter sources believed to be responsible for reionizing the Universe remain beyond the grasp of Hubble. With gravitational lensing, however, we can benefit from the magnification of faint sources, which brings them within reach of today's telescopes. The Hubble Frontier Fields program is a deep survey of strongly lensing clusters observed in the optical and near-infrared. Unfortunately, detecting highly magnified, intrinsically faint galaxies in these fields has proved challenging due to the bright foregound cluster galaxies and intracluster light. We have developed a technique using wavelet decomposition to overcome these difficulties and detect galaxies at z~7 with intrinsic UV magnitudes as faint as MUV = -13. We present this method and the resulting luminosity functions, which support a steep faint-end slope extending out to the observational limits. Our method has uncovered hundreds of galaxies at z > 6 fainter than any that have been seen before, providing our first insight into the small galaxy population during the epoch of reionization and a preview of the capabilities of JWST.

  2. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  3. Multiwavelength Measures of Star Formation: Galaxies observed by GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. D.; Schiminovich, D.; GALEX Science Team

    2006-06-01

    We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ˜ 1000 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS, provides a multiwavelength (presently 0.15-70 micron) view of star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M⊙/year. We present first results on the dust-age-color relation,showing that long wavelength-baseline colors (e.g. NUV-3.6 micron) can be cleanly decomposed into contributions from dust (measured with the infrared to UV ratio) and star formation history (measured with the relatively dust-insensitive D4000). We also show the relation of 8 micron PAH emission to other indicators of star formation and 8/24 micron vs. 24/70 micron color-color diagrams for the sample galaxies. Finally, we present initial empirical SEDs, split by relevant galaxy properties. The SEDs combined with many global measures of stellar, gas and dust properties will provide a useful local reference for models of galaxy formation and will also help guide interpretations of observations of higher redshift galaxies. We gratefully acknowledge NASA's support for construction, operation, and science analysis for the GALEX mission, developed in cooperation with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiale of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. BDJ was supported by NASA GSRP Grant NNG05GO43H.

  4. Observational effects of interaction in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pronik, I. I.; Metik, L.

    1990-01-01

    Some pecularities of the circummucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 were revealed, plausibly caused by interaction with the satellite IC 5283 and a starlike detail, situated on the edge of the west spiral branch 14 seconds from the nucleus. Shock excited H II regions were noted in the part of NGC 7469 turned toward the satellite IC 5283. The galaxy's central radio structure (lambda approx. 6 cm) stretches in the direction toward the satellite IC 5283 and the starlike detail. The spectum and color index of the starlike detail suggest that it is a cluster of early type stars (M sub V = -19 sup m) and dust clouds (A sub V = 3 sup m), in NGC 7469.

  5. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  6. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Cannon, John M.; Holtzman, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  7. Radio continuum observations of the quasar-galaxy pair 3C 232-NGC 3067

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haxthausen, Eric; Carilli, Chris; Vangorkom, Jacqueline H.

    1990-01-01

    The quasar-galaxy pair 3C 232-NGC 3067 is well known to show absorption by gas associated with the foreground galaxy against the background quasar (see Stocke et al. this volume). Observations by Carilli, van Gorkom, and Stocke (Nature 338, 134, 1989) found that the absorbing gas is located in a long tail of gas which extends from the galaxy toward the quasar and beyond (in projection). Though the HI observations of NGC 3067 indicate that the galaxy has been severely disturbed, there is no obvious candidate in the field which could cause such a disturbance, leading to the conclusion that the system has undergone a recent merger. The radio continuum observations of this system were designed to study the nature of this highly disturbed galaxy. New continuum observations confirm the notion that NGC 3067 is a highly disturbed system, and, in particular, the notion that the western half of the galaxy extends only 1/2 as far in radius as the eastern half. This disturbance must have occurred recently, since the galactic rotation would smooth out the observed asymmetry in about 10(exp 8) years. Researchers are left with the problem that there are no obvious candidates which could have caused such a disturbance.

  8. VLT/VIMOS observations of an occulting galaxy pair: redshifts and effective extinction curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Böker, T.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Keel, W. C.; de Jong, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    We present Very Large Telescope/Visible Multiobject Spectrograph Integral Field Unit observations of an occulting galaxy pair previously discovered in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. The foreground galaxy is a low-inclination spiral disc, which causes clear attenuation features seen against the bright bulge and disc of the background galaxy. We find redshifts of z = 0.064 ± 0.003 and 0.065 for the foreground and background galaxy, respectively. This relatively small difference does not rule out gravitational interaction between the two galaxies. Emission line ratios point to a star-forming, not active galactic nuclei dominated foreground galaxy. We fit the Cardelli, Clayton and Mathis extinction law to the spectra of individual fibres to derive slope (RV) and normalization (AV). The normalization agrees with the HST attenuation map and the slope is lower than the Milky Way relation (RV < 3.1), which is likely linked to the spatial sampling of the disc. We speculate that the values of RV point to either coherent interstellar medium structures in the disc larger than usual (˜9 kpc) or higher starting values of RV, indicative of recent processing of the dust. The foreground galaxy is a low stellar mass spiral (M* ˜ 3 × 109 M⊙) with a high dust content (Mdust ˜ 0.5 × 106 M⊙). The dust disc geometry visible in the HST image would explain the observed spectral energy distribution properties of smaller galaxies: a lower mean dust temperature, a high dust-to-stellar mass ratio but relatively little optical attenuation. Ongoing efforts to find occulting pairs with a small foreground galaxy will show how common this geometry is.

  9. Radio continuum and far-infrared observations of low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeppe, G.; Brinks, E.; Klein, U.; Giovanardi, C.; Altschuler, D. R.; Price, R. M.; Deeg, H. -J.

    1994-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum and Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) far-infrared (FIR) observations of 16 low luminosity galaxies of mostly low surface brightness. All galaxies had previously claimed single dish radio continuum detections. However, at the frequencies of our observations (1.49 and 8.48 GHz), we find significant radio emission for two objects only. We show that the other previously claimed detections are due to confusion with physically unrelated background sources. This implies a low radio continuum detection rate for these galaxies. Re-reduced IRAS scans yield significant far-infrared flux densities in at least one IRAS band for 6 of the 16 galaxies. These, together with the FIR and radio continuum upper limits, are consistent with the well established radio/FIR relation, where most of our galaxies populate the low-luminosity end. From the radio continuum and FIR flux densities and their upper limits we estimate the current star formation rates and demonstrate that the galaxies are currently passive in forming stars, in agreement with previous optical investigations. There is an indication that the galaxies were forming stars more intensively averaged over their lifetime than they are presently.

  10. The alignment of galaxy spin with the shear field in observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahwa, Isha; Libeskind, Noam I.; Tempel, Elmo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène M.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Sorce, Jenny G.

    2016-03-01

    Tidal torque theory suggests that galaxies gain angular momentum in the linear stage of structure formation. Such a theory predicts alignments between the spin of haloes and tidal shear field. However, non-linear evolution and angular momentum acquisition may alter this prediction significantly. In this paper, we use a reconstruction of the cosmic shear field from observed peculiar velocities combined with spin axes extracted from galaxies within 115 Mpc (˜8000 km s-1) from 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalogue to test whether or not galaxies appear aligned with principal axes of shear field. Although linear reconstructions of the tidal field have looked at similar issues, this is the first such study to examine galaxy alignments with velocity shear field. Ellipticals in the 2MRS sample show a statistically significant alignment with two of the principal axes of the shear field. In general, elliptical galaxies have their short axis aligned with the axis of greatest compression and perpendicular to the axis of slowest compression. Spiral galaxies show no signal. Such an alignment is significantly strengthened when considering only those galaxies that are used in velocity field reconstruction. When examining such a subsample, a weak alignment with the axis of greatest compression emerges for spiral galaxies as well. This result indicates that although velocity field reconstructions still rely on fairly noisy and sparse data, the underlying alignment with shear field is strong enough to be visible even when small numbers of galaxies are considered - especially if those galaxies are used as constraints in the reconstruction.

  11. Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, S. W.; Lawrence, A.; Wilson, A. S.; Elvis, M.; Wright, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies obtained with the VLA and Parkes radio telescopes are discussed, and the ratio of the radio to X-ray flux density is used to determine the degree of radio-loudness of the galaxies. A continuous distribution of the degree of radio loudness is found amongst the sample galaxies, and no evidence for distinct radio-quiet and radio-loud populations is noted. The X-ray and radio luminosity is shown to be nonlinearly correlated, with the radio-loud objects all having high X-ray luminosity.

  12. New observations of z ∼ 7 galaxies: evidence for a patchy reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Castellano, M.; Grazian, A.; Galametz, A.; Giallongo, E.; Paris, D.; Santini, P.; Vanzella, E.; Treu, T.; Mesinger, A.; Dijkstra, M.; Bradač, M.; Conselice, C.; Cristiani, S.; Dunlop, J.; McLure, R.; Giavalisco, M.; Koekemoer, A.; Maiolino, R.

    2014-10-01

    We present new results from our search for z ∼ 7 galaxies from deep spectroscopic observations of candidate z dropouts in the CANDELS fields. Despite the extremely low flux limits achieved by our sensitive observations, only two galaxies have robust redshift identifications, one from its Lyα emission line at z = 6.65, the other from its Lyman break, i.e., the continuum discontinuity at the Lyα wavelength consistent with a redshift of 6.42 but with no emission line. In addition, for 23 galaxies we present deep limits in the Lyα equivalent width derived from the nondetections in ultradeep observations. Using this new data as well as previous samples, we assemble a total of 68 candidate z ∼ 7 galaxies with deep spectroscopic observations, of which 12 have a line detection. With this much enlarged sample we can place solid constraints on the declining fraction of Lyα emission in z ∼ 7 Lyman-break galaxies compared to z ∼ 6, both for bright and faint galaxies. Applying a simple analytical model, we show that the present data favor a patchy reionization process rather than a smooth one.

  13. A New Database of observed SEDs of Nearby Starburst Galaxies from the UV to the FIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Clayton, G. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Misselt, K. A.; Smith, T. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present a new database of UV to FIR data of about 50 nearby starburst galaxies. The galaxies are selected based upon the availability of IUE data. We have recalibrated the IUE UV spectra for these galaxies by incorporating the most recent improvements in the IUE data calibration. For the spectra in optical range, we include the data from the atlas by Kinney et al. and the results of our own long-slit observations with the Bok telescope (Steward Observatory), complemented by the photometric data from the HST/WFPC2 observations. The NIR data are from the literature, our new observations at CTIO, NASA/IRTF and the Mount Laguana Observatory. In addition, the ISO archive has provided mid-IR spectra for some of the galaxies. The optical to IR data are matched to the IUE aperture. In conjunction with IRAS and ISO FIR fluxes, all these data form a set of observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the nucleus regions of nearby starburst galaxies, which should be useful in studying star formation and dust/gas attenuation in galaxies.

  14. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 observed with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, C.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P.; Bryant, J. J.; Hunstead, R.; Dicken, D.; Johnston, H.

    2016-02-01

    relatively low, up to AV ~ 2 mag. The ratio of line widths, σ, to bulk velocity, v, is so large that even the gas in galaxies with regular velocity fields is unlikely to be gravitationally bound. It is unclear, however, whether the large line widths are due to turbulence or unresolved, local outflows as are sometimes observed at low redshifts. We compare our sources with sets of radio galaxies at low and high redshift, finding that they may have more in common with gas-rich nearby radio galaxies with similar jet power than with the most powerful high-z radio galaxies. Comparison of the kinetic energy with the energy supply from the AGNs through jet and radiation pressure suggests that the radio source still plays a dominant role for feedback, consistent with low-redshift radio-loud quasars. Based on observations carried out with the Very Large Telescope of ESO under Program IDs 084.A-0324 and 085.A-0897, and at ATCA under Program ID C2604.

  15. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  16. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-11-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  17. Jellyfish: Observational Properties of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping Events in Massive Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conor, McPartland; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical origin and observational signatures of extreme ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z=0.3-0.7, based on data in the F606W passband obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen ``jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define quantitative morphological criteria to select candidate galaxies which are similar to known cases of RPS. Considering a sample of 16 ``jellyfish" galaxies (10 of which we present for the first time), we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on dynamical features such as apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the observed events occur primarily at large distances from the cluster core and involve infall trajectories featuring high impact parameters. Simple models of cluster growth show that such trajectories are consistent with two scenarios: 1) galaxy infall along filaments; and 2) infall at high velocities (≥1000 km/s) characteristic of cluster mergers. The observed distribution of events is best described by timescales of ˜few Myr in agreement with recent numerical simulations of RPS. The broader areal coverage of the Hubble Frontier Fields should provide an even larger sample of RPS events to determine the relative contributions of infall and cluster mergers. Prompted by the discovery of several jellyfish galaxies whose brightness in the F606W passband rivals or exceeds that of the respective brightest cluster galaxy, we attempt to constrain the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing RPS. The observed significant excess at the bright end compared to the luminosity functions of blue cluster members strongly suggests enhanced star formation, thus challenging theoretical and numerical studies according to which RPS merely displaces existing star-forming regions. In-depth studies of individual objects will help test our

  18. 2-165 keV observations of active galaxies and the diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    HEAO 1 spectral observations of 12 active galaxies in the 12-165 keV and 2-50 keV ranges are reported. The spectra of these galaxies in the 2-165 keV range are well represented by a single power law model; within experimental uncertainties a narrow dispersion in power law index attributable to the individual galaxies is observed, while the 2-165 keV luminosities of these galaxies ranged from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 3 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s. An apparent universality of the spectral form is found which can be interpreted as due to a common electron distribution with a temperature of tens of keV in the Compton scattering region or as a common nonthermal power-law distribution generating the observed flux through synchrotron-Compton processes. The data indicate that relativistic particles are likely to be responsible for the X-rays from cores of active galaxies through synchroton-Compton processes. In addition, it is noted that only weak number evolution, if any at all, is present in active galaxies.

  19. Star Formation Driven Outflows In Edge-On Spiral Galaxies Based on HST/ACS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossa, Joern; Dahlem, M.; Dettmar, R.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2007-12-01

    We present new results on extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) in four late-type, actively star-forming edge-on spirals. The high spatial resolution narrowband imaging observations were obtained with ACS on-board HST. Our H-alpha observations reveal a multitude of structures on both small and large scales. Whereas all four galaxies have been studied with ground-based telescopes before, here the small scale structure of the extended emission line gas is presented for the very first time at a spatial resolution of 0.05", corresponding to 5 pc at the mean distance to our galaxies. The eDIG morphology is very different for all four targets, as a result of their different star formation activity and galaxy mass. There is a very smooth DIG morphology observed in two of the galaxies (NGC4634 and NGC5775), whereas the other two (NGC4700 and NGC7090) show a much more complex morphology with intricate filaments, bubbles and supershells. We discuss how the morphology of the eDIG, in particular the break-up of diffuse emission into filaments in galaxy halos, depends on physical parameters such as galaxy mass and SF activity and other tracers as well as the galactic environment. Support for proposal 10416 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  1. IR observations of the double quasar 0957 + 561 A, B and the intervening galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.; Matthews, K.; Becklin, E. E.; Capps, R.

    1980-01-01

    Infrared observations of the double quasar 0957 + 561 A, B and the intervening galaxy believed to be responsible for its double appearance by gravitational light deflection are reported. Observations were obtained of each quasar at 1.6 and 2.2 microns and of the 12.5 arcsec region centered between the two quasars at 1.2, 1.6 and 2.2 microns. Extended IR emission is observed in the vicinity of both quasars and is attributed to emission from the intervening galaxy. The two quasars are found to have a constant flux ratio in all observed wavelength ranges, consistent with the achromatic imaging predicted by the gravitational lens model, and to exhibit an unusual continuum distribution in the region 0.35-2.2 microns. The infrared observations are also consistent with a giant elliptical lens galaxy at a redshift of approximately 0.40.

  2. High-J CO Intensity Measurements for Galaxies Observed by the Herschel FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip; Conley, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Molecular gas is the raw material for star formation and is commonly traced by the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule. The atmosphere blocks all but the lowest-J transitions of CO for observatories on the ground, but the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory revealed the CO emission of nearby galaxies from J=4-3 to J=13-12. Herschel showed that mid- and high-J CO lines in nearby galaxies are emitted from warm gas, accounting for approximately 10% of the molecular mass, but the majority of the CO luminosity. The energy budget of this warm, highly-excited gas is a significant window into the feedback interactions among molecular gas, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Likely, mechanical heating is required to explain the excitation. Such gas has also been observed in star forming regions within our galaxy.We have examined all ~ 300 spectra of galaxies from the Herschel Fourier Transform Spectrometer and measured line fluxes or upper limits for the CO J=4-3 to J=13-12, [CI], and [NII] 205 micron lines in ~ 200 galaxies, taking systematic effects of the FTS into account. We will present our line fitting method, illustrate trends available so far in this large sample, and preview the full 2-component radiative transfer likelihood modeling of the CO emission using an illustrative sample of 20 galaxies, including comparisons to well-resolved galactic regions. This work is a comprehensive study of mid- and high-J CO emission among a variety of galaxy types, and can be used as a resource for future (sub)millimeter studies of galaxies with ground-based instruments.

  3. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  4. Combining physical galaxy models with radio observations to constrain the SFRs of high-z dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Faro, B.; Silva, L.; Franceschini, A.; Miller, N.; Efstathiou, A.

    2015-03-01

    We complement our previous analysis of a sample of z ˜ 1-2 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies [(U)LIRGs], by adding deep Very Large Array radio observations at 1.4 GHz to a large data set from the far-UV to the submillimetre, including Spitzer and Herschel data. Given the relatively small number of (U)LIRGs in our sample with high signal-to-noise (S/N) radio data, and to extend our study to a different family of galaxies, we also include six well-sampled near-infrared (near-IR)-selected BzK galaxies at z ˜ 1.5. From our analysis based on the radtran spectral synthesis code GRASIL, we find that, while the IR luminosity may be a biased tracer of the star formation rate (SFR) depending on the age of stars dominating the dust heating, the inclusion of the radio flux offers significantly tighter constraints on SFR. Our predicted SFRs are in good agreement with the estimates based on rest-frame radio luminosity and the Bell calibration. The extensive spectrophotometric coverage of our sample allows us to set important constraints on the star formation (SF) history of individual objects. For essentially all galaxies, we find evidence for a rather continuous SFR and a peak epoch of SF preceding that of the observation by a few Gyr. This seems to correspond to a formation redshift of z ˜ 5-6. We finally show that our physical analysis may affect the interpretation of the SFR-M⋆ diagram, by possibly shifting, with respect to previous works, the position of the most dust obscured objects to higher M⋆ and lower SFRs.

  5. Submillimeter Observations of CLASH 2882 and the Evolution of Dust in this Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G; Kovacs, Attila; Decarli, Roberto; Egami, Eiichi; Michalowski, Michal J.; Rawle, Timothy D.; Toft, Sune; Walter, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Two millimeter observations of the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster have detected a source that was consistent with the location of the lensed MACS 1149-JD galaxy at z = 9.6. A positive identification would have rendered this galaxy as the youngest dust forming galaxy in the universe. Follow up observation with the AzTEC 1.1 mm camera and the IRAM NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) at 1.3 mm have not confirmed this association. In this paper we show that the NOEMA observations associate the 2 mm source with [PCB2012] 2882,12 source number 2882 in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) catalog of MACS J1149.6 +2223. This source, hereafter referred to as CLASH 2882, is a gravitationally lensed spiral galaxy at z = 0.99. We combine the Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer (GISMO) 2 mm and NOEMA 1.3 mm fluxes with other (rest frame) UV to far-IR observations to construct the full spectral energy distribution of this galaxy, and derive its star formation history, and stellar and interstellar dust content. The current star formation rate of the galaxy is 54/mu/Solar Mass/yr, and its dust mass is about 5 × 10(exp 7)/mu Solar Mass, where mu is the lensing magnification factor for this source, which has a mean value of 2.7. The inferred dust mass is higher than the maximum dust mass that can be produced by core collapse supernovae and evolved AGB stars. As with many other star forming galaxies, most of the dust mass in CLASH 2882 must have been accreted in the dense phases of the interstellar medium.

  6. Properties of Molecular Gas in Massive Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, Including New 12CO Observations of Three Malin 1 ``Cousins''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, K.; Schinnerer, E.

    2004-11-01

    To date, the only low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies that have been detected in CO are the massive LSB (MLSB) galaxies. In 2003, O'Neil, Schinnerer, & Hofner hypothesized that it is the prominent bulge component in MLSB galaxies, not present in less massive LSB galaxies, that gives rise to the detectable quantities of CO gas. To test this hypothesis, we have used the IRAM 30 m telescope to obtain three new, deep CO J(1-0) and J(2-1) observations of MLSB galaxies. Two of the three galaxies observed were detected in CO-one in the J(1-0) line and the other in both the J(1-0) and J(2-1) lines-bringing the total number of MLSB galaxies with CO detections to five, out of a total of nine MLSB galaxies observed at CO to date. The third object had no detection to 2 mK at CO J(1-0). Comparing all MLSB galaxy CO results with surveys of high surface brightness galaxies, we find that the MLSB galaxies' MH2 and MH2/MHI values fall within the ranges typically found for high surface brightness objects, albeit at the low end of the distribution, with the two MLSB galaxies detected at CO in this survey having the highest MH2/MHI values yet measured for any LSB system, by factors of 2-3.

  7. NGC 5548: LACK OF A BROAD Fe K{alpha} LINE AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCATION OF THE HARD X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mathur, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the co-added and individual 0.7-40 keV spectra from seven Suzaku observations of the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 taken over a period of eight weeks. We conclude that the source has a moderately ionized, three-zone warm absorber, a power-law continuum, and exhibits contributions from cold, distant reflection. Relativistic reflection signatures are not significantly detected in the co-added data, and we place an upper limit on the equivalent width of a relativistically broad Fe K{alpha} line at EW {<=} 26 eV at 90% confidence. Thus NGC 5548 can be labeled as a 'weak' type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in terms of its observed inner disk reflection signatures, in contrast to sources with very broad, strong iron lines such as MCG-6-30-15, which are likely much fewer in number. We compare physical properties of NGC 5548 and MCG-6-30-15 that might explain this difference in their reflection properties. Though there is some evidence that NGC 5548 may harbor a truncated inner accretion disk, this evidence is inconclusive, so we also consider light bending of the hard X-ray continuum emission in order to explain the lack of relativistic reflection in our observation. If the absence of a broad Fe K{alpha} line is interpreted in the light-bending context, we conclude that the source of the hard X-ray continuum lies at radii r{sub s} {approx}> 100 r{sub g}. We note, however, that light-bending models must be expanded to include a broader range of physical parameter space in order to adequately explain the spectral and timing properties of average AGNs, rather than just those with strong, broad iron lines.

  8. Chandra Observations of the Stellar Populations and Diffuse Gas in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezas, Andreas; Fabbiano, G.; Prestwich, A.; Murray, S.; Ward, M.

    We present Chandra observations of two star-forming galaxies (M82 and The Antennae) and three starburst/AGN composite galaxies (NGC 1808, NGC 6240, and NGC 7331). In both star-forming galaxies we detect a large number of sources with diverse properties. Some of them can be identified as X-ray binaries, based on their variability and spectra. However, there is a significant number of very soft and/or extended sources which could be supernova remnants. These observations confirm previous indications that there is a population of sources with X-ray luminosities much higher than the Eddington limit for a neutron star, suggesting that these objects are abundant in star-forming galaxies. We find that the X-ray luminosity functions of the discrete sources in these two galaxies are very similar. In the case of the composite galaxies we find that the AGN do not dominate their X-ray emission. A significant fraction of the emission from these objects is extended but there are also X-ray sources associated with circumnuclear star-formation. We thank Phil Kaaret and Vicky Kalogera for useful discussions. This work has been supported by NASA contracts NAS 8--39073 (CXC) and NAS8-38248 (HRC) and Chandra grant G01-2116X.

  9. X-ray observations of possible binary clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Many studies of superclusters of galaxies have been conducted, taking into account also superclusters representing candidate binary cluster systems. The present investigation is concerned with further studies of potential binary cluster systems, giving attention to a sample of six cluster pairs, in which the redshifts and X-ray luminosities of each member of a pair have been measured. One of the objectives of the investigation was related to a search for X-ray evidence that the clusters interact in these potentially binary systems. A second objective was to provide a measure of the mass of hot gas in the clusters. Two new systems in which the two clusters may have a physical association were found.

  10. The evolution of C/O in dwarf galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope FOS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnett, D. R.; Skillman, E. D.; Dufour, R. J.; Peimbert, M.; Torres-Peimbert, S.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Shields, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We present UV observations of seven H II regions in low-luminosity dwarf irregular galaxies and the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in order to measure the C/O abundance ratio in the interstellar medium (ISM) of those galaxies. We measure both O III 1666 A and C III 1909 A in our spectra, enabling us to determine C(+2)/O(+2) with relatively small uncertainties. The results from our HST observations show a continuous increase in C/O with increasing O/H, consistent with a power law having an index of 0.43 +/- 0.09 over the range -4.7 to -3.6 in log (O/H). One possible interpretation of this trend is that the most metal-poor galaxies are the youngest and dominated by the products of early enrichment by massive stars, while more metal-rich galaxies show increasing, delayed contributions of carbon from intermediate-mass stars. Our results also suggest that it may not be appropiate to combine abundances in irregular galaxies with those in spiral galaxies to study the evolution of chemical abundances. Our measured C/O ratios in the most metal-poor galaxies are consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis from massive stars for Weaver & Woosley's best estimate for the 12C(alpha, gamma) 16O nuclear reaction rate, assuming negligible contanmination from carbon produced in intermediate-mass stars in these galaxies. We detect a weak N III 1750 A multiplet in SMC N88A and obtain interesting upper limits for two other objects. Our 2 sigma uppr limits on the 1750 A feature indicate that the N(+2)/O(+2) ratios in these objects are not significantly larger than the N(+)/O(+) ratios measured from optical spectra. This behavior is consistent with predictions of photionization models, although better detections of N III are needed to confirm the results.

  11. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey: precursor observations of the NGC 628 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.; Davies, J. I.; Catinella, B.; van Driel, W.; Henning, P. A.; Linder, S.; Momjian, E.; Muller, E.; O'Neil, K.; Sabatini, S.; Schneider, S.; Bothun, G.; Cortese, L.; Disney, M.; Hoffman, G. L.; Putman, M.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Baes, M.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Boselli, A.; Brinks, E.; Brosch, N.; Irwin, J.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kilborn, V. A.; Koribalski, B.; Spekkens, K.

    2006-10-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) is one of several HI surveys utilizing the new Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) fitted to the 305-m radio telescope at Arecibo.a The survey is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments to higher sensitivity, higher velocity resolution and higher spatial resolution than previous fully sampled, 21-cm multibeam surveys. The emphasis is on making detailed observations of nearby objects although the large system bandwidth (100MHz) will allow us to quantify the HI properties over a large instantaneous velocity range. In this paper, we describe the survey and its goals and present the results from the precursor observations of a 5 × 1-deg2 region containing the nearby (~10Mpc) NGC 628 group. We have detected all the group galaxies in the region including the low-mass (MHI ~107Msolar) dwarf, dw0137+1541. The fluxes and velocities for these galaxies compare well with previously published data. There is no intragroup neutral gas detected down to a limiting column density of 2 × 1018cm-2. In addition to the group galaxies we have detected 22 galaxies beyond the NGC 628 group, nine of which are previously uncatalogued. We present the HI data for these objects and also SuperCOSMOS images for possible optical galaxies that might be associated with the HI signal. We have used V/Vmax analysis to model how many galaxies beyond 1000kms-1 should be detected and compare this with our results. The predicted number of detectable galaxies varies depending on the HI mass function (HIMF) used in the analysis. Unfortunately the precursor survey area is too small to determine whether this is saying anything fundamental about the HIMF or simply highlighting the effect of low number statistics. This is just one of many questions that will be addressed by the complete AGES survey.

  12. Quark nugget dark matter: Comparison with radio observations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K.; Zhitnitsky, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    It has been recently claimed that radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies essentially rule out a dark matter source for the galactic haze [1]. Here we consider the low energy thermal emission from a quark nugget dark matter model in the context of microwave emission from the galactic centre and radio observations of nearby Milky Way like galaxies. We demonstrate that observed emission levels do not strongly constrain this specific dark matter candidate across a broad range of the allowed parameter space in drastic contrast with conventional dark matter models based on the WIMP paradigm.

  13. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s‑1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr‑1 and the mean gas mass is ∼1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH–M * scaling relation.

  14. Interacting binary galaxies. III - Observations of NGC 1587/1588 and NGC 7236/7237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk D.; Hoessel, John G.

    1988-07-01

    The catalog of isolated galaxy pairs prepared by Karachentsev has been culled for its E-E constituents, and the results are reported. Radial variations of rotation velocity and velocity dispersion are extracted from the spectroscopic data for each of the two galaxies of a given pair. Such observations are described for two Karachentsev pairs, Nos. 99 and 564. The observed disturbances in rotation velocity and luminosity distribution are discussed in terms of the gravitational interaction hypothesis. It is argued that observational evidence of tidal friction in action is evidenced by these findings. One of the highest rotation rates known for an E2 galaxy of average luminosity is found in NGC 1587, the brighter component of K99. Because this rotation is in the same sense as the binary orbital motion, the net angular momentum in this isolated binary system is large, challenging simple tidal torque theories to identify the source of the momentum.

  15. Chandra observations of the ULX N10 in the Cartwheel galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolato, Fabio; Wolter, Anna; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2010-08-01

    The Cartwheel galaxy harbours more ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) than any other galaxy observed so far, and as such it is a particularly interesting target to study them. In this paper, we analyse the three Chandra observations of the brightest ULX (N10) in the Cartwheel galaxy, in light of current theoretical models suggested to explain such still elusive objects. For each model, we derive the relevant spectral parameters. Based on self-consistency arguments, we can interpret N10 as an accreting binary system powered by an ~ 100 Msolar black hole. A young supernova strongly interacting with its surroundings is a likely alternative that can be discarded only with the evidence of a flux increase from future observations.

  16. Interacting binary galaxies. III. Observations of NGC 1587/1588 and NGC 7236/7237

    SciTech Connect

    Borne, K.D.; Hoessel, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    The catalog of isolated galaxy pairs prepared by Karachentsev has been culled for its E-E constituents, and the results are reported. Radial variations of rotation velocity and velocity dispersion are extracted from the spectroscopic data for each of the two galaxies of a given pair. Such observations are described for two Karachentsev pairs, Nos. 99 and 564. The observed disturbances in rotation velocity and luminosity distribution are discussed in terms of the gravitational interaction hypothesis. It is argued that observational evidence of tidal friction in action is evidenced by these findings. One of the highest rotation rates known for an E2 galaxy of average luminosity is found in NGC 1587, the brighter component of K99. Because this rotation is in the same sense as the binary orbital motion, the net angular momentum in this isolated binary system is large, challenging simple tidal torque theories to identify the source of the momentum. 62 references.

  17. ACA [CI] observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krips, M.; Martín, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Aalto, S.; Bisbas, T. G.; Bolatto, A. D.; Downes, D.; Eckart, A.; Feruglio, Ch.; García-Burillo, S.; Geach, J.; Greve, T. R.; König, S.; Matsushita, S.; Neri, R.; Offner, S.; Peck, A. B.; Viti, S.; Wagg, J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of the molecular gas in almost all types of environments. However, several shortcomings of CO complicate usaging it as H2 tracer, such as its optical depth effects, the dependence of its abundance on metallicity, or its susceptibility to dissociation in highly irradiated regions. Neutral carbon emission has been proposed to overcome some of these shortcomings and hence to help revealing the limits of CO as a measure of the molecular gas. Aims: We aim to study the general characteristics of the spatially and spectrally resolved carbon line emission in a variety of extragalactic sources and evaluate its potential as complementary H2 tracer to CO. Methods: We used the Atacama Compact Array to map the [CI](3P1-3P0) line emission in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 at unprecedented angular resolution (~3''). This is the first well-resolved interferometric [CI] map of an extragalactic source. Results: We have detected the [CI] line emission at high significance levels along the central disk of NGC 253 and its edges where expanding shells have previously been found in CO. Globally, the distribution of the [CI] line emission strongly resembles that of CO, confirming the results of previous Galactic surveys that [CI] traces the same molecular gas as CO. However, we also identify a significant increase of [CI] line emission with respect to CO in (some of) the outflow or shocked regions of NGC 253, namely the bipolar outflow emerging from the nucleus. A first-order estimate of the [CI] column densities indicates abundances of [CI] that are very similar to the abundance of CO in NGC 253. Interestingly, we find that the [CI] line is marginally optically thick within the disk. Conclusions: The enhancement of the [CI]/CO line ratios (~0.4-0.6) with respect to Galactic values (≤0.1), especially in the shocked regions of NGC 253, clearly indicates that mechanical perturbation such as shocks and the strong radiation

  18. Galex-Gama Near-Ir Observations of ~100K Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffs, Richard

    We propose a MIS survey (59 pointings) with GALEX of the 108 square degrees covered by the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA). GAMA is a multiwavelength (ugrizYJHK FIR/submm) imaging, spectroscopic (370-880nm and 21cm HI) survey of the nearby galaxy population (125k galaxies out to z~0.25), covering 144 sq. deg. of the equatorial sky using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) Dedicated observations of the fields are underway or guaranteed with AAT (66 nights), UKIRT (30 nights), VST (60 nights) VISTA (45 nights) Herschel (200 hours) and the Australian Square Kiliometre Array Pathfinder ASKAP (equivalent one year observing time). Redshifts have already been obtained for 50,271 galaxies in the initial observing campaign during March 2008, The spectroscopic depth of GAMA is well matched to the imaging depth of GALEX in MIS mode for normal spiral galaxies, providing an optimum basis for the study of a deep volume-limited sample of the local population of spiral and dwarf galaxies in the UV to test the CDM paradigm. In particular, the very high redshift density (12 x that of the SDSS) is ideal to probe structure traced by UV-emitting galaxies on the sub Mpc scales on which on which dark matter halos virialize and merge, and baryons decouple, collapse and eventually start forming into the stars detectable in UV light by GALEX in, and around the periphery of, the complex visible structures that are galaxies. In particular, we will be in a position to compare and contrast the UV LF of field galaxies with the LF of galaxies in clusters and groups as a function of the depth of the gravitational potential in the parent dark matter halos, as probed by the dispersion of galaxian velocities in the groups and clusters. This will constrain the efficiency of conversion of baryons into stars as a function of halo mass.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of cD Galaxies and Their Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Côté, Patrick; West, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Minniti, Dante; Rejkuba, Marina

    2004-01-01

    We have used WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain F450W and F814W images of four cD galaxies (NGC 541 in Abell 194, NGC 2832 in Abell 779, NGC 4839 in Abell 1656, and NGC 7768 in Abell 2666) in the range 5400 km s-1<~cz<~8100 km s-1. For NGC 541, the HST data are supplemented by ground-based B and I images obtained with FORS1 on the Very Large Telescope. We present surface brightness and color profiles for each of the four galaxies, confirming their classification as cD galaxies. Isophotal analyses reveal the presence of subarcsecond-scale dust disks in the nuclei of NGC 541 and NGC 7768. Despite the extreme nature of these galaxies in terms of spatial extent and luminosity, our analysis of their globular cluster (GC) systems reveals no anomalies in terms of specific frequencies, metallicity gradients, average metallicities, or the metallicity offset between the globular clusters and the host galaxy. We show that the latter offset appears roughly constant at Δ[Fe/H]~0.8 dex for early-type galaxies spanning a luminosity range of roughly 4 orders of magnitude. We combine the globular cluster metallicity distributions with an empirical technique described in a series of earlier papers to investigate the form of the protogalactic mass spectrum in these cD galaxies. We find that the observed GC metallicity distributions are consistent with those expected if cD galaxies form through the cannibalism of numerous galaxies and protogalactic fragments that formed their stars and globular clusters before capture and disruption. However, the properties of their GC systems suggest that dynamical friction is not the primary mechanism by which these galaxies are assembled. We argue that cD's instead form rapidly, via hierarchical merging, prior to cluster virialization. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc

  20. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughn, Amber; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J.; Cohen, S.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; SOC, WFC3

    2011-01-01

    The Early Release Science II program for HST WFC3 includes one pointing observed with the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R 130) infrared grisms at a depth of 2 orbits/grism. From this data we detect 48 actively star-forming emission-line galaxies and measure the galaxies' redshifts, line fluxes, star-formation rates, and masses. In particular, the prominent emission lines Ha, [OII], and [OIII] fall into the two infrared grism bandpasses over a redshift range z=0.2-3.6, and the majority of galaxies have at least two lines in the observable wavelength range resulting in secure line identification and redshift determination. We detect galaxies with line fluxes to 3 x 10-17 erg/s/cm2 as well as several sources with very high EW lines. The higher spectral resolution and sensitivity of the WFC3 grisms over previous instrumentation also allows detection of other emission lines in some galaxies. The average magnitude of the emission-line galaxy sample is mAB(F098M)=23.6 mag with more than 20% of the sample fainter than mAB(F098M)=25 mag, demonstrating the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and intermediate redshifts. Our results point to the promising potential for future science with WFC3 grism spectroscopy, as well as upcoming missions such as JWST and WFIRST. This paper is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program. This research was supported in part by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at Goddard Space Flight Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA (ANS).

  1. Integral Observations of the Reflection Component of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The data were analyzed by Dr. Fabian's student Adrian Turner and included in his thesis (completed Sept 2004). We did not detect MCG-6 using the then current software and the spectrum of the Circinus galaxy turned out to be even worse then the published BeppoSAX spectrum. We decided not to do any more work on it. We were contacted about the data in March by Thierry Courvoisier (the data were thea public) as he had a student, Simona Soidi, working on a compilation of spectra. Dr. Fabian sent them the chapter from Adrian's thesis and we provided some general comments on what they were doing on 6 objects. This has since been accepted for publication with Fabian as a co-author. A paper on the Integral AGN catalogue appeared on astro-ph a few days ago which contains an detection of MCG-6 with a very poor spectrum. We didn't detect it because the software back then required a source to be detected within something like 30 min exposure in order to work. Integral is NOT very sensitive.

  2. Modeling spatially and spectrally resolved observations to diagnose the formation of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory Frantz

    2013-03-01

    In extragalactic astronomy, a central challenge is that we cannot directly watch what happens to galaxies before and after they are observed. This dissertation focuses on linking predictions of galaxy time-evolution directly with observations, evaluating how interactions, mergers, and other processes affect the appearance of elliptical galaxies. The primary approach is to combine hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, including all major components, with dust radiative transfer to predict their observational signatures The current paradigm implies that a quiescent elliptical emerges following a formative starburst event. These trigger accretion onto the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), which then radiates as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, it is not clear the extent to which SMBH growth is fueled by these events nor how important is their energy input at setting the appearance of the remnant. This thesis presents results drawing from three phases in the formation of a typical elliptical: 1) I evaluate how to disentangle AGN from star formation signatures in mid-infrared spectra during a dust-enshrouded starburst, making testable predictions for robustly tracing SMBH growth with the James Webb Space Telescope; 2) I develop a model for the rate of merger-induced post-starburst galaxies selected from optical spectra, resolving tension between their observed rarity and merger rates from other estimates; and 3) I present results from Hubble Space Telescope imaging of elliptical galaxies in galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 2, the precursors of present-day massive clusters with M ~ 1015 solar masses, demonstrating that their stars formed over an extended period and ruling out the simplest model for their formation history. These results lend support to a stochastic formation history for ellipticals driven by mergers or interactions. However, significant uncertainties remain in how to evaluate the implications of galaxy appearance, in particular their

  3. INTEGRAL and RXTE Observations of Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 3C 111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyakova, M.; Favre, P.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Lutovinov, A.; Molkov, S.; Beckmann, V.; Gros, A.; Gehrels, N.; Prodiut, N.; Walter, R.; Zdziarski, A.

    2004-10-01

    3C 111 is an X-ray bright broad-line radio galaxy which is classified as a Fanaroff-Riley type II source with a double-lobe/single jet morphology, and re- ported superluminal motion. It is a well-known X- ray source, and was observed by every major X-ray observatory since HEAO-1. In this paper we present the results of the RXTE and INTEGRAL data anal- ysis and compare them with the results of the previ- ous observations. Key words: X rays: radio galaxies; X rays: individ- uals: 3C 111.

  4. Origin of cosmic rays. I. Observations of the spiral galaxy NGC 3310

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N.; Seaquist, E.R.; Crane, P.C.; Davis, L.E.

    1986-05-01

    An observational technique is presented for addressing the problem of the origin of cosmic rays in galaxies by determining and comparing the distributions of cosmic rays, stars, and thermal gas. It is argued that optical continuum, emission line, and radio continuum imaging can be used to determine the distributions of the major stellar populations, the ionized gas, and the cosmic rays in galactic disks. An application of the technique is demonstrated by presenting and discussing observations of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3310. A preliminary analysis points to a possible spiral arm origin but argues against conventional models of cosmic-ray production such as supernova remnants. 38 references.

  5. Characterizing ultraviolet and infrared observational properties for galaxies. II. Features of attenuation law

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ye-Wei; Kong, Xu; Lin, Lin E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Variations in the attenuation law have a significant impact on observed spectral energy distributions for galaxies. As one important observational property for galaxies at ultraviolet and infrared wavelength bands, the correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color index (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV relation (or IRX-β relation), offered a widely used formula for correcting dust attenuation in galaxies, but the usability appears to be in doubt now because of considerable dispersion in this relation found by many studies. In this paper, on the basis of spectral synthesis modeling and spatially resolved measurements of four nearby spiral galaxies, we provide an interpretation of the deviation in the IRX-UV relation with variations in the attenuation law. From both theoretical and observational viewpoints, two components in the attenuation curve, the linear background and the 2175 Å bump, are suggested to be the parameters in addition to the stellar population age (addressed in the first paper of this series) in the IRX-UV function; different features in the attenuation curve are diagnosed for the galaxies in our sample. Nevertheless, it is often difficult to ascertain the attenuation law for galaxies in actual observations. Possible reasons for preventing the successful detection of the parameters in the attenuation curve are also discussed in this paper, including the degeneracy of the linear background and the 2175 Å bump in observational channels, the requirement for young and dust-rich systems to study, and the difficulty in accurate estimates of dust attenuations at different wavelength bands.

  6. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  7. Comparing the Observable Properties of Dwarf Galaxies on and off the Andromeda Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-01

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  8. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  9. Herschel observations of Hickson compact groups of galaxies: Unveiling the properties of cold dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Appleton, P. N.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Le Floc'h, E.; da Cunha, E.; Alatalo, K.; Cluver, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a Herschel far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) study of a sample of 120 galaxies in 28 Hickson compact groups (HCGs). Fitting their UV to sub-mm spectral energy distributions with the model of da Cunha et al. (2008), we accurately estimate the dust masses, luminosities, and temperatures of the individual galaxies. We find that nearly half of the late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups, those with more than 25% of early-type members and redder UV-optical colours, also have significantly lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to those of actively star-forming galaxies of the same mass found both in HCGs and in the field. Examining their dust-to-gas mass ratios, we conclude that dust was stripped out of these systems as a result of the gravitational and hydrodynamic interactions, experienced owing to previous encounters with other group members. About 40% of the early-type galaxies (mostly lenticulars), in dynamically "old" groups, display dust properties similar to those of the UV-optical red late-type galaxies. Given their stellar masses, star formation rates, and UV-optical colours, we suggest that red late-type and dusty lenticular galaxies represent transition populations between blue star-forming disk galaxies and quiescent early-type ellipticals. On the other hand, both the complete absence of any correlation between the dust and stellar masses of the dusty ellipticals and their enhanced star formation activity, suggest the increase in their gas and dust content due to accretion and merging. Our deep Herschel observations also allow us to detect the presence of diffuse cold intragroup dust in 4 HCGs. We also find that the fraction of 250 μm emission that is located outside of the main bodies of both the red late-type galaxies and the dusty lenticulars is 15-20% of their integrated emission at this band. All these findings are consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which gas dissipation, shocks, and turbulence, in addition to

  10. Deep Fabry-Perot Hα observations of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marcelin, M.; Epinat, B.; Carignan, C.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.-M.; Daigle, O.; Hernandez, O.

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse ionized gas can extend all the way to the end of the H I disc, and even beyond, such as in the case of the warped galaxyNGC 253 (Bland-Hawthorn et al.). Detecting ionized gas at these radii could carry significant implications as to the distribution of dark matter in galaxies. With the aim of detecting this gas, we carried out a deep Hα kinematical analysis of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300. The Fabry-Perot data were taken at the 36-cm Marseille Telescope in La Silla, Chile, offering a large field of view. With almost 20 hours of observations for each galaxy, very faint diffuse emission is detected. Typical emission measures of 0.1 cm-6 pc are reached. For NGC 247, emission extending up to a radius comparable with that of the H I disc (r˜ 13 arcmin) is found, but no emission is seen beyond the H I disc. For NGC 300, we detect ionized gas on the entirety of our field of view (rmax˜ 14 arcmin), and find that the bright H II regions are embedded in a diffuse background. Using the deep data, extended optical rotation curves are obtained, as well as mass models. These are the most extended optical rotation curves thus far for these galaxies. We find no evidence suggesting that NGC 247 has a warped disc, and to account for our non-detection of Hα emission beyond its H I disc, as opposed to the warped galaxy NGC 253, our results favour the model in which, only through a warp, ionization by hot young stars in the central region of a galaxy can let photons escape and ionize the interstellar medium in the outer parts.

  11. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  12. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - I. New observations of neutral and ionized gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (H I) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for 16 galaxies in the statistically representative Extended Disk Galaxy Explore Science kinematic sample. H I rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The H I rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in 12 galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  13. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; Dinerstein, H.; Thronson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  14. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  15. Extending ALFALFA: Reducing L-Band Wide Observations of Optically Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster were completed at the Arecibo Observatory in the spring and summer of 2015. 161 targets were observed, selected by photometry criteria such as magnitude and shape from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The targets, some too dim to be detected by Arecibo's ALFA drift scanner, were observed with the L-Band Wide detector. Once reductions in an IDL environment were done, these data were matched to the targets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the GALEX/MAST catalog. 115 of the 161 targets observed had positive detections, a 71% success rate. Comparing the galaxies that were detected against the galaxies that were not detected (by the L-Band Wide receiver) will allow us to refine our method of using photometric data to select HI-rich galaxies in the 2000 km/s to 9000 km/s range to refine our selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS), which uses the same method of target selection.

  16. Galaxies, AGN, and Environment at z=1: IRAC observations of DEEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Hickox, Ryan; Bundy, Kevin; Coil, Alison; Cool, Richard; Cooper, Michael; Croton, Darren; Davis, Marc; Eisenhardt, Peter; Eisenstein, Daniel; Faber, Sandy; Forman, William; Koo, David; Murray, Stephen; Papovich, Casey; Stern, Daniel; Weiner, Benjamin; Willmer, Christopher; Willner, Steven

    2008-03-01

    The Spitzer view of the z=1 Universe is spectroscopy starved. Only 5 sq. deg. of the sky have been surveyed with very deep (24th mag) spectroscopy that probes z>1 galaxies, and only about half of this area has been observed with Spitzer. Cosmic variance is severe even at z>1 and limits our ability to measure the evolution of galaxies and AGN at these epochs. DEEP2 is the premier z>1 wide-field survey, but only 1.5 sq. deg. of it has Spitzer coverage. Here we propose to more than double the overlap between Spitzer and DEEP2, with IRAC coverage of two fields that contain ~16,000 high-quality Keck spectra of galaxies at 0.7observed with Chandra. With these data we will study the distribution of stellar mass, star formation, and dark matter halo masses (via clustering) in diverse types of galaxies and AGN, across a wide range of environments, as a function of redshift. IRAC data will provide robust stellar masses (especially for blue galaxies) and allow us to identify at least 50% more AGN than are found in the X-ray and optical bands alone, revealing a unbiased view of the AGN population to high levels of obscuration. We will use the dense DEEP2 sampling to determine small-scale environments and clustering of galaxies and AGN as a function of stellar mass, color and luminosity. We will also be able to compare IRAC-based stellar masses with DEEP2 dynamical masses. The proposed observations will increase the overlap between IRAC and DEEP2 by a factor of 2.3. This will greatly increase the statistical power of the survey, reduce cosmic variance, and allow measurements of environment and clustering in multiple bins of AGN luminosity or stellar mass, needed to constrain galaxy and AGN evolution models. DEEP2 is the only survey that provides high-quality galaxy spectra and precise redshifts over a large volume at high redshift; these observations will therefore produce a lasting legacy dataset for

  17. Interferometric observations of molecular clouds in the Andromeda galaxy (M31)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.

    The study of the molecular component of the ISM in galaxies is crucial to our understanding of their structure and dynamics. Carbon monoxyde remains the best tracer of this cold molecular matter. A complete survey of the Andromeda galaxy in CO(1-0) at 115 GHz has now been completed with the IRAM 30m telescope. In addition, high--angular resolution, high--sensitivity interferometric observations of selected fields have been obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. The dynamical mass of molecular complexes can then be estimated with the virial theorem, and compared to the mass derived from the CO luminosity using the magic conversion factor X = NH2 / WCO.

  18. Observations of Very Metal-Poor Stars in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, Timothy C.

    2008-05-21

    I report on recent results from observations of stars with metallicities [Fe/H]{<=}-2.0. These include a substantial new sample of objects with high-resolution observations obtained as part of a follow-up of the HK Survey, The Hamburg/ESO Survey, and the ongoing survey SEGUE: Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. Perspectives on the next directions are also provided.

  19. Near-Infrared Faint Galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field: Comparing the Theory with Observations for Galaxy Counts, Colors, and Size Distributions to K ~ 24.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Maihara, Toshinori; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Motohara, Kentaro

    2001-10-01

    Galaxy counts in the K band, (J-K) colors, and apparent size distributions of faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) down to K~24.5 were studied in detail. Special attention has been paid to take into account various selection effects, including the cosmological dimming of surface brightness, to avoid any systematic bias that may be the origin of controversy in previously published results. We also tried to be very careful about systematic model uncertainties; we present a comprehensive survey of these systematic uncertainties and dependence on various parameters, and we have shown that the dominant factors to determine galaxy counts in this band are cosmology and number evolution. We found that the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model is very consistent with all the SDF data down to K~22.5, without any evidence for number or size evolution in a low-density, Λ-dominated flat universe, which is now favored by various cosmological observations. On the other hand, a number evolution of galaxies with η~2, when invoked as the luminosity conserving mergers as φ*~(1+z)η and L*~(1+z)-η for all types of galaxies, is necessary to explain the data in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. If the popular Λ-dominated universe is taken for granted, our result then gives a strong constraint on the number evolution of giant elliptical or early-type galaxies to z~1-2 that must be met by any models in the hierarchically clustering universe, since such galaxies are the dominant population in this magnitude range (K<~22.5). A number evolution with η~1 is already difficult to reconcile with the data in this universe. On the other hand, number evolution of late-type galaxies and/or dwarf galaxies, which has been suggested by previous studies of optical galaxies, is allowed from the data. In the fainter magnitude range of K>~22.5, we found a slight excess of observed counts over the prediction of the PLE model when elliptical galaxies are treated as a single population. We

  20. OBSERVATIONAL LIMITS ON THE GAS MASS OF A z = 4.9 GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Livermore, R. C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Bower, R. G.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Edge, A. C.; Geach, J. E.; Richard, J.; Crain, R. A.

    2012-10-20

    We present the results of a search for molecular gas emission from a star-forming galaxy at z = 4.9. The galaxy benefits from magnification of 22 {+-} 5 Multiplication-Sign due to strong gravitational lensing by the foreground cluster MS1358+62. We target the CO(5-4) emission at a known position and redshift from existing Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and Gemini/NIFS [O II]3727 imaging spectroscopy, and obtain a tentative detection at the 4.3{sigma} level with a flux of 0.104 {+-} 0.024 Jy km s{sup -1}. From the CO line luminosity and assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor {alpha} = 2, we derive a gas mass M{sub gas} {approx} 1{sup +1}{sub -0.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Combined with the existing data, we derive a gas fraction M{sub gas}/(M{sub gas} + M{sub *}) = 0.59{sup +0.11}{sub -0.06}. The faint line flux of this galaxy highlights the difficulty of observing molecular gas in representative galaxies at this epoch, and suggests that routine detections of similar galaxies in the absence of gravitational lensing will remain challenging even with ALMA in full science operations.

  1. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  2. Chandra and Very Large Array Observations of the Nearby Sd Galaxy NGC 45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Laine, Seppo; Schlegel, Eric M.; Lacey, Christina K.; Moffitt, William P.; Sharma, Biswas; Lackey-Stewart, Aaron M.; Kosakowski, Alekzander R.; Filipović, Miroslav D.; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of high angular resolution observations made in the X-ray and the radio with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), respectively, of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 45. This galaxy is the third that we have considered in a study of the supernova remnant (SNR) populations of nearby spiral galaxies and the present work represents the first detailed analysis of the discrete X-ray and radio source populations of this galaxy. We analyzed data sets from the three pointed observations made of this galaxy with Chandra along with a merged data set obtained from combining these data sets: the total effective exposure time of the merged data set is 63515 s. A total of 25 discrete X-ray sources are found in the entire field of view of the ACIS-S3 chip, with 16 sources found within the visual extent of the galaxy. We estimate that as many as half of the sources detected in the entire field of view of the ACIS-S3 chip and seven of the sources detected in the optical extent of NGC 45 may be background sources. We analyzed the spectral properties of the discrete X-ray sources within the galaxy and conclude that the majority of these sources are X-ray binaries. We have searched for counterparts at different wavelengths to the discrete X-ray sources and we find two associations: one with a star cluster and the other with a background galaxy. We have found one source that is clearly variable within one observation and seven that are seen to vary from one observation to another. We also conduct a photometric analysis to determine the near-infrared fluxes of the discrete X-ray sources in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera channels. We constructed a cumulative luminosity function of the discrete X-ray sources seen toward NGC 45: taking into account simultaneously the luminosity function of background sources, the fitted slope of the cumulative luminosity function Γ = -1.3{}-1.6+0.7 (all error bounds correspond to 90% confidence

  3. Emission Line Galaxies in the STIS Parallel Survey. 1; Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don J.; Rhodes, Jason; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    In the first three years of operation STIS obtained slitless spectra of approximately 2500 fields in parallel to prime HST observations as part of the STIS Parallel Survey (SPS). The archive contains approximately 300 fields at high galactic latitude (|b| greater than 30) with spectroscopic exposure times greater than 3000 seconds. This sample contains 220 fields (excluding special regions and requiring a consistent grating angle) observed between 6 June 1997 and 21 September 2000, with a total survey area of approximately 160 square arcminutes. At this depth, the SPS detects an average of one emission line galaxy per three fields. We present the analysis of these data, and the identification of 131 low to intermediate redshift galaxies detected by optical emission lines. The sample contains 78 objects with emission lines that we infer to be redshifted [OII]3727 emission at 0.43 < z < 1.7. The comoving number density of these objects is comparable to that of Halpha-emitting galaxies in the NICMOS parallel observations. One quasar and three probable Seyfert galaxies are detected. Many of the emission-line objects show morphologies suggestive of mergers or interactions. The reduced data are available upon request from the authors.

  4. Discordance of the unified scheme with observed properties of quasars and high-excitation galaxies in the 3CRR sample

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2014-07-01

    We examine the consistency of the unified scheme of Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and quasars with their observed number and size distributions in the 3CRR sample. We separate the low-excitation galaxies from the high-excitation ones, as the former might not harbor a quasar within and thus may not be partaking in the unified scheme models. In the updated 3CRR sample, at low redshifts (z < 0.5), the relative number and luminosity distributions of high-excitation galaxies and quasars roughly match the expectations from the orientation-based unified scheme model. However, a foreshortening in the observed sizes of quasars, which is a must in the orientation-based model, is not seen with respect to radio galaxies even when the low-excitation galaxies are excluded. This dashes the hope that the unified scheme might still work if one includes only the high-excitation galaxies.

  5. Star Formation and Extinction in Redshift z~2 Galaxies: Inferences from Spitzer MIPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Fadda, Dario; Yan, Lin; Pettini, Max; Shapley, Alice E.; Erb, Dawn K.; Adelberger, Kurt L.

    2006-06-01

    We use very deep Spitzer MIPS 24 μm observations to examine the bolometric luminosities (Lbol) and UV extinction properties of more than 200 spectroscopically identified, optically selected (UnGR) z~2 galaxies, supplemented with near-IR-selected (``BzK'' and ``DRG'') and submillimeter galaxies at similar redshifts, in the GOODS-N field. Focusing on redshifts 1.5observations measure the strength of the mid-IR PAH feature, we find that the rest-frame 5-8.5 μm luminosities (L5-8.5μm) are particularly tightly constrained for objects in our sample with precise spectroscopic redshifts. We demonstrate, using stacked X-ray observations and a subset of galaxies with Hα measurements, that L5-8.5μm provides a reliable estimate of LIR for most star-forming galaxies at z~2. We show that the range of LIR in the optical/near-IR-selected samples considered extends from ~=1010 to >1012 Lsolar, with a mean ~=2×1011 Lsolar. Using 24 μm observations as an independent probe of dust extinction, we find that, as in the local universe, the obscuration LIR/L1600 is strongly dependent on Lbol and ranges in value from <1 to ~1000 within the sample considered. However, the obscuration is generally ~10 times smaller at a given Lbol at z~2 than at z~0. We show that the values of LIR and obscuration inferred from the UV spectral slope β generally agree well with the values inferred from L5-8.5μm for Lbol<1012 Lsolar. Using the specific SFRs of galaxies as a proxy for cold gas fraction, we find a wide range in the evolutionary state of galaxies at z~2, from galaxies that have just begun to form stars to those that have already accumulated most of their stellar mass and are about to become, or already are, passively evolving. Based, in part, on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous

  6. Warp of the ionized gas layer in the outer Galaxy, traced by recombination line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, I. N.; Cersosimo, J. C.

    We report results of H166α recombination line observations from the outer Galaxy in both the Northern and Southern Galactic Plane. The Southern observations were made with the 30 m antenna of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía in Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the Northern ones ( more sensitive, high quality observations, performed with an ``state of the art'' receiver) with the 43 m antenna of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, in Green Bank, West Virginia, USA. >From the two sets of observations we obtain evidence of the warp of the low-density ionized gas layer, traced by the H166α emission in the outer Milky Way, towards positive galactic latitudes in the Northern and towards negative latitudes in the Southern Galaxy. The warp of this tracer qualitatively agrees with that of the HI.

  7. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  8. A deep Chandra observation of the interacting star-forming galaxy Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, K.; Zezas, A.; Ballo, L.; Della Ceca, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from a 90 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the X-ray luminous interacting galaxy system Arp 299 (NGC 3690/IC 694). We detect 25 discrete X-ray sources with luminosities above ˜4.0 × 1038 erg s-1 covering the entire Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX) regime. Based on the hard X-ray spectra of the non-nuclear discrete sources identified in Arp 299, and their association with young, actively star-forming region of Arp 299 we identify them as HMXBs. We find in total 20 off-nuclear sources with luminosities above the ULX limit, 14 of which are point-like sources. Furthermore we observe a marginally significant deficit in the number of ULXs, with respect to the number expected from scaling relations of X-ray binaries with the star formation rate (SFR). Although the high metallicity of the galaxy could result in lower ULX numbers, the good agreement between the observed total X-ray luminosity of ULXs, and that expected from the relevant scaling relation indicates that this deficit could be the result of confusion effects. The integrated spectrum of the galaxy shows the presence of a hot gaseous component with kT = 0.72 ± 0.03 keV, contributing ˜20 per cent of the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) unabsorbed luminosity of the galaxy. A plume of soft X-ray emission in the west of the galaxy indicates a large scale outflow. We find that the AGN in NGC 3690 contributes only 22 per cent of the observed broad-band X-ray luminosity of Arp 299.

  9. A deep Chandra observation of the interacting star-forming galaxy Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, K.; Zezas, A.; Ballo, L.; Della Ceca, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from a 90 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the X-ray luminous interacting galaxy system Arp 299 (NGC 3690/IC 694). We detect 25 discrete X-ray sources with luminosities above ˜4.0 × 1038 erg s-1 covering the entire Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX) regime. Based on the hard X-ray spectra of the non-nuclear discrete sources identified in Arp 299, and their association with young, actively star-forming region of Arp 299 we identify them as HMXBs. We find in total 20 off-nuclear sources with luminosities above the ULX limit, 14 of which are point-like sources. Furthermore we observe a marginally significant deficit in the number of ULXs, with respect to the number expected from scaling relations of X-ray binaries with the star formation rate (SFR). Although the high metalicity of the galaxy could result in lower ULX numbers, the good agreement between the observed total X-ray luminosity of ULXs, and that expected from the relevant scaling relation indicates that this deficit could be the result of confusion effects. The integrated spectrum of the galaxy shows the presence of a hot gaseous component with kT = 0.72 ± 0.03 keV, contributing ˜20% of the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) unabsorbed luminosity of the galaxy. A plume of soft X-ray emission in the west of the galaxy indicates a large scale outflow. We find that the AGN in NGC 3690 contributes only 22% of the observed broad-band X-ray luminosity of Arp 299.

  10. Predictions for the 21 cm-galaxy cross-power spectrum observable with LOFAR and Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrbanec, Dijana; Ciardi, Benedetta; Jelić, Vibor; Jensen, Hannes; Zaroubi, Saleem; Fernandez, Elizabeth R.; Ghosh, Abhik; Iliev, Ilian T.; Kakiichi, Koki; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Mellema, Garrelt

    2016-03-01

    The 21 cm-galaxy cross-power spectrum is expected to be one of the promising probes of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), as it could offer information about the progress of reionization and the typical scale of ionized regions at different redshifts. With upcoming observations of 21 cm emission from the EoR with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), and of high-redshift Ly α emitters with Subaru's Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), we investigate the observability of such cross-power spectrum with these two instruments, which are both planning to observe the ELAIS-N1 field at z = 6.6. In this paper, we use N-body + radiative transfer (both for continuum and Ly α photons) simulations at redshift 6.68, 7.06 and 7.3 to compute the 3D theoretical 21 cm-galaxy cross-power spectrum and cross-correlation function, as well as to predict the 2D 21 cm-galaxy cross-power spectrum and cross-correlation function expected to be observed by LOFAR and HSC. Once noise and projection effects are accounted for, our predictions of the 21 cm-galaxy cross-power spectrum show clear anti-correlation on scales larger than ˜60 h-1 Mpc (corresponding to k ˜ 0.1 h Mpc-1), with levels of significance p = 0.003 at z = 6.6 and p = 0.08 at z = 7.3. On smaller scales, instead, the signal is completely contaminated. On the other hand, our 21 cm-galaxy cross-correlation function is strongly contaminated by noise on all scales, since the noise is no longer being separated by its k modes.

  11. Relative merits of different types of rest-frame optical observations to constrain galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Charlot, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2012-04-01

    We present a new approach to constrain galaxy physical parameters from the combined interpretation of stellar and nebular emission in wide ranges of observations. This approach relies on the Bayesian analysis of any type of galaxy spectral energy distribution using a comprehensive library of synthetic spectra assembled using state-of-the-art models of star formation and chemical enrichment histories, stellar population synthesis, nebular emission and attenuation by dust. We focus on the constraints set by five-band ugriz photometry and low- and medium-resolution spectroscopy at rest wavelengths λ= 3600-7400 Å on a few physical parameters of galaxies: the observer-frame absolute r-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, M*/Lr; the fraction of a current galaxy stellar mass formed during the last 2.5 Gyr, fSFH; the specific star formation rate, ψS; the gas-phase oxygen abundance, 12 + log(O/H); the total effective V-band absorption optical depth of the dust, ?; and the fraction of this arising from dust in the ambient interstellar medium, μ. Since these parameters cannot be known a priori for any galaxy sample, we assess the accuracy to which they can be retrieved from observations by simulating 'pseudo-observations' using models with known parameters. Assuming that these models are good approximations of true galaxies, we find that the combined analysis of stellar and nebular emission in low-resolution [50 Å full width at half-maximum (FWHM)] galaxy spectra provides valuable constraints on all physical parameters. The typical uncertainties in high-quality spectra are about 0.13 dex for M*/Lr, 0.23 for fSFH, 0.24 dex for ψS, 0.28 for 12 + log(O/H), 0.64 for ? and 0.16 for μ. The uncertainties in 12 + log(O/H) and ? tighten by about 20 per cent for galaxies with detectable emission lines and by another 45 per cent when the spectral resolution is increased to 5 Å FWHM. At this spectral resolution, the analysis of the combined stellar and nebular emission in the high

  12. Chandra Observations of Gas Stripping in the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 4552 in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, M.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Nulsen, P.

    2006-06-01

    We use a 54.4 ks Chandra observation to study ram pressure stripping in NGC 4552 (M89), an elliptical galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. Chandra images in the 0.5-2 keV band show a sharp leading edge in the surface brightness 3.1 kpc north of the galaxy center, a cool (kT=0.51+0.09-0.06 keV) tail with mean density ne~(5.4+/-1.7)×10-3 cm-3 extending ~10 kpc to the south of the galaxy, and two 3-4 kpc horns of emission extending southward away from the leading edge. These are all features characteristic of supersonic ram pressure stripping of galaxy gas, due to NGC 4552's motion through the surrounding Virgo ICM. Fitting the surface brightness profile and spectra across the leading edge, we find the galaxy gas inside the edge is cooler (kT=0.43+0.03-0.02 keV) and denser (ne~0.010 cm-3) than the surrounding Virgo ICM [kT=2.2+0.7-0.4 keV and ne=(3.0+/-0.3)×10-4 cm-3]. The resulting pressure ratio between the free-streaming ICM and cluster gas at the stagnation point is ~7.6+3.4-2.0 for galaxy gas metallicities of 0.5+0.5-0.3 Zsolar, which suggests that NGC 4552 is moving supersonically through the cluster with a velocity v~1680+390-220 km s-1 (Mach 2.2+0.5-0.3) at an angle ξ~35deg+/-7deg toward us with respect to the plane of the sky.

  13. Velocities of warm galactic outflows from synthetic Hα observations of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Arribas, Santiago; Colina, Luis; Rodríguez Del Pino, Bruno; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel

    2016-08-01

    The velocity structure imprinted in the H{\\alpha} emission line profiles contains valuable information about galactic outflows. Using a set of high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies at z=2, we generate H{\\alpha} emission line profiles, taking into account the temperature-dependent H{\\alpha} emissivity, as well as dust extinction. The H{\\alpha} line can be described as a sum of two gaussians, as typically done with observations. In general, its properties are in good agreement with those observed in local isolated galaxies with similar masses and star formation rates, assuming a spatially constant clumping factor of c=24. Blueshifted outflows are very common in the sample. They extend several kpc above the galaxy discs. They are also spread over the full extent of the discs. However, at small radii, the material with high velocities tends to remain confined within a thick disc, as part of galactic fountains or a turbulent medium, most probably due to the deeper gravitational potential at the galaxy centre.

  14. The Milky Way Bulge: Observed Properties and a Comparison to External Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Gadotti, Dimitri

    The Milky Way bulge offers a unique opportunity to investigate in detail the role that different processes such as dynamical instabilities, hierarchical merging, and dissipational collapse may have played in the history of the Galaxy formation and evolution based on its resolved stellar population properties. Large observation programs and surveys of the bulge are providing for the first time a look into the global view of the Milky Way bulge that can be compared with the bulges of other galaxies, and be used as a template for detailed comparison with models. The Milky Way has been shown to have a boxy/peanut (B/P) bulge and recent evidence seems to suggest the presence of an additional spheroidal component. In this review we summarize the global chemical abundances, kinematics and structural properties that allow us to disentangle these multiple components and provide constraints to understand their origin. The investigation of both detailed and global properties of the bulge now provide us with the opportunity to characterize the bulge as observed in models, and to place the mixed component bulge scenario in the general context of external galaxies. When writing this review, we considered the perspectives of researchers working with the Milky Way and researchers working with external galaxies. It is an attempt to approach both communities for a fruitful exchange of ideas.

  15. Velocities of warm galactic outflows from synthetic Hα observations of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Arribas, Santiago; Colina, Luis; Rodríguez Del Pino, Bruno; Dekel, Avishai; Primack, Joel

    2016-08-01

    The velocity structure imprinted in the Hα emission line profiles contains valuable information about galactic outflows. Using a set of high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies at z ≃ 2, we generate Hα emission line profiles, taking into account the temperature-dependent Hα emissivity, as well as dust extinction. The Hα line can be described as a sum of two Gaussians, as typically done with observations. In general, its properties are in good agreement with those observed in local isolated galaxies with similar masses and star formation rates, assuming a spatially constant clumping factor of c ≃ 24. Blueshifted outflows are very common in the sample. They extend several kpc above the galaxy discs. They are also spread over the full extent of the discs. However, at small radii, the material with high velocities tends to remain confined within a thick disc, as part of galactic fountains or a turbulent medium, most probably due to the deeper gravitational potential at the galaxy centre.

  16. VALIDATION OF THE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION TO z ∼ 3 THROUGH MOLECULAR GAS AND DUST OBSERVATIONS OF LENSED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Saintonge, Amélie; Lutz, Dieter; Genzel, Reinhard; Tacconi, Linda J.; Berta, Stefano; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sturm, Eckhard; Wuyts, Eva; Wuyts, Stijn; Magnelli, Benjamin; Nordon, Raanan; Baker, Andrew J.; Bandara, Kaushala

    2013-11-20

    We combine IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements to study the dust and gas contents of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We present new observations for a sample of 17 lensed galaxies at z = 1.4-3.1, which allow us to directly probe the cold interstellar medium of normal star-forming galaxies with stellar masses of ∼10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, a regime otherwise not (yet) accessible by individual detections in Herschel and molecular gas studies. The lensed galaxies are combined with reference samples of submillimeter and normal z ∼ 1-2 star-forming galaxies with similar far-infrared photometry to study the gas and dust properties of galaxies in the SFR-M{sub *}-redshift parameter space. The mean gas depletion timescale of main-sequence (MS) galaxies at z > 2 is measured to be only ∼450 Myr, a factor of ∼1.5 (∼5) shorter than at z = 1 (z = 0), in agreement with a (1 + z){sup –1} scaling. The mean gas mass fraction at z = 2.8 is 40% ± 15% (44% after incompleteness correction), suggesting a flattening or even a reversal of the trend of increasing gas fractions with redshift recently observed up to z ∼ 2. The depletion timescale and gas fractions of the z > 2 normal star-forming galaxies can be explained under the 'equilibrium model' for galaxy evolution, in which the gas reservoir of galaxies is the primary driver of the redshift evolution of specific star formation rates. Due to their high star formation efficiencies and low metallicities, the z > 2 lensed galaxies have warm dust despite being located on the star formation MS. At fixed metallicity, they also have a gas-to-dust ratio 1.7 times larger than observed locally when using the same standard techniques, suggesting that applying the local calibration of the δ{sub GDR}-metallicity relation to infer the molecular gas mass of high-redshift galaxies may lead to systematic differences with CO-based estimates.

  17. Consequences of bursty star formation on galaxy observables at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Alberto; Siana, Brian; Brooks, Alyson M.; Christensen, Charlotte R.; Bruzual, Gustavo; Stark, Daniel P.; Alavi, Anahita

    2015-07-01

    The star formation histories (SFHs) of dwarf galaxies are thought to be bursty, with large - order of magnitude - changes in the star formation rate on time-scales similar to O-star lifetimes. As a result, the standard interpretations of many galaxy observables (which assume a slowly varying SFH) are often incorrect. Here, we use the SFHs from hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of bursty SFHs on sample selection and interpretation of observables and make predictions to confirm such SFHs in future surveys. First, because dwarf galaxies' star formation rates change rapidly, the mass-to-light ratio is also changing rapidly in both the ionizing continuum and, to a lesser extent, the non-ionizing ultraviolet continuum. Therefore, flux limited surveys are highly biased towards selecting galaxies in the burst phase and very deep observations are required to detect all dwarf galaxies at a given stellar mass. Second, we show that a log10[νLν(1500 Å)/LHα] > 2.5 implies a very recent quenching of star formation and can be used as evidence of stellar feedback regulating star formation. Third, we show that the ionizing continuum can be significantly higher than when assuming a constant SFH, which can affect the interpretation of nebular emission line equivalent widths and direct ionizing continuum detections. Finally, we show that a star formation rate estimate based on continuum measurements only (and not on nebular tracers such as the hydrogen Balmer lines) will not trace the rapid changes in star formation and will give the false impression of a star-forming main sequence with low dispersion.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array Observations of the H2O Gigamaser Galaxy TXS 2226-184.

    PubMed

    Falcke; Wilson; Henkel; Brunthaler; Braatz

    2000-02-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Wide-Field and Planetary Camera 2 images in Halpha + [N ii] lambdalambda6548, 6583 lines and continuum radiation and a VLA map at 8 GHz of the H2O gigamaser galaxy TXS 2226-184. This galaxy has the most luminous H2O maser emission known to date. Our red continuum images reveal a highly elongated galaxy with a dust lane crossing the nucleus. The surface brightness profile is best fitted by a bulge plus exponential disk model, favoring classification as a highly inclined spiral galaxy (i=70&j0;). The color map confirms that the dust lane is aligned with the galaxy major axis and is crossing the putative nucleus. The Halpha + [N ii] map exhibits a gaseous, jetlike structure perpendicular to the nuclear dust lane and the galaxy major axis. The radio map shows compact, steep spectrum emission that is elongated in the same direction as the Halpha + [N ii] emission. By analogy with Seyfert galaxies, we therefore suspect that this alignment reflects an interaction between the radio jet and the interstellar medium. The axes of the nuclear dust disk, the radio emission, and the optical line emission apparently define the axis of the active galactic nucleus. The observations suggest that in this galaxy the nuclear accretion disk, obscuring torus, and large-scale molecular gas layer are roughly coplanar. Our classification of the host galaxy strengthens the trend for megamasers to be found preferentially in highly inclined spiral galaxies. PMID:10642194

  19. Hitomi observations of the Perseus Cluster / Constant metallicity in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Norbert; Simionescu, Aurora; Urban, Ondrej; Allen, Steven

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations with the Suzaku satellite reveal a remarkably homogeneous distribution of iron out to the virial radii of nearby galaxy clusters. Observations of the Virgo Cluster, that also allow us to measure the abundances of Si, S, and Mg out to the outskirts, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales. These observations require that most of the metal enrichment and mixing of the intergalactic medium occurred before clusters formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. We estimate the ratio between the number of SN Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 15-20%, generally consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy.

  20. Molecular Carbon in the Galaxy: Laboratory and Observational Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saykally, Richard James

    2003-01-01

    In a collaboration with the Mats Larsson group from Stockholm, we carried out a new measurement of the rate of dissociative recombination of H(sup *, sub j), using a new pulsed supersonic beam source of rotationally cold H(sup *, sub j). This source was first designed and characterized in our lab by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy, determining a rotationaYtranslationa1 temperature of 20-60K, depending on conditions. This new source was then taken to Stockholm for the recombination rate studies at the CRYRING storage ring. The recombination rate constant measured against temperature yields values consistent with the most recent calculations, whereas previous experimental measurements varied over a range of 10(exp 4) and were poor agreement with theory. This is a crucial achievement for understanding the ion chemistry of diffuse clouds. Moreover, this result in combination with recent observations implies a greatly enhanced (factor of 40) cosmic ray ionization rate in a diffuse cloud (zeta Persei) relative to previous studies. The implications of this are discussed in our recent Nature paper. An enhanced cosmic-ray flux towards zeta Persei inferred from a laboratory study of the H(sup *, sub j)-e(sup -) recombination rate.

  1. Ancient light from young cosmic cities: Physical and observational signatures of galaxy proto-clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Overzier, Roderik; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-12-20

    A growing number of galaxy clusters at z = 1-2 is being discovered as part of deep optical, IR, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect surveys. For a complete picture of cluster formation, however, it is important that we also start probing the much earlier epoch, between redshifts of about 2 and 7, during which these clusters and their galaxies first began to form. Because the study of these so-called proto-clusters is currently quite limited by small number statistics, widely varying selection techniques, and many assumptions, we have performed a large systematic study of cluster formation utilizing cosmological simulations. We use the Millennium Simulations to track the evolution of dark matter and galaxies in about 3000 clusters from the earliest times to z = 0. We define an effective radius R{sub e} for proto-clusters and characterize their growth in size and mass with cosmic time. We show that the progenitor regions of galaxy clusters (ranging in mass from ∼10{sup 14} to a few times 10{sup 15} M {sub ☉}) can already be identified in galaxy surveys at very early times (at least up to z ∼ 5), provided that the galaxy overdensities are measured on a sufficiently large scale (R{sub e} ∼ 5-10 Mpc comoving) and with sufficient statistics. We present the overdensities in matter, dark matter halos, and galaxies as functions of present-day cluster mass, redshift, bias, and window size that can be used to interpret the wide range of structures found in real surveys. We also derive the probability that a structure having a galaxy overdensity δ{sub gal}, defined by a set of observational selection criteria, is indeed a proto-cluster, and we show how their z = 0 masses can already be estimated long before virialization. We present overdensity profiles as a function of radius, and we further show how the projected surface overdensities of proto-clusters decrease as the uncertainties in redshift measurements increase. We provide a table of proto-cluster candidates

  2. LBT/LUCIFER OBSERVATIONS OF THE z {approx} 2 LENSED GALAXY J0900+2234

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Bechtold, Jill; McGreer, Ian D.; Just, Dennis W.; Sand, David J.; Green, Richard F.; Thompson, David; Peng, Chien Y.; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy; Buschkamp, Peter; Juette, Marcus; Knierim, Volker

    2010-12-20

    We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z = 2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared (NIR) instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope. We fitted lens models to the rest-frame optical images and found that the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 {+-} 0.8 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame spectra covered by the H + K band, we detected H{beta}, [O III], H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction toward the ionized H II regions (E{sub g} (B - V)) was computed from the flux ratio of H{alpha} and H{beta} and appears to be much higher than that toward the stellar continuum (E{sub s} (B - V)), derived from the optical and NIR broadband photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5 - 1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than for typical z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of [S II]{lambda}6717 and [S II]{lambda}6732, we found that the electron number density of the H II regions in the high-z galaxy was {approx_equal}1000 cm{sup -3}, consistent with other z {approx} 2 galaxies but much higher than that in local H II regions. The star formation rate was estimated via the H{alpha} luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365 {+-} 69 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Combining the FWHM of H{alpha} emission lines and the half-light radius, we found that the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is (5.8 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. The gas mass is (5.1 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} from the H{alpha} flux surface density

  3. Herschel+Hubble Observations of a Multiply-Lensed Sub-millimeter Galaxy at z~3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, Hooshang; Cooray, Asantha R.; Calanog, Jae Alyson B.; Riechers, Dominik A.; Frayer, David T.; Herschel HERMES, H-ATLAS

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our deep Keck/NIRC2 and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations of an extremely star forming lensed dusty Sub-Millimeter Galaxy (SMG) identified from the Herschel Astrohysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). The object under study forms a complex lensing system that consists of four foreground aligned galaxies at z ~ 1 (measured from Keck/DEIMOS observations) with multiple lensing features that consist of giant arcs and counter images. Molecular line observations of the background source with Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) put it at a redshift of 2.685. Multi-band data from Keck, HST and Herschel yields a Star Formation Rate in excess of 1000 Solar masses per year putting this system among the most intensely star forming systems at z>2. The measured SFR puts this system well above the main sequence of star forming galaxies at z ~ 3. The measured gas fraction and molecular gas surface density measurements from long wavelength observations are consistent with theoretical models and observational trends of gas rich SMGs at high redshifts.

  4. H I OBSERVATIONS OF THE Ca II ABSORBING GALAXIES Mrk 1456 AND SDSS J211701.26-002633.7

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2009-12-15

    In an effort to study Damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) galaxies at low redshift, we have been using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify galaxies projected onto quasi-stellar object (QSO) sight lines and to characterize their optical properties. For low-redshift galaxies, the H I 21 cm emission line can be used as an alternate tool for identifying possible DLA galaxies, since H I-emitting galaxies typically exhibit H I columns that are larger than the classical DLA limit. Here, we report on follow-up H I 21 cm emission-line observations of two DLA candidates that are both low-redshift spiral galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7. The observations were made using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Arecibo telescope, respectively. Analysis of their H I properties reveal the galaxies to be about one and two M*{sub HI} galaxies, respectively, and to have average H I mass, gas richness, and gas-mass fraction for their morphological types. We consider Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 to be candidate DLA systems based upon the strength of the Ca II absorption lines they cause in their QSO's spectra, and impact parameters to the QSO that are smaller than the stellar disk. Compared to the small numbers of other H I detected DLA and candidate DLA galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 have high H I masses. Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 have also been found to lie in galaxy groups that are high in H I gas mass compared to the group containing SBS 1543+593, the only DLA galaxy previously known to be situated in a galaxy group. When compared with the expected properties of low-z DLAs from an H I-detected sample of galaxies, Mrk 1456 and SDSS J211701.26-002633.7 fall within the ranges for impact parameter and M{sub B} ; and the H I mass distribution for the H I-detected DLAs agrees with that of the expected H I mass distribution for low-z DLAs. Our observations support galaxy-evolution models in which high-mass galaxies make up an increasing

  5. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE CO-EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X. Z.; Bell, E. F.; Somerville, R. S.; Rix, H.-W.; Jahnke, K.; Fontanot, F.; Meisenheimer, K.; Rieke, G. H.; Schiminovich, D.

    2009-12-20

    The star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) functions are measured to be proportional to each other at z approx< 3. This close correspondence between SF and BHA would naturally yield a BH mass-galaxy mass correlation, whereas a BH mass-bulge mass correlation is observed. To explore this apparent contradiction, we study the SF in spheroid-dominated galaxies between z = 1 and the present day. We use 903 galaxies from the COMBO-17 survey with M{sub *} > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, ultraviolet and infrared-derived SFRs from Spitzer and Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and morphologies from GEMS Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. Using stacking techniques, we find that <25% of all SF occurs in spheroid-dominated galaxies (Sersic index n > 2.5), while the BHAR that we would expect if the global scalings held is 3 times higher. This rules out the simplest picture of co-evolution, in which SF and BHA trace each other at all times. These results could be explained if SF and BHA occur in the same events, but offset in time, for example at different stages of a merger event. However, one would then expect to see the corresponding star formation activity in early-stage mergers, in conflict with observations. We conclude that the major episodes of SF and BHA occur in different events, with the bulk of SF happening in isolated disks and most BHA occurring in major mergers. The apparent global co-evolution results from the regulation of the BH growth by the potential well of the galactic spheroid, which includes a major contribution from disrupted disk stars.

  6. HOT GAS HALOS AROUND DISK GALAXIES: CONFRONTING COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Pedersen, Kristian; Toft, Sune; Grove, Lisbeth F.; Benson, Andrew; Bower, Richard G.

    2009-05-20

    Models of disk galaxy formation commonly predict the existence of an extended reservoir of accreted hot gas surrounding massive spirals at low redshift. As a test of these models, we use X-ray and H{alpha} data of the two massive, quiescent edge-on spirals NGC 5746 and NGC 5170 to investigate the amount and origin of any hot gas in their halos. Contrary to our earlier claim, the Chandra analysis of NGC 5746, employing more recent calibration data, does not reveal any significant evidence for diffuse X-ray emission outside the optical disk, with a 3{sigma} upper limit to the halo X-ray luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. An identical study of the less massive NGC 5170 also fails to detect any extraplanar X-ray emission. By extracting hot halo properties of disk galaxies formed in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we compare these results to expectations for cosmological accretion of hot gas by spirals. For Milky-Way-sized galaxies, these high-resolution simulations predict hot halo X-ray luminosities which are lower by a factor of {approx}2 compared to our earlier results reported by Toft et al. We find the new simulation predictions to be consistent with our observational constraints for both NGC 5746 and NGC 5170, while also confirming that the hot gas detected so far around more actively star-forming spirals is in general probably associated with stellar activity in the disk. Observational results on quiescent disk galaxies at the high-mass end are nevertheless providing powerful constraints on theoretical predictions, and hence on the assumed input physics in numerical studies of disk galaxy formation and evolution.

  7. A XMM-Newton observation of a sample of four close dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, L.; Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Testa, V.; Ingrosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of deep archival XMM-Newton observations towards the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Leo I, Ursa Major II (UMa II) and Ursa Minor (UMi) in the Milky Way neighbourhood. The X-ray source population is characterized and cross-correlated with available databases to infer their nature. We also investigate if intermediate-mass black holes are hosted in the centre of these galaxies. For Draco, we detect 96 high-energy sources, two of them possibly being local stars, while no evidence for any X-ray emitting central compact object is found. Towards the Leo I and UMa II fields of view, we reveal 116 and 49 X-ray sources, respectively. None of them correlates with the putative central black holes and only one is likely associated with a UMa II local source. The study of the UMi dwarf galaxy found 54 high-energy sources and a possible association with a source at the dwarf spheroidal galaxy centre. We put an upper limit on the luminosity of the central compact object of 4.02 × 1033 erg s-1. Furthermore, via the correlation with a radio source near the galactic centre, the putative black hole should have a mass of (2.76^{+32.00}_{-2.54})× 10^6 M_{{{⊙}}} and be radiatively inefficient. This confirms a previous result obtained using Chandra data alone.

  8. Cosmological implications of ROSAT observations of groups and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Laurence P.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William

    1995-01-01

    We have combined ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and optical observations of a sample of groups and clusters of galaxies to determine the fundamental parameters of these systems (e.g., the dark matter distribution, gas mass fraction, baryon mass fraction, mass-to-light ratio, and the ratio of total-to-luminous mass). Imaging X-ray spectroscopy of groups and clusters show that the gas is essentially isothermal beyond the central region, indicating that the total mass density (mostly dark matter) scales as rho(sub dark) varies as 1/r squared. The density profile of the hot X-ray emitting gas is fairly flat in groups with rho(sub gas) varies as 1/r and becomes progressively steeper in hotter richer systems, with rho(sub gas) varies as 1/r squared in the richest clusters. These results show, that in general, the hot X-ray-emitting gas is the most extended mass component in groups and clusters, the galaxies are the most centrally concentrated component, and the dark matter is intermediate between the two. The flatter density rofile of the hot gas compared to the dark matter produces a gas mass fraction that increases with radius within each object. There is also a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction (from 2% to 30%) between elliptical galaxies and rich clusters due to the greater detectable extent of the X-ray emission in richer systems. For the few systems in which the X-ray emission can be traced to the virial radius (where the overdensity delta is approximately equal 200), the gas mass fraction (essentially the baryon mass fraction) approaches a roughly constant value of 30%, suggesting that this is the true primordial value. Based on standard big bang nucleosynthesis, the large baryon mass fraction implies that Omega = 0.1 - 0.2. The antibiased gas distribution suggests that feedback from galaxy formation and hydrodynamics play important roles in the formation of structure on the scale of galaxies to rich clusters. All the groups and

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF STARBURST GALAXIES WITH FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPHIC EXPLORER: GALACTIC FEEDBACK IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, J. P.; Heckman, T.; Meurer, G.; Strickland, D.; Aloisi, A.; Leitherer, C.; Sembach, K.; Calzetti, D.; Martin, C. L. E-mail: heckman@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: dks@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: leitherer@stsci.edu E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu

    2009-03-15

    We have analyzed FUSE (905-1187 A) spectra of a sample of 16 local starburst galaxies. These galaxies cover almost three orders of magnitude in star-formation rates and over two orders of magnitude in stellar mass. Absorption features from the stars and interstellar medium are observed in all the spectra. The strongest interstellar absorption features are generally blue-shifted by {approx} 50-300 km s{sup -1}, implying the almost ubiquitous presence of starburst-driven galactic winds in this sample. The outflow velocites increase with both the star-formation rate and the star-formation rate per unit stellar mass, consistent with a galactic wind, driven by the population of massive stars. We find outflowing coronal-phase gas (T {approx}10{sup 5.5} K) detected via the O VI absorption line in nearly every galaxy. The O VI absorption-line profile is optically thin, is generally weak near the galaxy-systemic velocity, and has a higher mean outflow velocity than seen in the lower ionization lines. The relationship between the line width and column density for the O VI absorbing gas is in good agreement with expectations for radiatively cooling and outflowing gas. Such gas will be created in the interaction of the hot out-rushing wind seen in X-ray emission and cool dense ambient material. O VI emission is not generally detected in our sample, suggesting that radiative cooling by the coronal gas is not dynamically significant in draining energy from galactic winds. We find that the measured outflow velocities in the H I and H II phases of the interstellar gas in a given galaxy increase with the strength (equivalent width) of the absorption feature and not with the ionization potential of the species. The strong lines often have profiles consisting of a broad and optically-thick component centered near the galaxy-systemic velocity and weaker but highly blue-shifted absorption. This suggests that the outflowing gas with high velocity has a lower column density than the more

  10. An observer's view of simulated galaxies: disc-to-total ratios, bars and (pseudo-)bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapieco, Cecilia; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Jonsson, Patrik; White, Simon D. M.

    2010-09-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of Milky Way-mass galaxies to study the relative importance of the main stellar components, i.e. discs, bulges and bars, at redshift zero. The main aim of this Letter is to understand if estimates of the structural parameters of these components determined from kinematics (as is usually done in simulations) agree well with those obtained using a photometric bulge/disc/bar decomposition (as done in observations). To perform such a comparison, we have produced synthetic observations of the simulation outputs with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SUNRISE and used the BUDDA code to make 2D photometric decompositions of the resulting images (in the i and g bands). We find that the kinematic disc-to-total (D/T) ratio estimates are systematically and significantly lower than the photometric ones. While the maximum D/T ratios obtained with the former method are of the order of 0.2, they are typically >0.4, and can be as high as 0.7, according to the latter. The photometric decomposition shows that many of the simulated galaxies have bars, with Bar/T ratios in the range 0.2-0.4, and that bulges have in all cases low Sérsic indices, resembling observed pseudo-bulges instead of classical ones. Simulated discs, bulges and bars generally have similar g - i colours, which are in the blue tail of the distribution of observed colours. This is not due to the presence of young stars, but rather due to low metallicities and poor gas content in the simulated galaxies, which makes dust extinction low. Photometric decompositions thus match the component ratios usually quoted for spiral galaxies better than kinematic decompositions, but the shift is insufficient to make the simulations consistent with observed late-type systems.

  11. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Haloes I: New Observations of Neutral and Ionized Gas Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  12. KAT-7 observations of an unbiased sample of mass-selected galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, G.; Venturi, T.; Cassano, R.; Dallacasa, D.; Brunetti, G.; Cuciti, V.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Oozeer, N.; Parekh, V.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of megaparsec-scale radio haloes in galaxy clusters has already been established by many observations over the last two decades. The emerging explanation for the formation of these giant sources of diffuse synchrotron radio emission is that they trace turbulent regions in the intracluster medium, where particles are trapped and accelerated during cluster mergers. Our current observational knowledge is, however, mainly limited to massive systems. Here we present observations of a sample of 14 mass-selected galaxy clusters, i.e. M500 > 4 × 1014 M⊙, in the Southern hemisphere, aimed to study the occurrence of radio haloes in low-mass clusters and test the correlation between the radio halo power at 1.4 GHz P1.4 and the cluster mass M500. Our observations were performed with the 7-element Karoo Array Telescope at 1.86 GHz. We found three candidates to host diffuse cluster-scale emission and derived upper limits at the level of 0.6-1.9 × 1024 Watt Hz-1 for ˜50 per cent of the clusters in the sample, significantly increasing the number of clusters with radio halo information in the considered mass range. Our results confirm that bright radio haloes in less massive galaxy clusters are statistically rare.

  13. Studies of galaxies giving rise to QSO absorption systems and observations of the high-redshift universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    I present a study of the galaxies that give rise to Lyman-α (Lyα) and triply ionized carbon (CIV) absorption lines observed in the spectra of background quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), as well as on studies of the high-redshift universe. By comparing the redshifts of galaxies and Lyα absorption systems along common lines of sight, I confirmed the existence of an anti- correlation between Lyα absorption equivalent width and galaxy impact parameter. Further analysis showed that tenuous gas is likely to be distributed around galaxies in spherical halos rather than in flattened disks with the gaseous extent scaling with galaxy B-band and K-band luminosities. I found that extended gaseous halos are a common and generic feature of galaxies over a wide range of luminosity and morphological type and Lyα absorption systems traced a significant and representative portion of the galaxy population. Applying the scaling relation between galaxy gaseous radius and galaxy B-band luminosity to predict the incidence of Lyα absorption systems originating in extended gaseous envelopes of galaxies, I found that luminous galaxies can explain about 50% of Lyα absorption systems with absorption equivalent width W > 0.3 Å. By comparing the redshifts of galaxies and CIV absorption systems along common lines of sight, I found that extended gaseous halos of galaxies have been metal contaminated out to large galactocentric radii, ~100 h-1 kpc. The covering factor of ionized gas in galactic halos was estimated to be 0.93 with a 1 σ lower bound of 0.83, which may strongly constrain the possibilities that CIV absorption systems arised in accreting satellite galaxies or in filaments of gravitationally collapsed structures. To study the high-redshift universe, I analyzed very deep slitless spectroscopy observations acquired by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations are especially suited for identifying very distant galaxies due to

  14. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  15. γ-ray emission from the Perseus cluster of galaxies observed with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, P.; Eisenacher, D.; Hildebrand, D.; Lombardi, S.; Lindfors, E.; Paneque, D.; Partini, S.; Prada, F.; Sitarek, J.; Zandanel, F.; MAGIC Collaboration; Dauser, T.; Kadler, M.; Krauss, F.; Kataoka, J.; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Wilbert, S.; Wilms, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Perseus cluster of galaxies is a nearby cool-core cluster with an intra-clustermedium (ICM) characterized by very high central densities. The observation of the Perseus cluster with the MAGIC telescopes, during 85 h from 2009 to 2011, resulted in the discovery of 2 point-like sources at very high energy (>100 GeV, VHE) coinciding with the central radio galaxy NGC1275 and the radio galaxy IC310. The γ-ray properties of these 2 sources are presented, taking into account contemporaneous Fermi-LAT as well as multi-wavelength data. Flux variability and spectral energy distribution shapes indicate that the VHE γ-rays do not originate from large-scale interaction of the radio galaxies with ICM but more likely from the active nuclei of these two galaxies. They could be both misaligned version of BL Lac objects, the most common TeV AGN. Our results provide vital clues to understand emission mechanisms of such misaligned objects, and how they may be related to the beamed emission seen in BL Lacs. No evidence of large-scale VHE γ-ray emission from hadronic cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the ICM has been found. The flux upper limit above 1 TeV reaches the signal expected by some theoretical models, constraining the cluster CR physics. In the framework of the hadronicmodel of the radiomini-halos, this limit implies aminimal magnetic field ranging from 4-9μG for the central cluster region.

  16. Spitzer and JCMT Observations of the Active Galactic Nucleus in the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendo, George J.; Buckalew, Brent A.; Dale, Daniel A.; Draine, Bruce T.; Joseph, Robert D.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Sheth, Kartik; Smith, John-David T.; Walter, Fabian; Calzetti, Daniela; Cannon, John M.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Helou, George; Hollenbach, David; Murphy, Eric J.; Roussel, Hélène

    2006-07-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-160 μm images, Spitzer mid-infrared spectra, and JCMT SCUBA 850 μm images of the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594), an Sa galaxy with a 109 Msolar low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). The brightest infrared sources in the galaxy are the nucleus and the dust ring. The spectral energy distribution of the AGN demonstrates that, while the environment around the AGN is a prominent source of mid-infrared emission, it is a relatively weak source of far-infrared emission, as had been inferred for AGNs in previous research. The weak nuclear 160 μm emission and the negligible polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission from the nucleus also implies that the nucleus is a site of only weak star formation activity and the nucleus contains relatively little cool interstellar gas needed to fuel such activity. We propose that this galaxy may be representative of a subset of low-ionization nuclear emission region galaxies that are in a quiescent AGN phase because of the lack of gas needed to fuel circumnuclear star formation and Seyfert-like AGN activity. Surprisingly, the AGN is the predominant source of 850 μm emission. We examine the possible emission mechanisms that could give rise to the 850 μm emission and find that neither thermal dust emission, CO line emission, bremsstrahlung emission, nor the synchrotron emission observed at radio wavelengths can adequately explain the measured 850 μm flux density by themselves. The remaining possibilities for the source of the 850 μm emission include a combination of known emission mechanisms, synchrotron emission that is self-absorbed at wavelengths longer than 850 μm, or unidentified spectral lines in the 850 μm band.

  17. The star formation-AGN interplay in merging galaxies: insights from hydrodynamical simulations and observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Galarza, Juan R.; Smith, Howard Alan; Weiner, Aaron; Hayward, Christopher C.; Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Rosenthal, Lee; Ashby, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Thermal emission from an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) can provide a significant contribution to the bolometric luminosity of galaxies, and its effect at infrared wavelengths can mimic the process of star-formation, jeopardizing star formation rate (SFR) diagnostics. It is therefore important to model the AGN emission and to quantify its effect on the estimated SFRs when SED fitting tools are applied. We tackle this problem by studying the dust radiative transfer calculations of hydrodynamically simulated binary galaxy mergers covering a broad range of parameters, including stellar mas ratios, gas contents, AGN luminosity and viewing angles. We apply the energy balance SED fitting codes CHIBURST and CIGALE to the mock SEDs of our simulated merger, and then compare with the results of applying the same codes to the SEDs of observed merging galaxies in the Local Universe. At different stages of the interaction, we compare their derived SFRs and AGN fractions with those predicted by the hydrodynamical simulations, for a broad range of the interaction parameters, but focus on the stages near coalescence, when the AGN contribution exceed 10% of the total luminosity. We show that the contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence, when the two supermassive black holes of the interacting pair merge and undergo and enhanced period of accretion. Under certain conditions, CIGALE succeeds at recovering the SFRs and AGN fractions with higher accuracy than other available codes, such as MAGPHYS, even during these extreme stages. Our results show that using the IR luminosity as a simple surrogate for star formation can significantly overestimate the true SFR by underestimating the contribution from the AGN. Finally, we study the effect of using different parametric star formation histories (SFHs) when fitting the SEDs of galaxies, and show that a delayed SFH is usually a reasonable choice for merging galaxies.

  18. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  19. The properties, origin and evolution of stellar clusters in galaxy simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Adamo, A.; Few, C. G.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Evans, A. S.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Kim, H.; Johnson, K. E.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Ubeda, L.; Whitmore, B.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the properties and evolution of star particles in two simulations of isolated spiral galaxies, and two galaxies from cosmological simulations. Unlike previous numerical work, where typically each star particle represents one `cluster', for the isolated galaxies we are able to model features we term `clusters' with groups of particles. We compute the spatial distribution of stars with different ages, and cluster mass distributions, comparing our findings with observations including the recent LEGUS survey. We find that spiral structure tends to be present in older (100s Myrs) stars and clusters in the simulations compared to the observations. This likely reflects differences in the numbers of stars or clusters, the strength of spiral arms, and whether the clusters are allowed to evolve. Where we model clusters with multiple particles, we are able to study their evolution. The evolution of simulated clusters tends to follow that of their natal gas clouds. Massive, dense, long-lived clouds host massive clusters, whilst short-lived clouds host smaller clusters which readily disperse. Most clusters appear to disperse fairly quickly, in basic agreement with observational findings. We note that embedded clusters may be less inclined to disperse in simulations in a galactic environment with continuous accretion of gas onto the clouds than isolated clouds and correspondingly, massive young clusters which are no longer associated with gas tend not to occur in the simulations. Caveats of our models include that the cluster densities are lower than realistic clusters, and the simplistic implementation of stellar feedback.

  20. CO Observations of the High Redshift Radio Galaxy 53W002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Tomita, Akihiko; Takata, Tadafumi

    1995-10-01

    We observed a high redshift radio galaxy 53W002 at z =2.390 with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope aiming at a detection of a redshifted ^12^CO (J=1-0) emission line. The galaxy was discovered in the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey and is known to have a blue SED and is a candidate for a genuinely young galaxy. We detected a weak (-5 mJy) emission-line feature at z = 2.392; the feature was significant in our November 1993 observations and marginally confirmed in the follow-up observations held in December 1993 and February 1994. If the detected emission-line feature is really a redshifted CO emission line associated with 53W002, its luminosity is 1.2 x 10^11^ h^-2^ K km s^-1^ pc^2^ (q_0_ = 0.5), or M(H_2_) ~ 5 x 10^11^ h^-2^ M_sun_, adopting the galactic CO-to-H_2_ conversion factor.

  1. Baryonic inflow and outflow histories in disk galaxies as revealed from observations of distant star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    Gas inflow and outflow are the most important processes, which determine the structural and chemical evolution of a disk galaxy like the Milky Way. In order to get new insights into these baryonic processes in Milky Way like galaxies (MWLGs), we consider the data of distant star-forming galaxies and investigate the evolution of the radial density profile of their stellar components and the associated total amount of gaseous inflow and outflow. For this purpose, we analyze the redshift evolution of their stellar mass distribution, combined with the scaling relations between the mass of baryonic components, star formation rate and chemical abundance for both high- and low-z star-forming galaxies. As a result, we find the new relations between star formation rate and inflow/outflow rate as deduced from these distant galaxies, which will provide fundamental information for understanding the structural and chemical evolution of MWLGs.

  2. Radio line and continuum observations of quasar-galaxy pairs and the origin of low reshift quasar absorption line systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Vangorkom, J. H.; Hauxthausen, E. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Salzer, J.

    1990-01-01

    There are a number of known quasars for which our line of sight to the high redshift quasar passes within a few Holmberg radii of a low redshift galaxy. In a few of these cases, spectra of the quasar reveal absorption by gas associated with the low redshift galaxy. A number of these pairs imply absorption by gas which lies well outside the optical disk of the associated galaxy, leading to models of galaxies with 'halos' or 'disks' of gas extending to large radii. The authors present observations of 4 such pairs. In three of the four cases, they find that the associated galaxy is highly disturbed, typically due to a gravitational interaction with a companion galaxy, while in the fourth case the absorption can be explained by clouds in the optical disk of the associated galaxy. They are led to an alternative hypothesis concerning the origin of the low redshift absorption line systems: the absorption is by gas clouds which have been gravitationally stripped from the associated galaxy. These galaxies are rapidly evolving, and should not be used as examples of absorption by clouds in halos of field spirals. The authors conclude by considering the role extended gas in interacting systems plays in the origin of higher redshift quasar absorption line systems.

  3. ASCA observation of three bright early-type galaxies: NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Mushotzky, Richard; Tsuru, Takeshi; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Loewenstein, Michael; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1994-01-01

    We report Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) 0.3-10 keV and X-ray observations of three early type galaxies, NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636. The extended mission in these galaxies is well described by thin thermal eimssion from hot gas. The gas temperature is 0.92 +/- 0.02 keV for NGC 4472, 0.79 +/- 0.01 keV for NGC 4406, and 0.73 +/- 0.02 keV for NGC 4636. The metal abundance for NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636 are, under the assumption of solar ratios, 0.63 +/- 0.15, 0.45 +/- 0.10, and 0.38 +/- 0.07, respectively. Detailed analysis has allowed determination of the abundances of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and iron. The observed abundances are consistent with the solar ratios. For NGC 4472 and NGC 4406 we also determined the mean temperature of the gas producing the Si lines from the ratio of the Si H to He-like lines and find it to be consistent with the continuum temperature. The X-ray temperature is in good agreement with the observed optical velocity dispersion, stellar density profile, and gas density profile. Our data indicates that the supernova rate should be less than one fifth of the nominal rate in early type galaxies. We derive the mass of these systems within fixed angular scales and find that M/L greater than 40, confirming that elliptical galaxies are dark matter dominated at large radii.

  4. Observational study of the candidate polar-ring galaxies NGC 304 and NGC 7625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karataeva, G. M.; Kuznetsov, A. N.

    2008-09-01

    We present the results of our photometric ( BV R) and spectroscopic CCD observations of NGC 304 and NGC 7625, candidate polar-ring galaxies, performed with the 6-m Special Astrophysical Observatory telescope. For NGC 304, such a study has been carried out for the first time. We have obtained basic integrated characteristics of the galaxies and determined their morphological types (S0 for NGC 304 and Sa for NGC 7625). The absolute magnitudes of the galaxies, M B = -20m.81 for NGC 304 and M B = -19m.34 for NGC7625, are indicative of their fairly high luminosities. The disk and bulge parameters have been determined forNGC 304 (µ0 = 20m.60, h = 3.86 kpc, µ e = 21m.59, r e = 1.26 kpc in the B band); these correspond to the parameters of S0-type objects. The rotation velocity for NGC 304 (200 km s-1) reaches its maximum at a galactocentric distance of 3.1 kpc, which yields a mass estimate for the galaxy of 2.8 × 1010 mathcal{M}_ odot . The observed photometric features at the center of NGC 304 indicate that it may have an inner ring structure, although we have failed to confirm the existence of two kinematic systems based on our spectroscopic observations. In NGC 7625, the disk makes a dominant contribution to the total brightness. The derived integrated color indices ( B-V = 0m.81 and V-R = 0m.61) agree with previous determinations of other authors. We have estimated the учештсешщт in the inner galactic regions. In the outer regions, we have detected structures with bluer colors ( B-V = 0m.60), which may be indicative of a polar ring with a minor stellar component.

  5. Suzaku observations of two narrow-line radio galaxies (3C 403 and IC 5063)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2012-03-01

    We report the results of Suzaku broad band X-ray observations of the two narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs), 3C 403 and IC 5063. Combined with the Swift/BAT spectra averaged for 58 months, we are able to accurately constrain their spectral properties over the 0.5-200 keV band. The spectra from the nucleus are well represented with an absorbed cut-off power law, a mildly absorbed reflection component from cold matter with an iron-K emission line, and an unabsorbed soft component, which gives a firm upper limit for the scattered emission. The reflection strength normalized to the averaged BAT flux is R(≡Ω/2π)~0:6 in both targets, implying that their tori have a sufficiently large solid angle to produce the reprocessed emission. The numerical torus model with an opening angle of ~50 degrees by Ikeda et al. (2009, ApJ, 692, 608) well reproduces the observed spectra. We discuss the possibility that the amount of the normal gas responsible for Thomson scattering is systematically smaller in radio galaxies compared with Seyfert galaxies. This difference may be due to gas being expelled by jet activity. The details of this work are given in Tazaki et al. (2011, ApJ, 738, 70).

  6. Active galaxies observed during the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Fruscione, A.; Carone, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) during the all-sky survey. A total of 13 sources were detected at a significance of 2.5 sigma or better: seven Seyfert galaxies, five BL Lac objects, and one quasar. The fraction of BL Lac objects is higher in our sample than in hard X-ray surveys but is consistent with the soft X-ray Einstein Slew Survey, indicating that the main reason for the large number of BL Lac objects in the extreme ulktraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray bands is their steeper X-ray spectra. We show that the number of AGNs observed in both the EUVE and ROSAT Wide Field Camera surveys can readily be explained by modelling the EUV spectra with a simple power law in the case of BL Lac objects and with an additional EUV excess in the case of Seyferts and quasars. Allowing for cold matter absorption in Seyfert galaxy hosts drive up the inferred average continuum slope to 2.0 +/- 0.5 (at 90% confidence), compared to a slope of 1.0 usually found from soft X-ray data. If Seyfert galaxies without EUV excesses form a significant fraction of the population, then the average spectrum of those with bumps should be even steeper. We place a conservative limit on neutral gas in BL Lac objects: N(sub H) less than 10(exp 20)/sq cm.

  7. A distance to the galaxy NGC4258 from observations of Cepheid variable stars.

    PubMed

    Maoz, E; Newman, J A; Ferrarese, L; Stetson, P B; Zepf, S E; Davis, M; Freedman, W L; Madore, B F

    1999-09-23

    Cepheid variable stars pulsate in a way that is correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, making them useful as 'standard candles' for determining distances to galaxies; the potential systematic uncertainties in the resulting distances have been estimated to be only 8-10%. They have played a crucial role in establishing the extragalactic distance scale and hence the value of the Hubble constant. Here we report observations of Cepheids in the nearby galaxy NGC4258; the distance calculated from the Cepheids is 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpc, where the uncertainty does not include possible systematic errors. There is an independently determined geometric distance to this galaxy of 7.2 +/- 0.5 Mpc, based on the observed proper motions of water masers orbiting the central black hole; the distances differ by 1.3sigma. If the maser-based distance is adopted and the Cepheid distance scale revised accordingly, the derived value of the Hubble constant would increase by 12 +/- 9%, while the expansion age of the Universe would decrease by the same amount. PMID:16862105

  8. Optical monitoring observations of two γ-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Wu, Chao; Wang, Jing; Wei, Jianyan

    2016-04-01

    1H 0323+342 is a rather radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) with γ-ray emission. Optical observations were carried out in B and R bands which covered 6 nights in 2011 to obtain light curves of 1H 0323+342. The difference image subtraction method was used to deal with the data of 1H 0323+342 because of the existence of extended host galaxy. Optical variability on day timescale was reported here. We also monitored the first γ-ray NLS1 SDSS J094857.3+002225 and confirmed the existence of intranight optical variability (INOV). These indicated the existence of a relativistic jet in these NLS1s.

  9. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  10. Reconstructing the primordial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe from the observed nonlinear clustering of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Matthews, Alex; Kumar, P.; Lu, Edward

    1991-01-01

    It was discovered that the nonlinear evolution of the two point correlation function in N-body experiments of galaxy clustering with Omega = 1 appears to be described to good approximation by a simple general formula. The underlying form of the formula is physically motivated, but its detailed representation is obtained empirically by fitting to N-body experiments. In this paper, the formula is presented along with an inverse formula which converts a final, nonlinear correlation function into the initial linear correlation function. The inverse formula is applied to observational data from the CfA, IRAs, and APM galaxy surveys, and the initial spectrum of fluctuations of the universe, if Omega = 1.

  11. OSSE observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies ARP 220 and MRK 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Shier, L. M.; Sturner, S. J.; McNaron-Brown, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results of oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies Arp 220 and Mrk 273 are reported. The pointings of Arp 220 and Mrk 273 concentrated on their upper limits. The gamma ray luminosities from these sources were found to be between one and two orders of magnitude smaller than the infrared luminosities. Multiwavelength luminosity spectra are produced from the radio to the gamma ray regime, and are compared with the typical multiwavelength spectra of active galactic nuclei. The lack of measured gamma ray emission provides no evidence for the existence of buried active galactic nuclei in these ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but is consistent with an origin of the infrared luminosity from starburst activity.

  12. XMM-Newton Observations of the Heavily Absorbed Seyfert 1 Galaxy IC 4329A

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbrugge, K.

    2005-01-05

    We detect seven distinct absorbing systems in the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A, taken with XMM-Newton. Firstly we detect absorption due to cold gas in our own Galaxy and warm gas in the Galactic halo or the Local Group. This local warm gas is only detected through O VII absorption, from which we deduce a temperature between 0.03 and 0.2 keV. In IC 4329A we detect absorption from the host galaxy as well as from a warm absorber, close to the nucleus, which has 4 components. The absorption from the host galaxy is well modeled by neutral material. The warm absorber detected in IC 4329A is photoionized and has an ionization range between log {xi} = -1.37 and log {xi} = 2.7. A broad excess is measured at the O VIII Ly{alpha} and N VII Ly{alpha} emission lines, which can be modeled by either disklines or multiple Gaussians. From the lightcurve we find that the source changed luminosity by about 20 % over the 140 ks observation, while the spectral shape, i.e. the softness ratio did not vary. In the EPIC spectra a narrow Fe K{alpha} and Fe XXVI Ly{alpha} emission line are detected. The narrowness of the Fe K{alpha} line and the fact that there is no evidence for flux variability between different observations leads us to conclude that the Fe K{alpha} line is formed at a large distance from the central black hole.

  13. Spitzer Observations of MAMBO Galaxies: Weeding Out Active Nuclei in Starbursting Protoellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Serjeant, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Egami, E.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Barmby, P.; Bei, L.; Dole, H.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Fazio, G. G.; Frayer, D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Hines, D. C.; Huang, J.-S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Misselt, K. A.; Miyazaki, S.; Morrison, J. E.; Papovich, C.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rigby, J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smail, I.; Wilson, G.; Willner, S. P.

    2004-09-01

    We present 3.6-24 μm Spitzer observations of an unbiased sample of nine luminous, dusty galaxies selected at 1200 μm by MAMBO on the IRAM 30 m telescope, a population akin to the well-known submillimeter or SCUBA galaxies (hereafter SMGs). Owing to the coarse resolution of submillimeter/millimeter cameras, SMGs have traditionally been difficult to identify at other wavelengths. We compare our multiwavelength catalogs to show that the overlap between 24 and 1200 μm must be close to complete at these flux levels. We find that all (4/4) of the most secure >=4 σ SMGs have >=4 σ counterparts at 1.4 GHz, while the fraction drops to 7/9 using all >=3 σ SMGs. We show that combining mid-infrared (MIR) and marginal (>=3 σ) radio detections provides plausible identifications in the remaining cases, enabling us to identify the complete sample. Accretion onto an obscured central engine is betrayed by the shape of the MIR continuum emission for several sources, confirming Spitzer's potential to weed out active galaxies. We demonstrate the power of an S24μm/S8μm versus S8μm/S4.5μm color-color plot as a diagnostic for this purpose. However, we conclude that the majority (~75%) of SMGs have rest-frame mid/far-IR spectral energy distributions commensurate with obscured starbursts. Sensitive 24 μm observations are clearly a useful route to identify and characterize reliable counterparts to high-redshift far-IR-bright galaxies, complementing what is possible via deep radio imaging.

  14. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using ALMA Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Kemball, Athol; Marshall, Philip J.; Murray, Norman; Perreault Levasseur, Laurence; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M ⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ∼ 2 × 107 M ⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.

  15. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using Alma Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; et al

    2016-05-19

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance ofmore » 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ~ 2 × 107 M⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Finally, observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.« less

  16. Einstein observations of the Hydra A cluster and the efficiency of galaxy formation in groups and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. P.; Arnaud, K. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein imaging proportional counter observations of the poor cluster of galaxies centered on the radio galaxy Hydra A are examined. From the surface brightness profile, it is found that the X-ray-emitting gas in the Hydra A cluster must be condensing out of the intracluster medium at a rate of 600 solar masses/yr. This is one of the largest mass deposition rates observed in a cluster of galaxies. The ratio of gas mass to stellar mass is compared for a variety of systems, showing that this ratio correlates with the gas temperature.

  17. Optical Observations of the Nearby Galaxy IC342 with Narrow Band [SII] and H_alpha Filters. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucetic, M. M.; Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Dobardzic, A.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Pannuti, T. G.; Petrov, N.

    2013-12-01

    We present observations of a portion of the nearby spiral galaxy IC342 using narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. These observations were carried out in November 2011 with the 2m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper we report coordinates, diameters, Hα and [SII] fluxes for 203 HII regions detected in two fields of view in IC342 galaxy. The number of detected HII regions is 5 times higher than previously known in these two parts of the galaxy.

  18. [C II] 158-micrometer Observations of a Sample of Late-type Galaxies from the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leech, K. J.; Volk, H. J.; Heinrichsen, I.; Hippelein, H.; Metcalfe, L.; Pierini, D.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Xu, C.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed 19 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) obtaining spectral around the (C II) 157.741-micrometer fine structure line.

  19. ISO observations of the interacting galaxy Markarian 297. with the powerful supernova remnant 1982aa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, L.; O'Halloran, B.; McBreen, B.; Delaney, M.; Burgdorf, M.; Leech, K.; Barr, P.; Clavel, J.; Coia, D.; Hanlon, L.; Gallais, P.; Laureijs, R.; Smith, N.

    2005-12-01

    Markarian (Mkn) 297 is a complex system comprised of two interacting galaxies that has been modelled with a variety of scenarios. Observations of this system were made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) using the ISOCAM, ISOPHOT and LWS instruments. ISOCAM maps at 6.7 μm, 7.7 μm, 12 μm and 14.3 μm are presented which, together with PHT-S spectrometry of the central interacting region, probe the dust obscured star formation and the properties of the organic dust. The ISOCAM observations reveal that the strongest emission in the four bands is at a location completely unremarkable at visible and near-IR (e.g. 2MASS) wavelengths, and does not coincide with the nuclear region of either colliding galaxy. This striking characteristic has also been observed in the overlap region of the colliding galaxies in the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039), the intragroup region of Stephan's Quintet, and in IC 694 in the interacting system Arp 299, and again underlines the importance of infrared observations in understanding star formation in colliding/merging systems. At 15 μm, the hidden source in Mkn 297 is, respectively, 14.6 and 3.8 times more luminous than the hidden sources in the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) and Stephan's Quintet. Numerical simulations of the Mkn 297 system indicate that a co-planar radial penetration between two disk galaxies yielded the observed wing formation in the system about 1.5 × 108 years after the collision. A complex emission pattern with knots and ridges of emission was detected with ISOCAM. The 7.7 μm map predominantly shows the galaxy in emission from the 7.7 μm feature attributed to PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). The 14.3/7.7 μm ratio is greater than unity over most of the galaxy, implying widespread strong star formation. Strong emission features were detected in the ISOPHOT spectrum, while [O I], [O III] and [C II] emission lines were seen with LWS. Using data from the three instruments, luminosities and masses for two dust

  20. Spectra, fluxes, and observability of gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Tylka, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Details of the physics of gamma-ray production by the annihilation of dark matter particles in the Galaxy are presented. Improved gamma-ray spectra and fluxes are calculated and compared with present observational data on cosmic gamma-ray fluxes at high Galactic latitudes. A comparison with the gamma-ray flux from cosmic-ray interactions is made. It is found that gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation are most potentially observable from patches of the sky at high Galactic latitudes in directions having an unusually low total column density of gas and from a dark matter core at the Galactic center.

  1. Combined X-Ray and mm-Wave Observations of Radio Quiet Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, E.

    2016-06-01

    A connection between the X-ray and radio sources in radio quiet active galaxies (AGNs) will be demonstrated. High radio frequency, i.e., mm-wave observations are promising probes of the X-ray emitting inner regions of the accretion disks in radio quiet AGNs. An argument for simultaneous observations in X-rays and in mm waves will be made, in order to promote these as one of the future science goals of X-ray and AGN astronomy in the next decade. Preliminary results from an exploratory campaign with several space and ground based telescopes will be presented.

  2. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  3. UBVRI simultaneous observations of the nucleus of Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548 in 1993-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. I.

    2002-05-01

    An ongoing program on photometric and spectral monitoring of some bright Seyfert galaxies has been carried out at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory since 1989. Results of photometric observations of NGC 5548 obtained with the 1.25 m telescope are reported in this paper; it focuses on the analysis of intranight variations. During 44 observational nights in 1993-1999 in each spectral band of the Johnson UBVRI system, 672 measurements have been performed simultaneously through the round aperture (diameter 15\\arcsec) using differential photometry techniques. The estimated accuracy of each measurement is about 0.01 mag. The peak amplitude R_max = Fmax /Fmin = 2.99 for the whole light curve was observed in the U band, while the minimum amplitude Fmax /Fmin =1.37 occurred in the I band during the full observation period. UBVRI observations and good sampled data of international monitoring campaigns of NGC 5548, were used to calculate Structure Functions. A comparison is made of the characteristics of the long and short time scale variations of NGC 5548 with those of NGC 4151, NGC 7469 and NGC 1275. In order to examine the intranight variations of the nucleus of NGC 5548, standard deviations (SD) of the nightly averaged flux F, and a measure of intranight variability - SD/F were calculated for each night. Using this parameter, a probability characteristics is introduced, and duty cycles (the fraction of time when the galaxy is variable), characterizing the efficiency of the central energy source, were evaluated. It is concluded that intranight variability is really transient in character and manifests itself with different probabilities for different galaxies.

  4. COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTER RADIO RELICS: INSIGHTS AND WARNINGS FOR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Collins, David C.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.

    2013-03-01

    Non-thermal radio emission from cosmic-ray electrons in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters is an important tracer of cluster merger activity, and is the result of complex physical processes that involve magnetic fields, particle acceleration, gas dynamics, and radiation. In particular, objects known as radio relics are thought to be the result of shock-accelerated electrons that, when embedded in a magnetic field, emit synchrotron radiation in the radio wavelengths. In order to properly model this emission, we utilize the adaptive mesh refinement simulation of the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a galaxy cluster from cosmological initial conditions. We locate shock fronts and apply models of cosmic-ray electron acceleration that are then input into radio emission models. We have determined the thermodynamic properties of this radio-emitting plasma and constructed synthetic radio observations to compare observed galaxy clusters. We find a significant dependence of the observed morphology and radio relic properties on the viewing angle of the cluster, raising concerns regarding the interpretation of observed radio features in clusters. We also find that a given shock should not be characterized by a single Mach number. We find that the bulk of the radio emission comes from gas with T > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, {rho} {approx} 10{sup -28}-10{sup -27} g cm{sup -3}, with magnetic field strengths of 0.1-1.0 {mu}G, and shock Mach numbers of M {approx} 3-6. We present an analysis of the radio spectral index which suggests that the spatial variation of the spectral index can mimic synchrotron aging. Finally, we examine the polarization fraction and position angle of the simulated radio features, and compare to observations.

  5. High-Resolution HI and CO Observations of HIghMass Galaxies - High HI Mass, HI-rich Galaxies at 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, Gregory; ALFALFA Team

    2014-01-01

    The HIghMass sample is a a group of 34 galaxies identified by the ALFALFA survey with both high HI mass (MHI > 1010 M⊙) and unusually high gas fraction (GF ≡ MHI / M* over half have GF > 1). Such galaxies are expected to be exceptionally rare. Have these galaxies recently acquired their gas, but have not yet been able to process it into stars? Or has this gas reservoir existed for a long time, and kept from forming stars by unusually high dark matter halo spin parameters? I present high-resolution HI and CO observations for a subset of these galaxies, and consider gas kinematics, stability, and inferred dark matter halo properties. The explanations for the current state of these galaxies are revealed to span a wide range of parameter space. For example, the HI in UGC 9037 is rapidly falling towards the center (vinfall ≈ 40 km s-1) which should soon fuel a major episode of star formation. Conversely, the HI in UGC 12506 is rapidly rotating and of low surface density, suggestive of a high spin parameter. This work has been supported by NSF-AST-0606007 and AST-1107390, grants from the Brinson Foundation, and a Student Observing Support award from NRAO.

  6. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  7. Chandra Observation of the Core of the Galaxy Cluster AWM 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furusho, T.; Yanasaki, N. Y.; Ohashi, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the core region of the nearby X-ray bright galaxy cluster AWM 7. There are blob-like substructures, which are seen in the energy band 2-10 keV, within 10 kpc (20") of the cD galaxy NGC 1129, and the brightest sub-peak has a spatial extent more than 4 kpc. We also notice that the central soft X-ray peak is offset from the optical center by 1.3 kpc. These structures have no correlated features in optical, infrared, or radio band. Energy spectrum of the hard sub-peak indicates a temperature higher than 3 keV with a metallicity less than 0.3 solar, or a power-law spectrum with photon index approximately 1.2. A hardness ratio map and a narrow Fe-K band image jointly indicate two Fe-rich blobs symmetrically located around the cD galaxy, with the direction perpendicular to the sub-peak direction. In larger scales (r less than 60 kpc), the temperature gradually drops from 4 keV to 2 keV toward the cluster center and the metal abundance rises steeply to a peak of 1.5 solar at r approximately equal to 7 kpc. These results indicate that a dynamical process is going on in the central region of AWM 7, which probably creates heated gas blobs and drives metal injection.

  8. Chandra Observation of the Core of the Galaxy Cluster AWM 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, T.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Ohashi, T.

    2003-10-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the core region of the nearby X-ray-bright galaxy cluster AWM 7. There are bloblike substructures, which are seen in the energy band 2-10 keV, within 10 kpc (20'') of the cD galaxy NGC 1129, and the brightest subpeak has a spatial extent more than 4 kpc. We also notice that the central soft X-ray peak is slightly offset from the optical center by 1 kpc. These structures have no correlated features in optical, infrared, or radio bands. The energy spectrum of the hard subpeak indicates a temperature higher than 3 keV with a metallicity less than 0.3 solar, or a power-law spectrum with photon index ~1.2. A hardness ratio map and a narrow Fe K band image jointly indicate two Fe-rich blobs symmetrically located around the cD galaxy, with the direction perpendicular to the subpeak direction. In larger scales (r<60 kpc), the temperature gradually drops from 4 to 2 keV toward the cluster center, and the metal abundance rises steeply to a peak of 1.5 solar at r~7 kpc. These results indicate that a dynamical process is going on in the central region of AWM 7, which probably creates heated gas blobs and drives metal injection.

  9. Observations of the CO J=6-5 transition in starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. I.; Hills, R. E.; Stutzki, J.; Graf, U. U.; Russell, A. P. G.; Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, short-submillimeter observations of carbon monoxide's (CO) mid-J rotational levels have revealed the presence of a large amount of excited molecular gas in luminous giant molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Submillimeter lines are specific probes of excited material: collisional excitation of the level energy of 116 K above ground, and 6-5 transition's critical density is approximately 10(exp 6) cm(exp -3) in optically thin gas. Radiative trapping effects reduce the excitation requirements to some extent, but detection of the CO J=6-5 line is nearly indisputable proof of the existence of gas that is both warm and dense. The excitation conditions also imply that cool (T less than 20 K) molecular clouds within the beam neither emit nor absorb in the short-submillimeter lines; in our Galaxy, clouds with active massive star formation emit the strongest short-submillimeter CO rotational lines. We used these properties to explore the distribution of excited molecular material and physical conditions within the star formation regions of several classical starburst nuclei: NGC253, M82, and IC342. We have used the 6-5 transition as a thermometer of warm molecular gas in starburst nuclei, unambiguously finding that the nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies is substantially warmer than in typical disk clouds.

  10. MODELING DUST AND STARLIGHT IN GALAXIES OBSERVED BY SPITZER AND HERSCHEL: NGC 628 AND NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T.; Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A.; Dale, D. A.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Hunt, L. K.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Galametz, M.; Krause, O.; Rix, H.-W.; Sandstrom, K.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Bolatto, A. D.; Donovan Meyer, J. E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu; and others

    2012-09-10

    We characterize the dust in NGC 628 and NGC 6946, two nearby spiral galaxies in the KINGFISH sample. With data from 3.6 {mu}m to 500 {mu}m, dust models are strongly constrained. Using the Draine and Li dust model (amorphous silicate and carbonaceous grains), for each pixel in each galaxy we estimate (1) dust mass surface density, (2) dust mass fraction contributed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, (3) distribution of starlight intensities heating the dust, (4) total infrared (IR) luminosity emitted by the dust, and (5) IR luminosity originating in regions with high starlight intensity. We obtain maps for the dust properties, which trace the spiral structure of the galaxies. The dust models successfully reproduce the observed global and resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The overall dust/H mass ratio is estimated to be 0.0082 {+-} 0.0017 for NGC 628, and 0.0063 {+-} 0.0009 for NGC 6946, consistent with what is expected for galaxies of near-solar metallicity. Our derived dust masses are larger (by up to a factor of three) than estimates based on single-temperature modified blackbody fits. We show that the SED fits are significantly improved if the starlight intensity distribution includes a (single intensity) 'delta function' component. We find no evidence for significant masses of cold dust (T {approx}< 12 K). Discrepancies between PACS and MIPS photometry in both low and high surface brightness areas result in large uncertainties when the modeling is done at PACS resolutions, in which case SPIRE, MIPS70, and MIPS160 data cannot be used. We recommend against attempting to model dust at the angular resolution of PACS.

  11. HST WFC3/IR Observations of Active Galactic Nucleus Host Galaxies at z ~ 2: Supermassive Black Holes Grow in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C. Megan; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGNs are X-ray-selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 1042 erg s-1galaxies of these AGNs have low Sérsic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z ~ 2 and z ~ 0.05. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute. STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  12. AN OBSERVED LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND VIOLENT DISK INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Juneau, Stephanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z {approx} 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] {lambda}3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, BH growth rates m-dot{sub BH}{approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of

  13. Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-line Galaxies from Infrared Grism Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughn, Amber N.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kümmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; Mutchler, Max; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Young, Erick T.; Xu, Chun

    2011-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 μm from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 μm grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the Hα, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 <~ z <~ 1.4, 1.2 <~ z <~ 2.2, and 2.0 <~ z <~ 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 μm R ~= 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 μm R ~= 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m AB(F098M) ~= 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Δz ~= 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m AB(F098M)= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z >~ 2.

  14. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE: EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM INFRARED GRISM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Straughn, Amber N.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kuemmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Bond, Howard E.; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.

    2011-01-15

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 {mu}m from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 {mu}m grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the H{alpha}, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.4, 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.2, and 2.0 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m A{sub B(F098M)} {approx_equal} 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts ({Delta}z {approx_equal} 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m{sub AB(F098M)}= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the

  15. Observational properties of simulated galaxies in overdense and average regions at redshifts z ≃ 6-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Shlosman, Isaac; Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We use high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies of Romano-Díaz et al., post-processing them with a panchromatic three-dimensional radiation transfer code to obtain the galaxy UV luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 6-12. The galaxies are followed in a rare, heavily overdense region within a ˜5σ density peak, which can host high-z quasars, and in an average density region, down to the stellar mass of Mstar ˜ 4 × 107 M⊙. We find that the overdense regions evolve at a substantially accelerated pace - the most massive galaxy has grown to Mstar ˜ 8.4 × 1010 M⊙ by z = 6.3, contains dust of Mdust ˜ 4.1 × 108 M⊙, and is associated with a very high star formation rate, SFR ˜ 745 M⊙ yr- 1. The attained SFR-Mstar correlation results in the specific SFR slowly increasing with Mstar. Most of the UV radiation in massive galaxies is absorbed by the dust, its escape fraction fesc is low, increasing slowly with time. Galaxies in the average region have less dust, and agree with the observed UV LF. The LF of the overdense region is substantially higher, and contains much brighter galaxies. The massive galaxies are bright in the infrared (IR) due to the dust thermal emission, with LIR ˜ 3.7 × 1012 L⊙ at z = 6.3, while LIR < 1011 L⊙ for the low-mass galaxies. Therefore, ALMA can probe massive galaxies in the overdense region up to z ˜ 10 with a reasonable integration time. The UV spectral properties of discy galaxies depend significantly upon the viewing angle. The stellar and dust masses of the most massive galaxy in the overdense region are comparable to those of the sub-millimetre galaxy found by Riechers et al. at z = 6.3, while the modelled SFR and the sub-millimetre flux fall slightly below the observed one. Statistical significance of these similarities and differences will only become clear with the upcoming ALMA observations.

  16. Active galaxies and their evolution: As observed in the FIRST and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reviglio, Pietro M.

    2008-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of more than 150000 galaxies of the local universe observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey aimed at clarifying the properties of active galaxies and their nuclei. We have investigated the systematics of spectroscopic selection of AGN by comparing a spectroscopically selected sample with a radio-selected sample of AGN. We have shown that pollution from the host galaxy light significantly biases the classification of low signal-to-noise systems if a constant threshold in line signal-to-noise is used to classify emission-line systems throughout the survey. We have developed a method to quantify this incompleteness in the spectroscopic classification of star-forming galaxies and AGN and have discussed a simple correction for this bias. We have used the corrected sample to investigate the evolution of those nuclei and their hosts in the look-back time of the SDSS. We have shown that significant evolution in the strength of both the emission lines and the radio emission can be detected, with the luminosity of these nuclei declining over time. Interestingly, we find that nuclei residing in lower luminosity hosts have undergone a more significant variation in their luminosities over the past 2 Gyrs than nuclei hosted by more luminous galaxies. Our study likely traces the low-redshift tail of downsizing in AGN activity observed at higher redshifts. This evolution in the AGN properties is accompanied by the evolution of the host properties. We have presented evidence of an increase in the concentration of the host light. The magnitude of this evolution towards more bulgy systems is dependent on the luminosity of the host as well, with less luminous galaxies evolving more significantly in the past 2 Gyrs than bigger systems, suggesting that, while spheroids and disks are stable configuration, the combination of the two is not and tends to evolve more rapidly towards the more concentrated distribution typical of spheroids. We have classified

  17. LBT/LUCIFER Observations of the z ~ 2 Lensed Galaxy J0900+2234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Bechtold, Jill; McGreer, Ian D.; Just, Dennis W.; Sand, David J.; Green, Richard F.; Thompson, David; Peng, Chien Y.; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy; Juette, Marcus; Knierim, Volker; Buschkamp, Peter

    2010-12-01

    We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z = 2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared (NIR) instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope. We fitted lens models to the rest-frame optical images and found that the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 ± 0.8 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame spectra covered by the H + K band, we detected Hβ, [O III], Hα, [N II], and [S II] emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction toward the ionized H II regions (Eg (B - V)) was computed from the flux ratio of Hα and Hβ and appears to be much higher than that toward the stellar continuum (Es (B - V)), derived from the optical and NIR broadband photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5-1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than for typical z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of [S II]λ6717 and [S II]λ6732, we found that the electron number density of the H II regions in the high-z galaxy was sime1000 cm-3, consistent with other z ~ 2 galaxies but much higher than that in local H II regions. The star formation rate was estimated via the Hα luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365 ± 69 M sun yr-1. Combining the FWHM of Hα emission lines and the half-light radius, we found that the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is (5.8 ± 0.9) × 1010 M sun. The gas mass is (5.1 ± 1.1) × 1010 M sun from the Hα flux surface density using global Kennicutt-Schmidt law, indicating a very high gas fraction of 0.79 ± 0.19 in J0900+2234. Based on data acquired

  18. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  19. Late-time Observations of GRB 080319B: Jet Break, Host Galaxy, and Accompanying Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, N. R.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Racusin, J. L.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at ~11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E jet >~ 1052 erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) ≈ 27.0, rest frame MB ≈ -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event—a small host and bright SN—are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  20. Relativistic Fe Kα line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, G.; Nandra, K.; Ponti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe Kα line in the X-ray spectra of these active galactic nuclei. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high-energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe Kα line is detected (at >95 per cent confidence) in all sources observed with high-signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are ≳4 × 104). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high-quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe Kα line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the strength of the reflection component is consistent with that of the line. There are exceptions in both senses, however i.e. where the reflection continuum is strong but with weak line emission, and vice versa. These observations present a challenge for standard reflection models.

  1. Testing the dark matter origin of the WMAP-Planck haze with radio observations of spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Eric; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano; Hooper, Dan E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov E-mail: profumo@ucsc.edu

    2013-07-01

    If the Galactic WMAP radio haze, as recently confirmed by Planck, is produced by dark matter annihilation or decay, similar diffuse radio halos should exist around other galaxies with physical properties comparable to the Milky Way. If instead the haze is due to an astrophysical mechanism peculiar to the Milky Way or to a transient event, a similar halo need not exist around all Milky Way ''twins''. We use radio observations of 66 spiral galaxies to test the dark matter origin of the haze. We select galaxies based on morphological type and maximal rotational velocity, and obtain their luminosities from a 1.49 GHz catalog and additional radio observations at other frequencies. We find many instances of galaxies with radio emission that is less than 5% as bright as naively expected from dark matter models that could produce the Milky Way haze, and at least 3 galaxies that are less than 1% as bright as expected, assuming dark matter distributions, magnetic fields, and cosmic ray propagation parameters equal to those of the Milky Way. For reasonable ranges for the variation of these parameters, we estimate the fraction of galaxies that should be expected to be significantly less bright in radio, and argue that this is marginally compatible with the observed distribution. While our findings therefore cannot rule out a dark matter origin for the radio haze at this time, we find numerous examples (including the Andromeda Galaxy) where, if dark matter is indeed the origin of the Milky Way haze, some mechanism must be in place to suppress the corresponding haze of the external galaxy. We point out that Planck data will offer opportunities to improve this type of constraint in a highly relevant frequency range and for a potentially larger set of candidate galaxies.

  2. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  3. CHARACTERIZING ULTRAVIOLET AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES FOR GALAXIES. I. INFLUENCES OF DUST ATTENUATION AND STELLAR POPULATION AGE

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Yewei; Kong Xu; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Hao, Cai-Na; Zhou Xu E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-09-20

    The correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV (or IRX-{beta}) relation, found in studies of starburst galaxies is a prevalent recipe for correcting extragalactic dust attenuation. Considerable dispersion in this relation discovered for normal galaxies, however, complicates its usability. In order to investigate the cause of the dispersion and to have a better understanding of the nature of the IRX-UV relation, in this paper, we select five nearby spiral galaxies, and perform spatially resolved studies on each of the galaxies, with a combination of ultraviolet and infrared imaging data. We measure all positions within each galaxy and divide the extracted regions into young and evolved stellar populations. By means of this approach, we attempt to discover separate effects of dust attenuation and stellar population age on the IRX-UV relation for individual galaxies. In this work, in addition to dust attenuation, stellar population age is interpreted to be another parameter in the IRX-UV function, and the diversity of star formation histories is suggested to disperse the age effects. At the same time, strong evidence shows the need for more parameters in the interpretation of observational data, such as variations in attenuation/extinction law. Fractional contributions of different components to the integrated luminosities of the galaxies suggest that the integrated measurements of these galaxies, which comprise different populations, would weaken the effect of the age parameter on IRX-UV diagrams. The dependence of the IRX-UV relation on luminosity and radial distance in galaxies presents weak trends, which offers an implication of selective effects. The two-dimensional maps of the UV color and the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio are displayed and show a disparity in the spatial distributions between the two galaxy parameters, which offers a spatial interpretation of the scatter

  4. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: I. Main result

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We present the galaxy number overdensity up to second order in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order that arise from observing on the past light cone, including all redshift effects, lensing distortions from convergence and shear, and contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW and time-delay terms. This result will be important for accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates, introduced by nonlinear projection effects.

  5. Restrictions on parameters of sterile neutrino dark matter from observations of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarsky, A.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Ruchayskiy, O.

    2006-11-15

    We find restrictions on the mass and mixing angle of the dark matter sterile neutrinos using x-ray observations of Coma and Virgo galaxy clusters with XMM-Newton satellite. In the absence of clearly detectable line, we present detailed analysis of various methods of putting restrictions on mass and mixing angle of sterile neutrino. Our analysis provides significant improvement over our previous results, coming from XRB background measurements. We also discuss restrictions from Virgo cluster by other authors and compare our results with them.

  6. SUB-MILLIMETER TELESCOPE CO (2-1) OBSERVATIONS OF NEARBY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue-Jian; Gu, Qiusheng; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu

    2015-01-20

    We present CO J = 2-1 observations toward 32 nearby gas-rich star-forming galaxies selected from the ALFALFA and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs, using the Sub-millimeter Telescope (SMT). Our sample is selected to be dominated by intermediate-M {sub *} galaxies. The scaling relations between molecular gas, atomic gas, and galactic properties (stellar mass, NUV – r, and WISE color W3 – W2) are examined and discussed. Our results show the following. (1) In the galaxies with stellar mass M {sub *} ≤10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, the H I fraction (f {sub H} {sub I} ≡ M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}) is significantly higher than that of more massive galaxies, while the H{sub 2} gas fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}} ≡ M{sub H{sub 2}}/M {sub *}) remains nearly unchanged. (2) Compared to f{sub H{sub 2}}, f {sub H} {sub I} correlates better with both M {sub *} and NUV – r. (3) A new parameter, WISE color W3 – W2 (12-4.6 μm), is introduced, which is similar to NUV – r in tracing star formation activity, and we find that W3 – W2 has a tighter anti-correlation with log f{sub H{sub 2}} than the anti-correlation of (NUV – r)-f {sub H} {sub I}, (NUV – r)-f{sub H{sub 2}}, and (W3 – W2)-f {sub H} {sub I}. This indicates that W3 – W2 can trace the H{sub 2} fraction in galaxies. For the gas ratio M{sub H{sub 2}}/M {sub H} {sub I} , only in the intermediate-M {sub *} galaxies it appears to depend on M {sub *} and NUV – r. We find a tight correlation between the molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}} and 12 μm (W3) luminosities (L {sub 12} {sub μm}), and the slope is close to unity (1.03 ± 0.06) for the SMT sample. This correlation may reflect that the cold gas and dust are well mixed on a global galactic scale. Using the all-sky 12 μm (W3) data available in WISE, this correlation can be used to estimate CO flux for molecular gas observations and can even predict H{sub 2} mass for star-forming galaxies.

  7. THE PROPAGATION OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELING. II. THE CHALLENGE OF COMPARING GALAXY EVOLUTION MODELS TO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Gunn, James E.; White, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Models for the formation and evolution of galaxies readily predict physical properties such as star formation rates, metal-enrichment histories, and, increasingly, gas and dust content of synthetic galaxies. Such predictions are frequently compared to the spectral energy distributions of observed galaxies via the stellar population synthesis (SPS) technique. Substantial uncertainties in SPS exist, and yet their relevance to the task of comparing galaxy evolution models to observations has received little attention. In the present work, we begin to address this issue by investigating the importance of uncertainties in stellar evolution, the initial stellar mass function (IMF), and dust and interstellar medium (ISM) properties on the translation from models to observations. We demonstrate that these uncertainties translate into substantial uncertainties in the ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared colors of synthetic galaxies. Aspects that carry significant uncertainties include the logarithmic slope of the IMF above 1 M{sub sun}, dust attenuation law, molecular cloud disruption timescale, clumpiness of the ISM, fraction of unobscured starlight, and treatment of advanced stages of stellar evolution including blue stragglers, the horizontal branch, and the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch. The interpretation of the resulting uncertainties in the derived colors is highly non-trivial because many of the uncertainties are likely systematic, and possibly correlated with the physical properties of galaxies. We therefore urge caution when comparing models to observations.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray observations of HCG galaxies (Tzanavaris+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkic, L.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study a sample of 15 compact groups (CGs) observed with Chandra/ACIS, Swift/UVOT and Spitzer/IRAC-MIPS for which archival data exist, allowing us to obtain SFRs, stellar masses, sSFRs and X-ray fluxes and luminosities. Table 1 shows the group sample, including redshifts, luminosity distances and group evolutionary types. Allowing for the fact that some galaxies do not fall in the field of view of all three instruments, the total number of CG galaxies analyzed is 47. Details on the Swift and Spitzer observations and data for systems in this sample can be found in Tzanavaris et al. (2010ApJ...716..556T) and (L. Lenkic et al. 2015, in preparation). For Chandra/ACIS observations we refer the reader to Tzanavaris et al. (2014, J/ApJS/212/9) and Desjardins et al. (2013ApJ...763..121D; 2014ApJ...790..132D). (2 data files).

  9. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY II ZW 229.015

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, M. T.; Ryle, Wesley T.

    2012-04-10

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy II ZW 229.015 has been observed with the Kepler spacecraft since quarter 4 of Kepler science operations. The results of the quarters 4-7 (1 year) Kepler observations are presented in this paper. We find the source to be highly variable on multiple timescales, with discrete variations occurring on timescales as short as tens of hours with amplitudes as small as 0.5%. Such small amplitude, rapid variability has never before been detected in active galactic nuclei. The presence of a strong galaxy component dilutes the variability determined from the photometric aperture used in the standard Kepler PDC analysis. Using the tools provided by the Kepler Guest Observer Office and simultaneous V-band photometry found in the literature, we determine an optimal customized aperture for photometry of this source with Kepler. The results of a PSRESP analysis reveal tentative evidence of a characteristic variability timescale in the power spectrum. Using this timescale, we estimate the mass of the central supermassive black hole and this estimate is consistent with the virial mass estimate from reverberation mapping studies.

  10. Constraining the Evolution of Galaxies over the Interaction Sequence with Multiwavelength Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Lauranne

    2013-03-01

    Interactions are crucial for galaxy formation and profoundly affect their evolution. However, our understanding of the impact of interactions on star formation and activity of the central supermassive black hole remains incomplete. In the canonical picture of the interaction process, these processes are expected to undergo a strong enhancement, but some recent studies have not found this prediction to be true in a statistically meaningful sense. This thesis uses a sample of local interactions observed from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and a suite of N-body hydrodynamic simulations of interactions to examine the evolution of star formation, stellar mass, dust properties, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over the interaction sequence. First, we present the SEDs of 31 interactions in 14 systems, which we fit with stellar population synthesis models combined with a thermal dust model. We examine the differences between mildly, moderately, and strongly interacting systems. The star formation rate (SFR), dust luminosity, and the 15-25 K dust component temperature increase as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting. However, the SFR per stellar mass remains constant across the interaction stages. Second, we create 14 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies and calculate simulated photometry in 25 bands using the SUNRISE radiative transfer code. By comparing observed and simulated SEDs, we identify the simulation properties necessary to reproduce an interaction's SED. The best matches originate from simulated systems of similar stellar mass, infrared luminosities, dust mass, and SFR to the observed systems. Although an SED alone is insufficient to identify the interaction stage, strongly interacting systems preferentially match SEDs from times close to coalescence in the simulations. Third, we describe a case study of a post-merger system, Fornax A, for which we constrain its parameters of its progenitors

  11. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, A. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J. R.; Cohen, S. H.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimlbe, R. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6-0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS South, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [O III ], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.6, 1.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 2.4 and 2.0 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R approximately 210) and C141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R approximately 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 25 ELGs to M(sub AB)(F098M) approximately 25 mag. The faintest source in our sample with a strong but unidentified emission line--is MAB(F098M)=26.9 mag. We also detect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample, indicative of downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes.

  12. Measurement of the Elemental Abundances in Four Rich Clusters of Galaxies. I. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Loewenstein, M.; Arnaud, K. A.; Tamura, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Matsushita, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Hatsukade, I.

    1996-08-01

    The elemental abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Ar, and Fe for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, 1060, 2199, and AWM 7) are determined from X-ray spectra derived from Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics performance verification phase observations. Since the gas in the outer parts of the cluster is optically thin and virtually isothermal, the abundance analysis is very straightforward compared to the analysis of stellar or H II region spectra. We find that the abundance ratios of all four clusters are very similar. The mean abundances of O, Ne, Si, S, and Fe are 0.48, 0.62, 0.65, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, relative to solar. The abundances of Si, S, and Fe are unaffected by the uncertainties in the atomic physics of the Fe L shell. The abundances of Ne and Mg and to a lesser extent O are affected by the present uncertainties in Fe L physics and are thus somewhat more uncertain. The Fe abundances derived from the Fe L lines agree well with those derived from the Fe K lines for these clusters. The observed ratio of the relative abundance of elements is consistent with an origin of all the metals in Type II supernovae. The presence of large numbers of Type II supernovae during the early stages of evolution of cluster galaxies is a very strong constraint on all models of galaxy and chemical evolution and implies either a very flat initial mass function or bimodal star formation during the period when most of the metals were created.

  13. Suzaku observations of metal distribution out to 0.5 r180 in the intracluster medium of four galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke

    We studied the distributions of metal abundances and metal-mass-to-light ratios in the intracluster medium of four galaxy groups, MKW 4, HCG 62, the NGC 1550 group, and the NGC 5044 group, out to ˜ 0.5 r_{180} observed with Suzaku.The Fe abundance decreases with radius, and about 0.2-0.4 solar beyond 0.1 r _{180}. At a given radius in units of r_{180}, the Fe abundance in the ICM of the four galaxy groups were consistent or smaller than those of clusters of galaxies. The Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios in the ICM are nearly constant at the solar ratio out to 0.5 r_{180}. Since the metals have been synthesized in galaxies, we collected K-band luminosities of galaxies from Two Micron All Sky Survey catalogue and calculated the integrated iron-mass-to-light-ratios (IMLR), or the ratios of the iron mass in the ICM to light from stars in galaxies. The groups with smaller gas mass to light ratios have smaller IMLR values and the IMLR inversely correlated with the entropy excess. Based on these abundance features, we discussed the past history of metal enrichment process in groups of galaxies. These results and discussions were shown in Sasaki et al. 2014,ApJ,781,36.

  14. Metal Distributions out to 0.5 r 180 in the Intracluster Medium of Four Galaxy Groups Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    We studied the distributions of metal abundances and metal-mass-to-light ratios in the intracluster medium (ICM) of four galaxy groups, MKW 4, HCG 62, the NGC 1550 group, and the NGC 5044 group, out to ~0.5 r 180 observed with Suzaku. The iron abundance decreases with radius and is about 0.2-0.4 solar beyond 0.1 r 180. At a given radius in units of r 180, the iron abundance in the ICM of the four galaxy groups was consistent with or smaller than those of clusters of galaxies. The Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios in the ICM are nearly constant at the solar ratio out to 0.5 r 180. We also studied systematic uncertainties in the derived metal abundances, comparing the results from two versions of atomic data for astrophysicists (ATOMDB) and single- and two-temperature model fits. Since the metals have been synthesized in galaxies, we collected K-band luminosities of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and calculated the integrated iron-mass-to-light-ratios (IMLR), or the ratios of the iron mass in the ICM to light from stars in galaxies. The groups with smaller gas-mass-to-light ratios have smaller IMLR values and the IMLR is inversely correlated with the entropy excess. Based on these abundance features, we discussed the past history of metal enrichment processes in groups of galaxies.

  15. Chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies based on model calculations incorporating observed star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, H.; Murayama, T.

    We investigate the chemical evolution model explaining the chemical composition and the star formation histories (SFHs) simultaneously for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Recently, wide imaging photometry and multi-object spectroscopy give us a large number of data. Therefore, we start to develop the chemical evolution model based on an SFH given by photometric observations and estimates a metallicity distribution function (MDF) comparing with spectroscopic observations. With this new model we calculate the chemical evolution for 4 dSphs (Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, Sextans), and then we found that the model of 0.1 Gyr for the delay time of type Ia SNe is too short to explain the observed [alpha /Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Short GRB Host Galaxies: Morphologies, Offsets and Local Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Wen-fai; Berger, E.; Fox, D.

    2010-01-01

    The morphological properties of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies are not well understood. Here, we present optical observations of eight short GRB hosts obtained with ACS and WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations allow us to characterize the galactic and local environments of short GRBs as a powerful constraint on the nature of their progenitors. Using a variety of techniques, we determine the hosts' morphological properties, measure the physical and host-normalized offsets relative to the galaxy centers, and study the locations of short GRBs relative to their host light distributions. We also compare our results to those for long GRBs. Overall, we find that the majority of short GRB hosts have exponential disk profiles, and are on average twice as large as long GRB hosts. We also find that the distribution of projected physical offsets for short GRBs has a median of 5 kpc, a factor of five larger than the median for long GRBs. However, when normalized by the size of the hosts, the offset distributions for the two populations become nearly identical. Finally, unlike long GRBs which are concentrated in the brightest regions of their hosts, short GRBs are found to uniformly trace their host light distribution. These results are consistent with a progenitor population of NS-NS binaries, but do not rule out other potential progenitor models. This research is supported by Harvard University, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and HST - Grant Number GO-10917.01.

  17. Herschel photometric observations of the low metallicity dwarf galaxy NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, B.; Galametz, M.; Madden, S. C.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Bendo, G. J.; Bock, J. J.; Boselli, A.; Bradford, M.; Buat, V.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Ciesla, L.; Clements, D. L.; Cormier, D.; Cooray, A.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S. A.; Elbaz, D.; Galliano, F.; Gear, W. K.; Glenn, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Hony, S.; Isaak, K. G.; Levenson, L. R.; Lu, N.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T. J.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rangwala, N.; Rigby, E. E.; Roussel, H.; Rykala, A.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M. R. P.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Srinivasan, S.; Stevens, J. A.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Vigroux, L.; Wilson, C. D.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G. S.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2010-07-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE and PACS photometeric observations of the low metallicity (Z ~ 0.35 Z⊙) nearby dwarf galaxy, NGC 1705, in six wavelength bands as part of the Dwarf Galaxy Survey guaranteed time Herschel key program. We confirm the presence of two dominant circumnuclear IR-bright regions surrounding the central super star cluster that had been previously noted at mid-IR wavelengths and in the sub-mm by LABOCA. On constructing a global spectral energy distribution using the SPIRE and PACS photometry, in conjunction with archival IR measurements, we note the presence of an excess at sub-mm wavelengths. This excess suggests the presence of a signiPcant cold dust component within NGC 1705 and was modeled as an additional cold component in the SED. Although alternative explanations for the sub-mm excess beyond 350 μm, such as changes to the dust emissivity cannot be ruled out, the most likely explanation for the observed submillimetre excess is that of an additional cold dust component.

  18. The extended disc and halo of the Andromeda galaxy observed with Spitzer-IRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiei Ravandi, Masoud; Barmby, Pauline; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Laine, Seppo; Davidge, T. J.; Zhang, Jenna; Bianchi, Luciana; Babul, Arif; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results from an extended survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) using 41.1 h of observations by Spitzer-IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 µm. This survey extends previous observations to the outer disc and halo, covering total lengths of 4.4° and 6.6° along the minor and major axes, respectively. We have produced surface brightness profiles by combining the integrated light from background-corrected maps with stellar counts from a new catalogue of point sources. Using auxiliary catalogues, we have carried out a statistical analysis in colour-magnitude space to discriminate M31 objects from foreground Milky Way stars and background galaxies. The catalogue includes 426 529 sources, of which 66 per cent have been assigned probability values to identify M31 objects with magnitude depths of [3.6] = 19.0 ± 0.2, [4.5] = 18.7 ± 0.2. We discuss applications of our data for constraining the stellar mass and characterizing point sources in the outer radii.

  19. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE NEARBY SCULPTOR GROUP Sd GALAXY NGC 7793

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Staggs, Wayne D.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Filipovic, Miroslav D.; Payne, Jeffrey L.; Petre, Robert

    2011-07-15

    We conducted a Chandra ACIS observation of the nearby Sculptor Group Sd galaxy NGC 7793 as part of a multiwavelength study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. At the assumed distance to NGC 7793 of 3.91 Mpc, the limiting unabsorbed luminosity of the detected discrete X-ray sources is L{sub X} (0.2-10.0 keV) {approx}3x10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. A total of 22 discrete sources were detected at the {approx}3{sigma} level or greater including one ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). Based on multiwavelength comparisons, we identify X-ray sources coincident with one SNR, the candidate microquasar N7793-S26, one H II region, and two foreground Galactic stars. We also find that the X-ray counterpart to the candidate radio SNR R3 is time variable in its X-ray emission: we therefore rule out the possibility that this source is a single SNR. A marked asymmetry is seen in the distribution of the discrete sources with the majority lying in the eastern half of this galaxy. All of the sources were analyzed using quantiles to estimate spectral properties and spectra of the four brightest sources (including the ULX) were extracted and analyzed. We searched for time variability in the X-ray emission of the detected discrete sources using our measured fluxes along with fluxes measured from prior Einstein and Roentgensatellit observations. From this study, three discrete X-ray sources are established to be significantly variable. A spectral analysis of the galaxy's diffuse emission is characterized by a temperature of kT = 0.19-0.25 keV. The luminosity function of the discrete sources shows a slope with an absolute value of {Gamma} = -0.65 {+-} 0.11 if we exclude the ULX. If the ULX is included, the luminosity function has a long tail to high L{sub X} with a poor-fitting slope of {Gamma} = -0.62 {+-} 0.2. The ULX-less slope is comparable to the slopes measured for the distributions of NGC 6946 and NGC 2403 but much shallower than the slopes measured for the distributions of

  20. Variations of the ISM Compactness Across the Main Sequence of Star Forming Galaxies: Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Smith, H. A.; Lanz, L.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Zezas, A.; Rosenthal, L.; Weiner, A.; Hung, C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Groves, B.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of star-forming galaxies follow a simple empirical correlation in the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M*) plane, of the form {{SFR}}\\propto {M}*α , usually referred to as the star formation main sequence (MS). The physics that sets the properties of the MS is currently a subject of debate, and no consensus has been reached regarding the fundamental difference between members of the sequence and its outliers. Here we combine a set of hydro-dynamical simulations of interacting galactic disks with state-of-the-art radiative transfer codes to analyze how the evolution of mergers is reflected upon the properties of the MS. We present Chiburst, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo spectral energy distribution (SED) code that fits the multi-wavelength, broad-band photometry of galaxies and derives stellar masses, SFRs, and geometrical properties of the dust distribution. We apply this tool to the SEDs of simulated mergers and compare the derived results with the reference output from the simulations. Our results indicate that changes in the SEDs of mergers as they approach coalescence and depart from the MS are related to an evolution of dust geometry in scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. This is reflected in a correlation between the specific star formation rate, and the compactness parameter { C }, that parametrizes this geometry and hence the evolution of dust temperature ({T}{{dust}}) with time. As mergers approach coalescence, they depart from the MS and increase their compactness, which implies that moderate outliers of the MS are consistent with late-type mergers. By further applying our method to real observations of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), we show that the merger scenario is unable to explain these extreme outliers of the MS. Only by significantly increasing the gas fraction in the simulations are we able to reproduce the SEDs of LIRGs.

  1. NuSTAR Observations of the Powerful Radio Galaxy Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Wik, Daniel R.; Madejski, Grzegorz; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Lanz, Lauranne; Miller, Jon M.; Saez, Cristian; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William

    2015-08-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN and intracluster medium components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to \\gt 70 keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law ({{Γ }}∼ 1.6-1.7) absorbed by a neutral column density of {N}{{H}}∼ 1.6× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. However, we also detect curvature in the hard (\\gt 10 keV) spectrum resulting from reflection by Compton-thick matter out of our line of sight to the X-ray source. Compton reflection, possibly from the outer accretion disk or obscuring torus, is required even permitting a high-energy cut off in the continuum source; the limit on the cut-off energy is {E}{cut}\\gt 111 keV(90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power law plus reflection model leaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast (15,000-26,000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 ), high column-density ({N}W\\gt 3× {10}23 {{cm}}-2), highly ionized (ξ ∼ 2500 {erg} {cm} {{{s}}}-1) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also suggested by these data. We show that the ionized wind likely carries a significant mass and momentum flux, and may carry sufficient kinetic energy to exercise feedback on the host galaxy. If confirmed, the simultaneous presence of a strong wind and powerful jets in Cygnus A demonstrates that feedback from radio-jets and sub-relativistic winds are not mutually exclusive phases of AGN activity but can occur simultaneously.

  2. Dark Matter Constraints from Observations of 25 Milky Way Satellite Galaxies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma ray observations of 25 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 4 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present gamma ray flux upper limits between 500MeV and 500 GeV. We determine the dark matter content of 18 dwarf spheroidal galaxies from stellar kinematic data and combine LAT observations of 15 dwarf galaxies to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. We set some of the tightest constraints to date on the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses between 2 GeV and 10TeV into prototypical standard model channels. We find these results to be robust against systematic uncertainties in the LAT instrument performance, diffuse gamma ray background modeling, and assumed dark matter density profile.

  3. Far Ultraviolet Observations of Hot Gas in the Galaxy with SPEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Jerry; Korpela, E. J.; Kregenow, J.; Sirk, M. M.; Min, K.; Ryu, K.; Shinn, J.; Han, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-09-01

    The distribution of a low-density hot (10^5-10^6 K) phase of the interstellar medium conveys the character and evolution of diffuse matter in the Galaxy. This, difficult to observe component of the ISM emits mainly in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) (912-1800 A) band. We present spectral maps of FUV emission lines from highly ionized species over most of the sky and discuss the ramifications. These species are likely to exist in the hot phase of the ISM. The maps were obtained using an orbital spectrometer, SPEAR (or FIMS), that was launched in 2003 and has observed the FUV sky with a spectral resolution of 500 and an angular resolution of 10'. Funded NASA Grant NAG 5-5355 and by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

  4. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: II. Derivation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the observed galaxy number over-density on cosmological scales up to second order in perturbation theory. We include all relativistic effects that arise from observing on the past lightcone. The derivation is in a general gauge, and applies to all dark energy models (including interacting dark energy) and to metric theories of modified gravity. The result will be important for accurate cosmological parameter estimation, including non-Gaussianity, since all projection effects need to be taken into account. It also offers the potential for new probes of General Relativity, dark energy and modified gravity. This paper accompanies Paper I which presents the key results for the concordance model in Poisson gauge.

  5. The mass in galaxy clusters from X-ray/SZ observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The key tool to use galaxy clusters as astrophysical laboratories and cosmological probes is the knowledge of the distribution of the their gravitating and baryonic mass. I'll discuss the current status in reconstructing the gas and total cluster mass profiles from observations via X-rays and the Sunyeav-Zeldovich effect, highlighting the present limitations and biases, in particular in the clusters' outskirts, I'll show how the use of generalized scaling relations can help to reduce the scatter in obtaining the total mass and to constrain the physics responsible for the observed deviations from the self-similar model. I'll elucidate how Athena, the next-generation X-ray observatory and ESA-L2 mission, will address these issues.

  6. Chandra Observations of the Evening Core of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, K. A.; Heckman, T. M.; Dahlem, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Chandra observations of the core of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 reveal a heavily absorbed source of hard X-rays embedded within the nuclear starburst region. The source has an unabsorbed, 2 to 10 keV luminosity of greater than or equal to 10(exp 39) erg per s and photoionizes the surrounding gas. We observe this source through a dusty torus with a neutral absorbing column density of N(sub eta) approximately 2 x 10(exp 23)cm (exp -2). The torus is hundreds of pc across and collimates the starburst-driven nuclear outflow. We suggest that the ionizing source is an intermediate-mass black hole or a weakly accreting supermassive black hole, which may signal the beginnings or endings of AGN (active galactic nuclei) activity.

  7. EVN observations of the radio galaxy M87 following a TeV flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, M.; Giovannini, G.; Beilicke, M.; Cesarini, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2010-02-01

    We report on EVN observations of the radio galaxy M87, taken at 5 GHz on 2010 Feb 10. Data were acquired by 7 radio telescopes from 21:40 UT on Feb 10 to 8:30 UT on Feb 11, directly streamed to the central data processor at JIVE, and correlated in real-time (eVLBI). This permits us to promptly report on the status of the radio jet of the source, following the increase in gamma ray emission above 100GeV reported by MAGIC (ATel #2431) The observations have an angular resolution of about 7 mas x 3 mas and rms noise of 0.12 mJy/beam.

  8. Suzaku Observations of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 3C390.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, rita

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a 100ks Suzaku observation of the BLRG 3C390.3. The observations were performed to attempt to disentangle the contributions to the X-ray emission of this galaxy from an AGN and a jet component, via variability and/or the spectrum. The source was detected at high energies up to 80 keV, with a complex 0.3--80keV spectrum. Preliminary analysis of the data shows significant flux variability, with the largest amplitudes at higher energies. Deconvolution of the spectrum shows that, besides a standard Seyfert-like spectrum dominating the 0.3--8keV emission, an additional, hard power law component is required, dominating the emission above 10 keV. We attribute this component to a variable jet.

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. II. NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-08-15

    In this second paper of two analyses, we present near-infrared (NIR) morphological and asymmetry studies performed in a sample of 92 galaxies found in different density environments: galaxies in compact groups (CGs; HCGs in the Hickson Catalog of Compact Groups of Galaxies), isolated pairs of galaxies (KPGs in Karachentsev's list of isolated pairs of galaxies), and isolated galaxies (KIGs in Karachentseva's Catalog of Isolated Galaxies). Both studies have proved useful for identifying the effect of interactions on galaxies. In the NIR, the properties of the galaxies in HCGs, KPGs, and KIGs are more similar than they are in the optical. This is because the NIR band traces the older stellar populations, which formed earlier and are more relaxed than the younger populations. However, we found asymmetries related to interactions in both KPG and HCG samples. In HCGs, the fraction of asymmetric galaxies is even higher than what we found in the optical. In the KPGs the interactions look like very recent events, while in the HCGs galaxies are more morphologically evolved and show properties suggesting they suffered more frequent interactions. The key difference seems to be the absence of star formation in the HCGs; while interactions produce intense star formation in the KPGs, we do not see this effect in the HCGs. This is consistent with the dry merger hypothesis; the interaction between galaxies in CGs is happening without the presence of gas. If the gas was spent in stellar formation (to build the bulge of the numerous early-type galaxies), then the HCGs possibly started interacting sometime before the KPGs. On the other hand, the dry interaction condition in CGs suggests that the galaxies are on merging orbits, and consequently such system cannot be that much older either. Cosmologically speaking, the difference in formation time between pairs of galaxies and CGs may be relatively small. The two phenomena are typical of the formation of structures in low

  10. XMM-Newton observations of the hot spot galaxy NGC 2903

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Ebrero, J.; Leon, S.

    2010-11-01

    We report on the first deeper X-ray broad-band observation of the hot spot galaxy NGC 2903 obtained with XMM-Newton. X-ray imaging and spectra of the spiral barred galaxy NGC 2903 were obtained from XMM-Newton archival data to study its X-ray population and the conditions of the hot gas in its central region. We investigate the spectral properties of the discrete point-source population and give estimates of their X-ray spectral parameters. By analysing the RGS spectra, we derive temperature and abundances for the hot gas located in its central region. A total of six X-ray point sources (four of them ULX candidates) were detected in the energy range of 0.3-10.0 keV located within the galaxy D25 optical disk. Three of these sources are detected for the first time, and one of them, XMM-NGC2903 X2 with a luminosity of higher than 1039 erg s-1. After fitting three different models, we were able to estimate their luminosities, which are compatible with those of binaries with a compact object in the form of black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs). We extracted the combined first-order RGS1 and RGS2 spectra of its central region, which display several emission lines. The spectrum is dominated by a strong O viii Lyα emission line along with Ne x Lyα and several Fe xvii features. The O vii complex is also significantly detected, although only the forbidden and resonance lines could be resolved. Both O vii f and r lines seem to be of similar strength, which is consistent with the presence of the collisionally ionized gas that is typical of starburst galaxies. We fitted the spectrum to a model for a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) and the continuum was modelled with a power law, resulting in a plasma temperature of T = 0.31 ± 0.01 keV and an emission measure EM ≡ nHneV = 6.4-0.4+0.5 × 1061 cm-3. We also estimated abundances that are consistent with solar values.

  11. Deep MUSE observations in the HDFS. Morpho-kinematics of distant star-forming galaxies down to 108M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, T.; Epinat, B.; Bouché, N.; Brinchmann, J.; Boogaard, L. A.; Ventou, E.; Bacon, R.; Richard, J.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wisotzki, L.; Krajnović, D.; Vielfaure, J.-B.; Emsellem, E.; Finley, H.; Inami, H.; Schaye, J.; Swinbank, M.; Guérou, A.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Schroetter, I.; Shirazi, M.; Soucail, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Whereas the evolution of gas kinematics of massive galaxies is now relatively well established up to redshift z ~ 3, little is known about the kinematics of lower mass (M⋆≤ 1010M⊙) galaxies. We use MUSE, a powerful wide-field, optical integral-field spectrograph (IFS) recently mounted on the VLT, to characterize this galaxy population at intermediate redshift. Methods: We made use of the deepest MUSE observations performed so far on the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS). This data cube, resulting from 27 h of integration time, covers a one arcmin2 field of view at an unprecedented depth (with a 1σ emission-line surface brightness limit of 1 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2) and a final spatial resolution of ≈0.7''. We identified a sample of 28 resolved emission-line galaxies, extending over an area that is at least twice the seeing disk, spread over a redshift interval of 0.2 galaxies are at z ~ 0.3 - 0.7, which is a redshift range poorly studied so far with IFS kinematics. We used the public HST images and multiband photometry over the HDFS to constrain the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies and to perform a morphological analysis using Galfit, providing estimates of the disk inclination, disk scale length, and position angle of the major axis. We derived the resolved ionized gas properties of these galaxies from the MUSE data and model the disk (both in 2D and in 3D with GalPaK3D) to retrieve their intrinsic gas kinematics, including the maximum rotation velocity and velocity dispersion. Results: We build a sample of resolved emission-line galaxies of much lower stellar mass and SFR (by ~1 - 2 orders of magnitude) than previous IFS surveys. The gas kinematics of most of the spatially resolved MUSE-HDFS galaxies is consistent with disk-like rotation, but about 20% have velocity dispersions that are larger than the rotation velocities and 30% are part of a close pair and/or show clear signs of recent

  12. OmegaWINGS: OmegaCAM-VST observations of WINGS galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullieuszik, M.; Poggianti, B.; Fasano, G.; Zaggia, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; D'Onofrio, M.; Couch, W. J.; Vulcani, B.; Fritz, J.; Omizzolo, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Schipani, P.; Capaccioli, M.; Varela, J.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Wide-field observations targeting galaxy clusters at low redshift are complementary to field surveys and provide the local benchmark for detailed studies of the most massive haloes in the local Universe. The Wide-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) is a wide-field multi-wavelength survey of X-ray selected clusters at z = 0.04-0.07. The original 34' × 34' WINGS field of view has now been extended to cover a 1 deg2 field with both photometry and spectroscopy. Aims: We present the Johnson B- and V-band OmegaCAM at the VST observations of 46 WINGS clusters together with the data reduction, data quality, and Sextractor photometric catalogues. Methods: The data reduction was carried out with a modified version of the ESO-MVM (also known as ALAMBIC) reduction package, adding a cross-talk correction, the gain harmonisation, and a control procedure for problematic CCDs. The stray-light component was corrected for by employing our own observations of populated stellar fields. Results: With a median seeing of 1″ in both bands, our 25-min exposures in each band typically reach the 50% completeness level at V = 23.1 mag. The quality of the astrometric and photometric accuracy has been verified by comparison with the 2MASS and SDSS astrometry, and SDSS and previous WINGS imaging. Star-to-galaxy separation and sky-subtraction procedure were tested comparing them with previous WINGS data. Conclusions: The Sextractor photometric catalogues are publicly available at the CDS and will be included in the next release of the WINGS database on the Virtual Observatory together with the OmegaCAM reduced images. These data form the basis for a large ongoing spectroscopic campaign with AAOmega at the AAT and are being employed for a variety of studies. Based on observations made with VST at ESO Paranal Observatory under program ID 88.A-4005, 089.A-0023, 090.A-0074, 091.A-0059, and 093.A-0041.The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  13. RADIO GALAXY 3C 230 OBSERVED WITH GEMINI LASER ADAPTIVE-OPTICS INTEGRAL-FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbring, Eric

    2011-11-15

    The Altair laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility combined with the near-infrared integral-field spectrometer on Gemini North have been employed to study the morphology and kinematics of 3C 230 at z = 1.5, the first such observations of a high-redshift radio galaxy. These suggest a bi-polar outflow spanning 0.''9 ({approx}16 kpc projected distance for a standard {Lambda} CDM cosmology) reaching a mean relative velocity of 235 km s{sup -1} in redshifted H{alpha} +[N II] and [S II] emission. Structure is resolved to 0.''1 (0.8 kpc), which is well correlated with optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Array radio maps obtained at similar spatial resolution. Line diagnostics suggest that over the 10{sup 7} yr to 10{sup 8} yr duration of its active galactic nucleus activity, gas has been ejected into bright turbulent lobes at rates comparable to star formation, although constituting perhaps only 1% of the baryonic mass in the galaxy.

  14. 21 cm Synthesis Observations of VIRGOHI 21-A Possible Dark Galaxy in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, Robert; Davies, Jonathan; Disney, Michael; Grossi, Marco; Sabatini, Sabina; Boyce, Peter; Garcia, Diego; Impey, Chris; Jordan, Christine; Lang, Robert; Marble, Andrew; Roberts, Sarah; van Driel, Wim

    2007-12-01

    Many observations indicate that dark matter dominates the extragalactic universe, yet no totally dark structure of galactic proportions has ever been convincingly identified. Previously, we have suggested that VIRGOHI 21, a 21 cm source we found in the Virgo Cluster using Jodrell Bank, was a possible dark galaxy because of its broad line width (~200 km s-1) unaccompanied by any visible gravitational source to account for it. We have now imaged VIRGOHI 21 in the neutral hydrogen line and find what could be a dark, edge-on, spinning disk with the mass and diameter of a typical spiral galaxy. Moreover, VIRGOHI 21 has unquestionably been involved in an interaction with NGC 4254, a luminous spiral with an odd one-armed morphology, but lacking the massive interactor normally linked with such a feature. Numerical models of NGC 4254 call for a close interaction ~108 yr ago with a perturber of ~1011 Msolar. This we take as additional evidence for the massive nature of VIRGOHI 21, as there does not appear to be any other viable candidate. We have also used the Hubble Space Telescope to search for stars associated with the H I and find none down to an I-band surface brightness limit of 31.1+/-0.2 mag arcsec-2.

  15. Mass-to-Light-Ratios of the galaxy clusters and groups observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Matsushita, K.; Sato, K.; Abe, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kanno, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Tamura, T.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed 15 nearby (z < 0.06 ) clusters and groups observed with Suzaku out to ˜ 2 r_{500}. We derived Fe abundance profiles in the ICM, electron density, cumulative gas mass and Fe mass. We also collected K-band luminosities of galaxies and calculated the ratio of the cumulative gas mass and Fe mass in the ICM to the K-band luminosity (gas-mass-to-light ratio and iron-mass-to-light ratio, respectively). The Coma, Perseus, and medium systems have relatively flat radial profiles of the metal abundances at 0.3 solar within 0.5-1 r_{500}, and ˜ 0.2 solar beyond r_{500}. The gas-mass-to-light-ratios and iron-mass-to-light-ratios ratios increase with radius out to r_{500} and become flatter beyond the radius. The weighted average of the iron-mass-to-light ratios of the clusters at 1.6 r_{500} agrees with the expectation with the Salpeter initial-mass-function of stars, and we do not need a top-heavy slope. In contrast, groups and poor clusters have lower gas-mass-to-light ratios and lower iron-mass-to-light ratios than that of rich systems, with the higher entropy excess. Above these results, we discuss an early metal enrichment in galaxy clusters and groups.

  16. Chandra LETGS observation of the variable NLS1 galaxy Ark 564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the 100 ks X-ray spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxy Ark 564, taken with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board Chandra. Using χ2 statistics, several continuum models of the time-averaged spectrum of this object are compared, obtaining a semi-empirical solution for the description of the intrinsic emission continuum and a physical solution for the intrinsic absorption of the system. We find that the 0.1-10 keV spectrum can be well described by a power law plus two thermal components that account for the soft step. We are also able to detect and measure several narrow, unresolved absorption lines arising from highly ionized species of C, N, O, and Fe. The material seems to have a velocity consistent with the systemic velocity of the galaxy. This piece of evidence, in addition to the very low observed column density of NH ~ 1020 cm-2, is in good agreement with the scenario of a transverse biconical outflow with a gas density of n ≲ 3 × 1012 cm-3 at distances beyond the broad-line region r ≳ 10 lt-days, but a dust torus origin cannot be ruled out. The reduced spectrum is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A95

  17. XMM-Newton and Gemini Observations of Eight RASSCALS Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Andisheh; Finoguenov, Alexis; Böhringer, Hans; Geller, Margaret J.; Henry, J. Patrick

    2005-03-01

    We study the distribution of gas pressure and entropy in eight groups of galaxies belonging to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey/Center for Astrophysics Loose Systems (RASSCALS). We use archival and proprietary XMM-Newton observations, supplementing the X-ray data with redshifts derived from the literature; we also list 127 new redshifts measured with the Gemini North telescope. The groups are morphologically heterogeneous in both the optical and the X-ray, and several suffer from superpositions with background galaxies or clusters of galaxies. Nevertheless, they show remarkable self-similarity in their azimuthally averaged entropy and temperature profiles. The entropy increases with radius; the behavior of the entropy profiles is consistent with an increasing broken power law with inner and outer slope 0.92+0.04-0.05 and 0.42+0.05-0.04 (68% confidence), respectively. There is no evidence of a central, isentropic core, and the entropy distribution in most of the groups is flatter at large radii than in the inner region, challenging earlier reports, as well as theoretical models predicting large isentropic cores or asymptotic slopes of 1.1 as r-->∞. The pressure profiles are consistent with a self-similar decreasing broken power law in radius; the inner and outer slopes are -0.78+0.04-0.03 and -1.7+0.1-0.3, respectively. The results suggest that the larger scatter in the entropy distribution reflects the varied gasdynamical histories of the groups; the regularity and self-similarity of the pressure profiles is a sign of a similarity in the underlying dark matter distributions. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the US (NASA). The XMM-Newton project is supported by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung/Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (BMFT/DLR), the Max-Planck Society, and the Heidenhain-Stiftung, and also by PPARC, CEA, CNES, and ASI. Also

  18. RXTE Observations of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy MrK 348

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Georgantopoulos, Ioannis; Warwick, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    We present RXTE monitoring observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 348 spanning a 6 month period. The time-averaged spectrum in the 3-20 keV band shows many features characteristic of a Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxy, namely a hard underlying power-law continuum (Gamma approximately equal 1.8) with heavy soft X-ray absorption (N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm) plus measurable iron K.alpha emission (equivalent width approximately 100 eV) and, at high energy, evidence for a reflection component (R approximately < 1). During the first half of the monitoring period the X-ray continuum flux from Mrk 348 remained relatively steady. However this was followed by a significant brightening of the source (by roughly a factor of 4) with the fastest change corresponding to a doubling of its X-ray flux on a timescale of about 20 days. The flux increase was accompanied by a marked softening of X-ray spectrum most likely attributable to a factor approximately 3 decline in the intrinsic line-of-sight column density. In contrast the iron K.alpha line and the reflection components showed no evidence of variability. These observations suggest a scenario in which the central X-ray source is surrounded by a patchy distribution of absorbing material located within about a light-week of the nucleus of Mrk 348. The random movement of individual clouds within the absorbing screen, across our line of sight, produces substantial temporal variations in the measured column density on timescales of weeks to months and gives rise to the observed X-ray spectral variability. However, as viewed from the nucleus the global coverage and typical thickness of the cloud layer remains relatively constant.

  19. THE MASS-DEPENDENT STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF DISK GALAXIES: INFALL MODEL VERSUS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R. X.; Hou, J. L.; Shen, S. Y.; Shu, C. G.

    2010-10-10

    We introduce a simple model to explore the star formation histories of disk galaxies. We assume that the disk originate and grows by continuous gas infall. The gas infall rate is parameterized by the Gaussian formula with one free parameter: the infall-peak time t{sub p} . The Kennicutt star formation law is adopted to describe how much cold gas turns into stars. The gas outflow process is also considered in our model. We find that, at a given galactic stellar mass M{sub *}, the model adopting a late infall-peak time t{sub p} results in blue colors, low-metallicity, high specific star formation rate (SFR), and high gas fraction, while the gas outflow rate mainly influences the gas-phase metallicity and star formation efficiency mainly influences the gas fraction. Motivated by the local observed scaling relations, we 'construct' a mass-dependent model by assuming that the low-mass galaxy has a later infall-peak time t{sub p} and a larger gas outflow rate than massive systems. It is shown that this model can be in agreement with not only the local observations, but also with the observed correlations between specific SFR and galactic stellar mass SFR/M{sub *} {approx} M{sub *} at intermediate redshifts z < 1. Comparison between the Gaussian-infall model and the exponential-infall model is also presented. It shows that the exponential-infall model predicts a higher SFR at early stage and a lower SFR later than that of Gaussian infall. Our results suggest that the Gaussian infall rate may be more reasonable in describing the gas cooling process than the exponential infall rate, especially for low-mass systems.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope photometry of the central regions of Virgo Cluster elliptical galaxies. 1: Observations, discussion, and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Walter; Ford, Holland C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bosch, Frank C. Van Den; Ferrarese, Laura

    1994-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope we have observed at 10 pc resolution the nuclei of a luminosity-limited sample of 14 E and E/SO galaxies in the Virgo Cluster with magnitudes B(sub T) = 9.4 to 13.4. In this paper we present the images, and discuss the results of the detailed analysis of the surface photometry given in two companion papers. We find that the nuclear and near-nuclear morphologies confirm and strengthen the previously recognized dichotomy of 'E' galaxies into 'true' and 'disky' subtypes. The latter, usually classified E4 or later, often show a bright nuclear disk of radius approximately 100 pc. Essentially all early-type galaxies with -18 greater than M(sub B) greater than -20 are disky. Most true E galaxies are classified E4 or earlier. Most galaxies of both types show dust in the nuclear regions, the most remarkable example being a compact dust disk in NGC 4261. Other than dust, no anomalies were detected in the centers of the three galaxies in our sample which show clear kinematic evidence for a decoupled component.

  1. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  2. H I observations of two new dwarf galaxies: Pisces A and B with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Pisces A and Pisces B are the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy out of 22 Hi clouds identified in the GALFAHI survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. Aims: We derive the Hi content and kinematics of Pisces A and B. Methods: Our aperture synthesis Hi observations used the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), which is a pathfinder instrument for MeerKAT, the South African precursor to the mid-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-MID). Results: The low rotation velocities of ~5 km s-1 and ~10 km s-1 in Pisces A and B, respectively, and their Hi content show that they are really dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr). Despite that small rotation component, it is more the random motions ~9-11 km s-1 that provide most of the gravitational support, especially in the outer parts. The study of their kinematics, especially the strong gradients of random motions, suggest that those two dwarf galaxies are not yet in equilibrium. Conclusions: These Hi- rich galaxies may be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability. However, such gas-rich dwarf galaxies will most likely never be within the virial radius of MW-type galaxies and become subhalo candidates. Systems such as Pisces A and B are more likely to be found at a few Mpc s from MW-type galaxies. The final FITS cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/L3

  3. The Size Evolution of Passive Galaxies: Observations from the Wide-Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R. E., Jr.; McCarthy, P. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Yan, H.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H.; Calzetti, D.; Crockett, R. M.; Disney, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kaviraj, S.; Kimble, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Mutchler, M.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Silk, J. I.; Trauger, J.; Walker, A. R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Young, E.

    2012-04-01

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z ~ 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z >~ 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in ~40 arcmin2 to H < 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 μm <~ λobs <~ 1.6 μm with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of ~0.033(1 + z). We determine effective radii from Sérsic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M * ~ 1011 M ⊙) undergo the strongest evolution from z ~ 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z)-α, we find a tentative scaling of α ≈ (- 0.6 ± 0.7) + (0.9 ± 0.4)log (M */109 M ⊙), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of high-redshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M *-Re relation for red galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. Search for dark matter annihilation signatures in H.E.S.S. observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goudelis, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadsch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Serpico, P.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group are close satellites of the Milky Way characterized by a large mass-to-light ratio and are not expected to be the site of nonthermal high-energy gamma-ray emission or intense star formation. Therefore they are among the most promising candidates for indirect dark matter searches. During the last years the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observed five of these dwarf galaxies for more than 140 hours in total, searching for TeV gamma-ray emission from annihilation of dark matter particles. The new results of the deep exposure of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the first observations of the Coma Berenices and Fornax dwarves and the reanalysis of two more dwarf spheroidal galaxies already published by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Carina and Sculptor, are presented. In the absence of a significant signal new constraints on the annihilation cross section applicable to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are derived by combining the observations of the five dwarf galaxies. The combined exclusion limit depends on the WIMP mass and the best constraint is reached at 1-2 TeV masses with a cross-section upper bound of ˜ 3.9 ×10-24 cm3 s-1 at a 95% confidence level.

  5. Observations of MilkyWay Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-LAT detector and

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /IASF, Milan /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard

    2010-05-26

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky {gamma}-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected {gamma}-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant {gamma}-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the {gamma}-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the {gamma}-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in 8 of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair annihilation cross-section ofWIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g. in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The {gamma}-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e{sup +}e{sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair

  6. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-01-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  7. INTEGRAL/SPI Observations of Electron-Positron Annihilation Radiation from our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Watanabe, K.; Knoedlseder, J.; Jean, P.; Lonjou, V.; Weidenspointer, G.; Skinner, G.; Vedrenne, G.; Roques, J.-P.; Schanne, S.; Schoenfelder, V.

    2005-01-01

    The spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) is a coded-aperture gamma-ray telescope with moderate angular resolution (3 deg) and superior energy resolution (2 keV at 511 kev). One of it's principal science goals is the detailed study of 511 keV electron-positron annihilation from our Galaxy. The origin of this radiation remains a mystery, however current morphological studies suggest an older stellar population. There has also been recent speculation on the possibility of the existence of light (< 100 MeV) dark matter particles whose annihilation or decay could produce the observed 511 keV emission. In this paper we summarize the current results from SPI, compare them with previous results and discuss their implication on possible models for the production of the annihilation radiation.

  8. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I - IRAS pointed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution.

  9. Contamination of the Central Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Decrements in AMiBA Galaxy Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Birkinshaw, Mark; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Locutus Huang, Chih-Wei; Liao, Yu-Wei; Lin, Kai-Yang; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Koch, Patrick M.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Raffin, Philippe; Wei, Tashun; Wilson, Warwick

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the contamination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect for six galaxy clusters, A1689, A1995, A2142, A2163, A2261, and A2390, observed by the Y. T. Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy in 2007. With the range of baselines used, we find that the largest effect (of order 13%-50% of the central SZ flux density) comes from primary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and exceeds the thermal noise in all six cases. Contamination from discrete radio sources is estimated to be at a level of 3%-60% of the central SZ flux density. We use the statistics of these contaminating sources to estimate and correct the errors in the measured SZ effects of these clusters.

  10. Subarcsecond resolution observations of the central parsec of the Galaxy at 2.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Chen, W. P.; Forrest, W. J.; Garnett, J. D.; Longmore, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Four separate lunar occultations of the Galactic center in the infrared K-band have been observed, and the results are used to estimate the size of the sources and to derive photometry. It is found that IRS 16NE, 16NW, and IRS 29 are smaller than about 510 AU and IRS 16SW-W and C are smaller than 85 AU. All sources brighter than K = 10 mag in the central pc are smaller than 510 AU and therefore seem to be stars. IRS 7 is smaller than about 100 AU. IRS 1W and 13, resolved into pairs of stars, are probably the exciting stars for these H II regions. The shape of the differential luminosity function of the stars in the central sq pc is similar to that of stars in the central 150 sq pc. There is a steady increase in star density toward the central few arcsec of the Galaxy.

  11. Subarcsecond resolution observations of the central parsec of the Galaxy at 2. 2 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Chen, W.P.; Forrest, W.J.; Garnett, J.D.; Longmore, A.J. Rochester Univ., NY Royal Observatory, Edinburgh )

    1990-09-01

    Four separate lunar occultations of the Galactic center in the infrared K-band have been observed, and the results are used to estimate the size of the sources and to derive photometry. It is found that IRS 16NE, 16NW, and IRS 29 are smaller than about 510 AU and IRS 16SW-W and C are smaller than 85 AU. All sources brighter than K = 10 mag in the central pc are smaller than 510 AU and therefore seem to be stars. IRS 7 is smaller than about 100 AU. IRS 1W and 13, resolved into pairs of stars, are probably the exciting stars for these H II regions. The shape of the differential luminosity function of the stars in the central sq pc is similar to that of stars in the central 150 sq pc. There is a steady increase in star density toward the central few arcsec of the Galaxy. 26 refs.

  12. Horizon and the question whether galaxies that recede faster than light are observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, T.

    1997-02-01

    To the question, "Can we observe galaxies that recede faster than light ?", the great majority of cosmologists at present would answer, "No, such galaxies are outside our horizon". Underlying this answer is the idea that velocity in relativistic cosmology has to be defined by the relativistic Doppler shift formula. But in cosmology, redshift is "cosmological" and not "Doppler". And there is available an independent definition of velocity. Thanks to the Cosmological Principle, there is a distance- independent, universal time t and a time- dependent, instantaneous distance l, and velocity can naturally be defined as dl/dt. With this definition and the cosmological interpretation of redshift, it is shown: (1) That "horizon", which owes its role as the limit of observation to its association with infinite redshift, is irrelevant to the question. (2) That the answer must depend on the particular cosmological model. Specifically. the answer is NO for the steady state model, and YES for all three types ( k = 0, -1, +1) of the big bang model; in the k = 0 model, all sources with redshifts greater than 1.25 would have had their recession velocities at the time of emission greater than 1 light velocity. It has been found useful to contrast the character of time and distance in cosmology and black hole physics. A brief history of time, distance, velocity and redshift is given to show that the Doppler formula is inapplicable to recession velocities. Based on the present approach, a "World Atlas of the Universe" is constructed, which shows, inter alia, that recession and photon velocities at distant points obey the old, pre-relativity law of addition, while the local speed of light is kept constant

  13. P-MaNGA Galaxies: emission-lines properties - gas ionization and chemical abundances from prototype observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.; Bundy, K.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Bershady, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Bothwell, M.; Cales, S. L.; Coccato, L.; Drory, N.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, H.; Gelfand, J.; Law, D.; Masters, K.; Parejko, J.; Tremonti, C.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Yan, R.; Xiao, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Kinemuchi, K.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2015-05-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-yr Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 to 10 300 Å for a representative sample of over 10 000 nearby galaxies. In this paper, we present the analysis of nebular emission-line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams, we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterizations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended low ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER)-like emission (up to 1Re) in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the Hα equivalent width [EW(Hα)] to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionization from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between Dn(4000) and EW(HδA) and the position in the ionization diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionized by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal-rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionized gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate surface density. We further study the relation between N/O versus O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan 3-arcsec fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.

  14. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in

  15. Observing Strategy for the SDSS-IV/MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Cherinka, Brian; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Blanton, Michael R.; Klaene, Mark A.; Moran, Sean M.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Zhang, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an integral-field spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). MaNGA’s 17 pluggable optical fiber-bundle integral field units (IFUs) will observe a sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies distributed throughout the SDSS imaging footprint (focusing particularly on the North Galactic Cap). In each pointing these IFUs are deployed across a 3° field; they yield spectral coverage 3600-10300 Å at a typical resolution R ˜ 2000, and sample the sky with 2″ diameter fiber apertures with a total bundle fill factor of 56%. Observing over such a large field and range of wavelengths is particularly challenging for obtaining uniform and integral spatial coverage and resolution at all wavelengths and across each entire fiber array. Data quality is affected by the IFU construction technique, chromatic and field differential refraction, the adopted dithering strategy, and many other effects. We use numerical simulations to constrain the hardware design and observing strategy for the survey with the aim of ensuring consistent data quality that meets the survey science requirements while permitting maximum observational flexibility. We find that MaNGA science goals are best achieved with IFUs composed of a regular hexagonal grid of optical fibers with rms displacement of 5 μm or less from their nominal packing position; this goal is met by the MaNGA hardware, which achieves 3 μm rms fiber placement. We further show that MaNGA observations are best obtained in sets of three 15 minute exposures dithered along the vertices of a 1.44 arcsec equilateral triangle; these sets form the minimum observational unit, and are repeated as needed to achieve a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 5 Å-1 per fiber in the r-band continuum at a surface brightness of 23 AB arcsec-2. In order to ensure uniform coverage and delivered image quality, we require that the

  16. XMM-Newton observation of the interacting galaxies NGC 1512 and NGC 1510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducci, L.; Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The galaxy NGC 1512 is interacting with the smaller galaxy NGC 1510 and shows a peculiar morphology, characterised by two extended arms immersed in an HI disc whose size is about four times larger than the optical diameter of NGC 1512. Aims: For the first time we performed a deep X-ray observation of the galaxies NGC 1512 and NGC 1510 with XMM-Newton to gain information on the population of X-ray sources and diffuse emission in a system of interacting galaxies. Methods: We identified and classified the sources detected in the XMM-Newton field of view by means of spectral analysis, hardness-ratios calculated with a Bayesian method, X-ray variability, and cross-correlations with catalogues in optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths. We also made use of archival Swift (X-ray) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (radio) data to better constrain the nature of the sources detected with XMM-Newton. Results: We detected 106 sources in the energy range of 0.2-12 keV, out of which 15 are located within the D25 regions of NGC 1512 and NGC 1510 and at least six sources coincide with the extended arms. We identified and classified six background objects and six foreground stars. We discussed the nature of a source within the D25 ellipse of NGC 1512, whose properties indicate a quasi-stellar object or an intermediate ultra-luminous X-ray source. Taking into account the contribution of low-mass X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, the number of high-mass X-ray binaries detected within the D25 region of NGC 1512 is consistent with the star formation rate obtained in previous works based on radio, infrared optical, and UV wavelengths. We detected diffuse X-ray emission from the interior region of NGC 1512 with a plasma temperature of kT = 0.68 (0.31-0.87) keV and a 0.3-10 keV X-ray luminosity of 1.3 × 1038 erg s-1, after correcting for unresolved discrete sources. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and

  17. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  18. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  19. EXTENDED HOT HALOS AROUND ISOLATED GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.; Dai, Xinyu E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2013-01-10

    We place general constraints on the luminosity and mass of hot X-ray-emitting gas residing in extended 'hot halos' around nearby massive galaxies. We examine stacked images of 2165 galaxies from the 2MASS Isolated Galaxy Catalog as well as subsets of this sample based on galaxy morphology and K-band luminosity. We detect X-ray emission at high confidence (ranging up to nearly 10{sigma}) for each subsample of galaxies. The average L{sub X} within 50 kpc is 1.0 {+-} 0.1 (statistical) {+-}0.2 (systematic) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, although the early-type galaxies are more than twice as luminous as the late-type galaxies. Using a spatial analysis, we also find evidence for extended emission around five out of seven subsamples (the full sample, the luminous galaxies, early-type galaxies, luminous late-type galaxies, and luminous early-type galaxies) at 92.7%, 99.3%, 89.3%, 98.7%, and 92.1% confidence, respectively. Several additional lines of evidence also support this conclusion and suggest that about 1/2 of the total emission is extended, and about 1/3 of the extended emission comes from hot gas. For the sample of luminous galaxies, which has the strongest evidence for extended emission, the average hot gas mass is 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} within 50 kpc and the implied accretion rate is 0.4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  20. Herschel observations of Hickson compact groups of galaxies: Unveiling the properties of cold dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, Th.

    2013-09-01

    We present results of a Herschel far-IR and sub-mm study of a sample of 120 galaxies in 28 Hickson Compact Groups. Using the theoretical model of da Cunha et al. (2008), we have estimated the dust masses, luminosities and temperatures of the individual galaxies. Based on our results, we find that about half of the late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups, which were found to display redder UV-optical colors, have significantly lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to those of actively star-forming galaxies of the same mass found both in HCGs and the field. Examining their dust-to-gas ratios we conclude that it is much easier for the dynamical interactions to strip the HI rather than the interstellar dust and H2 out of the galaxies. About 40% of the early-type galaxies (mostly lenticulars), of the dynamically "old" groups, where found to display similar dust properties with the "red" late-type galaxies. We detect the presence of diffuse cold dust in 4 HCGs and we estimate its mass. In addition, we quantify the fraction of the 250Ïm emission, which is located out of the main bodies of the "red" late-type galaxies to be 20% of their total emission at this band. Our findings suggest that the "red" late-type, as well as these lenticular galaxies should consist the transition populations between the star-forming and the quiescent galaxies sequences. On the other hand, the complete absence of any correlation between the dust and stellar masses of the elliptical galaxies (about 30% of the far-IR detected early-type galaxies), implies the external origin of their dust content.

  1. The large-scale observational signatures of low-mass galaxies during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Keri L.; Iliev, Ilian T.; Mellema, Garrelt; Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of the epoch of reionization give us clues about the nature and evolution of the sources of ionizing photons, or early stars and galaxies. We present a new suite of structure formation and radiative transfer (RT) simulations from the PRACE4LOFAR project designed to investigate whether the mechanism of radiative feedback, or the suppression of star formation in ionized regions from UV radiation, can be inferred from these observations. Our source halo mass extends down to 108 M⊙, with sources in the mass range 108-109 M⊙ expected to be particularly susceptible to feedback from ionizing radiation, and we vary the aggressiveness and nature of this suppression. Not only do we have four distinct source models, we also include two box sizes (67 and 349 Mpc), each with two grid resolutions. This suite of simulations allows us to investigate the robustness of our results. All of our simulations are broadly consistent with the observed electron-scattering optical depth of the cosmic microwave background and the neutral fraction and photoionization rate of hydrogen at z ˜ 6. In particular, we investigate the redshifted 21-cm emission in anticipation of upcoming radio interferometer observations. We find that the overall shape of the 21-cm signal and various statistics are robust to the exact nature of source suppression, the box size, and the resolution. There are some promising model discriminators in the non-Gaussianity and small-scale power spectrum of the 21-cm signal.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCUBA observations of COSMOS galaxies (Casey+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, C. M.; Chen, C.-C.; Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koss, M.; Lee, N.; Le Floc'h, E.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    We present deep 450μm and 850μm observations of a large, uniformly covered 394arcmin2 area in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field obtained with the Scuba-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We achieve root-mean-square noise values of σ450=4.13mJy and σ850=0.80mJy. The differential and cumulative number counts are presented and compared to similar previous works. Individual point sources are identified at >3.6σ significance, a threshold corresponding to a 3-5% sample contamination rate. We identify 78 sources at 450μm and 99 at 850μm, with flux densities S450=13-37mJy and S850=2-16mJy. Only 62-76% of 450μm sources are 850μm detected and 61-81% of 850μm sources are 450μm detected. The positional uncertainties at 450μm are small (1-2.5 arcsec) and therefore allow a precise identification of multiwavelength counterparts without reliance on detection at 24μm or radio wavelengths; we find that only 44% of 450μm sources and 60% of 850μm sources have 24μm or radio counterparts. 450μm selected galaxies peak at =1.95+/-0.19 and 850μm selected galaxies peak at =2.16+/-0.11. The two samples occupy similar parameter space in redshift and luminosity, while their median SED peak wavelengths differ by ~20-50μm (translating to ΔTdust=8-12K, where 450μm selected galaxies are warmer). The similarities of the 450μm and 850μm populations, yet lack of direct overlap between them, suggests that submillimetre surveys conducted at any single far-infrared wavelength will be significantly incomplete (>~30%) at censusing infrared-luminous star formation at high z. (8 data files).

  3. Soft X-ray observations of the interacting galaxies NGC 1808 and NGC 1792

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Hartner, Gisela D.; Junkes, Norbert

    1994-01-01

    The soft X-ray emission from both galaxies NGC 1808 and NGC 1792, which we investigated using the ROSAT HRI and Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), comes most probably from X-ray binaries and/or from hot ionized gas in powerful supernovae and supernova remnants. The distribution of the soft X-ray emission in NGC 1808, which is very well correlated with the distribution of 'radio knots' in the central starburst, suggests that hot gas dominates the emission in the ROSAT band. This is consistent with the results of PSPC observations by Junkes et al. The total soft X-ray luminosity in the ROSAT band of NGC 1808 of 1.2 x 10(exp 41) ergs/s is relatively high compared with other nearby starburst galaxies. Soft X-ray emission of diffuse hot ionized gas that is associated with the outflow traced by the conspicuous dust filaments protruding from the plane has been detected. Its luminosity in the ROSAT band is greater than or equal to 3 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, i.e., several percent of the total soft X-ray luminosity. Thus, NGC 1808 is another example for a 'superwind' galaxy. The soft X-ray radiation from NGC 1792 is more likely to be dominated by a population of high-mass X-ray binaries or young powerful supernovae which are associated with the high-level star formation going on in the very prominent H II regions along its spiral arms, with possibly an additional contribution of diffuse hot ionized gas. The soft X-ray luminosities of individual sources lie in the range of 5 x 10(exp 38) to 2.7 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, thus exceeding by far the Eddington luminosity of an accreting neutron star. The peaks of some of these soft X-ray luminous sources are offset with respect to the H II regions by a few hundred parsecs. Accordingly, if the soft X-ray sources should originate from the H II regions, their relative velocities with respect to the ambient medium have to be as high as approximately 100 km/s.

  4. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF EDGES AND BUBBLES IN THE NGC 5846 GALAXY GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Machacek, Marie E.; Jerius, Diab; Kraft, Ralph; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Randall, Scott; Giacintucci, Simona; Sun Ming

    2011-12-10

    We use a combined 120 ks Chandra exposure to analyze X-ray edges produced by non-hydrostatic gas motions (sloshing) from galaxy collisions, and cavities formed by active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Evidence for gas sloshing is seen in the spiral morphology and multiple cold front edges in NGC 5846's X-ray surface brightness distribution, while the lack of spiral structure in the temperature map suggests that the perturbing interaction was not in the plane of the sky. Density and spectral modeling across the edges indicate that the relative motion of gas in the cold fronts is at most transonic. Evidence for AGN activity is seen in two inner bubbles at 0.6 kpc, filled with 5 GHz and 1.5 GHz radio plasma and coincident with H{alpha} emission, and in a ghost bubble at 5.2 kpc west of NGC 5846's nucleus. The outburst energy and ages for the inner (ghost) bubbles are {approx}10{sup 55} erg and {approx}2 Myr ({approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 55} erg and 12 Myr), respectively, implying an AGN duty cycle of 10 Myr. The inner bubble rims are threaded with nine knots, whose total 0.5-2 keV X-ray luminosity is 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, a factor {approx}2-3 less than that of the surrounding rims, and 0.7 keV mean temperature is indistinguishable from that of the rims. We suggest that the knots may be transient clouds heated by the recent passage of a shock from the last AGN outburst. We also observe gas stripping from a cE galaxy, NGC 5846A, in a 0.5 kpc long ({approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) hot gas tail, as it falls toward NGC 5846.

  5. Simulating Astro-H Observations of Sloshing Gas Motions in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Simionescu, A.; Bautz, M. W.

    2016-04-01

    Astro-H will be the first X-ray observatory to employ a high-resolution microcalorimeter, capable of measuring the shift and width of individual spectral lines to the precision necessary for estimating the velocity of the diffuse plasma in galaxy clusters. This new capability is expected to bring significant progress in understanding the dynamics, and therefore the physics, of the intracluster medium. However, because this plasma is optically thin, projection effects will be an important complicating factor in interpreting future Astro-H measurements. To study these effects in detail, we performed an analysis of the velocity field from simulations of a galaxy cluster experiencing gas sloshing and generated synthetic X-ray spectra, convolved with model Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) responses. We find that the sloshing motions produce velocity signatures that will be observable by Astro-H in nearby clusters: the shifting of the line centroid produced by the fast-moving cold gas underneath the front surface, and line broadening produced by the smooth variation of this motion along the line of sight. The line shapes arising from inviscid or strongly viscous simulations are very similar, indicating that placing constraints on the gas viscosity from these measurements will be difficult. Our spectroscopic analysis demonstrates that, for adequate exposures, Astro-H will be able to recover the first two moments of the velocity distribution of these motions accurately, and in some cases multiple velocity components may be discerned. The simulations also confirm the importance of accurate treatment of point-spread function scattering in the interpretation of Astro-H/SXS spectra of cluster plasmas.

  6. Constraints on the Energy Content of the Universe from a Combination of Galaxy Cluster Observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Haiman, Zoltan; Birkinshaw, Mark; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that constraints on cosmological parameters from the distribution of clusters as a function of redshift (dN/dz) are complementary to accurate angular diameter distance (D(sub A)) measurements to clusters, and their combination significantly tightens constraints on the energy density content of the Universe. The number counts can be obtained from X-ray and/or SZ (Sunyaev-Ze'dovich effect) surveys, and the angular diameter distances can be determined from deep observations of the intra-cluster gas using their thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission and the SZ effect. We combine constraints from simulated cluster number counts expected from a 12 deg(sup 2) SZ cluster survey and constraints from simulated angular diameter distance measurements based on the X-ray/SZ method assuming a statistical accuracy of 10% in the angular diameter distance determination of 100 clusters with redshifts less than 1.5. We find that Omega(sub m), can be determined within about 25%, Omega(sub lambda) within 20% and w within 16%. We show that combined dN/dz+(sub lambda) constraints can be used to constrain the different energy densities in the Universe even in the presence of a few percent redshift dependent systematic error in D(sub lambda). We also address the question of how best to select clusters of galaxies for accurate diameter distance determinations. We show that the joint dN/dz+ D(lambda) constraints on cosmological parameters for a fixed target accuracy in the energy density parameters are optimized by selecting clusters with redshift upper cut-offs in the range 0.55 approx. less than 1. Subject headings: cosmological parameters - cosmology: theory - galaxies:clusters: general

  7. A neutral hydrogen survey of polar-ring galaxies, 1: Green Bank observations of the northern sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, O.-G.; Sackett, P. D.; Sparke, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of a neutral hydrogen survey conducted with the Green Bank 140 foot radio telescope of 47 northern objects in the polar-ring galaxy atlas of Whitmore et al. (1990). We detected 39 of these above our detection limit of 1.7 Jy km/s; the average measured flux of 21 Jy km/s corresponds to an average neutral hydrogen mass of 5.3 x 109 solar mass for a Hubble constant of Hzero = 75 km/s/Mpc. For the polar-ring galaxies in our sample that have also been observed with radio arrays, we find that the 21 full width at half maximum (FWHM) Green Bank beam often includes much more flux than found by the synthesis instruments for the polar rings alone; some of these galaxies are known to have gas-rich companions. We compare the neutral hydrogen content of the sample to the blue luminosity and Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes. The H I-mass-to-blue-light ratios of the confirmed and probable polar rings are around unity in solar units, indicating that polar-ring galaxies (or their environments) are as gas-rich as typical irregular galaxies. For their blue luminosity, the confirmed polar rings are underluminous in the far infrared, as compared with the rest of the sample. They are also far infrared (FIR) underluminous for their H I masses, which suggests that most of the gas in the ring may be in stable orbits, rather than flowing inward to trigger star formation in the central galaxy. The more disordered class of 'related objects,' which includes a number of obvious mergers, is highly luminous in the far infrared. Detailed notes for each galaxy, including information about companions within the GB 140 min beam that may contribute to the total H I line integral and its width, are contained in the Appendix.

  8. AKARI observations of dust processing in merger galaxies: NGC2782 and NGC7727

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Mori, Tamami; Wu, Ronin; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2015-08-01

    Dust grains are the major reservoir of heavy elements and play significant roles in the thermal balance and chemistry in the interstellar medium. Where dust grains are formed and how they evolve in the ISM are one of the key issues for the understanding of the material evolution in the Universe. Although theoretical studies have been made, very little is so far known observationally about the lifecycle of dust grains in the ISM and that associated with Galactic scale events. The lifecycle of very small carbonaceous grains that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or PAH-like atomic groups are of particular interest because they emit distinct band emission in the near- to mid-infrared region and they are thought to be most vulnerable to environmental conditions. PAHs may be formed in carbon-rich stars, while recent AKARI observations suggest that they may be formed by fragmentation of large carbonaceous grains in shocks in a supernova remnant or a galactic wind (Onaka et al. 2010, A&A, 514, 15; Seok et al. 2012, ApJ, 744, 160).Here we report results of AKARI observations of two mergers. NGC2782 (Arp 215) and NGC7727 (Arp 222). NGC2782 is a merger of 200Myr old. It shows a very long western tail of HI gas by a tidal interaction and the eastern tail that consists mainly of stellar components without an appreciable amount of gas and is thought to be a relic of the colliding low-mass galaxy whose gas component has been stripped off Smith 1994, AJ, 107, 1695. We found significant emission at the 7 μm band of the IRC onboard AKARI, which must come from PAH 6.2 and 7.7 μm bands, in the eastern tail. Based on dust model fitting, we found a low abundance of ~10nm size dust despite of the presence of PAHs, suggesting that PAHs may be formed from fragmentation of ~10nm carbonaceous dust grains. NGC7727 is a 1.2Gyr old merger and shows a SED similar to the NGC2782 tail in the northern tail of the merger event product, suggesting also the formation of PAHs from

  9. Magnetic flux transfer in the 5 April 2010 Galaxy 15 substorm: an unprecedented observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-03-01

    At approximately 08:25 UT on 5 April 2010, a CME-driven shock compressed Earth's magnetosphere and applied about 15 nT of southward IMF for nearly an hour. A substorm growth phase and localized dipolarization at 08:47 UT were followed by large dipolarizations at 09:03 UT and 09:08 UT, observed by GOES West (11) in the midnight sector, and by three THEMIS spacecraft near X=-11, Y=-2 RE. A large electric field at the THEMIS spacecraft indicates so much flux transfer to the inner magnetosphere that "overdipolarization" took place at GOES 11. This transfer is consistent with the ground and space magnetic signature of the substorm current wedge. Significant particle injections were also observed. The ensemble of extreme geophysical conditions, never previously observed, is consistent with the Near-Earth Neutral Line interpretation of substorms, and subjected the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite to space weather conditions which appear to have induced a major operational anomaly.

  10. A NEW CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES BASED ON OBSERVED LONG STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, Hidetomo; Murayama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-01

    We present a new chemical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the local universe. Our main aim is to explain both their observed star formation histories and metallicity distribution functions simultaneously. Applying our new model for the four local dSphs, that is, Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, and Sextans, we find that our new model reproduces the observed chemical properties of the dSphs consistently. Our results show that the dSphs have evolved with both a low star formation efficiency and a large gas outflow efficiency compared with the Milky Way, as suggested by previous works. Comparing the observed [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation of the dSphs with the model predictions, we find that our model favors a longer onset time of Type Ia supernovae (i.e., 0.5 Gyr) than that suggested in previous studies (i.e., 0.1 Gyr). We discuss the origin of this discrepancy in detail.

  11. Simulations of nonthermal electron transport in multidimensional flows: synthetic observations of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregillis, I. L.; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu; Park, Charles

    2002-05-01

    We have applied an effective numerical scheme for cosmic-ray transport to 3D MHD simulations of jet flow in radio galaxies (see the companion paper by Jones et al. herein). The marriage of relativistic particle and 3D magnetic field information allows us to construct a rich set of 'synthetic observations' of our simulated objects. The information is sufficient to calculate the 'true' synchrotron emissivity at a given frequency using explicit information about the relativistic electrons. This enables us to produce synchrotron surface-brightness maps, including polarization. Inverse-Compton X-ray surface-brightness maps may also be produced. First results intended to explore the connection between jet dynamics and electron transport in radio lobes are discussed. We infer lobe magnetic field values by comparison of synthetically observed X-ray and synchrotron fluxes, and find these 'inverse-Compton' fields to be quite consistent with the actual RMS field averaged over the lobe. The simplest minimum energy calculation from the synthetic observations also seems to agree with the actual simulated source properties.

  12. How does our choice of observable influence our estimation of the centre of a galaxy cluster? Insights from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Biffi, Veronica; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe; Fabjan, Dunja; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Poole, Greg B.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxy clusters are an established and powerful test-bed for theories of both galaxy evolution and cosmology. Accurate interpretation of cluster observations often requires robust identification of the location of the centre. Using a statistical sample of clusters drawn from a suite of cosmological simulations in which we have explored a range of galaxy formation models, we investigate how the location of this centre is affected by the choice of observable - stars, hot gas, or the full mass distribution as can be probed by the gravitational potential. We explore several measures of cluster centre: the minimum of the gravitational potential, which would expect to define the centre if the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium; the peak of the density; the centre of brightest cluster galaxy (BCG); and the peak and centroid of X-ray luminosity. We find that the centre of BCG correlates more strongly with the minimum of the gravitational potential than the X-ray defined centres, while active galactic nuclei feedback acts to significantly enhance the offset between the peak X-ray luminosity and minimum gravitational potential. These results highlight the importance of centre identification when interpreting clusters observations, in particular when comparing theoretical predictions and observational data.

  13. Radial velocities of galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22 from observations with OPTOPUS, the ESO multiple object spectroscopy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; de Souza, R.; Lund, G.; Quintana, H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained with the ESO multiple fiber spectroscopic facility (OPTOPUS). Radial velocities and magnitudes are given for 44 galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22. The average redshift is 16160 km s-1 and the velocity dispersion 742 km s-1. The galaxy Kle 22/17 shows strong emission lines of [O III], with a FWHM of 850 km s-1, and is classified as a type 2 Seyfert. From these observations, the average efficiency of OPTOPUS, including telescope, spectrograph and detector, is computed as 1 detected photoelectron Å-1s-1 for an object of 15 B magnitude.

  14. Investigating early-type galaxy evolution with a multiwavelength approach - I. X-ray properties of 12 galaxies observed with Swift and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Wolter, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report here the results from the X-ray observations of 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) observed with Swift and XMM-Newton, originally selected from a sample of galaxies with Spitzer and/or GALEX data. With the combined analysis of new X-ray and optical-UV observations and of previously available data from archives, we aim at investigating the relation between X-ray luminosity and evolutionary phases of ETGs. We will interpret the results with the additional aid of smoothed particle hydrodynamics chemo-photometric simulations. All galaxies have been detected in the X-ray band, with luminosities Lx > 1039 erg s-1. X-ray emitting gas has been detected in about half of the sample, with luminosities from ≥1039 to 1040 erg s-1. UVOT images show a variety of morphologies, from absence of peculiar features relative to optical wavelengths typical of red and dead early-types, to well defined almost circular rings clearly emerging in the U band, to more spectacular and complex features connected to recent or even ongoing star formation (SF). We find little evidence of any influence of the SF activity on their global X-ray properties, and in particular, on the luminosity-weighted age of the system, usually estimated in the nuclear region. However, with the present data we cannot exclude that such a relation exists on smaller scales, related to the specific sites where we see evidence of newly formed stars, such as outer rings and arcs and peculiar features observed in UV images.

  15. Large-Field CO(J = 1→0) Observations of the Starburst Galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Aya; Tsuru, Takeshi G.

    2013-06-01

    We present large-field (15.7 × 16.9 arcmin2) CO(J = 1→0) observations of the starburst galaxy M 82, at an angular resolution of 22" with the NRO 45-m telescope. The CO emission was detected in the galactic disk, outflow (driven by the galactic wind) up to ˜2 kpc above the galactic plane in the halo, and in tidal streams. The kinematics of the outflow (including CO line splitting) suggests that it has the shape of a cylinder that is diverging outwards. The mass and kinetic energy of the molecular gas outflow are estimated to be (0.26-1.0) × 109 M⊙ and (1-4) × 1056 erg. A clump of CO gas was discovered 3.5 kpc above the galactic plane; it coincides with a dark lane previously found in X-ray observations, and a peak in H I emission. A comparison with H I, hot molecular hydrogen and dust suggests that the molecular gas shows signatures of warm and cool components in the outflow and tidal streams, respectively.

  16. JVLA Observations of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy Cluster ZwCl2341.1+0000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Ogrean, Georgiana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of the merging galaxy cluster ZwCl2341.1+0000 located at z=0.27. This cluster is known to contain two diffuse radio sources, the largest being about 1 Mpc in size, located on opposite sides of the cluster center. The sources are separated by about 2 Mpc. In addition, the presence of fainter emission located between the two diffuse sources has been suggested. Diffuse Mpc-size radio sources in clusters are classified as radio halos and relics. Their existence implies the presence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intracluster medium. The question is by which mechanism these cosmic rays are accelerated. For relics, there is increasing evidence that they trace particles (re)accelerated at large-scale shocks. However, the physics of the acceleration mechanism is not yet fully understood. Radio halos are centrally located in clusters. For halos, it has been suggested that the cosmic rays are re-accelerated by magneto-hydrodynamical turbulence. We use our JVLA observations of ZwCl2341.1+0000 to (1) search for the presence of additional large-scale emission in the cluster and (2) measure the spectral and polarization properties of the diffuse emission to determine its origin.

  17. Suzaku Observations of Chemical Enrcihment History of Galaxy Cluster A3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Cemile; Nihal Ercan, Enise; Bulbul, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are known as grand reservoir of metals as their intracluster medium (ICM) are gradually enriched by supernova (SN) explosions. The azimuthal and spatial distributions of these metals from cluster's centre out to the virial radius are of vital importance since they record all the information on nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history of the formation. In this study, we present results from Suzaku observations of an archetypal cluster A3112 out to ˜1470 kpc. We additionally used overlapping Chandra observations to detect unresolved point sources. We studied the total number of SN explosions and the ratio of type Ia (SN Ia) to core-collapse (SNcc) integrated over the cluster lifetime by directly fitting the X-ray spectra. We investigated almost flat radial distribution of the relative contribution of SN Ia to SNcc and the percentage of SN Ia contributing to ICM is found to be 10%-25%. We also studied the α element (Mg, Si and S) abundances. Ultimate results will be presented and they are expected to unravel the enrichment type of the evolution.

  18. Suzaku Observations of AWM 7 Cluster of Galaxies: Temperatures, Abundances, and Bulk Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kosuke; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ishida, Manabu; Sasaki, Shin; Ohashi, Takaya

    2008-01-01

    We carried out 3 observations of the cluster of galaxies AWM 7, for the central region and 20'-east and 20'-west offset regions, with Suzaku. Temperature and abundance profiles were measured out to 27' simeq 570 h70-1kpc, which corresponded to ˜0.35r180. The temperature of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) slightly decreased from 3.8keV at the center to 3.4keV in the ˜0.35 r180 region, indicating a flatter profile than those in other nearby clusters. The abundance ratio of Si to Fe was almost constant in our observations, while the Mg-to-Fe ratio increased with radius from the cluster center. The O to Fe ratio in the west region showed an increase with radius, while that in the east region was almost flat, though the errors were relatively large. These features suggest that the enrichment process is significantly different between products of type II supernovae (O and Mg) and those by type Ia supernovae (Si and Fe). We also examined the positional shift of the central energy of a He-like Fe-Kα line, in search of possible rotation of the ICM. The 90% upper limit for the line-of-sight velocity difference was derived to be Δ v lesssim 2000kms-1, suggesting that the ellipticity of AWM 7 is rather caused by a recent directional infall of gas along the large-scale filament.

  19. HI studies of extremely metal-deficient galaxies - II. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of SBS 1129+576

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekta; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Pustilnik, Simon A.

    2006-10-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope HI observations of an extremely metal-deficient galaxy SBS 1129+576. SBS 1129+576 has a weighted mean oxygen abundance of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.41 +/- 0.07, or 1/18 of the solar value. Our HI observations show that the galaxy is strongly interacting with a companion (projected separation ~27 kpc) galaxy, SBS 1129+577. HI emission from a third, smaller galaxy, SDSS J113227.68+572142.3, is also present in the data cube. We study the HI morphology and kinematics of this small group at angular resolutions ranging from ~40 to 8arcsec. The low-resolution map shows a bridge of emission connecting the two larger galaxies and a large one-armed spiral distortion of the disc of SBS 1129+577. We measure HI masses of ~4.2 × 108, ~2.7 × 109 and ~2.1 × 108Msolar for SBS 1129+576, SBS 1129+577 and the gas in the bridge, respectively. Assuming that most of the bridge gas originally came from SBS 1129+576, approximately one-third of its original gas mass has been stripped off. The third smaller galaxy has an HI mass of (MHI ~ 1.1 × 107Msolar) and does not show any sign of interaction with the other two galaxies. The higher-resolution maps show that SBS 1129+577 has a central bar and a ring surrounding the bar; there is also a hint of an integral-shaped warp in SBS 1129+576. All these features are very likely to have been induced by the tidal interaction. In both SBS 1129+576 and SBS 1129+577, there is, in general, a good correspondence between regions with high HI column density and those with ongoing star formation. The two brightest HII regions in SBS 1129+576 have (inclination-corrected) gas column densities of ~1.6 × 1021 and ~1.8 × 1021 atoms cm-2, respectively. The inclination-corrected HI column density near the HII regions in SBS 1129+577 is generally above ~2.0 × 1021 atoms cm-2. These values are close to the threshold density for star formation observed in other blue compact galaxies. In contrast to SBS 1129+576 and SBS 1129

  20. Chandra Observations of the Galaxy Group AWM 5: Cool Core Reheating and Thermal Conduction Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Nulsen, P.; David, L.; Kraft, R.; Simionescu, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present an analysis of a 40 ks Chandra observation of the galaxy group AWM 5. It has a small (~8 kpc) dense cool core with a temperature of ~1.2 keV and the temperature profile decreases at larger radii, from ~3.5 keV just outside the core to ~2 keV at ~300 kpc from the center. The abundance distribution shows a "hole" in the central ~10 kpc, where the temperature declines sharply. An abundance of at least a few times solar is observed ~15-20 kpc from the center. The deprojected electron density profile shows a break in slope at ~13 kpc and can be fit by two β models, with β = 0.72+0.16 -0.11 and rc = 5.7+1.8 -1.5 kpc, for the inner part, and β = 0.34 ± 0.01 and rc = 31.3+5.8 -5.5 kpc, for the outer part. The mass fraction of hot gas is fairly flat in the center and increases for r > 30 kpc up to a maximum of ~6.5% at r ~ 380 kpc. The gas cooling time within the central 30 kpc is smaller than a Hubble time, although the temperature only declines in the central ~8 kpc region. This discrepancy suggests that an existing cooling core has been partially reheated. In particular, thermal conduction could have been a significant source of reheating. In order for heating due to conduction to balance cooling due to emission of X-rays, conductivity must be suppressed by a large factor (at least ~100). Past active galactic nuclei activity (still visible as a radio source in the center of the group) is, however, the most likely source that reheated the central regions of AWM 5. We also studied the properties of the ram pressure stripped tail in the group member NGC 6265. This galaxy is moving at M ≈ 3.4+0.5 -0.6 (v ~ 2300 km s-1) through the hot group gas. The physical length of the tail is ~42 kpc and its mass is 2.1 ± 0.2 × 109 M sun.

  1. Very-long-baseline radio interferometry observations of low power radio galaxies.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, G; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Lara, L; Venturi, T; Marcaide, J M

    1995-01-01

    The parsec scale properties of low power radio galaxies are reviewed here, using the available data on 12 Fanaroff-Riley type I galaxies. The most frequent radio structure is an asymmetric parsec-scale morphology--i.e., core and one-sided jet. It is shared by 9 (possibly 10) of the 12 mapped radio galaxies. One (possibly 2) of the other galaxies has a two-sided jet emission. Two sources are known from published data to show a proper motion; we present here evidence for proper motion in two more galaxies. Therefore, in the present sample we have 4 radio galaxies with a measured proper motion. One of these has a very symmetric structure and therefore should be in the plane of the sky. The results discussed here are in agreement with the predictions of the unified scheme models. Moreover, the present data indicate that the parsec scale structure in low and high power radio galaxies is essentially the same. PMID:11607596

  2. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its Extremely Red Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; DellAntonio, Ian; Merrill, Javier

    2004-01-01

    We present near-infrared (a) and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in an infrared search at Kitt Peak 5 hours after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest ever observed in the R-band at such an early epoch, and exhibits very red colors, with R-K approximately equal to 6. The magnitude of the optical afterglow of GRB 030115 is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting that without early nIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark" burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likely due to dust extinction and indicate that at least some optical afterglows are observations were also taken of the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts imply that the host, and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field are at z approximately 2.5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB 030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxy shows extremely red colors (R-K=5) and is the first GRB host to be classified as an Extreme Red Object (ERO). Some of the galaxies surrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of the cluster are much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. As it is thought that much of high redshift star formation occurs in highly obscured environments it may well be that GRB 030115 represents a transition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen to date and a population which are very heavily extinguished, even in the nIR.

  3. Nearby Galaxy Filaments and the Ly-alpha Forest: Confronting Simulations and the UV Background with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Hernandez, Audra K.; French, David M.; Kim, Tae-Sun; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Savage, Blair D.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of the formation of large-scale structures predict that dark matter, low density highly ionized gas, and galaxies form 10 to 40 Mpc scale filaments. These structures are easily recognized in the distribution of galaxies. Here we use Lyα absorption lines to study the gas in 30 × 6 Mpc filament at cz ˜ 3500 km s-1, defined using a new catalog of nearby (cz < 10,000 km s-1) galaxies, which is complete down to a luminosity of about 0.05 L* for the region of space analyzed here. Using Hubble Space Telescope spectra of 24 active galactic nuclei, we sample the gas in this filament. All of our sightlines pass outside the virial radius of any known filament galaxy. Within 500 kpc of the filament axis the detection rate is ˜80%, but no detections are seen more than 2.1 Mpc from the filament axis. The width of the Lyα lines correlates with filament impact parameter and the four BLAs in our sample occur within 400 kpc of the filament axis, indicating increased temperature and/or turbulence. Comparing to simulations, we find that the recent Haardt & Madau extragalactic ionizing background predicts a factor of 3-5 too few ionizing photons. Using a more intense radiation field matches the hydrogen density profile within 2.1 Mpc of the filament axis, but the simulations still overpredict the detection rate between 2.1 and 5 Mpc from the axis. The baryonic mass inside filament galaxies is 1.4 × 1013 M⊙, while the mass of filament gas outside galaxy halos is found to be 5.2 × {10}13 {M}⊙ . Based on observations taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  4. First Hubble Space Telescope observations of the brightest stars in the Virgo galaxy M100 = NGC 4321

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Stetson, Peter B.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Trauger, John T.; Gallagher, John S., III; Ballester, Gilda E.; Burrows, Christopher J.

    1994-01-01

    As part of both the Early Release Observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, we have obtained multiwavelength BVR Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) images for the face-on Virgo cluster spiral galaxy M100 = NGC 4321. We report here preliminary results from those observations, in the form of a color-magnitude diagram for approximately 11,500 stars down to V approximately 27 mag and a luminosity function for the brightest blue stars which is found to have a slope of 0.7, in excellent agreement with previous results obtained for significantly nearer galaxies. With the increased resolution now available using WFPC2, the number of galaxies in which we can directly measure Population I stars and thereby quantify the recent evolution, as well as test stellar evolution theory, has dramatically increased by at least a factor of 100. Finally, we find that the stars are present in M100 at the colors and luminosities expected for the brightest Cepheid variables in galaxies.

  5. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /JAXA, Sagamihara /SLAC /Ehime U. /Wako, RIKEN /Saitama U. /Kogakuin U.

    2007-01-03

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.

  6. Observations of CO J=3-2 in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.; Clark, Jason

    2001-05-01

    Observations are presented of the distribution of 12CO J=3-2 emission in the starburst galaxy M82 covering a region 3''×3'' (2.8×2.8 kpc). This area includes the halo region involved in the superwind outflow. More limited coverage is presented for 13CO J=3-2 and C18O J=3-2. The mass of molecular gas in the halo is about 5×108 Msolar, with a dynamical timescale of the order of 107 yr. The results show the region of the outflow at higher CO excitation than previous published observations. Comparison with recently made observations of 12CO J=2-1 shows that the CO gas becomes progressively de-excited at larger distances from the starburst disk, and the isotopic ratio 13CO/12CO J=3-2 also becomes smaller outside the starburst disk. These effects are interpreted as differences in excitation and optical depth between the starburst region and the outflow and outer disk. A comparison between the 12CO J=3-2 emission with a published 850 μm continuum map shows that CO makes a significant contribution to the continuum in this band and that the fractional contribution is greatest near +/-30" from the nucleus approximately along the major axis. The progressively slower rotation of the halo gas with distance above and below the disk, coupled with consideration of the conservation of angular momentum, is analyzed to reveal the pattern of the outflow. The flow appears to diverge more strongly below the disk, with a cone angle of about 90°, which compares to about 40° above the disk. The mass and energetics of the halo molecular gas suggest the possibility that the molecular material and dust in the halo will not escape from M82 but are instead being recycled through the halo after injection as supershells by one or more transient starburst events.

  7. Observation of the Coma cluster of galaxies with ROSAT during the all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briel, U. G.; Henry, J. P.; Boehringer, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Coma cluster of galaxies was observed with the position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) during the ROSAT all sky survey. We find evidence for substructure in this cluster. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from the regions of the NGC 4839 and 4911 subgroups at 6 percent and 1 percent of the total cluster emission respectively. There may be emission associated with the NGC 4874 and 4889 subgroups as well. The NGC 4839 group appears to be in the process of merging with the cluster. These X-ray data show that at least some of the groups previously found in projection are in fact physical objects possessing potential wells deep enough to trap their own X-ray gas. Because of the unlimited field of view of the all sky survey and the low background of the PSPC, we were able to measure the azimuthally averaged surface brightness of Coma out to approximately 100 arcmin, twice as far as was previously possible. Given the validity of our mass models, these new X-ray data imply that within 5/h(50) Mpc the binding mass of the Coma cluster is 1.8 +/- 0.6 x 10 exp 15/h(50) solar mass, and the fraction of cluster mass contained in hot gas is 0.30 +/- 0.14h(50) exp -3/2. Furthermore, the binding mass is more centrally concentrated than is the X-ray gas.

  8. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: Observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-04-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterises spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterises spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  9. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. I. IRAS pointed observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.

    1989-04-01

    Redshifts for 66 galaxies were obtained from a sample of 93 60-micron sources detected serendipitously in 22 IRAS deep pointed observations, covering a total area of 18.4 sq deg. The flux density limit of this survey is 150 mJy, 4 times fainter than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). The luminosity function is similar in shape with those previously published for samples selected from the PSC, with a median redshift of 0.048 for the fainter sample, but shifted to higher space densities. There is evidence that some of the excess number counts in the deeper sample can be explained in terms of a large-scale density enhancement beyond the Pavo-Indus supercluster. In addition, the faintest counts in the new sample confirm the result of Hacking et al. (1989) that faint IRAS 60-micron source counts lie significantly in excess of an extrapolation of the PSC counts assuming no luminosity or density evolution. 81 refs.

  10. Observable signatures of a black hole ejected by gravitational-radiation recoil in a galaxy merger.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham

    2007-07-27

    According to recent simulations, the coalescence of two spinning black holes (BHs) could lead to a BH remnant with recoil speeds of up to thousands of km s(-1). Here we examine the circumstances resulting from a gas-rich galaxy merger under which the ejected BH would carry an accretion disk and be observable. As the initial BH binary emits gravitational radiation and its orbit tightens, a hole is opened in the disk which delays the consumption of gas prior to the eventual BH ejection. The punctured disk remains bound to the ejected BH within the region where the gas orbital velocity is larger than the ejection speed. For a approximately 10(7) M[middle dot in circle] BH the ejected disk has a characteristic size of tens of thousands of Schwarzschild radii and an accretion lifetime of approximately 10(7) yr. During that time, the ejected BH could traverse a considerable distance and appear as an off-center quasar with a feedback trail along the path it left behind. PMID:17678347

  11. Gas velocity patterns in simulated galaxies: observational diagnostics of spiral structure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J.; Morokuma-Matsui, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Egusa, F.; Kuno, N.

    2016-08-01

    There are two theories of stellar spiral arms in isolated disc galaxies that model stellar spiral arms with different longevities: quasi-stationary density wave theory, which characterizes spirals as rigidly rotating, long-lived patterns (i.e. steady spirals), and dynamic spiral theory, which characterizes spirals as differentially rotating, transient, recurrent patterns (i.e. dynamic spirals). In order to discriminate between these two spiral models observationally, we investigated the differences between the gas velocity patterns predicted by these two spiral models in hydrodynamic simulations. We found that the azimuthal phases of the velocity patterns relative to the gas density peaks (i.e. gaseous arms) differ between the two models, as do the gas flows; nevertheless, the velocity patterns themselves are similar for both models. Such similarity suggests that the mere existence of streaming motions does not conclusively confirm the steady spiral model. However, we found that the steady spiral model shows that the gaseous arms have radial streaming motions well inside the co-rotation radius, whereas the dynamic spiral model predicts that the gaseous arms tend to have tangential streaming motions. These differences suggest that the gas velocity patterns around spiral arms will enable distinction between the spiral theories.

  12. Theoretical uncertainties due to AGN subgrid models in predictions of galaxy cluster observable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Sutter, P. M.; Ricker, Paul M.

    2012-12-01

    Cosmological constraints derived from galaxy clusters rely on accurate predictions of cluster observable properties, in which feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a critical component. In order to model the physical effects due to supermassive black holes (SMBH) on cosmological scales, subgrid modelling is required, and a variety of implementations have been developed in the literature. However, theoretical uncertainties due to model and parameter variations are not yet well understood, limiting the predictive power of simulations including AGN feedback. By performing a detailed parameter-sensitivity study in a single cluster using several commonly adopted AGN accretion and feedback models with FLASH, we quantify the model uncertainties in predictions of cluster integrated properties. We find that quantities that are more sensitive to gas density have larger uncertainties (˜20 per cent for Mgas and a factor of ˜2 for LX at R500), whereas TX, YSZ and YX are more robust (˜10-20 per cent at R500). To make predictions beyond this level of accuracy would require more constraints on the most relevant parameters: the accretion model, mechanical heating efficiency and size of feedback region. By studying the impact of AGN feedback on the scaling relations, we find that an anti-correlation exists between Mgas and TX, which is another reason why YSZ and YX are excellent mass proxies. This anti-correlation also implies that AGN feedback is likely to be an important source of intrinsic scatter in the Mgas-TX and LX-TX relations.

  13. On VI Observations of Galaxy Clusters: Evidence for Modest Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Fabian, A. C.; Miller, Eric D.; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2006-05-01

    A prediction of the galaxy-cluster cooling flow model is that as gas cools from the ambient cluster temperature, emission lines are produced in gas at subsequently decreasing temperatures. Gas passing through 105.5 K emits in the lines of O VI λλ1032, 1035, and here we report a FUSE study of these lines in three cooling flow clusters, Abell 426, Abell 1795, and AWM 7. No emission was detected from AWM 7, but O VI is detected from the centers of Abell 426 and Abell 1795, and possibly to the south of the center in Abell 1795, where X-ray and optical emission line filaments lie. In Abell 426 these line luminosities imply a cooling rate of 32+/-6 Msolar yr-1 within the central r=6.2 kpc region, while for Abell 1795 the central cooling rate is 26+/-7 Msolar yr-1 (within r=22 kpc), and about 42+/-9 Msolar yr-1 including the southern pointing. Including other studies, three of six clusters have O VI emission, and they also have star formation as well as emission lines from 104 K gas. These observations are generally consistent with the cooling flow model, but at a rate closer to 30 Msolar yr-1 than to the originally suggested values of 102-10 3 Msolar yr-1.

  14. High resolution infrared astronomy satellite observations of a selected spiral galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The H I, infrared, CO, H alpha and H beta band observations of M51, the prototypical grand-design spiral galaxy, are used to study the consequences of star formation for the distribution of H I and dust. Using the new Very Large Array (VLA) map of 21 cm emission, the Owens Valley Radio Observatory CO mosaic map, and an H alpha imate, new tests were performed with the idea of Tilanus and Allen that the H I is largely a photodissociation product in star-forming regions. It is confirmed that the H I spiral arms are generally coincident with the H II region arms, and offset downstream from the CO arms. The radial distributions of total gas, H alpha and H I surface density have a simple explanation in the dissociation picture. The distributions also demonstrate how the surface density of H I might be related to the star formation efficiency in molecule-rich galaxies. The large width of the H I regions along the arms compared to that of the giant H II regions can be understood in terms of a simple calculation of the expected size of an H I region associated with a typical giant H II region. The longer lifetime of the stars producing dissociating radiation vs. those producing ionizing radiation and the relatively long molecular formation timescale will also contribute to the greater width of the H I arms if stars are continuously forming on the arms. The lack of detailed coincidence of the H I and H II regions along the inner arms has a variety of possible explanations. Two simple tests were performed to probe the origins of the IRAS emission in M51. First, it was found that the infrared excess (IFE) of M51 is 24, suggesting that a substantial fraction of the infrared emission arises from dust heated by photons which do not originate in massive star-formaing regions. Second, radial cuts through the IRAS bands show that at 12, 25, and 60 microns, the arm-interarm contrast of the IRAS emission is substantially less than that of the H alpha emission, providing further

  15. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  16. IRAS observations of optically selected galaxies. I - The properties of the UGC redshift sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Rice, Walter

    1989-01-01

    The FIR properties of more than 2400 optically selected galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalog are examined. The galaxies were detected by IRAS at 60 and 100 microns and have measured redshifts. A simple radiative transfer model is presented to study the nature of dust-heating sources. It is shown that for many normal disk galaxies, dust heated by old disk stars competes with dust heated by UV photons from newly formed stars. It is found that the 60-micron/100-micron flux density ratio may be used as an indicator of the dominant dust-heating source. Scaling relations with galaxy size and mass are presented which make it possible to estimate the contributions of any cirrus-like component to the total FIR luminosity.

  17. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  18. Linear polarization observations in selected celestial zones - the central region of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, R.C.; Simard-Normandin, M.; Vallee, J.P.

    1988-07-01

    The Algonquin Radio Observatory and the very large array have been used to obtain the linear polarization integrated over the angular size of a radio galaxy or quasar. All sources are located in a celestial angular zone encompassing the central region of the Galaxy. In addition to the total intensity (Stokes I) flux density, the percentage and position angle of the linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) are obtained for 14 sources at several centimetric wavelengths. 15 references.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the globular cluster systems of early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Arunav

    1999-11-01

    We have studied the globular cluster systems of 60 early type galaxies using archival Hubble Space Telescope images. We discovered that the color distributions of the cluster systems of 30 to 60 percent of ellipticals is bimodal. The bimodality is most likely a signature of two major epochs of globular cluster formation in the history of these galaxies. At least 10% of the S0 galaxies in our sample show similar evidence of bimodality. However, the mechanism for the formation of the redder or metal-rich set of clusters appears to be different in the two galaxies that we studied in most detail, M87 the giant elliptical at the center of the Virgo cluster, and the S0 galaxy NGC 3115. While the red clusters in M87 appear to have formed during a major merger, the metal-rich clusters in NGC 3115 are associated with the thick disk of the galaxy. It seems likely that the red clusters in NGC 3145 were formed during a minor merger that did not destroy the disk. We measured the turnover luminosity of the globular cluster luminosity function in both the V and I-band. Comparing the turnover luminosities with other distance estimates we find that the absolute magnitude of the turnover luminosity in both bands is constant to within ~ 0.1 to ~ 0.2 mag. We conclude that the peak of the globular cluster luminosity function is an excellent distance indicator, with an accuracy comparable to other competing methods. We have also measured the sizes of individual clusters in our sample. The median size of the clusters appears to be the same in all galaxies. We suggest that this can be exploited to directly measure the distance to galaxies by simple geometrical considerations.

  20. Spitzer Observations of Two Early-Type Spiral Galaxies with Dust Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendo, G. J.; Armus, L.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D. A.; Draine, B. T.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Grauer, A.; Helou, G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Joseph, R. D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Kewley, L. J.; Leitherer, C.; Li, A.; Malhotra, S.; Meyer, M.; Murphy, E. J.; Regan, M. W.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Roussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M. D.; Walter, F.

    2004-12-01

    We present Spitzer images of the SB0/a galaxy NGC 1291 and the SAa galaxy NGC 4594. Both galaxies contain dust rings that can be used for studying the relation between dust emission and star formation activity. At 24 microns, the nuclei of both galaxies are the brightest sources in the galaxies, and dust emission from the rings is relatively weak. At 160 microns, however, the dust rings are more prominent sources; in NGC 4594, the dust ring is the source of virtually all of the 160 micron emission. We discuss whether the 160 micron emission from the rings is related to star formation activity or to heating by older stellar populations, and we examine the relation between dust and PAH emission. For NGC 4594, we also present submillimeter data that show that the nucleus dominates the 850 micron emission. These results demonstate that the 850 micron emission cannot come from the same dust that dominates the 160 micron emission. We examine the possible mechanisms that could be generating the 850 micron emission as well as the implications for dust models and galaxy spectral energy distribution templates.

  1. REPRODUCING THE STELLAR MASS/HALO MASS RELATION IN SIMULATED {Lambda}CDM GALAXIES: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONAL ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Ferah; Governato, F.; Loebman, S.; Quinn, T.; Brooks, A. M.; Christensen, C.; Shen, S.; Moster, B.; Wadsley, J.

    2013-03-20

    We examine the present-day total stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) ratio as a function of halo mass for a new sample of simulated field galaxies using fully cosmological, {Lambda}CDM, high-resolution SPH + N-body simulations. These simulations include an explicit treatment of metal line cooling, dust and self-shielding, H{sub 2}-based star formation (SF), and supernova-driven gas outflows. The 18 simulated halos have masses ranging from a few times 10{sup 8} to nearly 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. At z = 0, our simulated galaxies have a baryon content and morphology typical of field galaxies. Over a stellar mass range of 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}-4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} we find extremely good agreement between the SHM ratio in simulations and the present-day predictions from the statistical abundance matching technique presented in Moster et al. This improvement over past simulations is due to a number systematic factors, each decreasing the SHM ratios: (1) gas outflows that reduce the overall SF efficiency but allow for the formation of a cold gas component; (2) estimating the stellar masses of simulated galaxies using artificial observations and photometric techniques similar to those used in observations; and (3) accounting for a systematic, up to 30% overestimate in total halo masses in DM-only simulations, due to the neglect of baryon loss over cosmic times. Our analysis suggests that stellar mass estimates based on photometric magnitudes can underestimate the contribution of old stellar populations to the total stellar mass, leading to stellar mass errors of up to 50% for individual galaxies. These results highlight that implementing a realistic high density threshold for SF considerably reduces the overall SF efficiency due to more effective feedback. However, we show that in order to reduce the perceived tension between the SF efficiency in galaxy formation models and in real galaxies, it is very important to use proper techniques to

  2. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of Extended [O III] λ5007 Emission in a Far-Infrared Selected Sample of Seyfert Galaxies: Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. R.; Donley, J. L.; Antonucci, R. R. J.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kinney, A. L.

    2003-10-01

    We present a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) survey of extended [O III] emission for a sample of 60 Seyfert galaxies (22 Seyfert 1 galaxies and 38 Seyfert 2 galaxies), selected based on their far-infrared properties. The observations for 42 of these galaxies were done in a snapshot survey with WFPC2. The remaining 18 were obtained from the HST archive, most of which were observed with the same configuration. These observations cover 68% of the objects in the sample defined by Kinney et al. and create a valuable data set for the study of the narrow-line region (NLR) properties of Seyfert galaxies. In this paper, we present the details of the observations, reductions, and measurements. We also discuss the extended structure of individual sources, and the relation of this emission to the radio and host galaxy morphology. We also address how representative the subsample of [O III]-imaged galaxies is of the entire sample, and possible selection effects that may affect this comparison of the properties of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  3. CATALOG OF OBSERVED TANGENTS TO THE SPIRAL ARMS IN THE MILKY WAY GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2014-11-01

    From the Sun's location in the Galactic disk, one can use different arm tracers (CO, H I, thermal or ionized or relativistic electrons, masers, cold and hot dust, etc.) to locate a tangent to each spiral arm in the disk of the Milky Way. We present a master catalog of the astronomically observed tangents to the Galaxy's spiral arms, using different arm tracers from the literature. Some arm tracers can have slightly divergent results from several papers, so a mean value is taken—see the Appendix for CO, H II, and masers. The catalog of means currently consists of 63 mean tracer entries, spread over many arms (Carina, Crux-Centaurus, Norma, Perseus origin, near 3 kpc, Scutum, Sagittarius), stemming from 107 original arm tracer entries. Additionally, we updated and revised a previous statistical analysis of the angular offset and linear separation from the mid-arm for each different mean arm tracer. Given enough arm tracers, and summing and averaging over all four spiral arms, one could determine if arm tracers have separate and parallel lanes in the Milky Way. This statistical analysis allows a cross-cut of a Galactic spiral arm to be made, confirming a recent discovery of a linear separation between arm tracers. Here, from the mid-arm's CO to the inner edge's hot dust, the arm halfwidth is about 340 pc; doubling would yield a full arm width of 680 pc. We briefly compare these observations with the predictions of many spiral arm theories, notably the density wave theory.

  4. Detail studies of the physical properties in the outer regions of galaxy clusters using Suzaku observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyk, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed physical analysis of five nearby galaxy clusters using Suzaku observationsis presented. The low and stable level of the instrumental background at large radii facilitate the determination of the main physical characteristics in clusters at the virial radius. The temperatures, metal abundances, and entropy profiles have been constructed out to the outskirts of the clusters. The temperature profiles all display the same shape, with a negative gradient towards to the center and a flat outer plateau. The strong temperature gradients in the central parts of the clusters are usually associated with strong peaks of the surface brightness profiles. The temperature systematically decrease outward from the central regions, by a factor of three at and slightly beyond the cluster outskirts. The temperature profiles are compared with profiles predicted by N-body and hydrodynamical simulations obtained using several numerical algorithms. The slopes in the observed and simulated temperature profiles are consistent with each other in the cluster outskirts. The central regions of the clusters are characterized by low entropy and high metallicity. The possible influence of cool cores on the cluster outskirts is also discussed. The total mass profiles were determined using the observed gas-density and temperature profiles, assuming hydrostatic equilibriumand spherical symmetry. The gas-density profiles were fitted using an improved three-dimensional model to fit the inner and outer regions of the cluster independently. The total mass profiles were described using an NFW model out to R 200. The measurements show clear evidence for universality of the total mass distribution. The scaled mass profiles in units of R 200 and M 200 display a dispersion of ~15% at 0.1 R 200. The fraction of gas out to R 200 was also found.

  5. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Junichiro; Tanaka, Y.T.; Stawarz, L.; O'Sullivan, S.P.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Funk, S.; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Spiral Galaxy M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; McCollough, Michael L.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah

    2003-01-01

    A Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S imaging observation is used to study the population of X-ray sources in the nearby Sab galaxy M81 (NGC 3031). A total of 177 sources are detected with 124 located within the D(sub 25) isophote to a limiting X-ray luminosity of approx. 3 x 10(exp 36) ergs/s. Source positions, count rates, luminosities in the 0.3-8.0 keV band, limiting optical magnitudes, and potential counterpart identifications are tabulated. Spectral and timing analysis of the 36 brightest sources are reported including the low luminosity active galactic nucleus, SN 1993J, and the Einstein-discovered ultraluminous X-ray source X6. The nucleus accounts for approx. 86%, or 5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, of the total X-ray emission from M81. Its spectrum is well fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index 1.98 +/- 0.08, consistent with previous observations (average index 1.9). SN 1993J has softened and faded since its discovery. At an age of 2594 days, SN 1993J displayed a complex thermal spectrum from a reverse shock rich in Fe L and highly ionized Mg, Si, and S but lacking O. A hard X-ray component, emitted by a forward shock, is also present. X6 is spatially coincident with a stellar object with optical brightness and colors consistent with an O9-B1 main-sequence star. It is also coincident with a weak radio source with a flux density of approx. 95 microJy at lambda = 3.6 cm. The continuum-dominated X-ray spectrum of X6 is most closely reproduced by a blackbody disk model suggesting the X-ray source is an approx. 18 solar mass object accreting at nearly its Eddington limit.

  7. ALMA observations of the Antennae galaxies. I. A new window on a prototypical merger

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Brogan, Crystal; Evans, Aaron; Hibbard, John; Leroy, Adam; Remijan, Anthony; Sheth, Kartik; Chandar, Rupali; Johnson, Kelsey; Privon, George

    2014-11-10

    We present the highest spatial resolution (≈0.''5) CO (3-2) observations to date of the 'overlap' region in the merging Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/39), taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. We report on the discovery of a long (3 kpc), thin (aspect ratio 30/1), filament of CO gas that breaks up into roughly 10 individual knots. Each individual knot has a low internal velocity dispersion (≈10 km s{sup –1}); the dispersion of the ensemble of knots in the filament is also low (≈10 km s{sup –1}). At the other extreme, we find that the individual clouds in the supergiant molecular cloud 2 region discussed by Wilson and collaborators have a large range of internal velocity dispersions (10 to 80 km s{sup –1}), and a large dispersion among the ensemble (≈80 km s{sup –1}). Other large-scale features observed in CO emission, and their correspondence with historical counterparts using observations in other wavelengths, are also discussed. We compare the locations of small-scale CO features with a variety of multi-wavelength observations, in particular broad- (BVIJH) and narrow-band data (H{sub α} and Pa{sub β}) taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and radio (3.6 cm) continuum observations taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. This comparison leads to the development of an evolutionary classification system that provides a framework for studying the sequence of star cluster formation and evolution—from diffuse supergiant molecular clouds (SGMCs) to proto, embedded, emerging, young, intermediate/old clusters. The relative timescales have been assessed by determining the fractional population of sources at each evolutionary stage. The main uncertainty in this estimate is the identification of four regions as candidate protoclusters (i.e., strong compact CO emission but no clearly associated radio emission). Using the evolutionary framework, we estimate that the maximum age range of clusters in a single GMC is ≈10 Myr

  8. Joint scaling properties of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and optical richness observables in an optically-selected galaxy cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Christopher Holland

    Galaxy cluster abundance measurements are an important tool used to study the universe as a whole. The advent of multiple large-area galaxy cluster surveys across multiple ensures that cluster measurements will play a key role in understanding the dark energy currently thought to be accelerating the universe. The main systematic limitation at the moment is the understanding of the observable-mass relation. Recent theoretical work has shown that combining samples of clusters from surveys at different wavelengths can mitigate this systematic limitation. Precise measurements of the scatter in the observable-mass relation can lead to further improvements. We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signal for 28 galaxy clusters selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) maxBCG catalog. This cluster sample represents a complete, volume-limited sample of the richest galaxy clusters in the SDSS between redshifts 0.2 ≥ z ≥ 0.3, as measured by the RedMaPPer algorithm being developed for the Dark Energy Survey (DES; Rykoff et al. 2012). We develop a formalism that uses the cluster abundance in tandem with the galaxy richness measurements from SDSS and the SZ signal measurements from CARMA to calibrate the SZ and optical observable-mass relations. We find that the scatter in richness at fixed mass is σlog λ| M = 0.24+0.09-0.07 using SZ signal calculated by integrating a cluster pressure profile to a radius of 1 Mpc at the redshift of the cluster. We also calculate the SZ signal at R500 and find that the choice of scaling relation used to determined R500 has a non-trivial effect on the constraints of the observable-mass relationship. Finally, we investigate the source of disagreement between the positions of the SZ signal and SDSS Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs). Improvements to the richness calculator that account for blue BCGs in the cores of cool-core X-ray clusters, as well as

  9. OSO-8 X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies. 1. Observations of twenty clusters: Physical correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Smith, B. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.

    1978-01-01

    OSO-8 X-ray spectra from 2 to 20 keV were analyzed for 26 clusters of galaxies. Temperature, emission integrals, iron abundances, and low energy absorption measurements are given. Eight clusters have positive iron emission line detections at the 90% confidence level, and all twenty cluster spectra are consistent with Fe/H=0.000014 by number with the possible exception of Virgo. Physical correlations between X-ray spectral parameters and other cluster properties are examined. It is found that: (1) the X-ray temperature is approximately proportional to the square of the velocity dispersion of the galaxies; (2) the emission integral and therefore the bolometric X-ray luminosity is a strong function of the X-ray temperature; (3) the X-ray temperature and emission integral are better correlated with cluster central galaxy density than with richness; (4) temperature and emission integral are separately correlated with Rood-Sastry type; and (5) the fraction of galaxies which are spirals is correlated with the observed ram pressure in the cluster core.

  10. The observed growth of massive galaxy clusters - II. X-ray scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A.; Allen, S. W.; Ebeling, H.; Rapetti, D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2010-08-01

    This is the second in a series of papers in which we derive simultaneous constraints on cosmology and X-ray scaling relations using observations of massive, X-ray flux-selected galaxy clusters. The data set consists of 238 clusters with 0.1-2.4keV luminosities >2.5 × 1044h-270ergs-1, and incorporates follow-up observations of 94 of those clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory or ROSAT (11 were observed with both). The clusters are drawn from three samples based on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey: the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (78/37 clusters detected/followed-up), the ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray sample (126/25) and the bright sub-sample of the Massive Cluster Survey (34/32). Our analysis accounts self-consistently for all selection effects, covariances and systematic uncertainties. Here we describe the reduction of the follow-up X-ray observations, present results on the cluster scaling relations, and discuss their implications. Our constraints on the luminosity-mass and temperature-mass relations, measured within r500, lead to three important results. First, the data support the conclusion that excess heating of the intracluster medium (or a combination of heating and condensation of the coldest gas) has altered its thermodynamic state from that expected in a simple, gravitationally dominated system; however, this excess heat is primarily limited to the central regions of clusters (r < 0.15r500). Secondly, the intrinsic scatter in the centre-excised luminosity-mass relation is remarkably small, being bounded at the <10 per cent level in current data; for the hot, massive clusters under investigation, this scatter is smaller than in either the temperature-mass or YX-mass relations (10-15 per cent). Thirdly, the evolution with redshift of the scaling relations is consistent with the predictions of simple, self-similar models of gravitational collapse, indicating that the mechanism responsible for heating the central regions of clusters was in operation before

  11. X-ray and submillimetre observations of star-forming QSOs in the epoch of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Mat; Stevens, Jason; Carrera, Francisco; Symeonidis, Myrto; Vieira, Joaquin; HerMES Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. The most promising mechanism to terminate star formation is a strong wind from the AGN that drives the interstellar medium out into intergalactic space. In the years leading up to the launch of Herschel, ground based submillimetre observations combined with X-ray surveys have shown that a subset of luminous QSOs, those with significant X-ray absorption (despite their strong UV emission), are embedded in powerful star-forming submillimetre galaxies. I will present the XMM-Newton spectroscopy that implicates highly-ionised winds in the role of X-ray absorber in these objects, and discuss the QSO/star formation evolutionary-sequence suggested by these observations. I will move on to describe the results obtained from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) observations of the Chandra Deep Field North which pairs the deepest submillimetre images ever obtained with one of the two deepest X-ray survey exposures ever taken (2012 Nature 485, 213). The Herschel data provide the first sensitive glimpse into the far-infrared and star formation properties of a large part of the AGN population at cosmological distances. We show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN at redshifts of 1-3 (when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old), but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around AGN above an X-ray luminosity of 10^44 ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxies of powerful AGN is

  12. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  13. First Observational Support for Overlapping Reionized Bubbles Generated by a Galaxy Overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Dayal, P.; Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Hutter, A.; Brammer, G.; Merlin, E.; Grazian, A.; Pilo, S.; Amorin, R.; Cristiani, S.; Dickinson, M.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Guaita, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Maiolino, R.; Paris, D.; Santini, P.; Vallini, L.; Vanzella, E.; Wagg, J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-band imaging of the BDF field specifically designed to identify faint companions around two of the few Lyα emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at z ˜ 7. Although separated by only 4.4 proper Mpc these galaxies cannot generate H ii regions large enough to explain the visibility of their Lyα lines, thus requiring a population of fainter ionizing sources in their vicinity. We use deep HST and VLT-Hawk-I data to select z ˜ 7 Lyman break galaxies around the emitters. We select six new robust z ˜ 7 LBGs at Y ˜ 26.5-27.5 whose average spectral energy distribution is consistent with the objects being at the redshift of the close-by Lyα emitters. The resulting number density of z ˜ 7 LBGs in the BDF field is a factor of approximately three to four higher than expected in random pointings of the same size. We compare these findings with cosmological hydrodynamic plus radiative transfer simulations of a universe with a half neutral IGM: we find that indeed Lyα emitter pairs are only found in completely ionized regions characterized by significant LBG overdensities. Our findings match the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts are generated within significant galaxy overdensities and support a scenario where faint, “normal” star-forming galaxies are responsible for reionization.

  14. Observational model of the ionized gas in Seyfert and radio-galaxy nuclei*

    PubMed Central

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1978-01-01

    Equivalent widths of the total emission-line Hβ in Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, and intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies, expressed in terms of the featureless continuum, all have approximately the same frequency distribution. This suggests that the energy-input mechanism to both the narrow-line, low-density gas and the broad-line, high-density gas is photoionization by the featureless continuum. The reason for the weakness of the narrow emission lines in extreme Seyfert 1 galaxies is then the absorption of most of the ionizing photons in the dense gas near the central source. The statistics of line widths can be fitted by a model in which the dense gas has typical rotational velocity 5000 km/sec and typical turbulent velocity 2000 km/sec. A model is proposed in which the dense gas forms a rotating, turbulent disk with dimension ≈0.1 pc and height/diameter ≈2/5. Seyfert 2 galaxies are objects with little dense gas, and intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies are objects in which the dense gas is optically thin to ionizing radiation at least along the poles. Most radio galaxies have strong narrow emission lines, suggesting that escape of radio plasma can only occur where some ionizing photons can also escape from the dense gas. Other predictions, implications, and tests of this model are discussed. Images PMID:16592488

  15. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra deep field south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Comastri, A.; Ranalli, P.; Akylas, A.; Salvato, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.; Koutoulidis, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra deep field south. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. This type of galaxy is characterized by a very high infrared (IR) to optical flux ratio (f24 μm/fR > 1000), which in the case of CT AGN could be due to the suppression of AGN emission by absorption and its subsequent re-emission in the IR. The most reliable way of confirming the CT nature of an AGN is by X-ray spectroscopy. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields, the Chandra deep field north (CDF-N), and the Chandra deep field south (CDF-S). In that work, we only found a moderate percentage (<50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample. However, we pointed out that the limited photon statistics for most of the sources in the sample did not allow us to strongly constrain this number. In this paper, we further explore the properties of the sample of DOGs in the CDF-S presented in that work by using not only a deeper 6Ms Chandra survey of the CDF-S, but also by combining these data with the 3Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (NH > 1023 cm-2), whereas 2 look unabsorbed, and the other 3 are only moderately absorbed. Among the highly absorbed AGN, we find that only three could be considered CT AGN. In only one of these three cases, we detect a strong Fe Kα emission line; the source is already classified as a CT AGN with Chandra data in a previous work. Here we confirm its CT nature by combining Chandra and XMM-Newton data. For the other two CT

  16. Spitzer 24 Micron Observations of Optical/Near-Infrared-Selected Extremely Red Galaxies: Evidence for Assembly of Massive Galaxies at Z approximately equal to 1-2?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Choi, Philip I.; Fadda, D.; Marleau, F. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Im, M.; Armus, L.; Frayer, D. T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Helou, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Chapman, S.; Fan, F.; Heinrichsen, I.; Lacy, M.; Shupe, D. L.; Squires, G. K.; Surace, J.; Wilson, G.

    2004-01-01

    We carried out direct measurement of the fraction of dusty sources in a sample of extremely red galaxies with (R - Ks) >= 5.3 mag and Ks < 20:2 mag, using 24 micron data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Combining deep 24 micron Ks- and R-band data over an area of 64 arcmin(sup 2) in ELAIS N1 of the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS), we find that 50% +/- 6% of our extremely red object (ERO) sample have measurable 24 micron flux above the 3 (sigma) flux limit of 40 (micro)Jy. This flux limit corresponds to a star formation rate (SFR) of 12 solar masses per year 1, much more sensitive than any previous long-wavelength measurement. The 24 micron-detected EROs have 24 micron/2.2 micron and 24 micron/0.7 micron flux ratios consistent with infrared luminous, dusty sources at z >= 1, and are an order of magnitude too red to be explained by an infrared quiescent spiral or a pure old stellar population at any redshift. Some of these 24 micron-detected EROs could be active galactic nuclei; however, the fraction among the whole ERO sample is probably small, 10%-20%, as suggested by deep X-ray observations as well as optical spectroscopy. Keck optical spectroscopy of a sample of similarly selected EROs in the FLS field suggests that most of the EROs in ELAIS N1 are probably at z 1. The mean 24 micron flux (167 (micro)Jy) of the 24 micron-detected ERO sample roughly corresponds to the rest-frame 12 micron luminosity, (nu)L(nu)(12 micron, of 3x10(exp 10)(deg) solar luminosities at z 1. Using the c IRAS (nu)L(nu)(12 (micron) and infrared luminosity LIR(8-1000 (micron), we infer that the (LIR) of the 24 micron- detected EROs is 3 x 10(exp 11) and 1 x 10(exp 12) solar luminosities at z = 1.0 and similar to that of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The corresponding SFR would be roughly 50-170 solar masses per year. If the timescale of this starbursting phase is on the order of 108 yr as inferred for the local LIRGs and ULIRGs, the

  17. Decoding X-ray observations from centres of galaxy clusters using MCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhchaura, Kiran; Saini, Tarun Deep; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally the thermodynamic profiles (gas density, temperature, etc.) of galaxy clusters are obtained by assuming spherical symmetry and modeling projected X-ray spectra in each annulus. The outer annuli contribute to the inner ones and their contribution needs to be subtracted to obtain the temperature and density of spherical shells. The usual deprojection methods lead to propagation of errors from outside to in and typically do not model the covariance of parameters in different radial shells. In this paper we describe a method based on a free-form model of clusters with cluster parameters (density, temperature) given in spherical shells, which we {\\it jointly} forward fit to the X-ray data by constructing a Bayesian posterior probability distribution that we sample using the MCMC technique. By systematically marginalising over the nuisance outer shells, we estimate the inner entropy profiles of clusters and fit them to various models for a sample of Chandra X-ray observations of 17 clusters. We show that the entropy profiles in almost all of our clusters are best described as cored power laws. A small subsample is found to be either consistent with a power law, or alternatively their cores are not fully resolved (smaller than, or about few kpc). We find marginal evidence for bimodality in the central values of entropy (and cooling time) corresponding to cool-core and non cool-core clusters. The minimum value of the ratio of the cooling time and the free-fall time (min[$t_{\\rm cool}/t_{\\rm ff}$]; correlation is much weaker with core entropy) is anti-correlated with $H\\alpha$ and radio luminosity. $H\\alpha$ emitting cold gas is absent in our clusters with min$(t_{\\rm cool}/t_{\\rm ff})\\gtrsim 10$. Our lowest core entropies are systematically and substantially lower than the values quoted by the ACCEPT sample.

  18. Decoding X-ray observations from centres of galaxy clusters using MCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhchaura, Kiran; Saini, Tarun Deep; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally the thermodynamic profiles (gas density, temperature, etc.) of galaxy clusters are obtained by assuming spherical symmetry and modelling projected X-ray spectra in each annulus. The outer annuli contribute to the inner ones and their contribution needs to be subtracted to obtain the temperature and density of spherical shells. The usual deprojection methods lead to propagation of errors from outside to in and typically do not model the covariance of parameters in different radial shells. In this paper we describe a method based on a free-form model of clusters with cluster parameters (density, temperature) given in spherical shells, which we jointly forward fit to the X-ray data by constructing a Bayesian posterior probability distribution that we sample using the MCMC technique. By systematically marginalizing over the nuisance outer shells, we estimate the inner entropy profiles of clusters and fit them to various models for a sample of Chandra X-ray observations of 17 clusters. We show that the entropy profiles in almost all of our clusters are best described as cored power laws. A small subsample is found to be either consistent with a power law, or alternatively their cores are not fully resolved (smaller than, or about few kpc). We find marginal evidence for bimodality in the central values of entropy (and cooling time) corresponding to cool-core and non cool-core clusters. The minimum value of the ratio of the cooling time and the free-fall time (min[tcool/tff]; correlation is much weaker with core entropy) is anti-correlated with H α and radio luminosity. H α emitting cold gas is absent in our clusters with min(tcool/tff) ≳ 10. Our lowest core entropies are systematically and substantially lower than the values quoted by the ACCEPT sample.

  19. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF SPT-DISCOVERED, STRONGLY LENSED, DUSTY, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Y. D.; Marrone, D. P.; Spilker, J. S.; Bothwell, M.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Vieira, J. D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aird, K. A.; Aravena, M.; De Breuck, C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; and others

    2013-04-20

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 860 {mu}m imaging of four high-redshift (z = 2.8-5.7) dusty sources that were detected using the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 mm and are not seen in existing radio to far-infrared catalogs. At 1.''5 resolution, the ALMA data reveal multiple images of each submillimeter source, separated by 1''-3'', consistent with strong lensing by intervening galaxies visible in near-IR imaging of these sources. We describe a gravitational lens modeling procedure that operates on the measured visibilities and incorporates self-calibration-like antenna phase corrections as part of the model optimization, which we use to interpret the source structure. Lens models indicate that SPT0346-52, located at z = 5.7, is one of the most luminous and intensely star-forming sources in the universe with a lensing corrected FIR luminosity of 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun} and star formation surface density of 4200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find magnification factors of 5 to 22, with lens Einstein radii of 1.''1-2.''0 and Einstein enclosed masses of 1.6-7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. These observations confirm the lensing origin of these objects, allow us to measure their intrinsic sizes and luminosities, and demonstrate the important role that ALMA will play in the interpretation of lensed submillimeter sources.

  20. ROSAT PSPC and HRI observations of the composite starburst/Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Halpern, Jules P.; Iwasawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    The nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672 has been observed with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and High Resolution Imager (HRI) instruments on board the ROSAT X-ray satellite. NGC 1672 is thought to have an obscured Seyfert nucleus, and it has strong starburst activity as well. Three bright X-ray sources with luminosities 1-2 x 10(exp 40) erg/s are clearly identified with NGC 1672. The strongest lies at the nucleus, and the other two lie at the ends of NGC 1672's prominent bar, locations that are also bright in H alpha and near-infrared images. The nuclear source is resolved by the HRI on about the scale of the recently identified nuclear ring, and one of the sources at the ends of the bar is also probably resolved. The X-ray spectrum of the nuclear source is quite soft, having a Raymond-Smith plasma temperature of approximately equals 0.7 keV and little evidence for intrinsic absorption. The ROSAT band X-ray flux of the nuclear source appears to be dominated not by X-ray binary emission but rather by diffuse gas emission. The absorption and emission properties of the sources, as well as their spatial extents, lead us to models of superbubbles driven by supernovae. However, the large density and emission measure of the nuclear X-ray source stretch the limits that can be comfortably accommodated by these models. We do not detect direct emission from the putative Seyfert nucleus, although an alternative model for the nuclear source is thermal emission from gas that is photoionized by a hidden Seyfert nucleus. The spectra of the other two X-ray sources are harder than that of the nuclear source, and have similar difficulties with regard to superbubble models.

  1. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  2. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  3. Enhanced star formation rates in AGN hosts with respect to inactive galaxies from PEP-Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Rosario, D. J.; Shao, L.; Lutz, D.; Maiolino, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F. E.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Fontana, A.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mainieri, V.; Nordon, R.; Pérez Garcia, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Salvato, M.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wuyts, S.

    2012-04-01

    We compare the average star formation (SF) activity in X-ray selected AGN hosts with a mass-matched control sample of inactive galaxies, including both star forming and quiescent sources, in the 0.5 < z < 2.5 redshift range. Recent observations carried out by PACS, the 60-210 μm photometric camera on board the Herschel Space Observatory, in GOODS-S, GOODS-N and COSMOS allow us to obtain an unbiased estimate of the far-IR luminosity, and hence of the SF properties, of the two samples. Accurate AGN host stellar mass estimates are obtained by decomposing their total emission into the stellar and the nuclear components. We report evidence of a higher average SF activity in AGN hosts with respect to the control sample of inactive galaxies. The level of SF enhancement is modest (~0.26 dex at ~3σ confidence level) at low X-ray luminosities (LX ≲ 1043.5 erg s-1) and more pronounced (0.56 dex at > 10σ confidence level) in the hosts of luminous AGNs. However, when comparing to star forming galaxies only, AGN hosts are found broadly consistent with the locus of their "main sequence". We investigate the relative far-IR luminosity distributions of active and inactive galaxies, and find a higher fraction of PACS detected, hence normal and highly star forming systems among AGN hosts. Although different interpretations are possible, we explain our findings as a consequence of a twofold AGN growth path: faint AGNs evolve through secular processes, with instantaneous AGNaccretion not tightly linked to the current total SF in the host galaxy, while the luminous AGNs co-evolve with their hosts through periods of enhanced AGN activity and star formation, possibly through major mergers. While an increased SF activity with respect to inactive galaxies of similar mass is expected in the latter, we interpret the modest SF offsets measured in low-LX AGN hosts as either a) generated by non-synchronous accretion and SF histories in a merger scenario or b) due to possible connections

  4. Observational evidence of a slow downfall of star formation efficiency in massive galaxies during the past 10 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Elbaz, D.; Pannella, M.; Ciesla, L.; Wang, T.; Koekemoer, A.; Rafelski, M.; Daddi, E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the causes of the reported mass-dependence in the slope of the SFR-M∗ relation, the so-called main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and discuss its implication on the physical processes that shaped the star formation history of massive galaxies over cosmic time. We made use of the near-infrared high-resolution imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope in the CANDELS fields to perform a careful bulge-to-disk decomposition of distant galaxies and measure for the first time the slope of the SFR-Mdisk relation at z = 1. We find that this relation very closely follows the shape of the nominal SFR-M∗ correlation, still with a pronounced flattening at the high-mass end. This clearly excludes, at least at z = 1, the progressive growth of quiescent stellar bulges in star-forming galaxies as the main driver for the change of slope of the main sequence. Then, by stacking the Herschel data available in the CANDELS field, we estimated the gas mass (Mgas = MH i + MH2) and the star formation efficiency (SFE ≡ SFR/Mgas) at different positions on the SFR-M∗ relation. We find that the relatively low SFRs observed in massive galaxies (M∗> 5 × 1010 M⊙) are not caused by a reduced gas content, but by a star formation efficiency that is lower by up to a factor of 3 than in galaxies with lower stellar mass. The trend at the lowest masses is probably linked to the dominance of atomic over molecular gas. We argue that this stellar-mass-dependent SFE can explain the varying slope of the main sequence since z = 1.5, hence over 70% of the Hubble time. The drop in SFE occurs at lower masses in the local Universe (M∗> 2 × 1010 M⊙) and is not present at z = 2. Altogether, this provides evidence for a slow decrease in star formation efficiency in massive main sequence galaxies. The resulting loss of star formation is found to be rising starting from z = 2 to reach a level similar to the mass growth of the quiescent population by z = 1. We finally discuss the possible

  5. A New Look at Ionized Disk Winds in Seyfert-1 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, Allison; Miller, Jon M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of deep, high signal-to-noise Chandra/HETG observations of four Seyfert-1 galaxies with known warm absorbers (outflowing winds), including NGC 4151, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3783, and NGC 3516. Focusing on the 4-10 keV Fe K-band, we fit the spectra using grids of models characterized by photoion- ized absorption. Even in this limited band, the sensitive, time-averaged spectra all require 2-3 zones within the outflow. In an improvement over most previous studies, re-emission from the winds was self-consistently included in our models. The broadening of these emission components, when attributed to Keplerian rotation, yields new launching radius estimations that are largely consistent with the broad-line region. If this is correct, the hot outflow may supply the pressure needed to confine clumps within the broad-line region. NGC 4151 and NGC 3516 each appear to have a high-velocity component with speeds comparable to 0.01c. The winds in each of the four objects have kinetic luminosities greater than 0.5% of the host galaxy bolometric luminosity for a filling factor of unity, indicating that they may be significant agents of AGN feedback.

  6. First survey of Wolf-Rayet star populations over the full extension of nearby galaxies observed with CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles-Caballero, D.; Díaz, A. I.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Kehrig, C.; García-Benito, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; González Delgado, R. M.; van de Ven, G.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Meidt, S.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Mast, D.; Mendoza, M. A.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The search of extragalactic regions with conspicuous presence of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars outside the Local Group is challenging task owing to the difficulty in detecting their faint spectral features. In this exploratory work, we develop a methodology to perform an automated search of WR signatures through a pixel-by-pixel analysis of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data belonging to the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey, CALIFA. This procedure has been applied to a sample of nearby galaxies spanning a wide range of physical, morphological, and environmental properties. This technique allowed us to build the first catalogue of regions rich in WR stars with spatially resolved information, and enabled us to study the properties of these complexes in a two-dimensional (2D) context. The detection technique is based on the identification of the blue WR bump (around He iiλ4686 Å, mainly associated with nitrogen-rich WR stars; WN) and the red WR bump (around C ivλ5808 Å, mainly associated with carbon-rich WR stars; WC) using a pixel-by-pixel analysis that maximizes the number of independent regions within a given galaxy. We identified 44 WR-rich regions with blue bumps distributed in 25 out of a total of 558 galaxies. The red WR bump was identified only in 5 of those regions. Most of the WR regions are located within one effective radius from the galaxy centre, and around one-third are located within ~1 kpc or less from the centre. We found that the majority of the galaxies hosting WR populations in our sample are involved in some kind of interaction process. Half of the host galaxies share some properties with gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts where WR stars, such as potential candidates to the progenitors of GRBs, are found. We also compared the WR properties derived from the CALIFA data with stellar population synthesis models, and confirm that simple star models are generally not able to reproduce the observations. We conclude that other effects, such as

  7. Spitzer observations of red galaxies: Implication for high-redshift star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, Casey

    2006-03-01

    My colleagues and I identified distant red galaxies (DRGs) with J - Ks > 2.3 in the southern Great Observatories Origins Deep Surveys (GOODS-S) field. These galaxies reside at z ˜ 1-3.5, (< z> ≃ 2.2) and based on their ACS (0.4-1 μm), ISAAC (1-2.2 μm), and IRAC (3-8 μm) photometry, they typically have stellar masses M ⩾ 10 11 M⊙. Interestingly, more than 50% of these objects have 24 μm flux densities ⩾50 μJy. Attributing the IR emission to star-formation implies star-formation rates (SFRs) of ≃100-1000 M⊙ yr -1. As a result, galaxies with M ⩾ 10 11 M⊙ have specific SFRs equal to or exceeding the global value at z ˜ 1.5-3. In contrast, galaxies with M ⩾ 10 11 M⊙ at z ˜ 0.3-0.75 have specific SFRs less than the global average, and more than an order of magnitude lower than that for massive DRGs at z ˜ 1.5-3. Thus, the bulk of star formation in massive galaxies is largely complete by z ˜ 1.5. The red colors and large inferred stellar masses in the DRGs suggest that much of the star formation in these galaxies occurred at redshifts z ≳ 5-6. Using model star-formation histories that match the DRG colors and stellar masses at z ˜ 2-3, and measurements of the UV luminosity density at z ≳ 5-6, we consider what constraints exist on the stellar initial mass function in the progenitors of the massive DRGs at z ˜ 2-3.

  8. High-J CO Sleds in Nearby Infrared Bright Galaxies Observed By Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, N.; Sturm, E.; Sternberg, A.; Janssen, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Fischer, J.; Contursi, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Poglitsch, A.; Veilleux, S.; Davies, R.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; Verma, A.; Weiß, A.; Polisensky, E.; Nikola, T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) CO rotational emission from nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and starburst galaxies, as well as several merging systems and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). Using the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), we have detected transitions in the Jupp = 14-30 range. The PACS CO data obtained here provide the first reference of well-sampled FIR extragalactic CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) for this range. We find a large range in the overall SLED shape, even among galaxies of similar type, demonstrating the uncertainties in relying solely on high-J CO diagnostics to characterize the excitation source of a galaxy. Combining our data with low-J line intensities taken from the literature, we present a CO ratio-ratio diagram and discuss its value in distinguishing excitation sources and physical properties of the molecular gas. The position of a galaxy on such a diagram is less a signature of its excitation mechanism, than an indicator of the presence of warm, dense molecular gas. We then quantitatively analyze the CO emission from a subset of the detected sources with single-component and two-component large velocity gradient (LVG) radiative transfer models to fit the CO SLEDs. From these fits we derive the molecular gas mass and the corresponding CO-to-H2 conversion factor, {{α }CO}, for each respective source. For the ULIRGs we find α values in the canonical range 0.4- 5M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1, while for the other objects, α varies between 0.2 and 14. Finally, we compare our best-fit LVG model results with previous studies of the same galaxies and comment on any differences. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Combining Optical and 21 cm Observations: A Study of Baryons in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith Horne, Lisa; Zeh, P.; Rosenberg, J. L.; West, A. A.; ALFALFA Team

    2009-01-01

    This poster presents the first look at combining data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA), a blind HI 21cm radio survey, with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The goal of the project is to study the state of baryonic mass in galaxies in order to provide a better understanding of the evolution of gas into stars. Optical surveys tend to overlook some gas-rich galaxies such as low surface brightness galaxies because these systems are too low-contrast to easily be identified by their starlight while HI surveys can easily identify such objects by the gas that they contain. However, HI surveys tend to miss elliptical and spheroidal galaxies that have little gas. Therefore, the combination of the ALFALFA and SDSS data will allow a wider selection of objects to be detected and studied than would be possible with only one survey or the other. The data presented here are taken from one region of sky where ALFALFA and SDSS overlap. The environments probed in this region include the Great Wall and the low-density region in front of the Great Wall. It is found that this region contains a variety of galaxies from very dim, gas-deprived ellipticals to extremely bright, gas-rich spirals. We present measurements of HI mass, optical luminosity, and velocity width for galaxies in the sample and examine the relationship between these quantities. ALFALFA, PIs Giovanelli and Haynes, is a legacy survey funded by NAIC and NSF. SDSS is a legacy survey managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions.

  10. Observations of Environmental Quenching in Groups in the 11 GYR Since z = 2.5: Different Quenching For Central and Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tal, Tomer; Dekel, Avishai; Marchesini, Danilo; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Oesch, Pascal; Muzzin, Adam; Brammer, Gabriel B.; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Leja, Joel; Magee, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 less than z less than 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z approximately 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M=6.5x10(exp 10) M/solar mass) to nearby massive ellipticals (M=1.5x10(exp 11) M/solar mass). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M=6.5x10(exp 9) M/solar mass). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10(exp 12) and 10(exp 13) M/solar mass, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  11. Observations of environmental quenching in groups in the 11 Gyr since z = 2.5: Different quenching for central and satellite galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Daniel; Oesch, Pascal; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Marchesini, Danilo; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-07-10

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 < z < 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z ∼ 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 10}) to nearby massive ellipticals (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 1.5 × 10{sup 11}). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 9}). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M{sub ☉}, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  12. Galaxies near distant quasars - Observational evidence for statistical gravitational lensing. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugmann, W.

    1989-09-01

    A new statistical analysis of the data presented by Fugmann (1988) indicating that the association of the nearest neighboring galaxies with distant flat-spectrum radio quasars is significant at the 97.5 percent level. The distribution of nearest-neighbor distances is consistent with model calculations of gravitational microlensing, although very small angular distances may be systematically depleted. The overdensity of galaxies near the radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars of this sample seems to exceed that implied by the results of Webster et al. (1988) for a sample of optically selected QSOs.

  13. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  14. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-01-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  15. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-11-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  16. Ultraviolet to Mid-Infrared Observations of Star-forming Galaxies at z~2: Stellar Masses and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Erb, Dawn K.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Adelberger, Kurt L.; Pettini, Max; Barmby, Pauline; Huang, Jiasheng

    2005-06-01

    We present the broadband UV through mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of 72 spectroscopically confirmed star-forming galaxies at z=2.30+/-0.3. Located in a 72 arcmin2 field centered on the bright background QSO, HS 1700+643, these galaxies were preselected to lie at z~2 solely on the basis of their rest-frame UV colors and luminosities and should be representative of UV-selected samples at high redshift. In addition to deep ground-based photometry spanning from 0.35 to 2.15 μm, we make use of Spitzer IRAC data, which probe the rest-frame near-IR at z~2. The range of stellar populations present in the sample is investigated with simple, single-component stellar population synthesis models. The inability to constrain the form of the star formation history limits our ability to determine the parameters of extinction, age, and star formation rate without using external multiwavelength information. Emphasizing stellar mass estimates, which are much less affected by these uncertainties, we find =10.32+/-0.51 for the sample. The addition of Spitzer IRAC data as a long-wavelength baseline reduces stellar mass uncertainties by a factor of 1.5-2 relative to estimates based on optical-Ks photometry alone. However, the total stellar mass estimated for the sample is remarkably insensitive to the inclusion of IRAC data. We find correlations between stellar mass and rest-frame R band (observed Ks) and rest-frame 1.4 μm (observed 4.5 μm) luminosities, although with significant scatter. Even at rest-frame 1.4 μm, the mass-to-light ratio varies by a factor of 15 indicating that even the rest-frame near-IR, when taken alone, is a poor indicator of stellar mass in star-forming galaxies at z~2. Allowing for the possibility of episodic star formation, we find that typical galaxies in our sample could contain up to 3 times more stellar mass in an old underlying burst than what was inferred from single-component modeling. In contrast, mass

  17. CO (J = 1-0) Observation of the cD Galaxy of AWM 7: Constraints on the Evaporation of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Tosaki, Tomoka; Nakamichi, Akika; Kuno, Nario

    2000-04-01

    We have searched for molecular gas in the cD galaxy of a poor cluster of galaxies, AWM 7, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We did not detect CO emission in the galaxy. Our limit of molecular gas in the inner 7.5 kpc is M_H_2< 4times 108 MO . We estimate the total mass of molecular gas left in the cD galaxy when the gas deposited by a cooling flow once becomes molecular gas and the molecular gas is continuously evaporated by the ambient hot gas. The observational limit of molecular gas requires f>~ 10-3, where f is the ratio of the heat conduction rate to that of Spitzer. However, this contradicts recent X-ray observations showing f<10-5. Thus, the non-detection of CO cannot be explained by evaporation, and most of the cooled gas predicted by a cooling flow model may not change into molecular gas in the cD galaxy. Moreover, we estimate the evaporation time of molecular clouds brought to a cD galaxy through the capture of gas-rich galaxies and find that these clouds should not be evaporated if f<~ 10-3-10-4. Therefore, the non-detection of CO in a cD galaxy could constrain the total mass of the molecular clouds brought into it.

  18. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Dissociative Merger in the Galaxy Cluster CIZA J0107.7+5408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Dawson, W. A.; Mroczkowski, T.; Blanton, E. L.; Bulbul, E.; Giacintucci, S.

    2016-06-01

    We present results based on X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the massive galaxy cluster CIZA J0107.7+5408. We find that this system is a post-core-passage, dissociative, binary merger, with the optical galaxy density peaks of each subcluster leading their associated X-ray emission peaks. This separation occurs because the diffuse gas experiences ram pressure forces, while the effectively collisionless galaxies (and presumably their associated dark matter (DM) halos) do not. This system contains double-peaked diffuse radio emission, possibly a double radio relic with the relics lying along the merger axis and also leading the X-ray cores. We find evidence for a temperature peak associated with the SW relic, likely created by the same merger shock that is powering the relic radio emission in this region. Thus, this system is a relatively rare, clean example of a dissociative binary merger, which can in principle be used to place constraints on the self-interaction cross-section of DM. Low-frequency radio observations reveal ultra-steep spectrum diffuse radio emission that is not correlated with the X-ray, optical, or high-frequency radio emission. We suggest that these sources are radio phoenixes, which are preexisting non-thermal particle populations that have been re-energized through adiabatic compression by the same merger shocks that power the radio relics. Finally, we place upper limits on inverse Compton emission from the SW radio relic.

  19. Observational properties of the open cluster system of the Milky Way and what they tell us about our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moitinho, André

    2010-01-01

    Almost 80 years have passed since Trumpler's analysis of the Galactic open cluster system laid one of the main foundations for understanding the nature and structure of the Milky Way. Since then, the open cluster system has been recognised as a key source of information for addressing a wide range of questions about the structure and evolution of our Galaxy. Over the last decade, surveys and individual observations from the ground and space have led to an explosion of astrometric, kinematic and multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic open cluster data. In addition, a growing fraction of these data is often time-resolved. Together with increasing computing power and developments in classification techniques, the open cluster system reveals an increasingly clearer and more complete picture of our Galaxy. In this contribution, I review the observational properties of the Milky Way's open cluster system. I discuss what they can and cannot teach us now and in the near future about several topics such as the Galaxy's spiral structure and dynamics, chemical evolution, large-scale star formation, stellar populations and more.

  20. The star formation rate intensity distribution function—. Comparison of observations with hierarchical galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan

    2002-09-01

    Recently, Lanzetta et al. [ApJ (2002) in press] have measured the distribution of star formation rate intensity in galaxies at various redshifts. This data set has a number of advantages relative to galaxy luminosity functions; the effect of surface-brightness dimming on the selection function is simpler to understand, and this data set also probes the size distribution of galactic disks. We predict this function using semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation in a ΛCDM cosmology. We show that the basic trends found in the data follow naturally from the redshift evolution of dark matter halos. The data are consistent with a constant efficiency of turning gas into stars in galaxies, with a best-fit value of 2%, where dust obscuration is neglected; equivalently, the data are consistent with a cosmic star formation rate which is constant to within a factor of two at all redshifts above two. However, the practical ability to use this kind of distribution to measure the total cosmic star formation rate is limited by the predicted shape of an approximate power law with a smoothly varying power, without a sharp break.

  1. New Constraints on Galaxy Cluster Evolution from Chandra Observations of SPT-Selected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.

    2014-07-01

    In the past 4 years, the number of known galaxy clusters at z>0.5 has grown by a factor of >5, thanks primarily to Sunyaev Zel'dovich surveys such as Planck, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Here, I present several important results from the SPT 2500 deg^2 survey, which has discovered over 500 new galaxy clusters, more than 300 of which are at z>0.5. Using data primarily from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we determine evolutionary trends in the central cluster galaxy (inner ˜20 kpc), the cluster core (inner ˜100 kpc), and cluster outskirts (>1 Mpc) over the past 8 Gyr, addressing such outstanding issues as the cooling flow problem, the effects of AGN feedback, and subhalo accretion, or clumping, at the virial radius. These studies are providing the most detailed constraints to date on the evolution of galaxy clusters on all physical scales, and will continue to improve with the next generation of surveys already upon us.

  2. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE (NEP) SUPERCLUSTER AT z = 0.087: MID-INFRARED VIEW OF TRANSITION GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Jeon, Yiseul; Shim, Hyunjin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Papovich, Casey; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki

    2012-02-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies within a supercluster in the north ecliptic pole region at z {approx} 0.087 observed with the AKARI satellite. We use data from the AKARI NEP-Wide (5.4 deg{sup 2}) IR survey and the CLusters of galaxies EVoLution studies (CLEVL) mission program. We show that near-IR (3 {mu}m)-mid-IR (11 {mu}m) color can be used as an indicator of the specific star formation rate and the presence of intermediate-age stellar populations. From the MIR observations, we find that red-sequence galaxies consist not only of passively evolving red early-type galaxies, but also of (1) 'weak-SFGs' (disk-dominated star-forming galaxies that have star formation rates lower by {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign than blue-cloud galaxies) and (2) 'intermediate-MXGs' (bulge-dominated galaxies showing stronger MIR dust emission than normal red early-type galaxies). These two populations can be a set of transition galaxies from blue, star-forming, late-type galaxies evolving into red, quiescent, early-type ones. We find that the weak-SFGs are predominant at intermediate masses (10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) and are typically found in local densities similar to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. As much as 40% of the supercluster member galaxies in this mass range can be classified as weak-SFGs, but their proportion decreases to <10% at larger masses (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) at any galaxy density. The fraction of the intermediate-MXG among red-sequence galaxies at 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} also decreases as the density and mass increase. In particular, {approx}42% of the red-sequence galaxies with early-type morphologies are classified as intermediate-MXGs at intermediate densities. These results suggest that the star formation activity is strongly dependent on the stellar mass, but that the morphological transformation is mainly controlled by the environment.

  3. Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Bourne, N.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; De Zotti, G.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S. J.; Scott, D.; Smith, D. J. B.; Smith, M. W. L.; Symeonidis, M.; Valiante, E.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 20 BeppoSAX and Swift GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of z = 3.1) located in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, the Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey, the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, totalling 880 deg2, or ˜3 per cent of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale Herschel survey - therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using deep data at wavelengths of 100-500 μm, we tentatively detected 1 out of 20 GRB hosts located in these fields. We constrain their dust masses and star formation rates (SFRs), and discuss these in the context of recent measurements of submillimetre galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The average far-infrared flux of our sample gives an upper limit on SFR of <114 M⊙ yr-1. The detection rate of GRB hosts is consistent with that predicted assuming that GRBs trace the cosmic SFR density in an unbiased way, i.e. that the fraction of GRB hosts with SFR > 500 M⊙ yr-1 is consistent with the contribution of such luminous galaxies to the cosmic star formation density.

  4. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, Y.; Cheung, C.C.; Hayashida, M.; Grandi, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Celotti, A.; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; Taylor, G.B.; Tosti, G.; Digel, S.W.; McConville, W.; Finke, J.; D'Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  5. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image is a Galaxy Evolution Explorer observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way. Andromeda is the nearest large galaxy to our own. The image is a mosaic of 10 separate Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken in September, 2003. The color image (with near ultraviolet shown by red and far ultraviolet shown by blue) shows blue regions of young, hot, high mass stars tracing out the spiral arms where star formation is occurring, and the central orange-white 'bulge' of old, cooler stars formed long ago. The star forming arms of Messier 31 are unusual in being quite circular rather than the usual spiral shape. Several companion galaxies can also be seen. These include Messier 32, a dwarf elliptical galaxy directly below the central bulge and just outside the spiral arms, and Messier 110 (M110), which is above and to the right of the center. M110 has an unusual far ultraviolet bright core in an otherwise 'red,' old star halo. Many other regions of star formation can be seen far outside the main body of the galaxy.

  6. Hubble space telescope observations of young star clusters in NGC-4038/4039, 'the antennae' galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Schweizer, Francois

    1995-01-01

    New, high-resolution images of the disks of NGC 4038/4039 obtained with the Wide Field Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are presented. NGC 4038/4039, nicknamed The Antennae, is a prototypical example of a pair of colliding galaxies believed to be at an early stage of a merger. Down to the limiting magnitude of V approximately 23 mag, the HST images reveal a population of over 700 blue pointlike objects within the disks. The mean absolute magnitude of these objects is M(sub V) = -11 mag, with the brightest objects reaching M(sub V) approximately -15. Their mean apparent color indices ar U - V = -0.7 mag and V - 1 = 0.8 mag on the Johnson UVI passband system, while their mean indices corrected for internal reddening are (u - v)(sub 0) = -1.0 mag and (V - I(sub 0) = 0.5. Their mean effective radius, determined from slightly resolved images, is 18 pc (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s /Mpc). Based on their luminosities and resolution, most of these objects cannot be individual stars, but are likely young compact star clusters. The brighter ones are similar to the objects found in NGC 1275 and NGC 7252, which appear to be young globular clusters formed during recent galazy mergers. Based on their U - V and V - I colors, the brightest, bluest clusters of NGC 4038/4039 appear to be less than 10 Myr old. Most of these bright clusters are relatively tightly clustered themselves, with typically a dozen individual clusters belonging to a complex identified as a giant H II region from ground-based observations. The cluster luminosity function (LF) is approximately a power law, phi(L)dL proportional to L(exp -1.78+/-0.05)dL, with no hint of a turnover at fainter magnitudes. This power-law shape agrees with the LF of Magellanic Cloud clusters and Galactic open clusters, but differs from the LF of old globular cluster systems that is typically Gaussian with a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of approximately 3 mag. Besides the blue clusters, we also find about a dozen extremely

  7. Constraints on dark matter particles from theory, galaxy observations, and N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-02-01

    Mass bounds on dark matter (DM) candidates are obtained for particles that decouple in or out of equilibrium while ultrarelativistic with arbitrary isotropic and homogeneous distribution functions. A coarse grained Liouville invariant primordial phase-space density D is introduced which depends solely on the distribution function at decoupling. The density D is explicitly computed and combined with recent photometric and kinematic data on dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies in the Milky Way (dShps) and the observed DM density today yielding upper and lower bounds on the mass, primordial phase-space densities, and velocity dispersion of the DM candidates. Combining these constraints with recent results from N-body simulations yields estimates for the mass of the DM particles in the range of a few keV. We establish in this way a direct connection between the microphysics of decoupling in or out of equilibrium and the constraints that the particles must fulfill to be suitable DM candidates. If chemical freeze-out occurs before thermal decoupling, light bosonic particles can Bose condense. We study such Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a dark matter candidate. It is shown that, depending on the relation between the critical (Tc) and decoupling (Td) temperatures, a BEC light relic could act as cold DM but the decoupling scale must be higher than the electroweak scale. The condensate hastens the onset of the nonrelativistic regime and tightens the upper bound on the particle’s mass. A nonequilibrium scenario which describes particle production and partial thermalization, sterile neutrinos produced out of equilibrium, and other DM models is analyzed in detail and the respective bounds on mass, primordial phase-space density, and velocity dispersion are obtained. Thermal relics with m˜fewkeV that decouple when ultrarelativistic and sterile neutrinos produced resonantly or nonresonantly lead to a primordial phase-space density compatible with cored dShps and disfavor

  8. Observational restrictions on sodium and aluminium abundance variations in evolution of the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzhevitski, V. S.; Shimanskaya, N. N.; Shimansky, V. V.; Sakhibullin, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct and analyze the uniform non-LTE distributions of the aluminium ([Al/Fe]-[Fe/H]) and sodium ([Na/Fe]-[Fe/H]) abundances in the sample of 160 stars of the disk and halo of our Galaxy with metallicities within -4.07 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.28. The values of metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξ turb indices are determined from the equivalent widths of the Fe II and Fe I lines. We estimated the sodium and aluminium abundances using a 21-level model of the Na I atom and a 39-level model of the Al I atom. The resulting LTE distributions of [Na/Fe]-[Fe/H] and [Al/Fe]-[Fe/H] do not correspond to the theoretical predictions of their evolution, suggesting that a non-LTE approach has to be applied to determine the abundances of these elements. The account of non-LTE corrections reduces by 0.05-0.15 dex the abundances of sodium, determined from the subordinate lines in the stars of the disk with [Fe/H] ≥ -2.0, and by 0.05-0.70 dex (with a strong dependence on metallicity) the abundances of [Na/Fe], determined by the resonance lines in the stars of the halo with [Fe/H] ≤ -2.0. The non-LTE corrections of the aluminium abundances are strictly positive and increase from 0.0-0.1 dex for the stars of the thin disk (-0.7 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.28) to 0.03-0.3 dex for the stars of the thick disk (-1.5 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -0.7) and 0.06-1.2 dex for the stars of the halo ([Fe/H] ≤ -2.0). The resulting non-LTE abundances of [Na/Fe] reveal a scatter of individual values up to Δ[Na/Fe] = 0.4 dex for the stars of close metallicities. The observed non-LTE distribution of [Na/Fe]-[Fe/H] within 0.15 dex coincides with the theoretical distributions of Samland and Kobayashi et al. The non-LTE aluminium abundances are characterized by a weak scatter of values (up to Δ[Al/Fe] = 0.2 dex) for the stars of all metallicities. The constructed non-LTE distribution of [Al/Fe]-[Fe/H] is in a satisfactory agreement to 0.2 dex with the theoretical data of Kobayashi et al., but

  9. H I scaling relations of galaxies in the environment of H I-rich and control galaxies observed by the Bluedisk project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enci; Wang, Jing; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Li, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Our work is based on the `Bluedisk' project, a programme to map the neutral gas in a sample of 25 H I-rich spirals and a similar number of control galaxies with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). In this paper, we focus on the H I properties of the galaxies in the environment of our targeted galaxies. In total, we extract 65 galaxies from the WSRT cubes with stellar masses between 108 and 1011 M⊙. Most of these galaxies are located on the same H I mass-size relation and `H I-plane' as normal spiral galaxies. We find that companions around H I-rich galaxies tend to be H I-rich as well and to have larger R_{90,H I}/R_{50,H I}. This suggests a scenario of `H I conformity', similar to the colour conformity found by Weinmann et al.: galaxies tend to adopt the H I properties of their neighbours. We visually inspect the outliers from the H I mass-size relation and galaxies which are offset from the H I plane and find that they show morphological and kinematical signatures of recent interactions with their environment. We speculate that these outliers have been disturbed by tidal or ram-pressure stripping processes, or in a few cases, by accretion events.

  10. Star formation activity in spiral galaxy disks and the properties of radio halos: Observational evidence for a direct dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Lisenfeld, Ute; Golla, Gotz

    1995-01-01

    In this article we address observationally the questions: how does star formation (SF) in the disks of galaxies lead to the creation of radio halos, and what minimum energy input into the interstellar medium (ISM) is needed to facilitate this? For the investigation we use a sample of five edge-on galaxies exhibiting radio continuum emmission in their halos and enhanced SF spread over large parts of their disks. In a detailed study of the two galaxies in our sample for which we have the best data, NGC 891 and NGC 4631, we show that the radio halos cut off abruptly at galactocentric radii smaller than those of the underlying thin radio disks. Our most important result is that the halo cutoffs are spatially coincident with the radii where the SF activity in the underlying disks drops sharply. The difference in radius of the emission distributions tracing ongoing SF in the disks (IRAS 50 micrometers, H alpha) versus that of the nonthermal radio continuum thin disks (tracing the distribution of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons) is typically a few kpc. This difference in extent is caused by CR diffusion. We have measured the CR diffusion coefficients in the thin disks of both NGC 891 and NGC 4631. For radial diffusion of CR electrons within the galactic disks the values are D(sub r) = 1.1-2.5 x 10 (exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 4631) and D(sub r) = 1.2 x 10(exp 29) sq cm/s (NGC 891). For motions in the z-direction in areas within the thin disks where no outflows occur, we derive a firm upper limit of D(sub z) less than or equal to 0.2 x 10(exp 28) sq cm/s for NGC 891. The value for NGC 4631 is D(sub z = 1.4 x 10 (exp 28) sq cm/s. The other three galaxies in our sample, NGC 3044, NGC 4666, and NGC 5775 show (at the sensitivity of our data) less extended, more filamentary radio halos. Isolates spurs or filaments of nonthermal radio continuum emission in their halos are traced only above the most actively star-forming regions in the disks. This, in conjuction with the results obtained for

  11. Pushing the Limits, Episode 2: K2 Observations of Extragalactic RR Lyrae Stars in the Dwarf Galaxy Leo IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Pál, A.; Plachy, E.; Ripepi, V.; Moretti, M. I.; Szabó, R.; Kiss, L. L.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first observations of extragalactic pulsating stars in the K2 ecliptic survey of the Kepler space telescope. The variability of all three RR Lyrae stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo IV was successfully detected, at a brightness of Kp ≈ 21.5 mag, from data collected during Campaign 1. We identified one modulated star and another likely Blazhko candidate with periods of 29.8 ± 0.9 days and more than 80 days, respectively. EPIC 210282473 represents the first star beyond the Magellanic Clouds for which the Blazhko period and cycle-to-cycle variations in the modulation were unambiguously measured. The photometric [Fe/H] indices of the stars agree with earlier results that Leo IV is a very metal-poor galaxy. Two out of the three stars blend with brighter background galaxies in the K2 frames. We demonstrate that image subtraction can be reliably used to extract photometry from faint confused sources, which will be crucial not only for the K2 mission but also for future space photometric missions.

  12. Baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters: XMM-Newton observations of A1095 and A1926

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Chong; Wang, Q. Daniel; Tripp, Todd M.; Li, Zhiyuan; Gu, Qiusheng; Ji, Li

    2016-06-01

    We have initiated a program to study the baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters. Here we present results primarily from XMM-Newton observations of two optically selected galaxy clusters, A1095 (z ≃ 0.210) and A1926 (z ≃ 0.136). We find that both of them are actually cluster pairs at similar redshifts. We characterize the temperatures of these individual clusters through X-ray spectral fits and then estimate their gravitational masses. We show a rich set of substructures, including large position offsets between the diffuse X-ray centroids and the brightest galaxies of the clusters, which suggests that they are dynamically young. For both A1095 and A1926, we find that the mass required for the cluster pairs to be bound is smaller than the total gravitational mass. Thus both cluster pairs appear to be ongoing major mergers. Incorporating Sloan Digital Sky Survey and NRAO VLA Sky Survey/Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm data, we further examine the large-scale structure environment and radio emission of the clusters to probe their origins, which also leads to the discovery of two additional X-ray-emitting clusters (z ≃ 0.097 and ≃0.147) in the field of A1926. We estimate the hot gas and stellar masses of each cluster, which compared with the expected cosmological baryonic mass fraction, leave ample room for warm gas.

  13. High resolution radio and optical observations of the central starburst in the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy II Zw 40

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Reines, Amy E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Walker, Lisa May E-mail: areines@nrao.edu E-mail: lisamay@virginia.edu

    2014-02-01

    The extent to which star formation varies in galaxies with low masses, low metallicities, and high star formation rate surface densities is not well constrained. To gain insight into star formation under these physical conditions, this paper estimates the ionizing photon fluxes, masses, and ages for young massive clusters in the central region of II Zw 40—the prototypical low-metallicity dwarf starburst galaxy—from radio continuum and optical observations. Discrete, cluster-sized sources only account for half the total radio continuum emission; the remainder is diffuse. The young (≲ 5 Myr) central burst has a star formation rate surface density that significantly exceeds that of the Milky Way. Three of the 13 sources have ionizing photon fluxes (and thus masses) greater than R136 in 30 Doradus. Although isolating the effects of galaxy mass and metallicity is difficult, the H II region luminosity function and the internal extinction in the center of II Zw 40 appear to be primarily driven by a merger-related starburst. The relatively flat H II region luminosity function may be the result of an increase in interstellar medium pressure during the merger and the internal extinction is similar to that generated by the clumpy and porous dust in other starburst galaxies.

  14. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF LUMINOUS SOURCES IN NEARBY GALAXIES NGC 4395, NGC 4736, AND NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuz, A.; Avdan, H.; Kayaci, S.; Ozel, M. E.; Sonbas, E.; Balman, S.

    2013-03-15

    We present the results of a study of non-nuclear discrete sources in a sample of three nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 4395, NGC 4736, and NGC 4258) based on XMM-Newton archival data supplemented with Chandra data for spectral and timing analyses. A total of 75 X-ray sources have been detected within the D{sub 25} regions of the target galaxies. The large collecting area of XMM-Newton makes the statistics sufficient to obtain spectral fitting for 16 (about 20%) of these sources. Compiling the extensive archival exposures available, we were able to obtain the detailed spectral shapes of diverse classes of point sources. We have also studied temporal properties of these luminous sources. Eleven of them are found to show short-term (less than 80 ks) variation while eight of them show long-term variation within factors of {approx}2-5 during a time interval of {approx}2-12 years. Timing analysis provides strong evidence that most of these sources are accreting X-ray binary systems. One source that has properties different from others was suspected to be a supernova remnant, and our follow-up optical observation confirmed this. Our results indicate that sources within the three nearby galaxies are showing a variety of source populations, including several ultraluminous X-ray sources, X-ray binaries, transients together with a super soft source, and a background active galactic nucleus candidate.

  15. 2MTF III. H I 21 cm observations of 1194 spiral galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.; Crook, Aidan; Hong, Tao; Jarrett, T. H.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Macri, Lucas; Springob, Christopher M.; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2014-09-01

    We present H I 21 cm observations of 1194 galaxies out to a redshift of 10 000 km s-1 selected as inclined spirals (i ≳ 60°) from the 2MASS redshift survey. These observations were carried out at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This observing programme is part of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. This project will combine H I widths from these GBT observations with those from further dedicated observing at the Parkes Telescope, from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey at Arecibo, and S/N > 10 and spectral resolution vres < 10 km s-1 published widths from a variety of telescopes. We will use these H I widths along with 2MASS photometry to estimate Tully-Fisher distances to nearby spirals and investigate the peculiar velocity field of the local Universe. In this paper, we report on detections of neutral hydrogen in emission in 727 galaxies, and measure good signal to noise and symmetric H I global profiles suitable for use in the Tully-Fisher relation in 484.

  16. Star Formation in Distant Red Galaxies: Spitzer Observations in the Hubble Deep Field-South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy M. A.; van Dokkum, Pieter; Egami, Eiichi; Fazio, Giovanni; Franx, Marijn; Gawiser, Eric; Herrera, David; Huang, Jiasheng; Labbé, Ivo; Lira, Paulina; Marchesini, Danilo; Maza, José; Quadri, Ryan; Rudnick, Gregory; van der Werf, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We present Spitzer 24 μm imaging of 1.5galaxies (DRGs) in the 10'×10' extended Hubble Deep Field-South of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile. We detect 65% of the DRGs with KAB<23.2 mag at S24μm>~40 μJy and conclude that the bulk of the DRG population is dusty active galaxies. A mid-infrared (MIR) color analysis with IRAC data suggests that the MIR fluxes are not dominated by buried AGNs, and we interpret the high detection rate as evidence for a high average star formation rate of =130+/-30 Msolar yr-1. From this, we infer that DRGs are important contributors to the cosmic star formation rate density at z~2, at a level of ~0.02 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3 to our completeness limit of KAB=22.9 mag.

  17. Constraining sterile neutrino warm dark matter with Chandra observations of the Andromeda galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Casey R.; Polley, Nicholas K.; Li, Zhiyuan E-mail: zyli@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-03-01

    We use the Chandra unresolved X-ray emission spectrum from a 12'–28' (2.8–6.4 kpc) annular region of the Andromeda galaxy to constrain the radiative decay of sterile neutrino warm dark matter. By excising the most baryon-dominated, central 2.8 kpc of the galaxy, we reduce the uncertainties in our estimate of the dark matter mass within the field of view and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of prospective sterile neutrino decay signatures relative to hot gas and unresolved stellar emission. Our findings impose the most stringent limit on the sterile neutrino mass to date in the context of the Dodelson-Widrow model, m{sub s} < 2.2 keV (95% C.L.). Our results also constrain alternative sterile neutrino production scenarios at very small active-sterile neutrino mixing angles.

  18. Massive stars formed in atomic hydrogen reservoirs: H I observations of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Krumholz, M. R.; Tanvir, N. R.; Kamphuis, P.; Burlon, D.; Baes, M.; Basa, S.; Berta, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Crosby, D.; D'Elia, V.; Elliott, J.; Greiner, J.; Hunt, L. K.; Klose, S.; Koprowski, M. P.; Le Floc'h, E.; Malesani, D.; Murphy, T.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Palazzi, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Rossi, A.; Savaglio, S.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Watson, D.; van der Werf, P.; Vergani, S. D.; Xu, D.

    2015-10-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), among the most energetic events in the Universe, are explosions of massive and short-lived stars, so they pinpoint locations of recent star formation. However, several GRB host galaxies have recently been found to be deficient in molecular gas (H2), believed to be the fuel of star formation. Moreover, optical spectroscopy of GRB afterglows implies that the molecular phase constitutes only a small fraction of the gas along the GRB line of sight. Here we report the first ever 21 cm line observations of GRB host galaxies, using the AustraliaTelescope Compact Array, implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (H i), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought. In this case, it is possible that star formation is directly fuelled by atomic gas (or that the H i-to-H2 conversion is very efficient, which rapidly exhaust molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because cooling of gas (necessary for star formation) is faster than the H i-to-H2 conversion. Indeed, large atomic gas reservoirs, together with low molecular gas masses, stellar, and dust masses are consistent with GRB hosts being preferentially galaxies which have very recently started a star formation episode after accreting metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. This provides a natural route for forming GRBs in low-metallicity environments. The gas inflow scenario is also consistent with the existence of the companion H I object with no optical counterpart ~19 kpc from the GRB 060505 host, and with the fact that the H I centroids of the GRB 980425 and 060505 hosts do not coincide with optical centres of these galaxies, but are located close to the GRB positions.

  19. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-INFRARED COOLING LINES IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT (ULTRA)-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Pearson, C.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A.; Wang, L.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2014-01-20

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158 μm line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 galaxies, (U)LIRGs (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ☉}), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158 μm line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) × 10{sup –3} of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ∼10 times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} and L{sub [CII]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ∼ 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years.

  20. HEAO 1 hard X-ray observation of clusters of galaxies and intracluster magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Yoel; Gruber, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of HEAO 1 hard X-ray measurements of three clusters of galaxies, Abell 401, Abell 2255, and Abell 2256 are reported. Nonthermal components were not detected above the level of 10 to the -5th photons/sq cm/s/keV. Comparison of the flux upper limits with theoretical predictions yields lower limits of about 10 to the -7th gauss on the mean value of the intracluster magnetic fields in the central regions of these clusters.

  1. Chandra Observations of the Nuclei of Radio Galaxies: 3C 295 and Hydra A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. E.; McNamara, B. R.; David, L. P.; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The angular resolution available with Chandra allows us to isolate the X-ray emission from the nucleus of many radio galaxies and obtain their spectra. As expected from unification schemes, spectra so far obtained can best be interpreted as heavily absorbed power laws. We present the spectral parameters so derived for 3C 295 and Hydra A and compare them to data obtained at other wavelengths.

  2. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  3. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H.; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J.; Oh, Kyuseok; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-07-10

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  4. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  5. Ion-heated thermal Comptonization models and x-ray spectral correlations in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, C.D.

    1989-11-01

    Recent Ginga observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies NGC 4051 and MCG 6-30-15 show a positive correlation between the 2-10 keV luminosity and photon spectral index {alpha}. Similar behavior has also been reported in Exosat and Einstein observations of other active galactic nuclei, and is suggested in hard x-ray low-state data of the galactic black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1. A two-temperature thermal Comptonization model with internal soft-photon production provides a simple explanation for this correlation. The electron temperature, determined by a balance between ion heating and radiative cooling, decreases in response to an enhancement of the soft photon flux, resulting in a softening of the spectrum and an increase in the soft x-ray luminosity. The bulk of the soft photons are produced through pion production in collisions between the hot ions. Pivoting of the spectrum at photon energies {var epsilon} > 50 keV is a consequence of variations in the ion temperature. An important test of the model would be time correlations between soft and hard x-ray bands. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. First Results from the NuSTAR AGN Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Laura; Fuerst, F.; Matt, G.; Walton, D.; Madejski, G. M.; Marinucci, A.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR, launched June 2012) is revolutionizing our knowledge of the physics at work in active galactic nuclei (AGN). With its high collecting area, focusing optics and low background from 3-79 keV, NASA's newest X-ray observatory is providing an unprecedented look at the spectral and timing properties of AGN in this energy range, which have been notoriously difficult to access. NuSTAR has observed several AGN to date simultaneously with XMM-Newton, Suzaku and/or Swift for the purposes of understanding their coronal properties (e.g., plasma temperature, optical depth) and measuring the spins of their supermassive black holes. We present the first results from these observing campaigns, highlighting the spectral and timing analysis of the bright, nearby AGN IC 4329A, NGC 4151, NGC 1365 and MCG--6-30-15. These are the highest signal-to-noise datasets ever obtained across the 0.2-79 keV energy band for these three sources, allowing us to cleanly deconvolve the X-ray continuum, absorption and reflection components in each galaxy for the first time via time-averaged and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  7. An ISOCAM survey through gravitationally lensing galaxy clusters. III. New results from mid-infrared observations of the cluster Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coia, D.; Metcalfe, L.; McBreen, B.; Biviano, A.; Smail, I.; Altieri, B.; Kneib, J.-P.; McBreen, S.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; O'Halloran, B.

    2005-01-01

    The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) with two spectacular gravitational lensing arcs was observed at 14.3 μm (hereafter 15 μm) with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (\\cite{1999AJ....118..645B}). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. Infrared luminosities and star formation rates are obtained for six sources: the cluster members and the foreground galaxies. For the three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ˜5.7 × 1010 L⊙ and 1.4 × 1011 L⊙, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 M⊙ yr-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5 × 1010 L⊙ and 9.4 × 1010 L⊙ yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 M⊙ yr-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. \\cite{2004A&A...416..839B}). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity. Based on observations

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  9. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  11. The X-Ray Zurich Environmental Study (X-ZENS). I. Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxies in nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, J. D.; Miniati, F.; Finoguenov, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Cibinel, A.; Lilly, S. J.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of 18 M group ~ 1-6 × 1013 M ⊙, z ~ 0.05 galaxy groups from the Zurich ENvironmental Study. The X-ray data aim at establishing the frequency and properties, unaffected by host galaxy dilution and obscuration, of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in central and satellite galaxies, also as a function of halo-centric distance. X-ray point-source detections are reported for 22 of the 177 galaxies, down to a sensitivity level of f 0.5 - 8 keV ~ 5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to a limiting luminosity of L 0.5 - 8 keV ~ 3 × 1040 erg s-1. With the majority of the X-ray sources attributed to AGNs of low-to-moderate levels (L/L Edd >~ 10-4), we discuss the detection rate in the context of the occupation of AGNs to halos of this mass scale and redshift and compare the structural and morphological properties between AGN-active and non-active galaxies. At galaxy mass scales <1011 M ⊙, central galaxies appear to be a factor of ~4 more likely to host AGNs than satellite galaxies of similar mass. This effect, coupled with the tendency for AGNs to be hosted by massive galaxies, explains the (weak) trend for AGNs to be preferentially found in the inner parts of group halos, with no detectable trend with halo-centric distance in the frequency of AGNs within the satellite population. Finally, our data indicate that the rate of decline with redshift of AGN activity in galaxy groups matches that of the global AGN population, indicating that either AGN activity occurs preferentially in group halos or that the evolution rate is independent of halo mass.

  12. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Accretion-Induced Star Formation in the Tadpole Galaxy Kiso 5639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Gallagher, John S.; Rafelski, Marc; Filho, Mercedes; Ceverino, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The tadpole galaxy Kiso 5639 has a slowly rotating disk with a drop in metallicity at its star-forming head, suggesting that star formation was triggered by the accretion of metal-poor gas. We present multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of UV through I band plus Hα to search for peripheral emission and determine the properties of various regions. The head has a mass in young stars of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ and an ionization rate of 6.4× {10}51 s‑1, equivalent to ∼2100 O9-type stars. There are four older star-forming regions in the tail, and an underlying disk with a photometric age of ∼1 Gyr. The mass distribution function of 61 star clusters is a power law with a slope of ‑1.73 ± 0.51. Fourteen young clusters in the head are more massive than {10}4 {M}ȯ , suggesting a clustering fraction of 30%–45%. Wispy filaments of Hα emission and young stars extend away from the galaxy. Shells and holes in the head H ii region could be from winds and supernovae. Gravity from the disk should limit the expansion of the H ii region, although hot gas might escape through the holes. The star formation surface density determined from Hα in the head is compared to that expected from likely pre-existing and accreted gas. Unless the surface density of the accreted gas is a factor of ∼3 or more larger than what was in the galaxy before, the star formation rate has to exceed the usual Kennicutt–Schmidt rate by a factor of ≥slant 5.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Accretion-Induced Star Formation in the Tadpole Galaxy Kiso 5639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Gallagher, John S.; Rafelski, Marc; Filho, Mercedes; Ceverino, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The tadpole galaxy Kiso 5639 has a slowly rotating disk with a drop in metallicity at its star-forming head, suggesting that star formation was triggered by the accretion of metal-poor gas. We present multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of UV through I band plus Hα to search for peripheral emission and determine the properties of various regions. The head has a mass in young stars of ˜ {10}6 {M}ȯ and an ionization rate of 6.4× {10}51 s‑1, equivalent to ˜2100 O9-type stars. There are four older star-forming regions in the tail, and an underlying disk with a photometric age of ˜1 Gyr. The mass distribution function of 61 star clusters is a power law with a slope of ‑1.73 ± 0.51. Fourteen young clusters in the head are more massive than {10}4 {M}ȯ , suggesting a clustering fraction of 30%–45%. Wispy filaments of Hα emission and young stars extend away from the galaxy. Shells and holes in the head H ii region could be from winds and supernovae. Gravity from the disk should limit the expansion of the H ii region, although hot gas might escape through the holes. The star formation surface density determined from Hα in the head is compared to that expected from likely pre-existing and accreted gas. Unless the surface density of the accreted gas is a factor of ˜3 or more larger than what was in the galaxy before, the star formation rate has to exceed the usual Kennicutt–Schmidt rate by a factor of ≥slant 5.

  15. The 0.3-30 keV spectra of Powerful Starburst Galaxies: NuSTAR and Chandra observations ofNGC 3256 and NGC 3310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Joshua; Lehmer, Bret; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Wik, Daniel R.; Ptak, Andrew; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona; Maccarone, Tom; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2015-01-01

    We present nearly simultaneous Chandra and NuSTAR observations of two actively star-forming galaxies: NGC 3256 and NGC 3310. The NuSTAR galaxy-wide spectra of both galaxies follow steep power law distributions, similar to the spectra of bright individual ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have been studied by NuSTAR. The X-ray emission from both galaxies is spatially resolved by Chandra, which indicates that hot gas dominates the E < 1 - 3 keV emission, while ULXs make up a majority of the emission at E > 1-3 keV. Using new and archival Chandra data we found that both galaxies have candidate AGNs coincident with nuclear regions. However, the steep NuSTAR spectra of both galaxies restricts these candidates to be low luminosity AGN, and a non-AGN nature cannot be ruled out. We find the average 0.3 -30 keV SFR-normalized spectra of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310, combined with equivalent measurements for M83 and NGC 253, show sharpening power-law slopes at energies above 3 - 6 keV due to ULX populations. Our observations therefore constrain the average spectral shape of an unbiased population of ULXs to be similar to the super-Eddington accreting ULXs that have been studied by NuSTAR. We also find that for NGC 3310, there is a factor of 5 times excess X-ray emission, due to an overabundance of ULXs in the galaxy compared to typical galaxies. We argue that the excess is due to the relatively low metallicity of the young stellar population in the galaxy.

  16. Optical observations of NGC 2915: A nearby blue compact dwarf galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meurer, G. R.; Mackie, G.; Carignan, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents B and R band Charge Coupled Device (CCD) images and medium resolution spectroscopy of NGC 2915, a relatively isolated BCD (blue compact dwarf) galaxy at a distance of approximately 5 Mpc. NGC 2915 contains two stellar populations: a high surface brightness blue core population and a red diffuse population. The core population contains all of the H II, and numerous embedded objects. It is the locus of current high mass star formation. The brightest embedded objects are likely to be young ionizing clusters, while many of the fainter objects are likely to be individual supergiant stars with masses up to approximately 25 solar mass, or blends of a few such stars. Curious aligned structures on the SE side of the galaxy are seen and their nature discussed. The spectrum of the core is dominated by bright narrow emission lines like that of a high excitation and low metallicity (less than half solar) H II region. The continuum is flat, with Balmer and Ca II features seen in absorption. The velocity of the Ca II features suggest contamination by galactic interstellar absorption. There is a significant velocity gradient in the spectra, probably indicative of rotation. Outside of its core, NGC 2915 resembles a dE (dwarf elliptical) galaxy, in that it has an exponential surface brightness profile, is red ((B-R)(sub 0) = 1.65), and has a low extrapolated central surface brightness (B(0)(sub c) = 22.44). NGC 2915's properties are compared with other BCDs, concentrating on two morphologically similar BCDs that are near enough to resolve into stars: NGC 1705 and NGC 5253. It is noted that the presence of winds in BCDs invalidates closed box chemical evolution models and the remaining constraints on star formation duration are relatively weak. Some BCDs, including NGC 2915, may be able to maintain their present star formation rate for Gyr time scales. This suggests that the overall evolution of these BCDs may be much slower than the approximately 10 Myr burst

  17. Chandra and MMT observations of low-mass black hole active galactic nuclei accreting at low rates in dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, W.; Zhou, H.; Dou, L.; Dong, X.-B.; Wang, T.-G.; Fan, X.

    2014-02-10

    We report on Chandra X-ray observations of four candidate low-mass black hole (M {sub bh} ≲ 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that have the estimated Eddington ratios among the lowest (∼10{sup –2}) found for this class. The aims are to validate the nature of their AGNs and to confirm the low Eddington ratios that are derived from the broad Hα line, and to explore this poorly studied regime in the AGN parameter space. Among them, two objects with the lowest significance of the broad lines are also observed with the Multi-Mirror Telescope, and the high-quality optical spectra taken confirm them as Seyfert 1 AGNs and as having small black hole masses. X-ray emission is detected from the nuclei of two of the galaxies, which is variable on timescales of ∼10{sup 3} s, whereas no significant (or only marginal at best) detection is found for the remaining two. The X-ray luminosities are on the order of 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} or even lower, on the order of 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} for non-detections, which are among the lowest regimes ever probed for Seyfert galaxies. The low X-ray luminosities, compared to their black hole masses derived from Hα, confirm their low accretion rates assuming typical bolometric corrections. Our results hint at the existence of a possibly large population of under-luminous low-mass black holes in the local universe. An off-nucleus ultra-luminous X-ray source in one of the dwarf galaxies is detected serendipitously, with a luminosity (6-9)× 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} in 2-10 keV.

  18. EVALUATING THE CALORIMETER MODEL WITH BROADBAND, CONTINUOUS SPECTRA OF STARBURST GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Bower, Geoffrey C. E-mail: gbower@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-02-20

    Although the relationship between the far-infrared and centimeter-wave radio luminosities of normal galaxies is one of the most striking correlations in astronomy, a solid understanding of its physical basis is lacking. In one interpretation, the 'calorimeter model', rapid synchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons is essential in reproducing the observed linear relationship. Observed radio spectra, however, are shallower than what is expected of cooled synchrotron emission. In 2006, Thompson et al. presented a simple parameterized model to explain how relatively shallow observed spectra might arise even in the presence of rapid synchrotron cooling by accounting for ionization losses and other cooling mechanisms. During the commissioning of the 42 element Allen Telescope Array (ATA), we observed the starburst galaxies M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220 at frequencies ranging from 1 to 7 GHz, obtaining unprecedented broadband continuous radio spectra of these sources. We combine our observations with high-frequency data from the literature to separate the spectra into thermal and nonthermal components. The nonthermal components all steepen in the centimeter-wave regime and cannot be well modeled as simple power laws. The model of Thompson et al. is consistent with our M82 results when plausible parameters are chosen, and our results in fact significantly shrink the space of allowed model parameters. The model is only marginally consistent with our NGC 253 data. Assuming the Thompson et al. model, a steep electron energy injection index of p = -2.5 is ruled out in M82 and NGC 253 to >99% confidence. We describe in detail the observing procedures, calibration methods, analysis, and consistency checks used for broadband spectral observations with the ATA.

  19. Metal distributions out to 0.5 r {sub 180} in the intracluster