These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Galaxy Zoo User Behaviors 2: How Forums, Favorites, and having Fun relates to User Classifications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this poster we examine how the rate at which Galaxy Zoo users classify galaxies varies as a function of other interactions they have within the Galaxy Zoo interface. The Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott 2008) asks users to look at images of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to classify them based on their appearance. As of the submission of this abstract, nearly 240,000 individuals had registered to participate through two different interfaces - Galaxy Zoo 1 (GZ1) and Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) - and had contributed over 10,000,000 classification to the GZ2 project alone. To support the efforts of these users and to add some fun to what they are doing, we have provided them discussion forums, the ability to favorite items, and a variety of ways to explore their favorites, including the ability to create World Wide Telescope sky tours (see related poster, Luebbert et al.). We find that there are correlations between how users interact with these additional features and their rate of classifications, including a weak anti-correlation between extreme forum usage and classification number. In addition to forum-classification relationships, we look at trends in favoriting galaxies (including what types of objects get favorited), and trends as a function of generating WWT sky tours. This work has been funded through NASA ROSES NNX09AD34G.

Gay, Pamela L.; Bracey, G.; Raddick, M. J.; CS390/490 Class, SIUE; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

2

Polar ring galaxies in the Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report observations of 16 candidate polar-ring galaxies (PRGs) identified by the Galaxy Zoo project in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data base. Deep images of five galaxies are available in the SDSS Stripe82 data base, while to reach similar depth we observed the remaining galaxies with the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We derive integrated magnitudes and u-r colours for the host and ring components and show continuum-subtracted H?+[N II] images for seven objects. We present a basic morphological and environmental analysis of the galaxies and discuss their properties in comparison with other types of early-type galaxies. Follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow a kinematic confirmation of the nature of these systems and a more detailed analysis of their stellar populations.

Finkelman, Ido; Funes, José G.; Brosch, Noah

2012-05-01

3

Dreamers, Poets, Citizens, and Scientists: Motivations for Engaging in GalaxyZoo Citizen Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A particularly successful effort to engage the public in science has been to move the nearly countless galaxies imaged by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to citizen scientists in a project known widely as Galaxy Zoo (URL; http://www.galaxyzoo.org). To everyone’s surprise, the unexpectedly large participation in the website has caused the data set, numbering over a million images, to be classified multiple times, quicker than the project leader anticipated, and continues to boast a high hit count on the website (15 classifications per second). Within 24 hours of launch, the site was receiving 70,000 classifications an hour, and more than 50 million classifications were received by the project during its first year, from almost 150,000 people. In a parallel effort, the Galaxy Zoo forum was created to handle the flood of emails that occurred alongside the flood of classifications, the team hoping that it would encourage the participants to handle each others' questions. By examining the motivations, methods and appeal of Galaxy Zoo to the participating public, other models of citizen science might be purposefully formulated to take advantage of the success exhibited in Galaxy Zoo. In addition, we want to understand the reasons people engage in science in informal settings in order to better enhance teaching methods in formal settings. Although in the past citizen science has primarily been used as a data collection method, there are many new opportunities contained in citizen science motivations and methods that we can use in future applications. This new and innovative method of online citizen science creates data for researchers of galaxies, but there is a parallel set of underlying data that has not yet been deeply analyzed: the motivations and underlying themes within the population of citizen scientists that could lead us to improve future citizen science projects. To address this, we pursued an investigation of the underlying reasons for the success of Galaxy Zoo revealed by inductively analyzing contributor’s posts and discussions through the accompanying Galaxy Zoo online bulletin board forum - When investigating the data interpretively collected from the Galaxy Zoo forum, what sort of trends emerge as motivations which contribute to the overall success of this citizen science model? Using a grounded theory approach, we learned that many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses while not compromising the scientific value of the project. From within the data emerged several trends of motivation, the primary being: the sense of community created within the project that promotes professional-amateur collaboration; fulfilling a dream of being an astronomer, physicist, or astronaut; tapping into a potential well of interest created during the space race era; the spiritual aspect generated when the imagination interacts with Galaxy Zoo; and uniting them all, the aesthetic appeal of the galaxy images. In addition, a very powerful tool also emerged as a method of retention unique to Galaxy Zoo. This tool, known as variable ratio reinforcement in behavioral psychology, uses the most appealing images as positive reinforcement to maintain classification rates over time.

Slater, S. J.; Mankowski, T.; Slater, T. F.; CenterAstronomy; Physics Education Research Caper Team

2010-12-01

4

Ultraviolet Extinction in Backlit Galaxies - from Galaxy Zoo to GALEX  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the ultraviolet extinction of galaxies on large scales, combining optical and GALEX UV data on backlit galaxies (most found in the Galaxy Zoo citizen-science project). We analyze the images in matching ways, modelling both foreground and background galaxies by symmetry or elliptical isophote families as appropriate, and using the non-overlapping regions of the galaxies to estimate errors in the derived transmission T=e-?. Spirals appear less symmetric in the UV, as star-forming regions become more dominant, so that our most reliable results are mean values across multiple regions and multiple galaxies. Our mean effective extinction curve is dominated by the contribution of luminous spirals,and shows a fairly flat gray" extinction law into the ultraviolet. For example, the median of ?NUV/?B in spiral arms is only 1.3. Along with previous high-resolution HST studies of a few nearby backlit galaxies, this suggests that on kpc scales the effective extinction is dominated by the dust clumping rather than the intrinsic reddening law. This implies that extrapolation of local properties to short wavelengths, a step toward the history of dust in galaxies through comparison of local properties with a similar analysis in deep HST fields, can be done without introducing much additional error. This work was supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX10AD54G.

Keel, William C.; Manning, A.; Holwerda, B. W.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2012-01-01

5

Galaxy Zoo User Behaviors 1: User classification trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this poster we examine patterns of classification behavior among Galaxy Zoo users. The Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott 2008) asks users to look at images of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to classify them based on their appearance. The success of this project, measured through 14 scientific journal articles, comes in large part from the dedicated contributions from over 230,000 registered users. These users have each contributed anywhere from a small handful of galaxy classifications to a few tens-of-thousands of classifications. While user behaviors vary greatly, we find that there are certain patterns of behavior that predict which individuals will make significant numbers of classifications over the course of their involvement in the project. Specifically, we study how the number of classifications a person makes shortly after they register for the site can predict future classification behavior. We also look for patterns in what events trigger users registering for the site and returning to site. Where possible, we break patterns of behavior down by gender, and study differences between populations who join at pivotal moments (site launch, major announcement, etc), join as the result of one-on-one contact with a member of the Galaxy Zoo collaboration, and the remaining population. The research was funded by NASA ROSES NNX09AD34G.

Pritchett, Brian; Gay, P. L.; CS390/490 Class, SIUE; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

6

Mining the Galaxy Zoo Database: Machine Learning Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new Zooniverse initiative is addressing the data flood in the sciences through a transformative partnership between professional scientists, volunteer citizen scientists, and machines. As part of this project, we are exploring the application of machine learning techniques to data mining problems associated with the large and growing database of volunteer science results gathered by the Galaxy Zoo citizen science project. We will describe the basic challenge, some machine learning approaches, and early results. One of the motivators for this study is the acquisition (through the Galaxy Zoo results database) of approximately 100 million classification labels for roughly one million galaxies, yielding a tremendously large and rich set of training examples for improving automated galaxy morphological classification algorithms. In our first case study, the goal is to learn which morphological and photometric features in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database correlate most strongly with user-selected galaxy morphological class. As a corollary to this study, we are also aiming to identify which galaxy parameters in the SDSS database correspond to galaxies that have been the most difficult to classify (based upon large dispersion in their volunter-provided classifications). Our second case study will focus on similar data mining analyses and machine leaning algorithms applied to the Galaxy Zoo catalog of merging and interacting galaxies. The outcomes of this project will have applications in future large sky surveys, such as the LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope) project, which will generate a catalog of 20 billion galaxies and will produce an additional astronomical alert database of approximately 100 thousand events each night for 10 years -- the capabilities and algorithms that we are exploring will assist in the rapid characterization and classification of such massive data streams. This research has been supported in part through NSF award #0941610.

Borne, Kirk D.; Wallin, J.; Vedachalam, A.; Baehr, S.; Lintott, C.; Darg, D.; Smith, A.; Fortson, L.

2010-01-01

7

A Galaxy Zoo - WorldWide Telescope Mashup: Expanding User Defined Exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new way of exploring your favorite Galaxy Zoo galaxies within the context of the sky using Microsoft Research's WorldWide Telescope. Galaxy Zoo has a fantastic community that is eager to learn and contribute to science through morphological classifications of galaxies. WorldWide Telescope is an interactive observatory that allows users to explore the sky. WorldWide Telescope uses images from the world's best telescopes, including the galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. WorldWide Telescope provides a fantastic sense of size and distance that is hard to experience in Galaxy Zoo. Creating tours from favorite galaxies directly from Galaxy Zoo aims to solve this dilemma.The incorporation of Galaxy Zoo and WorldWide telescope provides a great resource for users to learn more about the galaxies they are classifying. Users can now explore the areas around certain galaxies and view information about that location from within WorldWide Telescope. Not only does this encourage self-motivated research but after tours are created they can be shared with anyone. We hope this will help spread citizen science to different audiences via email, Facebook, and Twitter.Without the WorldWide Telescope team at Microsoft Research this project would not have been possible. Please go start exploring at http://wwt.galaxyzoo.org. This project was funded through the Microsoft Research Academic Program.

Luebbert, Jarod; Sands, M.; Fay, J.; Smith, A.; Gay, P. L.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

8

An Interpretive Study of Meanings Citizen Scientists Make When Participating in Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A particularly successful effort to engage the public in science has been to move the nearly countless galaxies imaged by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to citizen scientists in a project known widely as Galaxy Zoo (URL; http://www.galaxyzoo.org). By examining the motivations, methods and appeal of Galaxy Zoo to the participating public, other models of citizen science might be purposefully formulated to take advantage of the success exhibited in Galaxy Zoo. In addition, we want to understand the reasons people engage in science in informal settings in order to better enhance teaching methods in formal settings. We pursued an investigation of the underlying reasons for the success of Galaxy Zoo revealed by inductively analyzing contributor's posts and discussions through the accompanying Galaxy Zoo online bulletin board Using a grounded theory approach, we learned that many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images or the opportunity to become an empowered and contributing scientist, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses while not compromising the scientific value of the project.

Mankowski, Trent A.

9

Galaxy Zoo: spiral galaxy morphologies and their relation to the star-forming main sequence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate in disk galaxies at z<0.085, measuring different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. The morphologies of disk galaxies are obtained from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, which includes the number of spiral arms, the arm pitch angle, and the presence of strong galactic bars. We show that both the slope and dispersion of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS) is constant no matter what the morphology of the spiral disk. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by 0.3 dex; this is a significant reduction over the increase seen in merging systems at higher redshifts (z > 1). Of the galaxies that do lie significantly above the SFMS in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers, with a large contribution from the compact green pea galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence that the number and pitch angle of spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms for star formation or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback.

Willett, Kyle; Schawinski, Kevin; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Skibba, Ramin A.; Nichol, Robert; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke D.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo volunteers

2015-01-01

10

Galaxy Zoo: Evidence for Diverse Star Formation Histories through the Green Valley  

E-print Network

Does galaxy evolution proceed through the green valley via multiple pathways or as a single population? Motivated by recent results highlighting radically different evolutionary pathways between early- and late-type galaxies, we present results from a simple Bayesian approach to this problem wherein we model the star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy with two parameters, [t, \\tau] and compare the predicted and observed optical and near-ultraviolet colours. We use a novel method to investigate the morphological differences between the most probable SFHs for both disc-like and smooth-like populations of galaxies, by using a sample of 126,316 galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.25) with probabilistic estimates of morphology from Galaxy Zoo. We find a clear difference between the quenching timescales preferred by smooth- and disc-like galaxies, with three possible routes through the green valley dominated by smooth- (rapid timescales, attributed to major mergers), intermediate- (intermediate timescales, attributed to ...

Smethurst, R J; Simmons, B D; Schawinski, K; Marshall, P J; Bamford, S; Fortson, L; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L; Melvin, T; Nichol, R C; Skibba, R A; Willett, K W

2015-01-01

11

GALAXY ZOO MORPHOLOGY AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

It has recently been demonstrated that one can accurately derive galaxy morphology from particular primary and secondary isophotal shape estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging catalog. This was accomplished by applying Machine Learning techniques to the Galaxy Zoo morphology catalog. Using the broad bandpass photometry of the SDSS in combination with precise knowledge of galaxy morphology should help in estimating more accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies. Using the Galaxy Zoo separation for spirals and ellipticals in combination with SDSS photometry we attempt to calculate photometric redshifts. In the best case we find that the root-mean-square error for luminous red galaxies classified as ellipticals is as low as 0.0118. Given these promising results we believe better photometric redshift estimates for all galaxies in the SDSS ({approx}350 million) will be feasible if researchers can also leverage their derived morphologies via Machine Learning. These initial results look to be promising for those interested in estimating weak lensing, baryonic acoustic oscillation, and other fields dependent upon accurate photometric redshifts.

Way, M. J. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

2011-06-10

12

Galaxy Zoo : Evidence for a Diversity of Routes through the Green Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the ways in which galaxies change as they move from blue to red is critical to understanding the build up of the present-day galaxy population, and can best be addressed by looking at systems in the process of transitioning. We present the results of a new analysis of the population of galaxies which passes through the 'green valley' evident in optical colour-mass diagrams. Using data from SDSS and Galex, and a Bayesian analysis of their most probable star formation histories, we show that multiple routes through the green valley exist. By using Galaxy Zoo morphologies, we are able to draw on probabilistic estimates of morphology and find - in contrast to previous work - that there is evidence for slow, intermediate and rapid transitions from blue to red. Constraining these populations provides evidence for rapid morphological change in some populations, presumably through major mergers, and underpins our understanding of the build up of the red sequence.

Lintott, Chris; Smethurst, Rebecca; Simmons, Brooke; Galaxy Zoo

2015-01-01

13

Galaxy Zoo: AGN may be fueled by stellar bars in the local Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bars are a mechanism that have been proposed to explain how gas in the outer regions of a galaxy can be channeled inward and fuel AGN. Multiple observational studies have reported a significantly higher bar fraction in AGN than non-AGN. To accurately probe whether an excess of bars in AGN host galaxies exists because the galaxies host a bar, it is necessary to compare bar and AGN fractions at fixed mass and color, because the presence of bars strongly correlates with both. Thus, a sufficiently large sample is necessary to maintain adequate numbers in subsets of fixed mass and color. We have created a large, volume-limited sample of 19,765 disc galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By using morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we identify stellar bars in 51.8% of AGN hosts and 37.1% of star-forming disk galaxies. Once mass and color are fixed, there remains a statistically significant increase in the fraction of barred AGN over their unbarred counterparts. Using the L[O III]/MBH ratio as a measure of accretion efficiency, we also show that barred AGN do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGN at fixed mass or color. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fueling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to AGN fueling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo Science Team

2015-01-01

14

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

15

Galaxy Zoo: Are bars responsible for the feeding of active galactic nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS (All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey), COSMOS (Cosmological Evolution Survey), and (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South) GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of 2, at 99.7 per cent confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fuelling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan R.; Athanassoula, E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Faber, S. M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W.

2015-02-01

16

Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disk galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s?1 < LX < 1044 erg s?1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame color, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the bar fraction in the control sample by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

Galaxy Zoo; AEGIS; COSMOS; GOODS

2015-01-01

17

Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disk galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame color, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the bar fraction in the control sample by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan; Athanassoula, Lia; Bamford, Steven; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, Albert; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy; Kocevski, Dale; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo J.; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Nichol, Robert; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle; Galaxy Zoo, Aegis, Cosmos, Goods

2015-01-01

18

Logic Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hacker has let loose the wacky animals of Logic Zoo! Use your critical thinking skills to help him put them back in their proper places. Each area of the zoo is separated into four pens, and animals with things in common share the same pen.

2008-01-01

19

Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disk morphology  

E-print Network

We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate relation in star-forming disk galaxies at z1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

Willett, Kyle W; Simmons, Brooke D; Masters, Karen L; Skibba, Ramin A; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O Ivy; Nichol, Robert C; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J; Fortson, Lucy

2015-01-01

20

Zoo Calendar  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use the Zoo Calendar (page 1 of PDF) to involve learners in interdisciplinary, whole language, and writing activities about ecological concepts. Each 30-45 minute activity emphasizes the concept of biodiversity and demonstrates that science is all around us. These activities can be conducted before or after a visit to a zoo (or not at all), in a large or small group setting, and as a month long or shorter (or longer) unit.

Baltimore, The M.

2012-06-26

21

Microbe Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Microbe Zoo is a product of the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology (DLC-ME), a collaboration between Comm Tech Lab and Michigan State University to make tools for learning about microscopic organisms more readily available to students and teachers. This Web site is a fun way to learn about these communities of microbes, where they live, and how they help support life on earth. Students can learn about the microbes that inhabit diverse places like farm fields, toxic waste dumps, cow rumen, our homes, and even our food by clicking on words or pictures. This site is an entertaining way to learn about a subject that is often overlooked.

2002-01-01

22

Our Zoo to You  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes, and Madagascar hissing cockroaches.

Lois Mayo

2003-09-01

23

Our Zoo to You  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes,…

Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David W.; Abuloum, Amjad; Mancuso, Brian; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Mayo, Lois

2003-01-01

24

Group 10 - Zoos  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

BACKGROUND People have different opinions about zoos. Some feel it is animal cruelty. Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. TASK - Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. Explain to the class both sides of the issue of whether animals in zoos is cruelty or not. Give your opinions on zoos and what value they may have today. RESOURCES Crocodile Hunter Zoo Born Free.org PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) Endangered Species San Diego Zoo World Wildlife Fund The Nature Conservancy All groups may also search on The Student Research Center and The National Science Digital Library ...

Mecham, Mrs.

2006-11-30

25

Oregon Zoo Polar Bear  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Tasul, an Oregon Zoo polar bear, sports a high-tech collar that will help researchers study her endangered wild counterparts in the Arctic. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo....

26

First Results from Galaxy Zoo CANDELS: The Settling of Galactic Disks from 0.5 < z < 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large-scale bar features in disk galaxies are tracers of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. We report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS, implying the host disks are dynamically settled enough to be unstable to bar formation. The fraction of disk galaxies hosting barred structures does not significantly evolve across the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2 (fbar = 10.7+6.3-3.5% after correcting for incompleteness). We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

Galaxy Zoo; CANDELS

2015-01-01

27

ChimpanZoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"A collective effort between the Jane Goodall Institute, zoological facilities, and universities," ChimpanZoo is a research and education program that aims to "apply uniform research methods to learn more about chimpanzees and their psychological and behavioral responses to a captive environment." The program involves participating zoos, researchers, and volunteers collecting and submitting chimpanzee behavior data to the program. The site contains a great deal of information on chimpanzee behavior for a variety of different educational levels, high school and beyond. Topics include general chimpanzee behavior, biology, evolution, and results determined from the Chimpanzoo database.

28

Microbe Zoo Water World  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is maintained by the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology. A Microbe Zoo and the Microbe of the Month are included. The site provides some background material on many different types of Microbes, in ponds, around the deep sea vents, and various other locations. Two water regions are represented on the site, although mention is made of several others.

2004-01-28

29

Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Website with multilevel links to information on logistics, membership, exhibits, conservation, special events, news, and education. School programs include field trips and summer camps. Other activities offered: overnight stays, close encounters, dives, talks, marine biologist for a day, zoo keeper for a day, and career day. Institution promotes responsible stewardship of the world's resources through education, conservation, research and recreational opportunities. Located in Tacoma, Washington.

30

K-2 at the Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet is designed to help teachers maximize a zoo visit for children ages 5 to 7. The packet provides activities for use before, during, and after the zoo visit. Activities are provided to enhance student skills in language arts, reading, art, science, and math, and are correlated to the Oregon Essentials Learning Skills Common Curriculum…

Andrews, Lori; Andrews, Steve

31

It's a Zoo out There!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos can provide exciting educational opportunities for students to learn about a wide range of science subject matter. Zoos and similar nonschool sites have the added advantage of getting students out of school and into another environment, demonstrating that science learning can take place anywhere--not only in formal school settings. Through…

Henson, Kate

2008-01-01

32

Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in Zoo Animals in Selected Zoos in the Midwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplas- mosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of

Silvia de Camps; J. P. Dubey; W. J. A. Saville

2008-01-01

33

Oxyspiruriasis in zoo birds.  

PubMed

Oxyspiruriasis caused by the bird eyeworm, Oxyspirura mansoni, a thelaziid nematode, in three species of pheasants, 3 Chrysolophus pictus (golden pheasant), 7 Lophura nycthemera (silver pheasant) and 9 Phasianus colchicus (common pheasant) in Zoo Negara Malaysia are reported. Birds with the disease were treated with a solution of 0.5% iodine or 0.5% lysol. Antistress powder for 4 days in water and non-strep vitamin powder in water was also provided. Control measures included removal of the cockroach intermediate host, Pycnoscelus surinamensis (Surinam cockroach) from the vicinity of the birds. The golden pheasant is a new host for O. mansoni in peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22735854

Vellayan, S; Jeffery, J; Oothuman, P; Zahedi, M; Krishnasamy, M; Paramaswaran, S; Rohela, M; Abdul-Aziz, N M

2012-06-01

34

Modern Zoos: New Challenges, New Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the changing function of the modern zoo from its merely recreational role to its newly emerging role as preserver of species, educator, and center for research. Describes the San Diego Zoo as the model for the modern zoo and provides tips for planning field trips to a zoo. (JM)

Sandford, Floyd

1984-01-01

35

The Microbe Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This virtual zoo is part of the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology (DLC-ME), a science education project developed at Michigan State University. Its main attractions are: The snack bar, which explains how many foods are produced with the help of microbes, and includes information on yeast and lactobacillus; Water World, which includes a pond (with algae, cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, heterotrophs, sulfate reducers, and methanogens) and deep sea thermal vents (with riftia and tube worm symbionts); Animal Pavilion, which explains the microbes that live on humans, cows, termites, and dung; Dirtland, which includes sections on microbes in compost and toxic waste sites; and Space Adventure, which discusses the possibility of microbes on Mars and in future space missions.

2007-12-12

36

Pioneer Middle School Virtual Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Zoo showcases middle-school students' research and reports on the animal kingdom and animal classification. A broad outline of animal taxonomy organizes the student reports into the overarching animal kingdoms: Animalia, Plantea, Fungi, Protista, and Monera.

37

San Diego Zoo: Panda Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is provided by the San Diego Zoo. Visitors may view real time footage of pandas at the zoo with Panda Cam, have their questions answered at the Panda Facts page, or read up on each panda with Panda Profiles. And of course, no one should miss the features devoted to panda Hua Mei, who seems to have spent nearly every minute of her life in front of a camera since her birth at the San Diego Zoo in 1999. Visitors can watch video clips of Hua Mei from her birth onward, or view a slide show that chronicles her progress from a tiny unrecognizable lump to a "curious and precocious cub." The Web site has been recently updated to include a short piece about Hua Mei's third birthday, celebrated in August 2002.

2002-01-01

38

The Neutron Star Zoo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not clear how effective it is or on what timescale a buried field might re-emerge. One piece of evidence in favor of accretion-driven field reduction is the fact that NSs in LMXBs, which are older systems (> 108 yr), have mostly low fields and NSs in HMXBs, which are younger systems (107 - 108 yr), have higher fields. This may be an indication that accretion-driven field reduction or decay has not had enough time to operate in HMXBs but has in LMXBs. However, there does not seem to be any evidence of decaying fields in either the LMXB or HMXB populations; e.g. smaller magnetic fields in older systems. On the other hand, CCOs are very young so if they acquired their low fields through mass fallback accretion, the field submergence would have had to operate on much faster timescales than it apparently does in LMXBs. But as we continue to find new species in the NS zoo, one of these may someday be the "Rosetta Stone" that will give us the clues for solving these puzzles.

Harding, Alice K.

2014-01-01

39

Bring the Zoo to You!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hands-on, minds-on zoo project provides a fun and safe opportunity for students to experience the world of animals and nature right in their own classroom. Students have the chance to work individually or in small groups to explore, observe, and discover answers to their questions about the natural world. In addition, it provides numerous…

Wilcox, Dawn Renee; Sterling, Donna R.

2008-01-01

40

[Scabies among the Zoo mammals].  

PubMed

Scabies was observed in 9 species of mammals at the Zoological Garden of Lód? in years 1957-1989. Sarcoptes scabiei spp. was found in capybaras, tapirs and camelids. Notoedres cati was recorded from the siberian tiger, but Notoedres sp. from the Erinaceus europaeus. Scabies was also found in a wild dead Tapla europaea at the Zoo area. PMID:1823472

Zuchowska, E

1991-01-01

41

Buying time for wild animals with zoos.  

PubMed

Zoos and aquariums exhibit many rare species, but sustain few for long periods. Demanding genetic, demographic, and behavioral requirements are a part of the sustainability challenge, and historical zoo goals and limiting animal management objectives are another, but they have been overtaken by worldwide wildlife population contraction and endangerment. New policies are essential for zoo continuance and, if vanishing species are to be helped by zoo propagation, they must be given priority. However, zoos have little animal carrying capacity and propagation must be much more sharply focused. In addition, it is becoming urgent that zoos help to support parks and reserves and, where possible, manage some especially endangered species mutually with parks. PMID:20938970

Conway, William G

2011-01-01

42

Survey of tuberculin testing in Swedish zoos.  

PubMed

Tuberculin test results from 214 animals in three Swedish zoos, tested between the years 1993 and 2000, were compiled from a questionnaire sent out to zoo veterinarians. Comparative testing with bovine and avian tuberculin was used on various sites of injection. A total of five skin test reactors were found: three cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) in one zoo and two tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in another zoo. Postmortem culture from one of the tapirs revealed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a stamping out policy was adopted in the herd. Tuberculosis in the primates was ruled out by further investigations. Zoo veterinarians should try to adopt a common scheme for the regular testing of zoo animals to improve the diagnostic ability and comparison of results between institutions. PMID:12564537

Sternberg, Susanna; Bernodt, Karin; Holmström, Andrea; Röken, Bengt

2002-12-01

43

SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN ZOO ANIMALS IN SELECTED ZOOS IN MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, h...

44

Happy Hollow Park and Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Happy Hollow Park and Zoo participates in conservation and propagation of rare and endangered species by providing hands-on experience with many animals along with the education that's necessary to secure the future of endangered species. The Zoo is in partnership with a number of organizations, including the Belize Audubon Society, the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force, the Center for Ecosystem Survival, the Orangutan Conservancy, and the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, to help educate the public and raise funds to protect endangered species. The interactive exhibit, Backyard Habitat, was constructed in partnership with Watershed Watch by the Happy Hollow staff using conservation grant dollars. It provides visitors with ideas on how they might turn their own backyard into wildlife habitats. Guests may also obtain a handy pamphlet at this exhibit, Invite Wildlife Into Your Backyard. Educational programs also include Pre-K classes, teacher/classroom programs, camps, Scouts programs and Zoofaris guided tours.

45

Zoo and aquarium webcams: an informed view.  

PubMed

Providing webcams for public viewing is a relatively new but growing phenomenon among zoos and aquariums. Reasons for incorporating this programmatic feature are varied, and no guidelines exist to aid institutions considering webcam installations. Decision makers need to know how much effort the cameras require as well as how successful other zoos have found them to be. We evaluated existing webcams and provide an overview of their characteristics, including reliability. Quantitative evaluations provided by zoo/aquarium staff and by zoo members indicate generally positive perceptions of webcams, whereas staff acknowledge a notable level of effort required. Here, we strive to offer guidelines that will help institutions considering this venture. PMID:21688310

Dodson, Gary; Murphy, Cory

2012-01-01

46

Teaching Scientific Inquiry with Galaxy Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The universe of topics to choose from when teaching an astronomy course is astronomically immense. This wide array of opportunity presents some inherently difficult choices for teachers at all levels on how to limit the scope of the course to make the syllabus manageable. As but one example, consider that even the most experienced astronomy teacher must choose between focusing

Stephanie J. Slater; Timothy F. Slater; Daniel J. Lyons

2011-01-01

47

Zoo and Wildlife Libraries: An International Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conservation and well-being of exotic animals is core to the mission of zoos, aquariums and many small nonprofit wildlife groups. Increasingly, these organizations are committed to scientific research, both basic and applied. To ascertain the current state of the libraries that support their efforts, librarians at the San Diego Zoo conducted…

Coates, Linda L.; Tierney, Kaitlyn Rose

2010-01-01

48

Moon Zoo: Educating side-by-side with Doing Science (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon Zoo citizen science project (http://www.moonzoo.org) engages individuals - primarily members of the public - in identifying geological (and sometimes technological) features on the lunar surface. Using a flash-based interface that runs in a web browser, users can mark craters, linear features, and even left-behind lunar landers on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images. These science tools are embedded in an environment designed to encourage learning and collaboration. On the main Moon Zoo site users can explore educational content, including video tutorials, articles, glossary terms, and flash interactive activities. Additionally, there is a blog and a forum to encourage collaboration and social learning, and a twitter feed for general communications. Through this suite of software Moon Zoo users can contribute to science while learning about the Moon and geology. The Moon Zoo educational content is designed with one purpose in mind: To make sure that a curious user can find information quickly, easily, and on (or within 1-click of) the Moon Zoo site. The Internet is filled with many excellent lunar educational products, and many high-quality digital products exist in offline archives. Finding desired resources, however, can sometimes be a challenge even for professional educators. In order to make finding content easier, we developed a glossary list and a basic concept map for our website that addresses geology, lunar exploration, observing, and the moon in history and culture, and then we populated these terms and concepts with already available materials. We also do things in a way that encourages both doing science tasks and learning at the same time! Specifically, we use pop-out audio and video players that allow users to listen, learn, and classify the lunar surface all at once. To try and understand our users better we are conducting both learning and motivations studies while also monitoring site usage. Our learning assessments use an assessment tool designed by Sebastien Cormier and Ed Prather. At the time of this writing, data collection is still in progress. We are asking users with a variety of different experience levels within Moon Zoo to answer concept questions to assess if we can measure a higher conceptual knowledge in people who have spent more time in Moon Zoo and see change over time in individual users. We are also doing interview-based grounded theory investigations into what motivates people to come to Moon Zoo and to continue using the site. Preliminary results of the investigations will be presented, along with user behaviors, and other website statistics-based research. This work is funded through NASA ROSES grant NNX09AD34G and NSF grant DRL-0917608.

Gay, P. L.; Moon Zoo Team

2010-12-01

49

The effect of use of visitor facilities in zoos on duration and intensity of zoo visits  

E-print Network

THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS QN DURATION AND INTENSII'Y OF ZOO VISITS A I'hesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May I979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS ON DURATION AND INTENSITY OF ZOO VISITS A Thesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Shughart, Melinda Joy

1979-01-01

50

Programmatic Evaluation in Association of Zoos and Aquariums–Accredited Zoos and Aquariums: A Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of educational programs in zoos and aquariums is a growing area of interest for researchers and professionals. In this review, the authors examine the literature that focuses on these settings. They then discuss evaluations that have been conducted in institutions accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in relation to knowledge, attitude, and behavior changes in visitors and

Kathayoon Khalil; Nicole Ardoin

2011-01-01

51

Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]?5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

2012-02-01

52

The beast within : measuring the minds of zoo animals  

E-print Network

Though zoos have come far from their early days of concrete boxes in caring for their residents' physical health, zoo animals' mental health-the feelings and thoughts beneath the furry and scaly exteriors-has only recently ...

Duke, Julia Jane

2014-01-01

53

An Investigation into the Determining Factors of Zoo Visitor Attendances in UK Zoos  

PubMed Central

The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126 and n?=?34, r?=??0.430, P?=?0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations. PMID:22253799

Whitworth, Andrew William

2012-01-01

54

Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

Klasson, KT

2003-04-07

55

World Urban Forum III  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are forums on many topics, ranging from animal husbandry to the latest trends in fashion technology, but there is only one forum sponsored by the United Nations that draws such a tremendously diverse mix of practitioners, politicians, and pundits: the World Urban Forum. In its third edition, the Forum and its participants have descended upon Vancouver, and this website brings together materials they are working on during their time at this third meeting. Visitors can learn about the governing bodies that oversee the Forum’s operations, read speeches and statements from those speaking at the event, and also learn about a related event, the World Youth Forum. Visitors with specific interests in various aspects of urbanism will want to look over their “Programmes” area, which contains specific information about the Forum’s initiatives, including land tenure, housing policies, and urban economic development.

2006-01-01

56

Art Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for Art Forum magazine offers a wide range of features, including a Chinese language version, and a host of interactive extras and reports from the art world. The interactive feature "Artguide", which can be accessed via a tab near the top of the page, or by clicking on the box with a world map made of colorful continents, provides a list of "Art Fairs Everywhere", "Special Events", and hotels and restaurants, under "Eat & Sleep". Looking for art exhibits in a particular country? Visitors can click on one of the colorful continents, or choose a "region" or a "country/city" from the drop down boxes underneath the colorful map. Clicking on "Calendar" lets visitors browse by date. Visitors interested in the picks of art critics will find "Picks" helpful, which can be linked to via a tab near the top of any page. Currently there are almost two dozen cities in which work has been chosen, and some cities have more than one exhibit.

57

Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.  

PubMed

In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation. PMID:19598253

Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

2010-01-01

58

IQ Zoo and Teaching Operant Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychology texts often cite the work of Marian and Keller Breland and their business, Animal Behavior Enterprises (ABE), to demonstrate operant conditioning and the "misbehavior of organisms" from an evolutionary perspective. Now available on the Internet at the official IQ Zoo website (http://www3.uca.edu/iqzoo/), the artifacts of ABE's work, in…

Bihm, Elson M.; Gillaspy, J. Arthur, Jr.; Lammers, William J.; Huffman, Stephanie P.

2010-01-01

59

The fungal flora of zoo animals' ears.  

PubMed

The mycotic flora of the ears of zoo animals was investigated in a large zoological garden in Germany. Malassezia pachydermatis was isolated from the following animals: big ant-eater, brown bear, common wombat, Eurasian badger, Indian elephant, Mangaliza pig and wide-mouthed rhinoceros. Aspergillus and Penicillium species, yeasts and zygomycetes were also isolated from some animals. PMID:7935595

Kuttin, E S; Müller, J

1994-01-01

60

Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

Ward, Kristin

61

Football Forum Key Themes Alumni Forum  

E-print Network

Football Forum Key Themes Alumni Forum October 15, 2007; 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm Harris Alumni Center higher revenue generation potential Adding football provides opportunity to change conference affiliation & Community support important, and has high potential considering corporate dollars in community Football

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

62

Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.  

PubMed

For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22753040

Lacy, Robert C

2013-01-01

63

Spatio-temporal constraints on the zoo hypothesis, and the breakdown of total hegemony  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zoo Hypothesis posits that we have not detected extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) because they deliberately prevent us from detecting them. While a valid solution to Fermi's Paradox, it is not particularly amenable to rigorous scientific analysis, as it implicitly assumes a great deal about the sociological structure of a plurality of civilisations. Any attempt to assess its worth must begin with its most basic assumption - that ETIs share a uniformity of motive in shielding Earth from extraterrestrial contact. This motive is often presumed to be generated by the influence of the first civilisation to arrive in the Galaxy. I show that recent work on inter-arrival time analysis, while necessary, is insufficient to assess the validity of the Zoo Hypothesis (and its related variants). The finite speed of light prevents an early civilisation from exerting immediate cultural influence over a later civilisation if they are sufficiently distant. I show that if civilisation arrival times and spatial locations are completely uncorrelated, this strictly prevents the establishment of total hegemony throughout the Galaxy. I finish by presenting similar results derived from more realistic Monte Carlo Realisation simulations (where arrival time and spatial locations are partially correlated). These also show that total hegemony is typically broken, even when the total population of civilisations remains low. In the terminology of previous studies of solutions to Fermi's Paradox, this confirms the Zoo Hypothesis as a "soft" solution. However, an important question to be resolved by future work is the extent to which many separate hegemonies are established, and to what extent this affects the Zoo Hypothesis.

Forgan, Duncan H.

2011-10-01

64

Encephalomyocarditis virus infection in an Italian zoo  

PubMed Central

A fatal Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection epidemic involving fifteen primates occurred between October 2006 and February 2007 at the Natura Viva Zoo. This large open-field zoo park located near Lake Garda in Northern Italy hosts one thousand animals belonging to one hundred and fifty different species, including various lemur species. This lemur collection is the most relevant and rich in Italy. A second outbreak between September and November 2008 involved three lemurs. In all cases, the clinical signs were sudden deaths generally without any evident symptoms or only with mild unspecific clinical signs. Gross pathologic changes were characterized by myocarditis (diffuse or focal pallor of the myocardium), pulmonary congestion, emphysema, oedema and thoracic fluid. The EMCV was isolated and recognized as the causative agent of both outbreaks. The first outbreak in particular was associated with a rodent plague, confirming that rats are an important risk factor for the occurrence of the EMCV infection. PMID:20298561

2010-01-01

65

Cool Cosmos: The Infrared Zoo Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As students tour this online Infrared Zoo, they gather new information about the animals they would not get from a visible light picture. Infrared light shows us the heat radiated by the world around us. By viewing animals with a thermal infrared camera, we can actually see the differences between warm and cold-blooded animals. Infrared also allows us to study how well feathers, fur and blubber insulate animals.

NASA IPAC/Caltech

66

LLW Forum meeting report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01

67

Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

2014-01-01

68

Extraordinary Animals and Expository Writing: Zoo in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A zoo outreach program led to placing animals in classrooms where those animals became foci for numerous learning activities such as writing, observing, and care. Systematic debriefings suggested uniqueness to learning outcomes connected to zoo animals. Subsequent analysis of student writing indicated that students responded to situational…

Trainin, Guy; Wilson, Kathleen; Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David

2005-01-01

69

A ZOO-WIDE EVALUATION INTO THE CURRENT FEEDER INSECT SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAM AT THE BROOKFIELD ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Commercially raised insects are an important food source for captive animals. For those animals that are purely insectivorous, the nutrient concentrations of the food source are vitally important for the health and welfare of the animal, particularly the Ca to P ratio. In the summer of 2002, a zoo-wide evaluation of the current methods of insect supplementation was conducted at

Roy D. McClements; Barbara A. Lintzenich; Jennifer Boardman

70

Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals in selected zoos in the midwestern United States.  

PubMed

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of the midwestern United States was determined by using the modified agglutination test (MAT). A titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of T. gondii exposure. Among wild felids, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 6 (27.3%) of 22 cheetahs (Acynonyx jubatus jubatus), 2 of 4 African lynx (Caracal caracal), 1 of 7 clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), 1 of 5 Pallas cats (Otocolobus manul), 12 (54.5%) of 22 African lions (Panthera leo), 1 of 1 jaguar (Panthera onca), 1 of 1 Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), 1 of 1 Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), 5 (27.8%) of 18 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), 1 of 4 fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), 3 of 6 pumas (Puma concolor), 2 of 2 Texas pumas (Puma concolor stanleyana), and 5 (35.7%) of 14 snow leopards (Uncia uncia). Antibodies were found in 10 of 34 feral domestic cats (Felis domesticus) trapped in 3 zoos. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were not found in any of the 78 fecal samples from wild and domestic cats. Among the macropods, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 Dama wallabies (Macropus eugenii), 1 of 1 western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus), 1 of 2 wallaroos (Macropus robustus), 6 of 8 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), 21 (61.8%) of 34 red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), and 1 of 1 dusky pademelon (Thylogale brunii). Among prosimians, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 blue-eyed black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons), 1 of 21 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 2 of 9 red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra), and 2 of 4 black- and white-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata). Among the avian species tested, 2 of 3 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were seropositive. Among 7 possible risk factors, sex, freezing meat temperature (above -13 C vs. below -13 C), washing vegetables thoroughly, frequency of feral cat sightings on zoo grounds (occasionally vs. frequently), frequency of feral cat control programs, capability of feral cats to enter hay/grain barn, and type of animal exhibit, exhibiting animals in open enclosures was the only factor identified as a significant risk (OR 3.22, P = 0.00). PMID:18605803

de Camps, Silvia; Dubey, J P; Saville, W J A

2008-06-01

71

BIOSPECIMEN BEST PRACTICES FORUM  

Cancer.gov

BIOSPECIMEN BEST BIOSPECIMEN BEST PRACTICES FORUM PRACTICES FORUM Overview of Ethical, Legal, and Policy Overview of Ethical, Legal, and Policy Best Practices Best Practices June 18, 2007 June 18, 2007 Karen Smith Thiel, Ph.D., J.D. Karen Smith Thiel,

72

EPA SCIENCE FORUM  

EPA Science Inventory

Every year, the world's leading environmental scientists and policy makers meet at the EPA Science Forum to explore the latest discoveries in the world of environmental research. Background EPA's Research & Development's Office has been hosting the EPA Scien...

73

The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

2000-01-01

74

Zoo visitors' understanding of terms denoting research activity.  

PubMed

Zoos have increasingly sought to justify their existence by reference to a scientific role particularly in the domains of animal welfare and conservation. Given recent initiatives by the UK government to foster public engagement with science, it is timely to investigate public attitudes towards primary research activity by zoos. This study reports the views of 83 visitors to Edinburgh Zoo. Within certain items in a structured interview noun terms denoting research activity were manipulated ("research" versus "studies") as was their qualification (adjective "scientific" present or absent before the noun term). "Research" was associated with a restricted and negative perception of investigatory activity. This effect was intensified when the noun term was preceded by "scientific". It is concluded that there is a continuing need to challenge public perceptions, particularly of the phrase "scientific research"; that in the meantime zoos should perhaps exercise caution when using it in relation to their activities. PMID:25414921

Carson, Lloyd

2014-07-01

75

Education at Zoos and Aquariums in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the variety of formal and informal educational programs being developed by zoos and aquariums in the United States and suggests methods of increasing the educational utility of these facilities. (AL)

Turkowski, Frank J.

1972-01-01

76

Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on an inquiry into the use of zoos as a source of informal or free choice learning. The study was contexualised within the zoo's environmental enrichment programme (an animal husbandry principle that seeks to develop species-typical behaviour for captive animals by using naturalistic enclosures or artificial items that stimulate animal interest). Visitor perceptions and actual use of the zoo were investigated using structured interviews based on an interview protocol that elicited their perspectives of the nature and character of zoo settings including the use of photographs of selected exhibits to induce stimulated recall. These data were triangulated with unobtrusive observation at the same exhibits (Bitgood et al., 1988). The visitors spent little time at a given exhibit, and rated the more naturalistic or enriched exhibits more favourably, but older visitors seemed less concerned with naturalness of exhibits. The zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning for both general visitors and school groups. Both general visitors and school groups reported that the prime purpose of their visit was for entertainment. It appears learning of science at the zoo is limited for general visitors, however, the learning of science for school children is enhanced by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricula links.

Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

2003-01-01

77

The global reach of zoos and aquariums in visitor numbers and conservation expenditures.  

PubMed

A survey conducted by the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums, in collaboration with national and regional zoo and aquarium associations, showed that annually more than 700 million people visit zoos and aquariums worldwide and are thus potentially exposed to environmental education. Furthermore, the world zoo and aquarium community reportedly spends about US$ 350 million on wildlife conservation each year. Therefore, the world zoo and aquarium community has the potential to play an important role in both environmental education and wildlife conservation. Systematic reviews are encouraged to provide further evidence for the effectiveness of zoos and aquariums as centers of education and conservation. PMID:21136509

Gusset, Markus; Dick, Gerald

2011-01-01

78

Math Forum@Drexel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Math Forum is an online resource for mathematics education intended for teachers, parents, students, and others interested in math and math education. The site includes a help page with an ask-the-expert feature, a searchable, annotated library of links to math-related web sites, and a searchable archive of teacher-to-teacher discussions about teaching mathematics. There is also a problems page that includes problems and puzzles, a problem-of-the-week feature, and "Write Math with the Math Forum," a tool for curriculum support that features grade-specific problems aligned to state and national standards. Other materials include links to online forums and discussion groups, links to resources and tools (including a teacher exchange page for user-contributed lessons and activities), links to discussions of key issues, a newsletter, and information about professional development opportunities.

79

Alaska Science Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alaska Science Forum Web site is provided by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The forum consists of articles written about various science subjects by scientists from the Geophysical Institute. Categories include the aurora, earthquakes, fun science facts, historic Alaska, mountains, rocks and geology, volcanoes, weather, and more. One of the latest articles, by Ned Rozell, is titled: Bogs, Permafrost and the Global Carbon Equation. Each of the articles is listed along with the author's name and a direct link to the online publication, most of which are fairly short and geared towards nonscientists making reading easy and interesting. [JAB

80

Alzheimer Research Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Alzheimer Research Forum is an independent nonprofit organization" of science and medical professionals dedicated to research and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The site includes up-to-date information in the form of news, papers of the week, journal article abstracts in advance, live discussions, and more. A wide variety of resources focus on many different aspects of Alzheimer's research.

81

Mark Modera Affiliates Forum  

E-print Network

Smart Home (PNE) · Light Commercial and Retail · Western Cooling Challenge ­ High-Efficiency Packaged AMark Modera Affiliates Forum May 7, 2013 #12;"Partner with stakeholders to identify technologies, conduct research and demonstrations, disseminate information, and implement programs that reduce cooling

California at Davis, University of

82

2012 National Leadership Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two key themes emerged from the 2012 National Leadership Forum: Taking Business to School, which was hosted by the Career and Technical Education Foundation at the end of May. The first was that employers are looking for a workforce that is technologically savvy while having leadership and employability skills. The second is that the business…

Magnuson, Peter

2012-01-01

83

A Virtual Publications Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the continuing effort to inform members about the publications program and get their input, the Publications Committee scheduled an open forum at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting. This was to allow any members or guests the opportunity to ask questions about the AGU publications program, processes, progress, or any other publications-related concerns. Here, we are using the

George Hornberger; Jean-Louis Bougeret; Samuel Bowring; Curtis Collins; John Costa; Robert Jackson; Ralf Jaumann; Ross Stein; Kiyoshi Suyehiro; Xubin Zeng

2004-01-01

84

Journal Archives Article Forum  

E-print Network

About Journal Archives Article Forum Perspectives on Terrorism Home Journal Archives Print Edition About Contact search... Home Journal Archives Back to Perspectives on Terrorism Past Issues Back to Perspectives on Terrorism This Issue Volume IV, Issue 2 Perspectives on Terrorism - Interview

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Forestry: Forum summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A synopsis of a forum addressing the use of LANDSAT data in forestry is given. Broad inventory studies, clear-cut monitoring, and insect and disease detection were among the subject areas discussed. Concerns regarding the vailability of data, cloud cover, resolution and classification accuracy, and product format were expressed by foresters.

Whitmore, R.

1981-01-01

86

Glanders outbreak at Tehran Zoo, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives In December 2010 four, lions and one tiger died at the Tehran zoo. Out of all samples, Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of Glanders) was isolated just from ulcer sample of the tiger which was imported to Iran from Russia. Materials and Methods One nasal swab from a tiger and fifteen blood samples with anticoagulant belonging to one tiger and fourteen lions (four dead lions and eleven live lions) were collected and were inoculated directly onto the selective media. The isolate was identified by morphological and biochemical and API BBL tests and PCR using specific primers (Bma- IS407-flip). The standard (Razi Type Culture Collection RTCC: 2375) and tiger isolates were inoculated into 2 guinea pigs. All residue solipeds and carnivores were checked by Malleination test and Complement Fixation (CF) Test respectively. Results One isolate of B. mallei was isolated from tiger's nasal swab. Both of B.mallei strains were recovered from inoculated animals. All of solipeds were negative by malleination test, however, 11 lions including 4 dead and 7 live lions out of 14 lions were positive in CF test for Glanders and all were put down by the authorities. Conclusion Active surveillance of Glanders is essential for solipeds, especially it's more important while being used to feed valuable carnivores like lions and tigers. Therefore, a reliable test like malleination must be carried out twice (first before transferring and one month after quarantine). Both test results should be negative for use for feeding. PMID:22783454

Khaki, P; Mosavari, N; Khajeh, Nasiri S; Emam, M; Ahouran, M; Hashemi, S; Taheri, Mohammad M; Jahanpeyma, D; Nikkhah, S

2012-01-01

87

A Cosmic Zoo in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomers often turn their telescopes to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the closest galaxies to our own Milky Way, in their quest to understand the Universe. In this spectacular new image from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, a celestial menagerie of different objects and phenomena in part of the LMC is on display, ranging from vast globular clusters to the remains left by brilliant supernovae explosions. This fascinating observation provides data for a wide variety of research projects unravelling the life and death of stars and the evolution of galaxies. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is only about 160 000 light-years from our own Milky Way - very close on a cosmic scale. This proximity makes it a very important target as it can be studied in far more detail than more distant systems. The LMC lies in the constellation of Dorado (the Swordfish), deep in the southern sky and well placed for observations from ESO's observatories in Chile. It is one of the galaxies forming the Local Group surrounding the Milky Way [1]. Though enormous on a human scale, the LMC is less than one tenth the mass of our home galaxy and spans just 14 000 light-years compared to about 100 000 light-years for the Milky Way. Astronomers refer to it as an irregular dwarf galaxy [2]. Its irregularity, combined with its prominent central bar of stars suggests to astronomers that tidal interactions with the Milky Way and fellow Local Group galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, could have distorted its shape from a classic barred spiral into its modern, more chaotic form. This image is a mosaic of four pictures from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image covers a region of sky more than four times as large as the full Moon. The huge field of view of this camera makes it possible to see a very wide range of objects in the LMC in a single picture, although only a small part of the entire galaxy can be included. Dozens of clusters of young stars can be seen as well as traces of glowing gas clouds. Huge numbers of faint stars fill the image from edge to edge and in the background, more galaxies, far beyond the LMC, are visible. Globular clusters are collections of hundreds of thousands to millions of stars bound by gravity into a roughly spherical shape just a few light-years across. Many clusters orbit the Milky Way and most are ancient, over ten billion years old, and composed mainly of old red stars. The LMC also has globular clusters and one is visible as the fuzzy white oval cluster of stars in the upper right part of the image. This is NGC 1978, an unusually massive globular cluster. Unlike most other globular clusters, NGC 1978 is believed to be just 3.5 billion years old. The presence of this kind of object in the LMC leads astronomers to think that the LMC has a more recent history of active star formation than our own Milky Way. As well as being a vigorous region of star birth, the LMC has also seen many spectacular stellar deaths in the form of brilliant supernova explosions. At the top right of the image, the remnant of one such supernova, a strangely shaped wispy cloud called DEM L 190, often also referred to as N 49, can be seen. This giant cloud of glowing gas is the brightest supernova remnant in the LMC, and is about 30 light-years across. At the centre, where the star once burned, now lies a magnetar, a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. It was only in 1979 that satellites orbiting Earth detected a powerful gamma-ray burst from this object, drawing attention to the extreme properties of this new class of stellar exotica created by supernova explosions. This part of the Large Magellanic Cloud is so packed with star clusters and other objects that astronomers can spend entire careers exploring it. With so much activity, it is easy to see why astronomers are so keen to study the strange creatures in this heavenly zoo. Notes [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Group [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_mor

2010-06-01

88

Quantification of false positives within Moon Zoo crater annotations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how a quantitative pattern recognition system can be used to estimate the quantity of contamination in Moon Zoo data from erroneous annotations. The proposed method produces not only estimates of true verses false crater annotations, but also a full error covariance, with additional conformity checks, which is essential for the meaningful interpretation of measurements, e.g. for plotting error bars.

Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

2014-04-01

89

Science in the 19th-century zoo.  

PubMed

The 19th century saw the advent of the modern zoological garden. The newly founded zoos not only claimed to educate and entertain their audiences, but also to serve science by providing direct access to exotic animals. However, reality did not live up to the promise of such rhetoric. The vast majority of biologists preferred to use dead bodies as the material for their morphological research. Nevertheless, there was still a strong interaction between the zoo and science. In the debate on Darwinism, the apes in the cage played a vital role. PMID:15749152

Hochadel, Oliver

2005-03-01

90

Dark web forums portal: Searching and analyzing jihadist forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the advent of Web 2.0, the Web is acting as a platform which enables end-user content generation. As a major type of social media in Web 2.0, Web forums facilitate intensive interactions among participants. International Jihadist groups often use Web forums to promote violence and distribute propaganda materials. These Dark Web forums are heterogeneous and widely distributed. Therefore, how

Yulei Zhang; Shuo Zeng; Li Fan; Yan Dang; Catherine A. Larson; Hsinchun Chen

2009-01-01

91

Inquiry Learning Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Inquiry Learning Forum (ILF) is an online community of K-12 math and science teachers interested in inquiry-based teaching and learning. Materials at the ILF web site include discussions on what inquiry is and why it is useful,and how it connects to local and national educational standards. The ILF library is a collection of lesson ideas and web links suggested by teachers, including inquiry-based lesson plans, activities, and unit ideas, as well as links to online resources from other web sites. Teachers can create their own personal portals with links to ILF and external resources, personal profiles, and a personal journal. There are also discussion forums for teachers; a collaborative group space for sharing ideas; virtual visits to classrooms; and information on professional development activities.

92

The PRIVACY Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Begun in 1992, the PRIVACY Forum is a moderated digest of "the discussion and analysis of issues relating to the general topic of privacy (both personal and collective) in the 'information age'." It is sponsored by the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), internetMCI and Cisco Systems, but they do not influence its content. The digest mailing itself is a once- or twice-weekly publication, and submissions are generally, though not always, signed by the author. The archive includes all of the Privacy Forum's digests as well as various reports, legislative acts, fact sheets and other materials that are topically related. The archive is keyword searchable but results contain no descriptive information--only the volume and number of the issue.

93

Agricultural Outlook Forum '98: USDA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Department of Agriculture organized Agricultural Outlook Forum '98 to provide "up-to-date assessment of farm and commodity prospects and major economic developments in agriculture." The topics covered in the forum include agricultural and trade prospects, new frontiers for agriculture, food safety, economic opportunities for small farms, risk management, trade barriers, biotechnology, marketing organic food products, conservation, international marketing, price indexes and transportation. Selected speeches from the forum are now available for downloading.

94

Factors facilitating research: a survey of zoo and aquarium professionals.  

PubMed

The purpose of this survey was to assess the background, training, and perceptions of professionals conducting and coordinating research at North American zoos and aquariums accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and to identify the factors they considered critical to successful scientific programs. We analyzed responses to a 57-item questionnaire from 231 professionals at AZA zoos and aquariums. The majority of those surveyed conducted behavioral research, conducted research only in a captive setting, held curatorial positions, had their salaries supported by their institutions' operating budget, and considered themselves part of a successful scientific program. About 30% of those we surveyed possessed a doctoral research degree in comparison to 55% possessing lesser level degrees-19% with master's, 34% with bachelor's, and 2% with other degrees. Support from the chief executive officer and personnel dedicated to conducting scientific programs were judged as the two most important factors contributing to the successful scientific programs. The information provided in this report may be used to develop and improve both established and newly initiated scientific programs in zoos and aquariums. PMID:20127961

Anderson, Ursula S; Maple, Terry L; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

2010-01-01

95

A quantitative microbiological risk assessment for Campylobacter in petting zoos.  

PubMed

The significance of petting zoos for transmission of Campylobacter to humans and the effect of interventions were estimated. A stochastic QMRA model simulating a child or adult visiting a Dutch petting zoo was built. The model describes the transmission of Campylobacter in animal feces from the various animal species, fences, and the playground to ingestion by visitors through touching these so-called carriers and subsequently touching their lips. Extensive field and laboratory research was done to fulfill data needs. Fecal contamination on all carriers was measured by swabbing in 10 petting zoos, using Escherichia coli as an indicator. Carrier-hand and hand-lip touching frequencies were estimated by, in total, 13 days of observations of visitors by two observers at two petting zoos. The transmission from carrier to hand and from hand to lip by touching was measured using preapplied cow feces to which E. coli WG5 was added as an indicator. Via a Beta-Poisson dose-response function, the number of Campylobacter cases for the whole of the Netherlands (16 million population) in a year was estimated at 187 and 52 for children and adults, respectively, so 239 in total. This is significantly lower than previous QMRA results on chicken fillet and drinking water consumption. Scenarios of 90% reduction of the contamination (meant to mimic cleaning) of all fences and just goat fences reduces the number of cases by 82% and 75%, respectively. The model can easily be adapted for other fecally transmitted pathogens. PMID:24724585

Evers, Eric G; Berk, Petra A; Horneman, Mijke L; van Leusden, Frans M; de Jonge, Rob

2014-09-01

96

Zoo Biology 27:470487 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-print Network

, experimentation, modeling, and teaching of general and specific animal biology and behavior through work in both institutions; research; animal welfare; zoo research; academic research; academia; behavior; conservation of social and individual behavior that is relevant to housing of captive animals, relations among nearby

Timberlake, William D.

97

Observing Animal Behavior at the Zoo: A Learning Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate students in a learning laboratory course initially chose a species to study; researched that species' physical and behavioral characteristics; then learned skills necessary to select, operationalize, observe, and record animal behavior accurately. After their classroom preparation, students went to a local zoo to observe the behavior…

Hull, Debra B.

2003-01-01

98

Forum on Economic Freedom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Forum on Economic Freedom web site was developed by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) to build and strengthen democracy around the world through promoting private enterprise. The highlight of the site is Economic Reform Today, a journal published by CIPE to help educate policymakers on successful economic strategies. Recent issues have focused on challenges for policymakers in new democracies, globalization, reshaping government and market solutions to social issues. Other resources available include materials from CIPE "Central and Eastern Europe: Economic Policy Roundtables" and "Women in Business" programs.

99

Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or discussion boards, are web applications that provide online discussions. Like wikis, your forum…

Kahn, Sami

2009-01-01

100

London International Youth Science Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

Auty, Geoff

2010-01-01

101

(Tribology conferences and forums)  

SciTech Connect

The principal meeting attended during this trip was the Japan International Tribology Conference Nagoya 1990. The conference encompassed a wide range of topics, including the tribology of ceramics, the tribology in high-performance automobiles, and many aspects of lubrication technology. Associated forums were also held on the tribology of advanced ceramics, on solid lubrication, and on automotive lubricants. Presentations made during the latter forum discussed anticipated trends in engine development and anticipated improvements in lubricants required for the next generation of engines. In addition to meetings, site visits were made to five industrial organizations to discuss ceramic tribology. Nippon Steel Corporation and Toshiba Corporation are both very active in the ceramic area, Nippon Steel from their interest in research on new materials and Toshiba from both an interest in new materials and in support of their work in electronic devices. Two engine manufacturers were also visited, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. These companies were somewhat reserved in their discussion of progress in the utilization of ceramics in automobile engines.

Yust, C.S.

1990-11-30

102

The Great Issues Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Big ideas are important, and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York (CUNY) has created the Great Issues Forum in order to "explore critical issues of our time through a single thematic lens." The program was started in 2007, and the initiative includes free public conversations, online seminars, and a number of other features designed to bring these conversations to people around the globe. Visitors can get a sense of these conversations by clicking on the "Online Audio/Video Archive" to view past sessions. These sessions have included discussion on political power, economic power, and the African-American church and American politics. After checking one (or more) of these sessions out, visitors should then click on over to the "Seminars" area. Here they can read and comment on online discussions about subjects such as global natural resource conflicts and depictions of power in cinema. Along the way, visitors can also view participants' bios, and also learn about the upcoming seminar topics and public presentations and forums.

103

OECD: Global Forums  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the early 21st century, there are a multitude of evolving policy questions that are inherently transnational in scope and breadth, and thus require an ongoing dialogue across various political and organizational boundaries. It is not surprising that one of the international organizations involved in creating a meaningful dialogue and exchange of ideas is the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Its Global Forum program is an excellent way to learn about some of these complex policy questions and programs they are emerging, as the organization addressed such issues as governance, international investment, the knowledge economy, and sustainable development. Within each thematic section, users can view working papers, statistics, and other relevant documents related to each theme. For persons with an interest in these topics, this site will be of great use, and one that is worth returning to several times.

104

Harvard Law School Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1946 by 30 law students returned from the war, the Harvard Law School Forum has remained a nonprofit, student-run organization that sponsors a variety of speakers and panel discussions featuring political, literary, and cultural luminaries from around the world. Over the years, many of these discussions have been broadcast on the radio or otherwise recorded and are now available online in their entirety. Past programs currently offered in RealPlayer format include, to name just a few, Henry Kissinger, Timothy Leary, Jimmy Hoffa, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Shimon Peres, Carl Sagan, F. Lee Bailey, Mario Cuomo, Ralph Nader, Helen Thomas, Charlton Heston, and Vince McMahon. The site also features a guide to past programs (sorted by decade and some with photos or associated press clippings), a photo gallery, and information on upcoming speakers. The site is an ongoing project, and additional recordings and other materials will be added as they are prepared or become available.

105

Musical Instrument Makers Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With links to over 400 pages on acoustic guitar building, violin, dulcimer, flute, recorder, and bagpipe making, brass instrument building and repair, drum making and much, much more this is the site to visit to better understand how musical instruments are made and maintained. The Forum itself hosts a long list of topics which include discussions related to everything from splitting spruce billets to how to alter a violin to better fit a musician's hand to how to use bird's eye maple in guitar building. And as if all of that were not enough the site also provides links to appropriate books, magazines and hosts a tools store section with links to wood turning tools, hand tools and everything else that's needed to keep your fiddle, guitar or flute in tip top shape.

2006-10-17

106

A Virtual Publications Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the continuing effort to inform members about the publications program and get their input, the Publications Committee scheduled an open forum at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting. This was to allow any members or guests the opportunity to ask questions about the AGU publications program, processes, progress, or any other publications-related concerns. Here, we are using the pages of Eos to share several ``good news'' messages about AGU publications and open a dialog with the membership about the publications program. The first thing to remember about AGU publications is that historically they have supported many of the non-revenue generating activities of the Union that we hold to be important-examples include workshops for high school teachers, career information for pre-college students and school counselors, and information for the press and for decision makers at various levels of government. Publications are very important to the mission of AGU both intellectually and financially (Figure 1).

Hornberger, George; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Bowring, Samuel; Collins, Curtis; Costa, John; Jackson, Robert; Jaumann, Ralf; Stein, Ross; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Xubin

2004-03-01

107

Math Forum: K-12 Geometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geometry Forum is "An Electronic Community for Lovers of Geometry." An NSF-funded project at Swarthmore College, the Geometry Forum is a great place for geometry and math teachers to locate curriculum ideas, software for mathematics, Internet math projects, and information about professional organizations. The student center offers a problem of the week, project of the month, the Internet geometry hunt, student hangouts on the Internet (where students talk about school and math), and students publications. The Geometry Forum has been re-designed and is attractive, easy to navigate, and very friendly. The site is searchable, a Help Desk is included, and the staff is available for questions.

1997-01-01

108

Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo  

PubMed Central

Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda’s potentially dangerous behavior.

Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

2014-01-01

109

Intestinal parasites in various animals at a zoo in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal parasites from different groups of mammals housed in a zoological garden in Malaysia. A total of 197 faecal samples were collected randomly from various primates (99), hoofed mammals (70) and feline (28). It was discovered that 89.3% of feline, 54.5% of primates and 45.7% of hoofed mammals were infected with intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasites found in primates were Balantidium coli (19.2%), Cryptosporidium spp. (14.1%), hookworm (10.1%), Trichuris spp. (5.1%), Ascaris (4.0%) and Blastocystis spp. (2.0%). For hoofed mammals, hookworm had the highest prevalence (34.3%) followed by Trichuris spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. (5.7%). Meanwhile, for feline, Toxocara cati was the most prevalent (64.3%), followed by Cryptosporidium spp. (14.3%), Spirometra spp. (7.1%), and hookworm (3.6%). Animals that were infected were all asymptomatic with low parasite load. Routine monitoring of the presence of parasites in animals kept in the zoo is imperative in assisting zoo management in the formulation and implementation of preventive and control measures against the spread of infectious parasitic diseases among animals within the zoo or to humans. PMID:18723289

Lim, Y A L; Ngui, R; Shukri, J; Rohela, M; Mat Naim, H R

2008-10-20

110

A survey of diabetes prevalence in zoo-housed primates.  

PubMed

In humans, type II diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas is capable of producing insulin but cells do not appropriately respond to insulin with an uptake of glucose. While multiple factors are associated with type II diabetes in humans, a high calorie diet and limited exercise are significant risk factors for the development of this disease. Zoo primates, with relatively high caloric density diets and sedentary lifestyles, may experience similar conditions that could predispose them to the development of diabetes. We surveyed all Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) facilities with primates in their collections to determine the prevalence of diabetes, diagnosis and treatment methods, and treatment outcomes. Nearly 30% of responding institutions reported at least one diabetic primate in their current collection. Although the majority of reported cases were in Old World Monkeys (51%), all major taxonomic groups were represented. Females represented nearly 80% of the diagnosed cases. A wide variety of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment techniques were reported. It is clear from these results diabetes should be considered prominently in decisions relating to diet, weight and activity levels in zoo-housed primates, as well as discussions surrounding animal health and welfare. PMID:22847472

Kuhar, C W; Fuller, G A; Dennis, P M

2013-01-01

111

Cover Crops Soil Health Forum  

E-print Network

blinking light, onto Silk Farm Road. 4. Entrance to Center and Sanctuary is on the left. See sign. Cover Crops & Soil Health Forum February 18, 2014 NH Audubon Center 84 Silk Farm Road Concord, NH 03301

New Hampshire, University of

112

free! The Freedom Forum Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Freedom Forum, "a nonpartisan, international foundation dedicated to free press, free speech and free spirit for all people," offers this fine resource for current news related to free speech, free expression, and journalism. The stories are grouped by subject (First Amendment, Free Press, Technology, Professional Journalism, etc.), with the top stories in each section featured on the main page. free! also includes related links, links to audio Webcasts, and a user forum.

113

Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers\\/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after listening to students' conversations during a field trip to the zoo. In order to

Patricia Patrick; Cathy Mathews; Sue Dale Tunnicliffe

2011-01-01

114

Global Policy Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Global Policy Forum (GPF) monitors the United Nations' global policy making. Based in New York City, the internationally represented GPF has consultative status at the UN. Their visually simple, information-rich Website is divided into the following subsections: UN Financial Crisis, Security Council, Social/ Economic Policy, NGOs, Nations and States, and UN Reform. The content includes essays from the GPF staff, issue summaries, excerpts from conference presentations, news articles, and reports from the UN and other government agencies. Other special in-depth sections on the Iraq crisis, international justice, globalization, and additional timely topics are definitely worth a look. Also, check out GPF's What's New section to keep on top of current UN issues -- for instance, this week's What's New contains critical articles and essays on middle east peace negotiation, sanctions against Iraq, and the rumblings of a possible second genocide in Rwanda, among other topics. In addition, the GPF site offers a publications list, numerous links, an electronic mailing list, a search engine, an index, and a virtual visitors center.

115

Zoos through the Lens of the IUCN Red List: A Global Metapopulation Approach to Support Conservation Breeding Programs  

PubMed Central

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

Conde, Dalia A.; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K.; Jones, Owen R.

2013-01-01

116

Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs.  

PubMed

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K; Jones, Owen R

2013-01-01

117

Why Should I Care? Exploring the Use of Environmental Concern as a Frame of Communication in Zoos  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effectively communicating environmental issues to motivate visitors' behavior is critical for zoos to accomplish their missions. We examined the relationship between zoo visitors' environmental concern and agreement with messages framed by environmental concern. Findings from two zoos (N = 298; N = 400), using two message formats,…

Yocco, Victor S.; Bruskotter, Jeremy; Wilson, Robyn; Heimlich, Joseph E.

2015-01-01

118

Occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in Wrinkled Hornbill and other birds in the Kuala Lumpur National Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of a coccidian parasite, Cryptosporidium, among birds in the Kuala Lumpur National Zoo was investigated in this study. A hundred bird fecal samples were taken from various locations of the zoo. Fecal smears prepared using direct smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique were stained with modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Samples positive for Cryptosporidium with Ziehl-Neelsen stain were later

M. Rohela; Y. A. Lim; I. Jamaiah; P. Y. Khadijah; S. T. Laang; M. H. Nazri; Z. Nurulhuda

2005-01-01

119

Seroprevalences of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and abortions in cattle. Little is known about the prevalence of antibodies to this parasite in zoo animals. Sera from 556 animals, from 13 Czech and Slovak zoos were tested for antibodies to N. caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were

K. Sedlák; E. Bártová

2006-01-01

120

The educational claims of zoos: where do we go from here?  

PubMed

Zoos exude a certain self-confidence regarding their roles as education providers. Indeed, the education outputs of zoos are, at face value, pretty impressive, with most investing in learning opportunities for leisure visitors, education groups and in some cases, as part of their in situ programs. However, these outputs are not necessarily reliable indicators of the educational achievements of zoos. Quantity does not necessarily equate to quality, just as outputs do not necessarily lead to outcomes. Zoo-accreditation organizations such as the AZA and EAZA offer us clear insight into the strategic vision underpinning the education goals for zoo visitors; a heightened appreciation of the value of biodiversity and a connectedness with the natural world. Unsurprisingly, most zoos have educational goals that ally neatly with the vision of their respective accreditation body. Consequently, we are left with fairly narrow, top-down educational goals. This does not necessarily sit well with what we know about the unpredictability of "free choice" learning in environments such as zoos and aquariums, or what is known about public science communication. Research that seeks to explore the impacts of zoo visits often focuses on evaluating performance based on educational goals and the findings are used as a means of providing evidence of institutional achievement. However, any visitor outcome that falls outside of this narrow range could well be missed by the research. In this article, we propose that research that takes unpredictable and unexpected outcomes into account is necessary and overdue. PMID:22674295

Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

2013-01-01

121

A Curriculum Plan for the Columbus Zoo Aquarium. Grades 3 through 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum plan is submitted as a framework for developing educational programs at the Columbus Zoo Aquarium (CZA) for elementary school students in grades 3 through 6. It is intended to provide support and assistance to those involved with CZA programs. Major sections include: (1) "Review of Columbus Zoo's Educational Programs"; (2)…

Alsdorf, Brian

122

Serologic survey of trichinellosis in wild mammals kept in a Mexico City Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

A serologic survey of Trichinella infection was carried out to determine the prevalence of this parasitosis among wild mammals kept in captivity at the Chapultepec Zoo. This was prompted by the necropsy finding of a heavy Trichinella infection in a Canadian polar bear (Ursus maritimus) that had been kept at the Zoo for more than 11 years. The parasites recovered

L. Yépez-Mulia; C. Arriaga; M. A. Peña; F. Gual; G. Ortega-Pierres

1996-01-01

123

Unsilencing Voices: A Study of Zoo Signs and Their Language of Authority  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo signs are important for informal learning, but their effect on visitor perception of animals has been sparsely studied. Other studies have established the importance of informal learning in American society; this study discusses zoo signs in the context of such learning. Through the lens of Critical Theory framed by informal learning, and by…

Fogelberg, Katherine

2014-01-01

124

The green highway forum  

SciTech Connect

In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

NONE

2006-07-01

125

Coalescence and refinement of Moon Zoo crater annotations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how data from multiple users can be combined to give a consensus as to the parameters of annotated craters. The process uses annotations and image data to provide Likelihood solutions, revealing the most probable crater parameters, from which crater Size-Frequency Distributions (SFDs) might be produced.

Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

2014-04-01

126

Interpretive signs designed to trigger naturalist intelligence at two American zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation of interpretive graphics was conducted in 2005 at two mid-sized AZA-accredited zoos, Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida and Knoxville Zoo, Knoxville, Tennessee. The Lowry Park Zoo study investigated signs at a red-tailed hawk and sandhill crane exhibit. Combination signs and wordless signs were more effective helping visitors see animals, increasing holding time, and number of engagements than treatments of no signs, or signs with words only. A second study, at Knoxville Zoo, tested combination and wordless signs in a children's zoo, investigating 31 signs at a 3.5-acre exhibit. Comparisons of visitors seeing the animals/using interactive exhibit elements, holding time, and engagement activities, showed wordless signs were more effective than combination signs. Differences in gender ratio, age, group size, and other demographics were not significant. Visit motivation differed between zoos, with visitors from Lowry Park Zoo more often articulating reason for a visit as wanting to see animals. Visitors at Knoxville Zoo most often said they wanted to spend time with family and friends. Differences in potential for naturalist intelligence were probably related to local practices rather than to innate differences in naturalist intelligence. The number of communities in Florida that regulate pet ownership and provide lawn service could account for the lower number of people who have pets and plants. At both institutions, behaviors supported educational theories. The importance of signs as advanced organizers was shown where signs were removed at the bird exhibit at Lowry Park Zoo, with fewer visitors seeing the animals. Social interaction was noted at both zoos, with intra- and inter-group conversations observed. If naturalist intelligence is necessary to see animals, visitors run a continuum. Some are unable to see animals with signs and assistance from other visitors; others see animals with little difficulty. The importance of honing naturalist intelligence was best stated by a Lowry Park Zoo visitor who commented. "No one has ever shown me how to see animals." The potential for honing naturalist intelligence is the key finding of the study and should be considered as zoos work to connect their visitors with the creatures in their collections.

Bryant, Martha

127

THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum,  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum, Central Area, A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES, Address Informatics Forum. University Of Edinburgh. 10 Crichton Street. Edinburgh. E,H,8, 9,A,B. Telephone. 0,1,3,1, 6,5,1, 5,6,6,1, Map Link. http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/?building=informatics-forum #12;Page 1

Edinburgh, University of

128

Teachers' Online Discussion Forums in Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia has special online discussion forums for teachers as part of its internet website. The study surveys those teachers' online forums and reports the number of participants, number of threads and responses, topics with the highest and lowest posts and the forums role in teachers' professional development and…

Al-Jarf, Reima

2006-01-01

129

A potentially fatal mix of herpes in zoos.  

PubMed

Pathogens often have a limited host range, but some can opportunistically jump to new species. Anthropogenic activities that mix reservoir species with novel, hence susceptible, species can provide opportunities for pathogens to spread beyond their normal host range. Furthermore, rapid evolution can produce new pathogens by mechanisms such as genetic recombination. Zoos unintentionally provide pathogens with a high diversity of species from different continents and habitats assembled within a confined space. Institutions alert to the problem of pathogen spread to unexpected hosts can monitor the emergence of pathogens and take preventative measures. However, asymptomatic infections can result in the causative pathogens remaining undetected in their reservoir host. Furthermore, pathogen spread to unexpected hosts may remain undiagnosed if the outcome of infection is limited, as in the case of compromised fertility, or if more severe outcomes are restricted to less charismatic species that prompt only limited investigation. We illustrate this problem here with a recombinant zebra herpesvirus infecting charismatic species including zoo polar bears over at least four years. The virus may cause fatal encephalitis and infects at least five mammalian orders, apparently without requiring direct contact with infected animals. PMID:22902751

Greenwood, Alex D; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Ho, Simon Y W; Szentiks, Claudia A; Nikolin, Veljko M; Ma, Guanggang; Damiani, Armando; East, Marion L; Lawrenz, Arne; Hofer, Heribert; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

2012-09-25

130

Measuring animal personality for use in population management in zoos: suggested methods and rationale.  

PubMed

The concept that animals have personalities is gaining traction in the scientific community and is well established in zoos and aquariums. Applying knowledge of animal personalities has occurred more slowly and is most often only considered informally. However, animal personalities are likely to affect the welfare animals experience in captivity and thus should be of primary concern to zoo managers. In addition, animal personality likely affects the outcomes of zoo guest experiences and potentially guests' conservation-related behavior. With over 1,000,000 animals in the care of zoos internationally and hundreds of millions of visitors annually, it would be prudent and beneficial to maximize our use of animal personality data in zoos to effect positive conservation outcomes. Understanding how to broaden population planning techniques to include measures of animal personality and the important outcomes of welfare and education value is of prime importance to the zoo industry. In order to succeed, it is necessary to employ techniques that reliably assess animal personalities and provide measures that can easily be used in population planning models. We discuss the outcomes of recent workshops designed to determine the best techniques for measuring animal personalities in the zoo setting with the goal of incorporating personality into population planning. PMID:21370251

Watters, Jason V; Powell, David M

2012-01-01

131

Naturally occurring and melengestrol acetate-associated reproductive tract lesions in zoo canids.  

PubMed

As husbandry practices have improved, safe and effective contraception for captive wildlife management has become a necessity. Melengestrol acetate (MGA), a synthetic progestin, is highly effective and has been used in many zoo species. Long-term use of MGA has been associated with uterine lesions in zoo felids, but effects in zoo canids have not been evaluated. This retrospective study documented spontaneously occurring lesions and investigated the impact of MGA on the reproductive health of zoo canids. Reproductive tracts from adult females were submitted by US zoos to the Association of Zoos & Aquariums' Wildlife Contraception Center Health Surveillance Program. Reproductive tracts were sampled and processed for histopathologic examination following standard protocols. Microscopic evaluations were performed without prior knowledge of MGA treatment status. Prevalence of uterine lesions was evaluated and compared between MGA-treated animals (n = 20) and control (untreated) animals (n = 61). Common lesions within the study population as a whole included endometrial hyperplasia (predominantly cystic) (53%), hydrometra (33%), and adenomyosis (25%). Treatment with MGA was a risk factor for endometrial hyperplasia, hydrometra, fibrosis, and adenomyosis. Uterine mineralization occurred exclusively in MGA-treated animals. Results indicate that MGA contraception can lead to lesions that may permanently impair the fertility of females. Therefore, if long-term contraception of zoo canids is necessary, the use of alternate methods of reproductive control such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs or GnRH vaccines that reduce gonadal hormone exposure should be pursued. PMID:19605907

Moresco, A; Munson, L; Gardner, I A

2009-11-01

132

The sizes of elephant groups in zoos: implications for elephant welfare.  

PubMed

This study examined the distribution of 495 Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and 336 African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in 194 zoos, most of which were located in Europe (49.1%) and North America (32.6%). Cows outnumbered bulls 4 to 1 (Loxodonta) and 3 to 1 (Elephas). Groups contained 7 or fewer: mean, 4.28 (sigma = 5.73). One fifth of elephants lived alone or with one conspecific. Forty-six elephants (5.5%) had no conspecific. Many zoos ignore minimum group sizes of regional zoo association guidelines. The American Zoo and Aquarium Association recommends that breeding facilities keep herds of 6 to 12 elephants. The British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums recommends keeping together at least 4 cows over 2 years old. Over 69% Asian and 80% African cow groups-including those under 2 years-consisted of fewer than 4 individuals. Recently, Europe and North America have made progress with some zoos no longer keeping elephants and with others investing in improved facilities and forming larger herds. The welfare of individual elephants should outweigh all other considerations; zoos should urgently seek to integrate small groups into larger herds. PMID:19107664

Rees, Paul A

2009-01-01

133

Automatic morphological classification of galaxy images  

PubMed Central

We describe an image analysis supervised learning algorithm that can automatically classify galaxy images. The algorithm is first trained using a manually classified images of elliptical, spiral, and edge-on galaxies. A large set of image features is extracted from each image, and the most informative features are selected using Fisher scores. Test images can then be classified using a simple Weighted Nearest Neighbor rule such that the Fisher scores are used as the feature weights. Experimental results show that galaxy images from Galaxy Zoo can be classified automatically to spiral, elliptical and edge-on galaxies with accuracy of ~90% compared to classifications carried out by the author. Full compilable source code of the algorithm is available for free download, and its general-purpose nature makes it suitable for other uses that involve automatic image analysis of celestial objects. PMID:20161594

Shamir, Lior

2009-01-01

134

The Global Corporate Governance Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Corporate Governance Forum (GCGF) is a multidonor trust fund founded by the World Bank Group and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to promote global, regional, and local initiatives that aim improving the institutional framework and practices of corporate governance. \\

Ross Levine

135

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The 2010 Investor Forum connected the strongest and most promising NCI SBIR funded companies with life science investors and strategic partners. The event was a rare opportunity for attendees to get a first look at some of the best emerging companies focused on innovative cancer-related technologies, and to establish new collaborations that will expedite the commercialization of these products.

136

Fish Tagging Forum Meeting Notes  

E-print Network

Attendees: see list on the Fish Tagging Forum website http://www.nwcouncil.org/fw/tag/ Introductions fashion but may expand in future; and `f' for it may be used in the future. Nancy went over the major, "future use" means 1-5 years into the future. Also, the group agreed to add "adult reach survival

137

Premixed Prevaporized Combustor Technology Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Forum was held to present the results of recent and current work intended to provide basic information required for demonstration of lean, premixed prevaporized combustors for aircraft gas turbine engine application. Papers are presented which deal with the following major topics: (1) engine interfaces; (2) fuel-air preparation; (3) autoignition; (4) lean combustion; and (5) concept design studies.

1979-01-01

138

Guide to Indexing "The Forum."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents the policies and procedures used by the North Dakota State University Libraries for indexing "The Forum," a daily newspaper serving eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota. The guide includes lists of material to be included and excluded, timetables for updating the index, duties of the editor and the library clerk, rules…

Bakken, Lori; Miller, Michael M.

139

Forum on Education: Teacher Preparation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forum on Education Newsletter, Summer 2006. Articles included: The Learning Assistant Model for Teacher Education in Science and Technology by Valerie Otero, Undergraduate Learning Assistants at the University of Arkansas by Gay Stewart, and Creating and Sustaining a Teaching and Learning Professional Community at Seattle Pacific University by Lane Seeley and Stamatis Vokos.

Malamud, Ernie

140

An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning  

E-print Network

Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline...

Shi, Hao

2010-01-01

141

Zoo Biology 6:373-378 (1987) Submarine Foraging Behavior of Alcids in  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 6:373-378 (1987) Submarine Foraging Behavior of Alcids in an Artificial Environment of the birds' submarine foraging behavior are needed. We report here an initial study of foraging by seven

Duffy, David Cameron

142

Low pathogenic influenza A virus activity at avian interfaces in Ohio zoos, 2006-2009.  

PubMed

This investigation to examine influenza A virus activity in avian species at four Ohio zoos was initiated to better understand the ecology of avian-origin influenza A (AIV) virus in wild aquatic birds and the possibility of spill-over of such viruses into captive zoo birds, both native and foreign species. Virus isolation efforts resulted in the recovery of three low pathogenic (LP) AIV isolates (one H7N3 and two H3N6) from oral-pharyngeal or cloacal swabs collected from over 1000 zoo birds representing 94 species. In addition, 21 LPAIV isolates possessing H3N6, H4N6, or H7N3 subtype combinations were recovered from 627 (3.3%) environmental fecal samples collected from outdoor habitats accessible to zoo and wild birds. Analysis of oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected from free-ranging mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) live-trapped at one zoo in 2007 resulted in the recovery of 164 LPAIV isolates (48% of samples) representing five HA and six NA subtypes and at least nine HA-NA combinations. The high frequency of isolate recovery is undoubtedly due to the capture and holding of wild ducks in a common pen before relocation. Serologic analyses using an agar gel immune diffusion assay detected antibodies to the influenza A virus type-specific antigen in 147 of 1237 (11.9%) zoo bird sera and in 14 of 154 (9%) wild mallard sera. Additional analyses of a limited number of zoo bird sera demonstrated HA- and NA-inhibition activity to 15 HA and nine NA subtypes. The spectrum of HA antibodies indicate antibody diversity of AIV infecting zoo birds; however, the contribution of heterologous cross-reactions and steric interference was not ruled out. This proactive investigation documented that antigenically diverse LPAIVs were active in all three components of the avian zoologic-wild bird interfaces at Ohio zoos (zoo birds, the environment, and wild birds). The resulting baseline data provides insight and justification for preventive medicine strategies for zoo birds. PMID:24283133

Nolting, Jacqueline M; Dennis, Patricia; Long, Lindsey; Holtvoigt, Lauren; Brown, Deniele; King, Mary Jo; Shellbarger, Wynonna; Hanley, Chris; Killian, Mary Lea; Slemons, Richard D

2013-09-01

143

First observations of fertilized eggs and preleptocephalus larvae of Rhinomuraena quaesita in the Vienna Zoo.  

PubMed

For the first time worldwide, fertilized eggs of ribbon eels (Rhinomuraena quaesita) hatched into feeding preleptocephali and could be kept alive for a period of seven days in the Vienna Zoo. The study reports on husbandry, behavioral observations and dimensions of eggs and preleptocephalus larvae. Furthermore, body color variations of ribbon eels in captivity do not reflect its sex or sexual maturity. Zoo Biol. XXXX:1-4, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25385394

Preininger, D; Halbauer, R; Bartsch, V; Weissenbacher, A

2014-11-10

144

Nuclear waste disposal educational forum  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-10-18

145

An epidemiological approach to welfare research in zoos: the Elephant Welfare Project.  

PubMed

Multi-institutional studies of welfare have proven to be valuable in zoos but are hampered by limited sample sizes and difficulty in evaluating more than just a few welfare indicators. To more clearly understand how interactions of husbandry factors influence the interrelationships among welfare outcomes, epidemiological approaches are needed as well as multifactorial assessments of welfare. Many questions have been raised about the housing and care of elephants in zoos and whether their environmental and social needs are being met in a manner that promotes good welfare. This article describes the background and rationale for a large-scale study of elephant welfare in North American zoos funded by the (U.S.) Institute of Museum and Library Services. The goals of this project are to document the prevalence of positive and negative welfare states in 291 elephants exhibited in 72 Association of Zoos and Aquariums zoos and then determine the environmental, management, and husbandry factors that impact elephant welfare. This research is the largest scale nonhuman animal welfare project ever undertaken by the zoo community, and the scope of environmental variables and welfare outcomes measured is unprecedented. PMID:24079487

Carlstead, Kathy; Mench, Joy A; Meehan, Cheryl; Brown, Janine L

2013-01-01

146

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The event held November 5, 2009 was attended by over 150 leading investors and top pharmaceutical and medical device companies, all strategic partners in the effort to develop and commercialize novel technologies and products to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer. The Forum showcased the top 14 SBIR companies focused on innovative research in cancer-related technologies, selected by strength of research, impact on cancer, product development and market potential.

147

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program hosted the 2012 NCI SBIR Investor Forum on April 18, 2012 in Santa Clara, CA. This year’s meeting brought together nearly 200 SBIR-funded companies, investors, venture capitalists, strategic partners, and business leaders from the biotech and pharmaceutical industries, and featured presentations from 18 top NCI SBIR-funded companies with innovative cancer-related technologies on the brink of commercialization.

148

Scholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum-NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships  

E-print Network

sports journalists, while promoting quality sports journalism education at the collegiate levelScholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum- NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships Scholarship source: NCAA and the Freedom Forum Address: Sports Journalism Scholarship Committee Freedom Forum Scholarships

Karonis, Nicholas T.

149

78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum...will convene a forum titled, ``Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation.'' The forum...organized into three topic areas: Lithium ion battery design, development, and...

2013-03-28

150

Evaluating the Contribution of Zoos and Aquariums to Aichi Biodiversity Target 1.  

PubMed

The United Nations Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 is a key initiative within global efforts to halt and eventually reverse the loss of biodiversity. The very first target of this plan states that "by 2020, at the latest, people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to conserve and use it sustainably." Zoos and aquariums worldwide, attracting more than 700 million visits every year, could potentially make a positive contribution to this target. However, a global evaluation of the educational impacts of visits to zoos and aquariums is entirely lacking in the existing literature. To address this gap, we conducted a large-scale impact evaluation study. We used a pre- and postvisit repeated-measures survey design to evaluate biodiversity literacy-understanding of biodiversity and knowledge of actions to help protect it-of zoo and aquarium visitors worldwide. Ours was the largest and most international study of zoo and aquarium visitors ever conducted. In total, 5661 visitors to 26 zoos and aquariums from 19 countries around the globe participated in the study. Aggregate biodiversity understanding and knowledge of actions to help protect biodiversity both significantly increased over the course of zoo and aquarium visits. There was an increase from previsit (69.8%) to postvisit (75.1%) in respondents demonstrating at least some positive evidence of biodiversity understanding. Similarly, there was an increase from previsit (50.5%) to postvisit (58.8%) in respondents who could identify actions to help protect biodiversity that could be achieved at an individual level. Our results are the most compelling evidence to date that zoo and aquarium visits contribute to increasing the number of people who understand biodiversity and know actions they can take to help protect biodiversity. Evaluación de la Contribución de los Acuarios y Zoológicos al Objetivo 1 de Biodiversidad de Aichi. PMID:25155574

Moss, Andrew; Jensen, Eric; Gusset, Markus

2014-08-22

151

Asynchronous Learning Forums for Business Acculturation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of IT as a facilitator for student collaboration in higher business education has grown rapidly since 2000. Asynchronous discussion forums are used abundantly for collaborative training purposes and for teaching students business-relevant tools for their future careers. This article presents an analysis of the asynchronous discussion forum…

Pence, Christine Cope; Wulf, Catharina

2009-01-01

152

National Dissemination Forum, 1977. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is an analysis of nine agreements focused on three areas of common concern to dissemination specialists involved in the 1977 National Dissemination Forum: resources, linkage, research, evaluation and quality control. FORUM participants represented the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC of the National Institute of Education…

Brickell, Henry M.

153

Lavender Research Forum Highlighting Graduate and  

E-print Network

Lavender Research Forum Highlighting Graduate and Undergraduate LGBTQ Research The Lavender) Issues is accepting submissions for student research papers to be presented at the Lavender Research. All authors selected must be available to present their work at the Lavender Research Forum

Illinois at Chicago, University of

154

The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum effectively acts as the United Kingdom's Nuclear Data Committee. As such it is the interface between the UK nuclear data community and international nuclear data centres. This paper outlines the Forum's terms of reference and describes some of its recent activities.

MacMahon, Desmond; Forrest, Robin; Judge, Steven

2005-05-01

155

Journal of the Proceedings, School Law Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the speeches given at the 1972 New Jersey School Law Forum. The Forum is held to encourage the research of timely legal issues involving the structure and operation of the New Jersey public schools, to assist the school law practitioner by affording him the opportunity to hear and discuss research and opinion on selected…

New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

156

Sarcocystosis among Wild Captive and Zoo Animals in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Sarcocystis sp. infection was investigated in 20 necropsied captive wild mammals and 20 birds in 2 petting zoos in Malaysia. The gross post-mortem lesions in mammals showed marbling of the liver with uniform congestion of the intestine, and for birds, there was atrophy of the sternal muscles with hemorrhage and edema of the lungs in 2 birds. Naked eye examination was used for detection of macroscopic sarcocysts, and muscle squash for microscopic type. Only microscopically visible cysts were detected in 8 animals and species identification was not possible. Histological examination of the sections of infected skeletal muscles showed more than 5 sarcocysts in each specimen. No leukocytic infiltration was seen in affected organs. The shape of the cysts was elongated or circular, and the mean size reached 254 × 24.5 µm and the thickness of the wall up to 2.5 µm. Two stages were recognized in the cysts, the peripheral metrocytes and large numbers of crescent shaped merozoites. Out of 40 animals examined, 3 mammals and 5 birds were positive (20%). The infection rate was 15% and 25% in mammals and birds, respectively. Regarding the organs, the infection rate was 50% in the skeletal muscles followed by tongue and heart (37.5%), diaphragm (25%), and esophagus (12.5%). Further ultrastructural studies are required to identify the species of Sarcocystis that infect captive wild animals and their possible role in zoonosis. PMID:20877499

Vellayan, Subramaniam; Omar, Effat; Abdullah, Suliman; Mat Desa, Noryatimah

2010-01-01

157

Clinicopathologic correlations of tuberculosis in large zoo mammals.  

PubMed

In August 1978, a black rhinoceros at the National Zoological Park died with generalized tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. A 2nd black rhinoceros was euthanatized 9 months after M bovis was cultured from its lungs. After these 2 deaths, numerous large zoo mammals that had been potentially exposed were subjected to various procedures to ascertain their status regarding tuberculosis. The procedures were: intradermal tuberculin testing, evaluation of delayed hypersensitivity reaction on biopsy specimens, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing, and culture of various secretions and organs. Several of the animals in this series died during the study. These were necropsied and examined for evidence of mycobacterial infection. The results of tuberculin testing varied from species to species and from site to site within a species. Delayed hypersensitivity responses generally correlated well with the amount of swelling at the tuberculin site. In some cases, however, positive reactions were found without any delayed hypersensitivity response. Results of ELISA testing were confirmatory in tuberculous animals. Several species were judged to be nonspecific reactors, based on positive or suspect tuberculin test results, with negative ELISA results and necropsy findings. PMID:7035420

Mann, P C; Bush, M; Janssen, D L; Frank, E S; Montali, R J

1981-12-01

158

Sarcocystosis among wild captive and zoo animals in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Sarcocystis sp. infection was investigated in 20 necropsied captive wild mammals and 20 birds in 2 petting zoos in Malaysia. The gross post-mortem lesions in mammals showed marbling of the liver with uniform congestion of the intestine, and for birds, there was atrophy of the sternal muscles with hemorrhage and edema of the lungs in 2 birds. Naked eye examination was used for detection of macroscopic sarcocysts, and muscle squash for microscopic type. Only microscopically visible cysts were detected in 8 animals and species identification was not possible. Histological examination of the sections of infected skeletal muscles showed more than 5 sarcocysts in each specimen. No leukocytic infiltration was seen in affected organs. The shape of the cysts was elongated or circular, and the mean size reached 254 x 24.5 µm and the thickness of the wall up to 2.5 µm. Two stages were recognized in the cysts, the peripheral metrocytes and large numbers of crescent shaped merozoites. Out of 40 animals examined, 3 mammals and 5 birds were positive (20%). The infection rate was 15% and 25% in mammals and birds, respectively. Regarding the organs, the infection rate was 50% in the skeletal muscles followed by tongue and heart (37.5%), diaphragm (25%), and esophagus (12.5%). Further ultrastructural studies are required to identify the species of Sarcocystis that infect captive wild animals and their possible role in zoonosis. PMID:20877499

Latif, Baha; Vellayan, Subramaniam; Omar, Effat; Abdullah, Suliman; Mat Desa, Noryatimah

2010-09-01

159

Unsilencing voices: a study of zoo signs and their language of authority  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zoo signs are important for informal learning, but their effect on visitor perception of animals has been sparsely studied. Other studies have established the importance of informal learning in American society; this study discusses zoo signs in the context of such learning. Through the lens of Critical Theory framed by informal learning, and by applying critical discourse analysis, I discovered subtle institutional power on zoo signs. This may influence visitors through dominant ideological discursive formations and emergent discourse objects, adding to the paradox of "saving" wild animals while simultaneously oppressing them. Signs covering a variety of species from two different United States-accredited zoos were analyzed. Critical Theory looks to emancipate oppressed human populations; here I apply it zoo animals. As physical emancipation is not practical, I define emancipation in the sociological sense—in this case, freedom from silence. Through this research, perhaps we can find a way to represent animals as living beings who have their own lives and voices, by presenting them honestly, with care and compassion.

Fogelberg, Katherine

2014-12-01

160

MoZis: mobile zoo information system: a case study for the city of Osnabrueck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a new project of the Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing, funded by the German Federal Foundation for the Environment (DBU, Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt www.dbu.de). The goal of this project is to develop a mobile zoo information system for Pocket PCs and Smart phones. Visitors of the zoo will be able to use their own mobile devices or use Pocket PCs, which could be borrowed from the zoo to navigate around the zoo's facilities. The system will also provide additional multimedia based information such as audio-based material, animal video clips, and maps of their natural habitat. People could have access to the project at the zoo via wireless local area network or by downloading the necessary files using a home internet connection. Our software environment consists of proprietary and non-proprietary software solutions in order to make it as flexible as possible. Our first prototype was developed with Visual Studio 2003 and Visual Basic.Net.

Michel, Ulrich

2007-10-01

161

Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strain from fecal samples of zoo animal.  

PubMed

The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment. PMID:24489514

Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

2013-01-01

162

ZooKeys 150:5-14 (201 I) doi: 10.3897/zookeys. 150.243 I  

E-print Network

biodiversity research ^ZooKeys ZooKeys l50:Three and a half years of innovative publishing and growth TerryKeys initiated several pilot projects thereby setting foundations of semantic tagging of, and enhancements to article "The symphytognathoid spiders of the Gaoligongshan, Yunnan, China' (Miller et al. 2009) where

Mathis, Wayne N.

163

Occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in Wrinkled Hornbill and other birds in the Kuala Lumpur National Zoo.  

PubMed

The occurrence of a coccidian parasite, Cryptosporidium, among birds in the Kuala Lumpur National Zoo was investigated in this study. A hundred bird fecal samples were taken from various locations of the zoo. Fecal smears prepared using direct smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique were stained with modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Samples positive for Cryptosporidium with Ziehl-Neelsen stain were later confirmed using the immunofluorescence technique and viewed under the epifluorescence microscope. Six species of bird feces were confirmed positive with Cryptosporidium oocysts. They included Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus), Great Argus Pheasant (Argusianus argus), Black Swan (Cygnus atratus), Swan Goose (Anser cygnoides), Marabou Stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), and Moluccan Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccencis). These birds were located in the aviary and lake, with the Moluccan Cockatoo routinely used as a show bird. Results obtained in this study indicated that animal sanctuaries like zoos and bird parks are important sources of Cryptosporidium infection to humans, especially children and other animals. PMID:16438177

Rohela, M; Lim, Y A L; Jamaiah, I; Khadijah, P Y Y; Laang, S T; Nazri, M H Mohd; Nurulhuda, Z

2005-01-01

164

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo Academy: Where Science Education Comes to Life!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo has become a leader in both informal and formal science education. Its Zoo Academy is one example of an effective nontraditional teaching model for science education. The academy has become an excellent work-based learning model and demonstrates how to collaborate and form partnerships successfully between school districts and the nonprofit/business world. From the Zoo Academy model, over 24 academy programs and five informal summer career camps have been developed and used with students in the Omaha Metropolitan area. This unique opportunity places students in a rich learning environment where they can make discoveries about the natural world and apply the knowledge gained to real-world situations.

Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

2008-01-01

165

Seroprevalences of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals.  

PubMed

Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and abortions in cattle. Little is known about the prevalence of antibodies to this parasite in zoo animals. Sera from 556 animals, from 13 Czech and Slovak zoos were tested for antibodies to N. caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 31 of 556 zoo animals (5.6%), representing 18 of 114 species tested: Eurasian wolf (Canis lupus lupus), Maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), fennec (Vulpes zerda), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarondi), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), Indian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis), fisher (Martes pennanti), blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra), European bison (Bison bonasus), lechwe (Kobus leche), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer), eland (Taurotragus oryx), sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekei gratus), Thorold's deer (Cervus albirostris), Eastern elk (C. elaphus canadensis), Vietnam sika deer (C. nippon pseudaxis) and Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus). Titres ranged from 1:40 to 1:2560. The highest prevalence 50% was found in family mustelidae of the order carnivora. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 193 of 556 zoo animals (34.7%) representing 72 of 114 species tested, with titres ranging from 1:40 to 1:40960. The highest prevalence 100% was found in families: hyaenidae, mustelidae, ursidae and viveridae of the order carnivora. The results of this study indicate that zoo animals have more exposure to T. gondii than to N. caninum. It is the first report of seroprevalence of antibodies to N. caninum in European zoo animals. PMID:16387445

Sedlák, K; Bártová, E

2006-03-31

166

Off Earth Mining Forum 19-21 February 2013  

E-print Network

1 Off Earth Mining Forum 19-21 February 2013 www.acser.unsw.edu.au/oemf Never Stand Still Faculty of Engineering Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research (ACSER) #12;Off Earth Mining Forum, UNSW, Sydney Australia's place in space. Off Earth Mining Forum Sponsors Off Earth Mining Forum The prospect of people

Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

167

Fish quarantine: current practices in public zoos and aquaria.  

PubMed

The primary goal of quarantine is to reduce the risk of introducing infectious diseases into established collections. Fish quarantine is inherently complex because of the variety of species, environmental requirements, and facilities. To examine current practices, questionnaires were submitted to 60 public zoos and aquaria, predominantly in North America. Questions reviewed system type (closed, flow-through), quarantine length, diagnostics, treatments, and cleaning and disinfection. Forty-two of the 60 institutions responded. Most institutions had separate quarantine protocols for freshwater teleosts, marine teleosts, and elasmobranchs. Ninety-five percent of institutions had a minimum quarantine period of 30 days or more. Sixty-four percent of institutions used isolated areas for some or all of their fish quarantine. Twenty-five percent had designated fish quarantine staff. All institutions used regular visual examinations to assess animal health. Fifty-four percent of the institutions carried out routine hands-on diagnostics on some fish; this was more common for elasmobranchs than teleosts. All institutions carried out necropsies on mortalities. Fifteen percent of institutions performed histopathology on almost all fresh mortalities; 54% percent performed histopathology on less than 10% of mortalities. Prophylactic treatments were common in closed systems, in particular, formalin immersion for teleosts, freshwater dips and copper sulfate immersion for marine teleosts, and praziquantel immersion for marine teleosts and elasmobranchs. Institutions using dips generally did so at the start or end of quarantine. Fenbendazole- and praziquantel-medicated foods were used commonly in teleosts, but dosages varied greatly. Cleaning and disinfection of systems and equipment increased in response to known pathogens. These results can be used to compare and discuss fish quarantine practices at display facilities in order to improve quarantine success. PMID:22204059

Hadfield, Catherine A; Clayton, Leigh A

2011-12-01

168

Comparative digestion studies in wild suids at Rotterdam Zoo.  

PubMed

Among the artiodactyla, the suids are a group whose digestive physiology has hardly been investigated. The apparent digestibilities (aD) of macronutrients were measured in captive specimens of warthog (Phacochoerus africanus), red river hog (Potamochoerus porcus), and Visayan warty pigs (Sus cebifrons), and compared with those reported for babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa) from the same facility on a similar diet. The animals were fed mixed diets of pelleted feed, grains, fruits, and vegetables; dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF) ranged from 17 to 26% dry matter. aD of organic matter and protein ranged from 72 to 89 and 70 to 82%, respectively. Although red river hogs and warty pigs achieved aD of NDF of 41-54%, this value was higher both in warthogs (63-66%) and babirusa (61-63%). aD of acid detergent fiber was comparatively low in red river hogs (4%), warty pigs (22%), and babirusa (13-25%) but high in warthog (59-62%). Comparison with additional literature data (including peccaries) indicates that in spite of differences in digestive anatomy, suids and peccaries are similar, and resemble other herbivores in fundamental characteristics, such as the negative influence of fiber on overall digestibility, or the positive influence of dietary protein on protein digestion. Although the existing data are equivocal as to a superior fiber digestion in peccaries as compared with other wild suids, the results suggest that warthogs are more efficient than other wild suids or peccaries in terms of fiber digestion. Zoo Biol 27:305-319, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19360626

Clauss, Marcus; Nijboer, Joeke; Loermans, Jochem H M; Roth, Thomas; Van der Kuilen, Jan; Beynen, Anton C

2008-07-01

169

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.) is a week long activity in preparation for a group presentation on a human genetic condition, such as dwarfism, Marfan's Syndrome, albinsim, Huntington's disease, PKU, or any other inheritable genetic condition. The activity is designed to encourage and teach students how to research and present scientific information on human genetic conditions. The teacher provides a list of conditions from which students select their research topic. The students, in groups of three, choose a topic to present at the Genetic Health Forum at the conclusion of that week. The students also choose from one of three jobs: the Forum Delegate, the Research Reporter, or the Graphic Artist. This will be the basis for teacher evaluation of their share of the project. Halfway through the week, students are invited to the Genetic Health Forum to be held the following two days.

Tamsen Profit (Borah High School REV)

1995-06-30

170

California Emerging Technology Forum Part II  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of the California Emerging Technology Forum Part II is to foster the removal of barriers for the development and use of clean technologies through the development of collaborative technology research projects on promising technologies. The collaborative technology resear...

171

National Sunflower Association Research Forum Papers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Sunflower Association (NSA) offers downloadable papers presented at the annual NSA Research Forum from 2002 onwards. Available search fields include year, author, keyword (s), and categories like Bird Predation, Insects, Quality, and Weeds.

172

Implementing a low-starch biscuit-free diet in zoo gorillas: the impact on health.  

PubMed

In the wild, western lowland gorillas consume a diet high in fiber and low in caloric density. In contrast, many gorillas in zoos consume a diet that is high-calorie and low in fiber. Some items commonly used in captive gorilla diets contain high levels of starch and sugars, which are minimal in the natural diet of gorillas. There is a growing concern that captive gorillas may qualify as obese. Furthermore, the leading cause of death for adult male gorillas in zoos is heart disease. In humans, a diet that is high in simple carbohydrates is associated with both obesity and the incidence of heart disease. In response to these issues, we implemented a biscuit-free diet (free of biscuits and low in fruit) and measured serum biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance pre- and post-diet change at three institutions: North Carolina Zoological Garden, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. We also added a resistant starch supplement to gorilla diets at two of the above institutions. We anticipated that these diet changes would positively affect biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance. Both diet manipulations led to a reduction in insulin. Resistant starch also decreased overall serum cholesterol levels. Future research will examine these health changes in a greater number of individuals to determine if the results remain consistent with these preliminary findings. PMID:24420273

Less, E H; Lukas, K E; Bergl, R; Ball, R; Kuhar, C W; Lavin, S R; Raghanti, M A; Wensvoort, J; Willis, M A; Dennis, P M

2014-01-01

173

Animal–visitor interactions in the modern zoo: Conflicts and interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal welfare, education, conservation, research, and entertainment are major goals of modern zoos, but they can be in conflict. For example, visitors enjoy learning about and observing natural behavior in captive animals, but visitors often want to observe and interact with the animals in close proximity. Unfortunately, proximity to and social interactions with humans induce stress for many species, particularly

Eduardo J. Fernandez; Michael A. Tamborski; Sarah R. Pickens; William Timberlake

2009-01-01

174

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in 3 zoos in Mexico City, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus...

175

Programmatic approaches to assessing and improving animal welfare in zoos and aquariums.  

PubMed

There continues to be intense public, professional, and scientific focus on the welfare of animals in zoos and aquariums, but implementing welfare assessment tools consistently throughout this community remains challenging. Indirect measures can be used to assess "welfare potential"-the potential that animals will experience good welfare based on the care that they are provided with. Zoos and aquariums focus on welfare potential with their continued commitment to develop animal care guidelines (e.g. Animal Care Manuals) that can play a role within institutional accreditation or certification. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums Animal Welfare Committee has been pursuing approaches to maximize welfare potential by developing the concept of an integrated welfare approach or framework-an attempt to identify recommended animal care programs (e.g. enrichment, nutrition, veterinary care, research, and animal training programs) and their programmatic components. Objectively assessing the influence that animal care recommendations have on the welfare of individual animals is important to determine the efficacy of programmatic approaches. The future of welfare assessment within zoos and aquariums will include population-level evaluations-tracking emerging trends in health and behavior that come from both formal and informal institutional animal reports. Sharing this information, and performing meta-analyses of the data using epidemiological approaches, will become easier with advances in technology and database management software. Identifying welfare "red/green flags" throughout captive populations will provide direction for more focused assessments that will ultimately inform the design of more effective animal care programs. PMID:19593774

Barber, Joseph C E

2009-11-01

176

Measuring a professional conservation education training program for zoos and wildlife parks in China.  

PubMed

Designed and implemented in 2006, the Academy for Conservation Training (ACT) is a conservation education academy modeled after the Association for Zoos and Aquariums' (AZA) professional conservation education course. ACT incorporates conservation education best practices utilized by AZA-accredited institutions to provide zoo and wildlife park professionals in China with the skills, knowledge, and tools needed to design, implement, and evaluate effective conservation education programs at their facilities. Initial findings indicate that the ACT model is an effective approach to connect these emerging educators with conservation education best practices. The strongest satisfaction responses in this study were in perceptions of the program preparing the individual for work and in personal development. In terms of the longitudinal survey conducted with ACT graduates after the training, the lowest scoring items were the opportunities to meet other zoo educators in China and the quantity of information provided. The most revealing trend in regards to preparedness in becoming zoo educators was that specific pedagogical skills were those where perceived gain was consistent and strong across all three academies. PMID:19821503

Askue, Laurel; Heimlich, Joe; Yu, Jin Ping; Wang, Xiaohong; Lakly, Shelly

2009-09-01

177

Dystopian dreams from South Africa: Lauren Beukes's Moxyland and Zoo City  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central theoretical concept underpinning this article is Lyman Tower Sargent's notion of the ‘critical dystopian’ novel, which is not nihilistic, but which disrupts easy binarist classifications, and incorporates elements of opposition to oppression, as well as hope for a more egalitarian future. I examine critical dystopian dreaming as portrayed in two novels by Lauren Beukes, Moxyland (2008) and Zoo

Cheryl Stobie

2012-01-01

178

Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maxi- mus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associ- ated with training elephants

Peter Oh; Reuben Granich; Jim Scott; Ben Sun; Michael Joseph; Cynthia Stringfield; Susan Thisdell; Jothan Staley; Donna Workman-Malcolm; Lee Borenstein; Eleanor Lehnkering; Patrick Ryan; Jeanne Soukup; Annette Nitta; Jennifer Flood

179

Use of videofluoroscopy in zoo dentistry: endodontic procedure in a tiger.  

PubMed

Videofluoroscopy was used as a radiographic technique to visualize a canine tooth during root canal therapy in a Siberian tiger. Videofluoroscopy was useful because the procedure was performed in a zoo setting with no access to an on-site darkroom. The fluoroscopic screen and videotape allowed for immediate viewing of the root canal system. PMID:9571894

DeForge, D H; Golden, A L

1997-03-01

180

Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

181

Investigation of zoonotic infections among Auckland Zoo staff: 1991-2010.  

PubMed

Investigation was undertaken to assess the occurrence of zoonotic infection among staff at Auckland Zoological Park, New Zealand, in 1991, 2002 and 2010. Serial cross-sectional health surveys in 1991, 2002 and 2010 comprising a health questionnaire, and serological, immunological and microbiological analysis for a range of potential zoonotic infections were performed. Laboratory results for zoo animals were also reviewed for 2004-2010 to assess the occurrence of potential zoonotic infections. Veterinary clinic, animal handler, grounds, maintenance and administrative staff participated in the surveys, with 49, 42 and 46 participants in the 1991, 2002 and 2010 surveys, respectively (29% of total zoo staff in 2010). A small number of staff reported work-related infections, including erysipelas (1), giardiasis (1) and campylobacteriosis (1). The seroprevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A virus and Toxoplasma gondii closely reflected those in the Auckland community. No carriage of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected, and most of those with anti-HBV antibodies had been vaccinated. Few staff had serological evidence of past leptospiral infection. Three veterinary clinic staff had raised Chlamydophila psittaci antibodies, all < 1 : 160 indicating past exposure. Two staff (in 1991) had asymptomatic carriage of Giardia lamblia and one person (in 2010) had a dermatophyte infection. After 1991, positive tests indicating exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis were < 10%, comparable to the general New Zealand population. Zoo animals had infections with potential zoonotic agents, including G. lamblia, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and T. gondii, although the occurrence was low. Zoonotic agents pose an occupational risk to zoo workers. While there was evidence of some zoonotic transmission at Auckland Zoo, this was uncommon and risks appear to be adequately managed under current policies and procedures. Nevertheless, ongoing assessment of risk factors is needed as environmental, human and animal disease and management factors change. Policies and procedures should be reviewed periodically in conjunction with disease monitoring results for both animals and staff to minimise zoonotic transmission. PMID:22639928

Forsyth, M B; Morris, A J; Sinclair, D A; Pritchard, C P

2012-12-01

182

Taurine and zoo felids: considerations of dietary and biological tissue concentrations.  

PubMed

Taurine (TAU) is an essential amino acid required in the diets of Felidae at concentrations ranging between 0.04 and 0.2% on a dry matter (DM) basis (in purified, highly digestible diets, and canned diets, respectively). Although the domestic cat seems to be an appropriate physiologic model for zoo felids, it is sometimes difficult to assess TAU status in zoo feeding programs owing to scattered information on feed ingredient TAU content as well as a lack of normal ranges for assessment of TAU in biological tissues. Knowing that TAU is required in the formulation of hand-rearing diets for exotic felids, the TAU content of 38 ingredients or products used in zoo carnivore feeding or hand-rearing programs was summarized, including 21 new feedstuffs for which TAU data were previously lacking. The kitten milk replacer contained a lower than expected value for TAU. Commercially prepared frozen or canned meat products, seafood products, whole rodent prey, and most strained meat jarred baby foods contained adequate TAU; chunk meats, and some specific types of jarred baby food meats were considerably lower in TAU content (zoo felids sampled opportunistically fell within reference ranges for domestic cats (80-120 and 300-600 nmol/ml in plasma and whole blood, respectively). Plasma concentrations are a useful measure of dietary impact, whereas whole blood concentrations seem to reflect tissue storage of this nutrient. Zoo Biol 26:517-531, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19360598

Hedberg, Gail E; Dierenfeld, Ellen S; Rogers, Quinton R

2007-11-01

183

Gender difference analysis of political web forums: An experiment on an international islamic women's forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an important type of social media, the political Web forum has become a major communication channel for people to discuss and debate political, cultural and social issues. Although the Internet has a male-dominated history, more and more women have started to share their concerns and express opinions through online discussion boards and Web forums. This paper presents an automated

Yulei Zhang; Yan Dang; Hsinchun Chen

2009-01-01

184

Radio Galaxies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

Downes, Ann

1986-01-01

185

A systematic development and evaluation of an undergraduate course in zoo biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biology curricula offered by most institutions of higher education follow a classic pattern of basic taxonomy, phylogeny, physiology, genetics, molecular biology and biometry. This course regimen certainly provides a knowledge structure within the discipline, but is somewhat lacking in information that is directly applicable within the field of zoo biology. The zoo biology curriculum set forth in this dissertation was designed to offer students immersion into the rapidly evolving field of zoo biology. It also offers insight and perspectives into the zoo profession, encompassing 185 accredited zoological parks and aquariums, which employ numerous biologists. There is not a degree granting college or university in Texas that currently offers coursework in this specialization. In order to determine the merit and worth of a course in zoo biology, a field trial and a revised course were presented and subjected to a systematic evaluation. Four evaluative categories were utilized following Benton's (1992) design: (a) consistency between terminal performance objectives, activities and test instrument items, (b) effect on scientific knowledge, (c) activity usefulness as perceived by course participants and the instructor, (d) course worth. Student (N = 49) and component data were measured using a pre-post-test design, a questionnaire, and other informal instruments during the antecedent, transaction and outcome phases. Data from the pre-post-tests were analyzed using t-tests for correlated means. The analysis of activities and test items indicated that they were consistent with the terminal performance objectives. The pre-post-test results indicated that the course had a positive effect on knowledge gain within the field of study. A significant statistical difference was found between the test means at a probability of p ? 0.001. A post course attitudinal questionnaire elicited a rating of 4.65 on a Likert scale of 5.0 on perceived usefulness to the participants. A systematic evaluation was conducted to determine the worth of the zoo biology course using the four evaluative categories mentioned above. The conclusions were as follows: course elements and components were judged to be consistent with terminal performance objectives. There was a dramatic increase in scientific knowledge. The course was considered to be very useful by the participants completing the curriculum. The course was judged worthy of adoption.

Burchfield, Patrick Mullen

186

76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a.m.,...

2011-11-16

187

Adolescent Learning in the Zoo: Embedding a Non-Formal Learning Environment to Teach Formal Aspects of Vertebrate Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of a zoo visit in terms of learning and retention of knowledge concerning the adaptations and behavior of vertebrate species. Basis of the work was the concept of implementing zoo visits as an out-of-school setting for formal, curriculum based learning. Our theoretical framework centers on the self-determination theory, therefore, we used a group-based, hands-on learning environment. To address this questions, we used a treatment—control design (BACI) with different treatments and a control group. Pre-, post- and retention tests were applied. All treatments led to a substantial increase of learning and retention knowledge compared to the control group. Immediately after the zoo visit, the zoo-guide tour provided the highest scores, while after a delay of 6 weeks, the learner-centered environment combined with a teacher-guided summarizing scored best. We suggest incorporating the zoo as an out-of-school environment into formal school learning, and we propose different methods to improve learning in zoo settings.

Randler, Christoph; Kummer, Barbara; Wilhelm, Christian

2012-06-01

188

The 3rd World Water Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Convened in March 2003 in Japan, the 3rd World Water Forum dealt with 38 interlocked themes concerning how to bring safe water and sanitation to the world. Considered the most important international water meeting to date, the forum hosted close to 24,000 persons from 182 countries. On this well-designed site, users can read various documents presented at the Forum, along with reading the daily newspaper produced at the meeting and its newsletter. The finest feature of the site is the streaming video archive of select meetings and plenary sessions. Here, visitors can listen and watch the participants discuss a number of timely topics, such as dams and development, water and transport, and floods. Equally valuable is the ability to browse through the different sessions, and, in some cases, users can download background documents and entire papers. [KMG

189

Second Annual HEDS-UP Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

HEDS-UP (Human Exploration and Development of Space-University Partners) conducted its second annual forum on May 6-7, 1999, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. This year, the topics focused on human exploration of Mars, including considerations ranging from systems analysis of the transportation and surface architecture to very detailed considerations of surface elements such as greenhouses, rovers, and EVA suits. Ten undergraduate projects and four graduate level projects were presented with a total of 13 universities from around the country. Over 200 students participated on the study teams and nearly 100 students attended the forum meeting.

Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

1999-01-01

190

Engineering Resources: The Engineers Forum on Sustainability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cosponsored by three prominent engineering societies, the Engineers Forum on Sustainability was founded to "help promote the principles and practice of sustainability." The forum's newsletter can be viewed at this site. It contains information on worldwide activities and developments in the field of sustainability, including educational initiatives, environmental protection programs, international conferences, and more. The July 2003 issue features a special guest article written by the President of the World Federation of Engineering Societies, who touches on issues of sustainable development, technology transfer, and the role of engineers in developing countries. The newsletter is released roughly three times a year.

191

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics America's Children  

E-print Network

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention httpFederal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics America's Children: Key National Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics #12;Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family

192

The Native Forum at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes films included in the Native Forum of the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. The forum was created to give Native filmmakers a chance to express a Native point of view, with the hope that such a forum will eventually become unnecessary. The article includes background information, plot summaries, comments, and contact information…

McDonald, Christine

2000-01-01

193

World Forum Communications: Analyses of Student and Mentor Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzed new forms of student social interaction and dialogue within asynchronous communications of six middle schools and six high schools participating in the World Forum. In the World Forum, students discussed, questioned, and debated with Arctic explorers, researchers, World Forum mentors, and peers about environmental issues. One…

Sugar, William A.; Bonk, Curtis Jay

194

Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014  

E-print Network

1 Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014 Northwest Power and Conservation of the Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum and led a round of introductions. The October 24, 2013 from objectives 3a, 3b and 3d in the charter for the Ocean and Plume Forum. Rich then described

195

National Charter School Policy Forum (Washington, DC, May 5, 2008)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Charter School Policy Forum of May 5, 2005 brought together 100 charter school leaders representing philanthropy, research, and practice. The panel discussants and forum participants participated in an interactive conversation about the next generation of charter schools. The forum's panels focused on three key topics: (1) The…

US Department of Education, 2008

2008-01-01

196

Avian tuberculosis of zoonotic importance at a zoo on the Bogotá Andean plateau (Sabana), Colombia.  

PubMed

Given that exposure to captive wild animals at circuses or zoos can be a source of zoonotic infection, a case and control study was carried out with a collection of exotic fowl at a zoo in Bogotá, Colombia. The presence of Mycobacterium avium-II was directly related to the death of birds kept in the original enclosure, and of 50% of a group of sentinel birds. Failure to detect the organism in a control group of birds outside the enclosure indicated that the infection was limited to the original enclosed area. We demonstrated that M. gordonae-IV was disseminated in all organs from 1 bird with macroscopic granulomatous lesion, a finding which has not been reported previously. We emphasize the importance of establishing handling norms to reduce the risk of zoonotic transmission. PMID:19881922

Silva, Angela del Pilar; Leon, Clara Inés; Guerrero, Martha Inírida; Neira, Rafael; Arias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, German

2009-08-01

197

Outbreak of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among captive Asian elephants in a Swedish zoo.  

PubMed

Between 2001 and 2003, there was an outbreak of tuberculosis in a Swedish zoo which involved elephants, giraffes, rhinoceroses and buffaloes. Cultures of trunk lavages were used to detect infected elephants, tuberculin testing was used in the giraffes and buffaloes, and tracheal lavage and tuberculin testing were used in the rhinoceroses. The bacteria isolated were investigated by spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five elephants and one giraffe were found to have been infected by four different strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:15736698

Lewerin, S Sternberg; Olsson, S L; Eld, K; Röken, B; Ghebremichael, S; Koivula, T; Källenius, G; Bölske, G

2005-02-01

198

How Abnormal Is the Behaviour of Captive, Zoo-Living Chimpanzees?  

PubMed Central

Background Many captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) show a variety of serious behavioural abnormalities, some of which have been considered as possible signs of compromised mental health. The provision of environmental enrichments aimed at reducing the performance of abnormal behaviours is increasing the norm, with the housing of individuals in (semi-)natural social groups thought to be the most successful of these. Only a few quantitative studies of abnormal behaviour have been conducted, however, particularly for the captive population held in zoological collections. Consequently, a clear picture of the level of abnormal behaviour in zoo-living chimpanzees is lacking. Methods We present preliminary findings from a detailed observational study of the behaviour of 40 socially-housed zoo-living chimpanzees from six collections in the United States of America and the United Kingdom. We determined the prevalence, diversity, frequency, and duration of abnormal behaviour from 1200 hours of continuous behavioural data collected by focal animal sampling. Results, Conclusion and Significance Our overall finding was that abnormal behaviour was present in all sampled individuals across six independent groups of zoo-living chimpanzees, despite the differences between these groups in size, composition, housing, etc. We found substantial variation between individuals in the frequency and duration of abnormal behaviour, but all individuals engaged in at least some abnormal behaviour and variation across individuals could not be explained by sex, age, rearing history or background (defined as prior housing conditions). Our data support a conclusion that, while most behaviour of zoo-living chimpanzees is ‘normal’ in that it is typical of their wild counterparts, abnormal behaviour is endemic in this population despite enrichment efforts. We suggest there is an urgent need to understand how the chimpanzee mind copes with captivity, an issue with both scientific and welfare implications. PMID:21698219

Birkett, Lucy P.; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas E.

2011-01-01

199

A serologic survey of viral infections in captive ungulates in Turkish zoos.  

PubMed

Zoos and zoologic gardens make optimal environments for interspecies transmission of viral infections. There are seven zoos and several small zoologic collections in Turkey. This study aimed to determine the current status of viral infections in captive ungulates living in these environments. Blood samples were taken from 163 captive animals from two zoos. There were 39 Cameroon sheep (Ovis ammon f aries), 11 Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), 57 pygmy goats (Capra hircus), 9 Angora goats (Capra hircus), 21 mountain goats (Capra aegagrus-aegagrus), 7 llamas (Lama glama), 8 Persian goitred gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa), 7 Caspian red deer (Cervus elaphus maral), 2 fallow deer (Dama dama), and 2 camels (Camelus dromedarius). Antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine adenoviruses (BAV-1 and -3), parainfluenzavirus 3 (PI-3), and bluetongue viruses (BTV-4 and -9) were investigated using the virus neutralization test, and malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) antibodies were screened by ELISA. All animals were negative for BVDV and BHV-1 antibodies. Seroprevalence of BAV-1, BAV-3, PI-3, BRSV, BT-4, BT-9, and MCF were detected as follows: 46.6%, 60.1%, 0.6%, 7.3%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 51.6%, respectively. Seroprevalence of BAVs and MCF were more common than all other viruses (P < 0.0001). Ten sheep (37.0%), 48 goats (84.2), and 1 Ilama (14.2%) were the only species positive for MCF antibodies. Prevalence of BRSV and MCF antibodies were found to be significantly higher in goats than in sheep. BTV antibodies were detected both in Cameroon sheep and mountain goats and suggest that zoo animals are at risk for BTV in endemic regions. PMID:22946369

Ye?ilba?, Kadir; Alpay, Gizem; Karakuzulu, Hatice

2011-03-01

200

Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo  

PubMed Central

From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette

2002-01-01

201

Human exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of multiple animal species in a Metropolitan Zoo.  

PubMed

From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette; Flood, Jennifer

2002-11-01

202

Tiger Tales: A Critical Examination of the Tiger's Enclosure at the San Francisco Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the recent tragedy involving a 350 pound Siberian Tiger and the death of teenager Carlos Souza Jr., one must ask a fundamental question: Can a tiger overcome an obstacle that is thirty-three feet away and twelve and a half feet tall? Are these dimensions sufficient enough to protect the zoo-visitors from a potential escape and\\/or attack? To answer these

Erica Walker; Raza M. Syed

2008-01-01

203

An exogenous retrovirus isolated from koalas with malignant neoplasias in a US zoo.  

PubMed

Leukemia and lymphoma account for more than 60% of deaths in captive koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in northeastern Australia. Although the endogenizing gammaretrovirus koala endogenous retrovirus (KoRV) was isolated from these koalas, KoRV has not been definitively associated with leukemogenesis. We performed KoRV screening in koalas from the San Diego Zoo, maintained for more than 45 y with very limited outbreeding, and the Los Angeles Zoo, maintained by continuously assimilating captive-born Australian koalas. San Diego Zoo koalas are currently free of malignant neoplasias and were infected with only endogenous KoRV, which we now term subtype "KoRV-A," whereas Los Angeles Zoo koalas with lymphomas/leukemias are infected in addition to KoRV-A by a unique KoRV we term subtype "KoRV-B." KoRV-B is most divergent in the envelope protein and uses a host receptor distinct from KoRV-A. KoRV-B also has duplicated enhancer regions in the LTR associated with increased pathology in gammaretroviruses. Whereas KoRV-A uses the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 1 (PiT1) as a receptor, KoRV-B employs a different receptor, the thiamine transporter 1 (THTR1), to infect cells. KoRV-B is transmitted from dam to offspring through de novo infection, rather than via genetic inheritance like KoRV-A. Detection of KoRV-B in native Australian koalas should provide a history, and a mode for remediation, of leukemia/lymphoma currently endemic in this population. PMID:23798387

Xu, Wenqin; Stadler, Cynthia K; Gorman, Kristen; Jensen, Nathaniel; Kim, David; Zheng, HaoQiang; Tang, Shaohua; Switzer, William M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Eiden, Maribeth V

2013-07-01

204

Behaviors and Motivations observed in the Zooniverse  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today, the total number of astronomers and geophysicists working in academia is dwarfed by the legions of citizen scientists who are flocking to citizen science programs like Moon Zoo, StarDust@Home, Solar Storm Watch, and Be a Martian. Through the Zooniverse collection of projects (including Moon Zoo and Solar Storm Watch), more than 2-dozen peer-reviewed science papers have been generated. These everyday people are, in their spare time, accomplishing necessary tasks and proving themselves to be a vital part of the research pipeline. While it is now understood they can make meaningful contributions to research, the questions of why they are contributing, and how they interact with the projects are still being investigated. In this presentation, preliminary results of a two-part study of Zooniverse user motivations and behaviors are presented. Motivations: We present the results of two sets of studies: detailed research into the motivations of Galaxy Zoo users during the Galaxy Zoo 1 and 2 projects and preliminary results into the investigations of Moon Zoo users. From Galaxy Zoo, we know that the largest primary motivation for people participating in Galaxy Zoo is the desire to contribute to science. At the time of this writing, interviews are being prepared to see if Moon Zoo users have similar motivations to Galaxy Zoo users, and to understand the personal context in which they make their contributions. Behaviors: As users explore the Zooniverse, they have the opportunity to participate in multiple science projects, to consume educational content, to take advantage of tutorials, and to be part of a community on the forums. Preliminary results examining how users moved between different science projects during the duration of Galaxy Zoo 2, and how they are moving between content and classifications in Galaxy Zoo Hubble and Moon Zoo are presented.

Gay, P. L.; Brown, S.; Huang, A. D.; Lehan, C.; Moon Zoo Team

2010-12-01

205

Presented by the HC Coombs Policy Forum,  

E-print Network

participation, welfare reform & social inclusion policies: their relevance for Australian policy makers #12;UK workforce participation, welfare reform & social inclusion HC Coombs Policy Forum 29 November, 2011 Dan Finn, University of Portsmouth and Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion #12;Activation reforms · Initial focus

206

TechnologyReview.com |Print Forums  

E-print Network

is the energy source that powers the sun and stars. In these natural fusion reactors, it is gravity that confines the plasma in a wonderfully stable and long-lived configuration. A human-scale fusion reactor mustTechnologyReview.com |Print Forums International Fusion Research By Ian H. Hutchinson July 8, 2005

207

The Cost of Frugality Oberstar Forum  

E-print Network

not enough, the I-35W bridge did fall down. #12;We are not good at dealing with low probability, highThe Cost of Frugality Oberstar Forum David Levinson October 8, 2007 #12;Some Vignettes #12;I-35W consequences of the collapse (Liu, Levinson, Harder) #12;Economic Effects· We estimated the Twin Cities 7

Levinson, David M.

208

REGIONAL TECHNICAL FORUM STATEMENT OF WORK  

E-print Network

and contain a gap analysis. The Business Case must also evaluate the option of not proceeding with the StudyEXHIBIT A REGIONAL TECHNICAL FORUM STATEMENT OF WORK Develop the Business Case for Implementing) has contracted with KEMA, Inc. (Contractor) to develop a business case (Business Case

209

The Twenty-Third LACUS Forum, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fifty-nine papers on language research and linguistic theory from the annual forum address these topics: correctness in language; aspects of neurolinguistics and psycholinguistics; historical linguistics and language evolution; linguistic philosophy; aspects of syntax; aspects of discourse analysis; lexicon and semantics; language contact and…

Melby, Alan K., Ed.

210

Member Organisation Forum European Peer Review Guide  

E-print Network

Member Organisation Forum European Peer Review Guide Integrating Policies and Practices, non-governmental organisation, the members of which are 78 national funding agencies, research in Strasbourg with offices in Brussels and Ostend, has assembled a host of organisations that span all

Economou, Tassos

211

Carnegie Mellon Staff Council Benefits Open Forum  

E-print Network

-268-2047 · HR Connection Password Issues ° HRIT@andrew.cmu.edu #12;Carnegie Mellon Benefits & Fitness FairCarnegie Mellon Staff Council Benefits Open Forum October 28, 2014 #12;Carnegie Mellon Agenda · Introductions · 2015 Benefit Changes · Open Enrollment · Q &A #12;Carnegie Mellon Introductions ­ HR Benefits

Andrews, Peter B.

212

Interaction Coherence Analysis for Dark Web Forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interaction coherence analysis (ICA) attempts to accurately identify and construct interaction networks by using various features and techniques. It is useful to identify user roles, user's social and information value, as well as the social network structure of Dark Web communities. In this study, we applied interaction coherence analysis for Dark Web forums using the hybrid interaction coherence (HIC) algorithm.

Tianjun Fu; Ahmed Abbasi; Hsinchun Chen

2007-01-01

213

Affect Intensity Analysis of Dark Web Forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Affects play an important role in influencing people's perceptions and decision making. Affect analysis is useful for measuring the presence of hate, violence, and the resulting propaganda dissemination across extremist groups. In this study we performed affect analysis of U.S. and Middle Eastern extremist group forum postings. We constructed an affect lexicon using a probabilistic disambiguation technique to measure the

Ahmed Abbasi; Hsinchun Chen

2007-01-01

214

What's right SHIP & Healthcare Reform Forum  

E-print Network

&Health Reform What's right for you SHIP & Healthcare Reform Forum: What's Right for You Berkeley SHIP compares with the plans available on Covered California health benefit exchange and * offer a Q & A session featuring representatives from Berkeley SHIP and Covered California at the end

Walker, Matthew P.

215

Web Maintainers Forum 29 August 2013  

E-print Network

1 Web Maintainers Forum 29 August 2013 Agenda Welcome and introduction Web team Update My Baker, WCMS Project Manager) Questions Web team update Web team site rebranded http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/web/ When was the last time you visited the web team site: August? June or July? 2013? 2012? Never

Hickman, Mark

216

APS Forum on Education Summer 2006 Newsletter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The APS Forum on Education (FEd) Summer 2006 Newsletter's Teacher Preparation Section articles included:The Learning Assistant Model for Teacher Education in Science and Technology by Valerie Otero,Undergraduate Learning Assistants at the University of Arkansas by Gay Stewart, andCreating and Sustaining a Teaching and Learning Professional Community at Seattle Pacific University by Lane Seeley and Stamatis Vokos.

2007-09-07

217

Veterans Health & Wellness Forum speakers Millersville University,  

E-print Network

Veterans Health & Wellness Forum speakers Millersville University, November 13, 2012 Jack Mc a civilian--to enlisted Marine at Parris Island--to combat veteran in Vietnam--to the first Vietnam veteran for today's student-veteran, but for veterans and their families across all generations. Click here to see

Hardy, Christopher R.

218

Privatizing Public Forums to Eliminate Dissent  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the 2008 presidential campaign gets underway, the candidates may be tempted to suppress dissent at public forum rallies by using a tactic that Ronald Reagan pioneered and George W. Bush perfected. Under this tactic, the candidate's advance team “privatizes” a public square or public park by securing a municipal permit for the rally date that authorizes the expulsion of

Kevin F ONeill

2007-01-01

219

FORUM REVIEW ARTICLE Alternative Perspectives on Aging  

E-print Network

FORUM REVIEW ARTICLE Alternative Perspectives on Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans: Reactive Oxygen mechanisms at the heart of the aging process are a long-standing mystery. An influential theory has it that aging is the result of an accumulation of molecular damage, caused in particular by reactive oxygen

Gems, David

220

1 SERIES FORUM MOOG Actuator Overview  

E-print Network

1° SERIES FORUM MOOG Actuator Overview IASI July 13th 2009 Technical University Gheorghe Asachi Actuation and Shaking tables #12;3 Moog proprietary and/or confidential data Constraint for high dynamic testing application · Stiffness of actuator is roughly proportional to cylinder area. · Stiffness, Mass

221

Making Bodies Talk in Forum Theatre  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most Forum Theatre practice encourages as many 'spect-actors' as possible to intervene directly on stage as part of the investigation of an oppressive social situation. Such practice is in line with Boal's advice (in "Games for actors and non-actors") that 'the keener the desire to take action, the more the spect-actors hurry on to the stage'.…

Dwyer, Paul

2004-01-01

222

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

NONE

1995-12-31

223

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

NONE

1990-12-31

224

Research Staff Forum 15th October 2014  

E-print Network

Research Staff Forum 15th October 2014 #12;Welcome! · Quick update from Research Staff Office · Open Access ­ Practicalities and Benefits for your research ­ Helen Webb (Library Research Support Team onto the research staff webpages) #12;Update from Research Staff Office · What's been happening since

Sussex, University of

225

A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication  

E-print Network

Timberland Investment A summary of a forum exploring changing ownership patterns and the implications American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling in Forest His- tory Bradford Gentry Lecturer in Sustainable Investments Timothy Gregoire Professor of Forest

226

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

Vol. 23, No. 4 Please see Expenditures, page 10 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE · A detailed review of a book on terrorism and the U.S. Constitution in the era of the war on terror (page 2). · Results;2 Alaska Justice Forum 23(4), Winter 2007 Review Essay Terrorism and the Constitution: Security, Civil

Pantaleone, Jim

227

Issues in California Community Colleges. Forum, 1982.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Forum," a journal designed to present ideas of California community college faculty, begins with "Community Colleges Can Keep the Door Open," by Jean B. Trapnell, which urges community colleges to reassess and integrate the new goals associated with lifelong learning with the primary goals of providing transfer, technical, and…

Laroche, Jonnah J., Ed.

1982-01-01

228

Solar Server: Forum for Solar Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based in Germany, this site provides a forum for news and information regarding all aspects of solar energy. The site provides background information on the technical aspects pertaining to solar energy and photovoltaics. A variety of images and descriptions provide useful background information about photovoltaic roof tiles and their role in solar buildings.

2007-08-28

229

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

NONE

1993-12-31

230

An examination of environmental collective identity development across three life-stages: The contribution of social public experiences at zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research breaks ground toward a revised theory of how collective environmental identity is associated with pro-environmental behaviors. My research comprises three activities that examined the experiences of three groups of people who claim zoo visiting as an important part of their life-story. The three studied groups were; conservation biologists who describe zoo experiences as having significant formative role in their childhood development of environmental values; parents who prioritize zoo visits as an important cultural experiences for their children; and a active zoo volunteers. This research also investigated whether the group experiences these participants had at zoos contributed to the value these people place on their current collective and environmental identities. Field conservationists' interest in learning from animals was validated by parents who also valued education and helped these children develop identities that included other animals in their scope of justice. Parents used zoos instrumentally to promote caring for others as a skill that will serve their children's socio-political future as part of human society. In both cases, these experiences appeared to be shaped around developing attitudes that would include animals in these children's scope of justice in later life. Zoo volunteers included animals in their scope of justice, believing that other species were also important sources of for their knowledge development. Shared positive attitudes toward animals were central to volunteers feeling part of a community and contributing to their collective self-esteem. The group may serve a restorative function in their lives, allowing them to take on a more activist role in society, seeking to promote social norms that are more inclusive of animal rights, and helping them to change their behaviors toward more environmentally responsible ends. This research contributes to the understanding of the theory of planned behavior and the values/beliefs/norms theory by demonstrating that pro-environmental behavior may originate with parenting activities in out-of-home cultural institutions like zoos, and is associated with involvement in social groups at later points in the life-course. It demonstrates that sharing a collective identity like that of a zoo volunteer is associated with engaging in pro-environmental behaviors even before those beliefs and values are fully understood. Although the contribution of parenting and group activity to pro-environmental behaviors demonstrated in this research was small, these results do suggest that focusing on out-of-home support for parents teaching social skills through animal based experiences, and support of activities that promote group attachment for environmentally concerned citizens, may be a possible strategies to advance more environmentally responsible behavior in society for both the short and long term.

Fraser, John Robert

231

Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and tick-borne encephalitis virus in zoo animal species in the Czech Republic.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of antibodies against Borrelia bugdorferi (Bb) s.l. and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in zoo animals in the Czech Republic. We collected 133 serum samples from 69 animal species from 5 zoos located in different parts of the country. The samples were obtained from even-toed ungulates (n=78; 42 species), odd-toed ungulates (n=32; 11 species), carnivores (n=13; 9 species), primates (n=2, 2 species), birds (n=3; 2 species), and reptiles (n=5; 3 species). A high antibody prevalence (60%) was observed for Bb s.l. On the other hand, only two animals had TBEV-specific antibodies: a markhor (Capra falconeri) and a reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), both from the same zoo, located in an area endemic for TBEV. Both of these animals were also positive for Bb s.l. antibodies. Our results indicate that a high number of animal species in the Czech zoos were exposed to Bb s.l. and that TBEV infection occurred at least in one of the investigated zoos. Considering the pathogenic potential of these two tick-borne pathogens, clinical and serological monitoring should be continued, and therapeutic and preventive measures should be taken when necessary. PMID:24889036

Sirmarová, Jana; Tichá, Lucie; Golovchenko, Marina; Salát, Ji?í; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia; Nowotny, Norbert; R?žek, Daniel

2014-09-01

232

United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During the 20th century, there has been a concerted effort by a number of transnational organizations and advocacy groups to effectively lobby for the rights and protection of indigenous groups in all parts of the world. In 2000, the United Nations Economic and Social Council established the Permanent Form on Indigenous Issues to effectively address the needs of the 370 million indigenous peoples around the world. On the site, visitors can read official documents and proceedings created by the Forum's work, peruse a photo gallery of indigenous peoples, and read the text of various speeches on indigenous issues. Finally, visitors will also want to peruse the list of upcoming events sponsored by the Forum and also review its latest press releases.

233

Harvard University Institute of Politics: Forum Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you are looking for a place online to find William Julius Wilson, Cesar Chavez, or Lech Walesa, you should look no further than the very fine online video archive of the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum from Harvard Universityâ??s Institute of Politics. Over the past thirty years, the Institute has held hundreds of public addresses and panel discussions on a myriad of topical issues. Recently, they created this online archive so that the web-browsing public could view some of these events at their leisure. Currently, the archive contains over 1200 Forum events, including those that deal with the environment, Afghanistan, aging, and the Cold War, among other themes. Visitors can use the online search engine to locate videos by participant, year, keyword, or topic.

234

Web Team Forum 27 August 2014  

E-print Network

18/09/2014 1 Web Team Forum 27 August 2014 · Web Team Update · WCMS Update (Perrine Baker, WCMS Web Team Update · http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/web/ · When was the last time you visited the Web Team site: ­ August 2014? ­ May, June, July 2014? ­ 1st half of 2014? ­ 2013? ­ Never? Web Team website

Hickman, Mark

235

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Contact Information  

Cancer.gov

The NCI SBIR Investor Forum was an exclusive opportunity for 14 NCI funded companies in the diagnostic, therapeutic and devices sector to showcase their technology and have one-on-one sessions with investors and strategic partners. Each of the 14 companies was carefully chosen by an independent panel of experts, selected for strength of research, impact on cancer, product development and market potential. The event was beneficial to both small businesses.

236

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies  

Cancer.gov

The 18 SBIR-funded companies that presented at the 2012 Investor Forum represented the most promising innovators developing the next generation of cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices primed for commercialization. The presenting companies were selected based on the strength of their technology and commercialization potential by a competitive process and review panel comprised of life science investment and business development experts from companies such as Merck, Pfizer, Varian, Mohr Davidow Ventures, and Fidelity Biosciences.

237

Preservation of Earth's resources focus for forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

A more efficient use of the Earth’s resources to preserve the environment for future generations was the focus of a forum held on climate change at Notre Dame’s Fremantle Campus in October.\\u000aDr Lucy Morris, Chief Executive Officer of Baptistcare; Jim Smith, Project Manager Western Australia of Catholic Earthcare Australia and Dr Michael O’Leary, Lecturer in Geography at The University

Leigh Dawson

2011-01-01

238

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York`s challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria.

NONE

1992-12-31

239

Y? The National Forum on People's Differences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Y? forum, the first of its kind to our knowledge, is a moderated and edited online environment that is "designed to give readers a way to ask people from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds the questions they've always been too embarrassed or uncomfortable to ask." The site provides guidelines for both asking a question and providing the answer; however, both are read by the editor before posting "for space and readability, and to paraphrase questions and answers to render them suitable for general viewing." The result is a space where readers can safely follow a dialogue on sensitive topics without the fear of having to wade through racist attacks, foul language, or "flame wars." Topics welcome at Y? include those related to differences in age, class, disability, gender, geography, occupation, race/ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation. The Y? Forum was developed and is managed by Phillip J. Milano, an editor for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville. The site is not related to the newspaper. The site states that an unmoderated forum will be provided in the future in addition to the current moderated format.

240

Assessing Public Engagement with Science in a University Primate Research Centre in a National Zoo  

PubMed Central

Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the ‘Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre’ in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial ‘dwell times’ in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences. PMID:22496822

Bowler, Mark T.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Whiten, Andrew

2012-01-01

241

The use of zoo exhibits by family groups to learn science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last twenty years, research about science learning in informal contexts such as museums, science centers, zoos and aquariums has proliferated. Many studies have created detailed descriptions of learning as it occurs in informal contexts. Science education researchers have defined learning in several different ways. The selection of a conceptual framework through which to view science learning determines the questions that a researcher can explore. My study applied Roth and Lee's (2002) understanding of science learning as a collective praxis to the context of informal science learning at a community zoo. This conceptual framework is rooted in the view of learning as situated cognition as described by Lave and Wenger (1991). My research explored the interaction of the sociocultural and physical contexts for informal learning as defined by Falk (2000) and investigates how family groups collaborate to learn science at zoo exhibits and how they incorporate the physical features of the exhibit into their collaboration. My interpretations of each family's discourse yielded a variety of genres or accepted patterns used to learn science. All families engaged in highly parent-directed discourse during their visit. For one family parent-controlled, directed explanation was present in all science learning events; the other families' science learning events were a mixture of directed explanation and more collaborative genres of discourse. All the families in this study used exhibit text in two different ways: as a way of framing or guiding their interaction with the exhibit or as a resource in the context of the Family's own frame. For all of the families in this study, each exhibit was a separate learning event---none of the families applied or linked ideas or explanations created at one exhibit to ideas or explanations created at another exhibit. Implications of this study include more longitudinal research on the role of zoo visits on family learning and more explicit connections among exhibits that allow visitors to reflect on their learning and encourage a broader view of the nature of science.

Parker, Loran Carleton

242

Tiger Tales: A Critical Examination of the Tiger's Enclosure at the San Francisco Zoo  

E-print Network

Given the recent tragedy involving a 350 pound Siberian Tiger and the death of teenager Carlos Souza Jr., one must ask a fundamental question: Can a tiger overcome an obstacle that is thirty-three feet away and twelve and a half feet tall? Are these dimensions sufficient enough to protect the zoo-visitors from a potential escape and/or attack? To answer these questions we use simple two-dimensional projectile motion to find the minimum velocity a tiger needs in order to clear the obstacle. With our results we conclude that it is highly likely that the tiger was able to leap over the obstacle with ease!

Walker, Erica

2008-01-01

243

PREFACE: IV Nanotechnology International Forum (RUSNANOTECH 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Logo The RUSNANOTECH 2011 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from 26-28 October 2011, in Moscow, Russia. It was the fourth forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into four sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Nanomaterials Nanotechnology and Green Energy Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma (United business and science & technology section on 'RUSNANOTECH 2011') The scientific program of the forum included more than 50 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them were world-known specialists such as Professor S Bader (Argonne National Laboratory, USA), Professor O Farokzhad (Harvard Medical School, USA), Professor K Chien (Massachusetts General Hospital, USA), Professor L Liz-Marzan (University of Vigo), A Luque (Polytechnic University of Madrid) and many others. The poster session consisted of over 120 presentations, 90 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 47 submissions. Section editors of the proceedings: Nanoelectronics and nanophotonics Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Anatoly Dvurechenskii (Institute of Semiconductor Physics, RAS). Nanomaterials Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Mikhail Alfimov (Photochemistry Center, RAS), Professor Igor Suzdalev (Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Vyacheslav Osiko (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Aleksey Khokhlov (Physical department of Moscow State University). Nanotechnology and green energy Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Eduard Son (Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS). Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Konstantin Skryabin (Bioengineering Center, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Rem Petrov (RAS), Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Sergey Deev (Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry).

Dvurechenskii, Anatoly; Alfimov, Mikhail; Suzdalev, Igor; Osiko, Vyacheslav; Khokhlov, Aleksey; Son, Eduard; Skryabin, Konstantin; Petrov, Rem; Deev, Sergey

2012-02-01

244

78 FR 13072 - Seventh Annual Drug Information Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum-2013...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum--2013; Public Conference AGENCY...entitled ``Seventh Annual DIA/FDA Statistics Forum--2013.'' The purpose of...I. Background This annual FDA/DIA statistics forum will establish a unique,...

2013-02-26

245

Spin Alignments of Spiral Galaxies within the Large-scale Structure from SDSS DR7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Luo, Wentao; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

2015-01-01

246

Combining Human and Machine Learning for Morphological Analysis of Galaxy Images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing importance of digital sky surveys collecting many millions of galaxy images has reinforced the need for robust methods that can perform morphological analysis of large galaxy image databases. Citizen science initiatives such as Galaxy Zoo showed that large data sets of galaxy images can be analyzed effectively by nonscientist volunteers, but since databases generated by robotic telescopes grow much faster than the processing power of any group of citizen scientists, it is clear that computer analysis is required. Here, we propose to use citizen science data for training machine learning systems, and show experimental results demonstrating that machine learning systems can be trained with citizen science data. Our findings show that the performance of machine learning depends on the quality of the data, which can be improved by using samples that have a high degree of agreement between the citizen scientists. The source code of the method is publicly available.

Kuminski, Evan; George, Joe; Wallin, John; Shamir, Lior

2014-12-01

247

Disease patterns in the Detroit Zoo: a study of the avian population from 1973 through 1983.  

PubMed

A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate disease patterns in birds at the Detroit Zoo from 1973 through 1983. Data were derived from the zoo's medical and animal census records; the mean (+/- SD) population of birds during the study period was 469 +/- 42. Overall annual morbidity rates were 12.5% to 21.5%, with spring months having the highest morbidity rates. Annual mortality rates were 3.1% to 15.2%; 23.9% of the deaths were caused by microbial agents (particularly Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, hemolytic Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Aeromonas spp and Proteus spp), 15.4% by trauma, and 42.5% by nondetermined causes. The mute swan (Cygnus olor), mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), common gallinule (Gallinula chloropus), common rhea (Rhea americana), and red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus) were the 5 species most frequently affected of the 1,032 deaths from 1973 through 1983. The most frequently isolated parasites were Microtetramere spp, coccidian species, Diplotriaena spp, and Trichomonia spp. PMID:3878351

Kaneene, J B; Taylor, R F; Sikarskie, J G; Meyer, T J; Richter, N A

1985-12-01

248

Prevalence and molecular typing of Giardia spp. in captive mammals at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia.  

PubMed

A total of 131 faecal samples from 57 mammalian species housed at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia, were tested for the presence of Giardia spp. cysts using epifluorescence microscopy. The overall prevalence (29%) was high, yet all animals were asymptomatic at the time of sampling. Positive samples were characterized by PCR and sequence analysis of both conserved and variable loci, for the identification of Giardia species and G. duodenalis assemblages and genotypes. Assemblages A and C were identified in Artiodactyla, assemblage B in Primates, Rodentia and Hyracoidea, and assemblages A, B, C and D, as well as Giardia microti, in Carnivora. Genotyping at the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, at the triose phosphate isomerase, glutamate dehydrogenase and beta-giardin genes revealed extensive polymorphisms, particularly among assemblage B isolates. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences showed that isolates from captive mammals housed at the zoo are genetically different from isolates of human and domestic animal origin. This is the first survey in a zoological garden to include a molecular characterization of the parasite, and provides novel sequence data of G. duodenalis from many previously uncharacterized hosts. PMID:20970259

Beck, Relja; Sprong, Hein; Bata, Ingeborg; Lucinger, Snjezana; Pozio, Edoardo; Cacciò, Simone M

2011-01-10

249

An intrafamilial transmission of Arthroderma benhamiae in Canadian porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) in a Japanese zoo.  

PubMed

An intra-familial transmission of Arthroderma benhamiae in Canadian porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) housed in a Japanese zoo was studied. The family consisted of an adult couple and two offspring (a male and a female). The porcupettes, born in Japan, showed severe hair loss while the parent animals, imported from the USA. (male) and Canada (female), showed mild symptoms or were asymptomatic. Morphologically identical Tricophyton spp. isolates were recovered within seven days from quills of all animals on chloramphenicol-supplemented potato dextrose agar plates incubated at 37 degrees C. Two representative colonies from each animal were identified as Arthroderma benhamiae Americano-European race based on mating type (+) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1-5.5S-ITS 2 region of the rRNA gene sequences (AB236404-AB236408). The present cases constituted the second isolation of dermatophytes from porcupines. There were two different ITS types, i.e., the predominant one isolated from all animals and a secondary one recovered from only the mother porcupine. The sequences have never been recorded in Japan or in the GenBank database to the best of our knowledge. In addition, they were located at a cluster involving the type strain and mating strains of A. benhamiae Americano-European race and its F1 progeny. In contrast, 28 rodents (eight species) and three insectivora (1 species) exhibited in the petting zoo were negative for any dermatophytes as determined by culture. PMID:18608939

Takahashi, Hideo; Takahashi-Kyuhachi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yoko; Yarita, Kyoko; Takayama, Akiko; Inomata, Tomo; Sano, Ayako; Nishimura, Kazuko; Kamei, Katsuhiko

2008-08-01

250

Is painting by elephants in zoos as enriching as we are led to believe?  

PubMed Central

The relationship between the activity of painting and performance of stereotyped and other stress-related behaviour was investigated in four captive Asian elephants at Melbourne Zoo, Australia. The activity involved the elephant being instructed to paint on a canvas by its keeper in front of an audience. Painting by elephants in zoos is commonly believed to be a form of enrichment, but this assumption had not been based on any systematic research. If an activity is enriching we would expect stress-related behaviour to be reduced but we found no evidence of the elephants anticipating the painting activity and no effect on the performance of stereotyped or other stress-related behaviour either before or after the painting session. This indicates that the activity does not fulfil one of the main aims of enrichment. However, if an elephant was not selected to paint on a given day this was associated with higher levels of non-interactive behaviour, a possible indicator of stress. Behavioural observations associated with ear, eye and trunk positions during the painting session showed that the elephant’s attentiveness to the painting activity or to the keeper giving instruction varied between individuals. Apart from positive reinforcement from the keeper, the results indicated that elephants gain little enrichment from the activity of painting. Hence, the benefits of this activity appear to be limited to the aesthetic appeal of these paintings to the people viewing them. PMID:25071994

Kaplan, Gisela; Rogers, Lesley J.

2014-01-01

251

Serologic survey of trichinellosis in wild mammals kept in a Mexico City Zoo.  

PubMed

A serologic survey of Trichinella infection was carried out to determine the prevalence of this parasitosis among wild mammals kept in captivity at the Chapultepec Zoo. This was prompted by the necropsy finding of a heavy Trichinella infection in a Canadian polar bear (Ursus maritimus) that had been kept at the Zoo for more than 11 years. The parasites recovered were identified as T. nativa (T2). A serologic study based on ELISA and Western blot analysis was performed in serum samples from two polar bears (U. maritimus), six wolves (Canis lupus); nine foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus); seven coyotes (Canis latrans); nine jaguars (Panthera onca); ten lions (Panthera leo); 11 tigers (Panthera tigris); six panthers (Panthera pardus); eight leopards (Panthera pardus); two lynxes (Lynx rufus); five pumas (Felis concolor); one yagouaroundi (Felis yagouaroundi); and one ocelot (Felis pardalis). In these assays, 25% and 27% of the samples studied were positive using total muscle larva extract from T. nativa (T2) or T. spiralis (T1), respectively. When T. spiralis (T1) excretory/secretory products or surface/stichosomal antigens were used, 15 and 13% positivity was obtained respectively. The reactivity rates obtained among the different groups varied from 11 to 83%, wolves having the highest infection rate. Western blot analysis of positive ELISA sera showed an antigenic recognition pattern characteristic of animals infected with Trichinella. PMID:9017871

Yépez-Mulia, L; Arriaga, C; Peña, M A; Gual, F; Ortega-Pierres, G

1996-12-31

252

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/97-0609 Title: Patent Declaration  

E-print Network

Forum/97-0609 ****************************************************************** Title: Patent is the owner of U.S. Patent No. 5,633,859 entitled "Method and Apparatus for Congestion Management in Computer that it is prepared to license its patents which are necessary to manufacture and sell implementations using

Jain, Raj

253

HEDS-UP Mars Exploration Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the early 1990s, Duke and Budden convened a series of workshops addressing mission rationale, exploration objectives, and key constraints and issues facing human crews on Mars. The focal point was "why" the U.S. should fly humans to Mars. In the mid-1990s, strategies for a Mars mission matured and evolved, driven formally by NASA Johnson Space Center's Office of Exploration. In 1997, NASA published a report capturing the current thinking: the NASA Mars Reference Mission. In the 1997-1998 school year, HEDS-UP sponsored six universities to conduct design studies on Mars exploration, using the Reference Mission as a basis for their work. The 1998 Mars Exploration Forum presents the results of these university studies, suggesting "how" we might explore Mars, in terms of specific technical components that would enable human missions to Mars. A primary objective of the HEDS-UP Mars Exploration Forum was to provide a forum for active interaction among NASA, industry, and the university community on the subject of human missions to Mars. NASA scientists and engineers were asked to present the state of exploration for Mars mission options currently under study. This status "snapshot" of current Mars strategies set the stage for the six HEDS-UP universities to present their final design study results. Finally, a panel of industry experts discussed readiness for human missions to Mars as it pertains to the aerospace industries and technologies. A robust poster session provided the backdrop for government-industry-university discussions and allowed for feedback to NASA on the Mars Reference Mission. The common thread woven through the two days was discussion of technologies, proven and emerging, that will be required to launch, land, and sustain human crews on the Red Planet. As this decade (and indeed this millenium) draws to a close, Mars will continue to loom in our sights as the next target for human space exploration. It is our hope that the efforts of the Mars Exploration Forum will serve as one small contribution toward the ultimate goal of humans exploring Mars.

Budden, Nancy Ann (Editor); Duke, Micheal B. (Editor)

1998-01-01

254

World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE) is an international interdisciplinary coalition of individuals and institutions concerned with the world soundscape as an ecologically balanced entity. WFAE encourages the study of the relationship between living organisms and their sonic environment (soundscape), it is WFAE's main task to draw attention to unhealthy imbalances in this relationship, to improve the acoustic quality of a place wherever possible and to protect and maintain acoustically balanced soundscapes where they still exist. WFAE has recently established four on-line services and we invite anyone interested in acoustic ecology and communication to participate.

255

Cavitation and multiphase flow forum -- 1993  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains papers presented at the 28th Cavitation and Multiphase Flow Forum of the Fluids Engineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. About 35 papers and 3 student papers were presented. The papers are divided into the following sections: Multiphase flow; Multiphase flow/Bubble dynamics; Vortex cavitations/Bubble cavitation/Cavitation erosion; Cavitation erosion/Bubble dynamics; Cavitation inception/Bubbles/Cavitation in fluid machinery; and Cavitation in fluid machinery. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Furuya, Okitsugu (ed.)

1993-01-01

256

An outbreak of canine distemper virus in tigers (Panthera tigris): possible transmission from wild animals to zoo animals.  

PubMed

Canine distemper virus (CDV), a morbillivirus that causes one of the most contagious and lethal viral diseases known in canids, has an expanding host range, including wild animals. Since December 2009, several dead or dying wild raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) were found in and around one safari-style zoo in Japan, and CDV was isolated from four of these animals. In the subsequent months (January to February 2010), 12 tigers (Panthera tigris) in the zoo developed respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, and CDV RNA was detected in fecal samples of the examined tigers. In March 2010, one of the tigers developed a neurological disorder and died; CDV was isolated from the lung of this animal. Sequence analysis of the complete hemagglutinin (H) gene and the signal peptide region of the fusion (F) gene showed high homology among these isolates (99.8-100%), indicating that CDV might have been transmitted from raccoon dog to tiger. In addition, these isolates belonged to genotype Asia-1 and had lower homology (<90%) to the vaccine strain (Onderstepoort). Seropositivity of lions (Panthera leo) in the zoo and wild bears (Ursus thibetanus) captured around this area supported the theory that a CDV epidemic had occurred in many mammal species in and around the zoo. These results indicate a risk of CDV transmission among many animal species, including large felids and endangered species. PMID:22214864

Nagao, Yumiko; Nishio, Yohei; Shiomoda, Hiroshi; Tamaru, Seiji; Shimojima, Masayuki; Goto, Megumi; Une, Yumi; Sato, Azusa; Ikebe, Yusuke; Maeda, Ken

2012-06-01

257

Metabolic bone disease in lion cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: the original animal model of rickets  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1889 Dr. John Bland-Sutton, a prominent London surgeon, was consulted about fatal rickets in over 20 successive litters of lion cubs born at the London Zoo. He evaluated the diet and found the cause of rickets to be nutritional in origin. He recommended that goat meat with crushed bones and cod-liver oil be added to the lean horsemeat diet

Russell W Chesney; Gail Hedberg

2010-01-01

258

Understanding geographic origins and history of admixture among chimpanzees in European zoos, with implications for future breeding programmes  

PubMed Central

Despite ample focus on this endangered species, conservation planning for chimpanzees residing outside Africa has proven a challenge because of the lack of ancestry information. Here, we analysed the largest number of chimpanzee samples to date, examining microsatellites in >100 chimpanzees from the range of the species in Africa, and 20% of the European zoo population. We applied the knowledge about subspecies differentiation throughout equatorial Africa to assign origin to chimpanzees in the largest conservation management programme globally. A total of 63% of the genotyped chimpanzees from the European zoos could be assigned to one of the recognized subspecies. The majority being of West African origin (40%) will help consolidate the current breeding programme for this subspecies and the identification of individuals belonging to the two other subspecies so far found in European zoos can form the basis for breeding programmes for these. Individuals of various degree of mixed ancestry made up 37% of the genotyped European zoo population and thus highlight the need for appropriate management programmes guided by genetic analysis to preserve maximum genetic diversity and reduce hybridization among subspecies. PMID:23531981

Hvilsom, C; Frandsen, P; Børsting, C; Carlsen, F; Sallé, B; Simonsen, B T; Siegismund, H R

2013-01-01

259

Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum Proceedings of the Workshops  

E-print Network

Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum Proceedings of the Workshops Hamburg, Munich, Hamburg 2010 of the Helmholtz Alliance Linear Collider Forum 2010­2012, Hamburg, M¨unchen, Hamburg, Germany Conference homepage, Internationales Congress Center, Dresden (at the 4th Annual Workshop of the Helmholtz Alliance `Physics

260

2006 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology  

E-print Network

2006 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology Transportation Choices, This report summarizes the fifth James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we examined ways to integrate non- motorized transportation options into our communities and our

Minnesota, University of

261

2008 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology  

E-print Network

2008 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology The Next Authorization: Transforming Transportation Policy? A Summary Report #12;June 2008 To the Reader, This report summarizes potential policy directions for the next authorization of the federal transportation act. This forum

Minnesota, University of

262

The Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum  

E-print Network

The Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Joseph B Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts October 1-2, 2014 Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes are offered under a new scheme called the Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program

263

Keeping the Rhetoric Orthodox: Forum Control in Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers how academic disciplines certify knowledge through publication in scholarly journals; therefore, peer review of journal articles is one method of authorizing someone's speech. Draws examples from the sciences. Discusses four methods of forum control: peer review, denial of forum, public correction, and published ridicule. Concludes that…

Sullivan, Dale L.

2000-01-01

264

Capitolium.org: The Official Website of the Imperial Forums  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Imperial Forum Project, a Roman architectural preservation effort, the city of Rome presents this site documenting the forums built by its emperors. The central feature of the site is the Recovering the Forums section, where users can view images and read descriptions of the historic structures and areas that are being restored, which are: the Forums of Augustus, Caesar, and Nerva, the Temple of Peace (Forum of Vespasian), the Forum of Trajan, and Trajan's Market. Most of the material is available in both Italian and English, except an interactive map of the project area, which seems to be offered only in Italian at the moment. Another nice feature is the virtual tour area, where visitors can "fly" through reconstructions of the Forum of Caesar and Ulpia by viewing a 3D movie. The site is rounded out with background information about the history of Rome, including pictures of clothing styles and recipes for Roman foods, and Ludi, or games, such as a collection of Roman proverbs, images of Imperial Rome from movies, and a Forum visit quiz.

265

The Environmental and Ecological Forum 1970-1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains the papers presented in the 1970-1971 Environmental and Ecological Forum series, planned to provide an overview of the significant environmental, social, and economic aspects of electric power generation, more specifically, the pros and cons of nuclear power production. The Forum was organized as a public service to foster…

Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC. Office of Information Services.

266

Homeless and Special Education Administrative Collaboration: Recommendations. Policy Forum Proceedings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) and the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) worked together to collect information regarding the need for a policy forum on the topic of administrative collaboration between school personnel who support homeless education under the McKinney-Vento…

Bowman, Diana; Burdette, Paula; Julianelle, Patricia

2008-01-01

267

BIOTECHNOLOGY FORUM: A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A forum to discuss present and future applications of biotechnology to the sugarbeet crop was held on March 3rd, 2005 in Palm Springs, CA. The forum was led and organized by J. R. Stander of Betaseed and included presentations from Rudolf Jansen of KWS, Klaas van der Woude from Van der Have, Gerhar...

268

Successive deaths of a captive snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) by infection with feline panleukopenia virus at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo.  

PubMed

Feline parvoviruses were isolated from frozen samples of intestines taken from a snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) that died successively at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo in Hokkaido, Japan. Isolates possessed an antigenic epitope for both the feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and mink enteritis virus, identified with a hemagglutination inhibition test. Sequencing analyses of the VP2 region of the isolates revealed that the two isolates were identical and of the FPLV-type. These results suggested that FPLV was introduced from a feral cat which entered the zoo and transmitted the virus inside the zoo. PMID:21116104

Sassa, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Mochizuki, Masami; Umemura, Takashi; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Miyazawa, Takayuki

2011-04-01

269

for~m..~.~ --------.-. -. ..----. --------------AUGUST--Zoo-I RESFARCH ON CHILDREN, AND THE NEWFEDERALISMFORLM FAMILIES,  

E-print Network

likely to report drug or alcohol abuse. On prehensive set of potential barriers to employment among other;Post- Recent severe domestic violence 14.9% 3.2-3.4% Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD); drug dependence; Drug abuse 3.3Yo 1.9Yo alcohol dependence; Alcohol abuse 2.7Yo 3.7Yo #12;2 the forum

Shyy, Wei

270

PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into eight sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Catalysis and Chemical Industry Nanobiotechnology Nanodiagnostics Nanoelectronics Nanomaterials Nanophotonics Nanotechnolgy In The Energy Industry Nanotechnology in Medicine The scientific program of the forum included 115 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them in the "Nanomaterials" section was the lecture by Dr Konstantin Novoselov, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. The poster session consisted of over 500 presentations, 300 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 57 submissions. The scientific program committee: Prof Zhores Alferov, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize winner, Russia, Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Sergey Deev, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesHead of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, M M Shemyakin and Yu A Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding MemberDeputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of S

Kazaryan, Konstantin

2011-03-01

271

Identifying Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students describe the characteristics of different types of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, barred spiral, peculiar, or irregular) in their own words. They also classify galaxies seen in the Hubble Deep Field. This activity includes a student worksheet and background information for the teacher. This is activity two in "The Hidden Lives of Galaxies" information and activity booklet.

272

Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_yellowstone/index.html) and video (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/videos/ir_yellowstone/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for the activities and will be presented by the authors in poster and CD form. Although the activities are written for middle and highschool learners, they can easily be adapted for college audiences. The Our Infrared World Gallery exploration helps learners think critically about visible light and infrared light as they compare sets of images (IR and visible light) of known objects. For example: by taking a regular photograph of a running faucet, can you tell if it is running hot or cold water? What new information does the IR image give you? The Infrared Zoo activities encourage learners to investigate the differences between warm and cold blooded animals by comparing sets of IR and visible images. In one activity, learners take on the role of a pit viper seeking prey in various desert and woodland settings. The main activities are extended into the real world by discussing and researching industrial, medical, and societal applications of infrared technologies. The Infrared Yellowstone lessons give learners a unique perspective on Yellowstone National Park and it's spectacular geologic and geothermal features. Infrared video technology is highlighted as learners make detailed observations about the visible and infrared views of the natural phenomena. The "Cool Cosmos" EPO activities are coordinated and managed by the SIRTF Science Center, based at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. You can find Cool Cosmos at http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/

Daou, D.; Gauthier, A.

2003-12-01

273

Zoo Labs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These five laboratory activities are designed for observation of primates and humans in a zoological environment and include studies of locomotion, communication, mother-infant interaction, general behavior, and dominance/submissive behavior. Students are directed to make observations and interpretations.

Brooks, Alison

2007-04-08

274

Zoo Labs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These five laboratory activities are designed for observation of primates and humans in a zoological environment and include studies of locomotion, communication, mother-infant interaction, general behavior, and dominance/submissive behavior. Students make observations and interpretations.

Alison Brooks

275

A case study of orangutan and siamang behavior within a mixed-species zoo exhibit.  

PubMed

This empirical case study assessed the behavior and welfare of 2 orangutans (Pongo abelii) and 2 siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus) within a mixed-species zoo exhibit. The study used instantaneous scan-sampling to record behavior, location, and interspecies proximity over 174 hr and all-occurrences data for any interactions between species. Results revealed frequent affiliative interactions between the female orangutan and siamang pair and an absence of agonistic or aggressive encounters. All individuals used the majority of the exhibit without segregation by species. Both orangutans spent most of their time on the ground (above 70% of all scans), and low levels of foraging were identified (1-4% of scans for all individuals). Overall, the findings support the notion that mixed-species exhibits may be enriching to the species involved through increased stimulation and opportunities for interaction. A poststudy incident also highlights the need for careful and continual monitoring of mixed-species exhibits over time. PMID:20865616

Pearson, Elissa L; Davis, Joanne M; Litchfield, Carla A

2010-01-01

276

Haemochromatosis in a Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) in an Australian zoo.  

PubMed

A 23-year-old Brazilian, or lowland, tapir with a 6-month history of loss of body condition developed clinical signs and laboratory findings consistent with liver failure. The animal was euthanased and a diagnosis of hepatic haemochromatosis was made based on histopathology. Two other healthy tapirs in the same collection had chronically elevated serum and tissue iron concentrations. The excessive accumulation of iron in tissues with resultant tissue damage (i.e. haemochromatosis) has been reported in a range of captive species. This and other reported cases of haemochromatosis in the Brazilian tapir would suggest that this condition is an important consideration in the management of this species in zoos. Further research into the endogenous regulation of iron metabolism, especially the role of hepcidin, in tapirs and other species at risk of iron storage disorders may be helpful in the prevention of this condition. PMID:22256982

Peters, A; Raidal, S R; Blake, A H; Atkinson, M M; Atkinson, P R; Eggins, G P

2012-01-01

277

Virologic and serologic studies of zoo birds for Marek's disease virus infection.  

PubMed Central

One hundred and eleven zoo birds representing 49 species in 14 orders were examined for Marek's disease (MD) herpesvirus (MDHV) infection. MDHV was isolated from 10 birds, all belonging to genus Gallus. The precipitating antibodies against MDHV were demonstrated only in the Gallus birds, when 51 selected birds including 34 Galliformes and 17 other birds representing 12 species from nine orders were examined. The 10 MDHV isolates all induced morphologically similar plaques in cell cultures closely resembling those of HN strain, a low pathogenic isolate of MDHV. Six of the 10 isolates, when inoculated into an experimental line of chickens highly susceptible to MD, caused only a minimal degree of histologic lesions without causing clinical MD, gross MD lesions, or deaths from MD. Natural hosts of MD are probably Galliformes, primarily affecting Gallus and less often other genera of Galliformes. Images PMID:1091554

Cho, B R; Kenzy, S G

1975-01-01

278

Leptospira and Brucella antibodies in collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) in Brazilian zoos.  

PubMed

The presence of Leptospira spp. and Brucella spp. antibodies was investigated in serum samples from 28 collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) kept in seven Brazilian zoos. Sera were tested against 19 Leptospira serovars using microscopic agglutination. Samples reacted to the following serovars: two (7.14%) to Patoc, three (10.71%) to Tarrasovi, three (10.71%) to both Patoc and Tarrasovi, two (7.14%) to Wolffi, and one (3.57%) to Australis. Two (7.14%) samples reacted to the buffered Brucella antigen test, but no confirmatory reaction occurred using the 2-mercaptoethanol slow slide agglutination test. No sample was reactive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test for rugose species of Brucella. The presence of anti-leptospira agglutinins in captive T. tetradactyla serum indicates that this species may be susceptible to infection by these bacteria. PMID:23272339

Sales, Indiara dos Santos; Folly, Márcio Manhães; Garcia, Luize Néli Nunes; Ramos, Tatiane Mendes Varela; da Silva, Mariana Cristina; Pereira, Martha Maria

2012-12-01

279

A comparative approach to the study of Keeper-Animal Relationships in the zoo.  

PubMed

Research on intensively farmed animals over the past 25 years has shown that human-animal interactions, by affecting the animal's fear of humans, can markedly limit the productivity and welfare of farm animals. This article begins to explore some of the factors that need to be considered to investigate Keeper-Animal Relationships (KARs) in the zoo. In the mid-1990s, a large body of multi-institutional data on zookeepers and animals was collected from 46 Zoos. Using standardized questionnaires, 82 keepers rated how they behaved towards animals, their husbandry routine, how the animal responds to them and to other people, and provided information about themselves. These data include 219 individuals of four endangered species: black rhinoceros, cheetah, maned wolf, and great hornbill. At each zoo, keepers were also videotaped calling to their animals in order to directly observe animal responses to keeper behaviors. Principle Components Analysis reduced eight animal variables to three components and ten keeper variables to five components. Scores for animals and for keepers were calculated on these components and compared, according to five predictions based on models of human-animal interactions in the literature. Animal responses to keepers varied along three dimensions: Affinity to Keeper, Fear of People, and Sociable/Curious. Animal scores of Fear of People were significantly and positively correlated with independent measures of poor welfare from two later studies: fecal corticoid concentrations for 12 black rhinos and "tense-fearful" scores for 12 cheetahs. (1) Significant species differences were found for Affinity to Keeper and Fear of People, and the interaction of these two dimensions of animal response to keepers appears to be species-specific. (2) The quality of KAR is influenced by whether the zookeeper goes in the enclosure with the animal or not, the frequency and time of feeding, and keeper visibility to the animal. Among keepers who go in with their animals, a significant negative correlation between Frequency of Feeding/Early Feedtime and average Affinity to Keeper of their animals, and a positive correlation between Keeper Experience and their animals' Fear of People, indicates that certain zoo keeping styles or habits among experienced keepers might be aversive and increase fear among animals. (3) Keepers who locomote or make unexpected noises when calling their animals elicit increased aggression or apprehension from maned wolves and cheetahs. (4) Wild-born black rhino and parent-reared maned wolf have significantly less affinity to keepers than their captive-born or hand-reared counterparts, but neither differs in Fear of People. (5) Keeper-animal relationships are likely to be reciprocal as evidenced by a negative correlation of Job Satisfaction with animal Fear of People. Future research directions are discussed with respect to assessment of keeper attitudes and behaviors, animal fear, positive measures of welfare, and positive reinforcement training. PMID:19885915

Carlstead, Kathy

2009-11-01

280

Third Annual HEDS-UP Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HEDS-UP (Human Exploration and Development of Space-University Partners) program has been instituted to build new relationships between university faculty and students and NASA in support of the Human Exploration and Development of Space. The program provides a mechanism whereby university students can explore problems of interest to NASA through student design projects, led by a university professor or mentor, and aided by the HEDSUP staff. HEDS-UP advises on the type of project that is of interest and provides contacts to NASA and industry professionals who may serve as mentors to the student project. Students become acquainted with objectives, strategies, development issues, and technologic characteristics of space exploration programs. In doing so, they are preparing themselves for future engineering challenges and may well find that the program is on their critical path to professional advancement. Many of the ideas are novel and are of interest to NASA. Industry finds in HEDS-UP a mechanism to meet many bright and enthusiastic students who are about to enter the work force. The universities become more involved with space exploration and the students are encouraged to include an outreach element in their work, to bring their efforts and their excitement to others in their universities or in their communities. The climax of the HEDS-UP program each year is the HEDS-UP Forum, held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. Here, the university teams bring their projects - written reports, oral reports, models, prototypes, and experiment demonstrations - to show to one another and to NASA and industry participants. NASA, industry, and academic professionals present discussions of problems of current interest to space exploration. All meet informally around the posters that each of the teams brings to the Forum. This year the HEDS-UP Forum was held May 4-5 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. Thirteen university teams from twelve universities participated. Eleven teams were undergraduate teams; two were composed of graduate students. Each team contributed a 20-page written report, and these reports are reproduced in this volume. The specially invited NASA presenters included Mr. John Connolly, Dr. David McKay and Dr. Donald Henninger of the NASA Johnson Space Center, Dr. Paul Spudis and Dr. Steve Clifford of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, and Dr. Pascal Lee of the NASA Ames Research Center.

Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

2000-01-01

281

Health-Related On-Line Forums: What's the Big Attraction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates what motivates people to make use of health-related online forums, and how people feel that using these forums helps them in coping with their situation. Results are based on an online questionnaire (N = 189) among users of a variety of health forums. Findings show an overall positive effect of using forums on the degree to which people are

Martin Tanis

2008-01-01

282

77 FR 36606 - Pipeline Safety: Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development Forum, Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development Forum, Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline...Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development (R&D) Forum. The R&D Forums are...pipeline safety and with protecting the environment. The forum allows public,...

2012-06-19

283

Prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens in a population of zoo animals.  

PubMed

Faecal prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens, including Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, as well as Arcobacter, were examined in 317 faecal specimens from 44 animal species in Belfast Zoological Gardens, during July-September 2006. Thermophilic campylobacters including Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter lari, were the most frequently isolated pathogens, where members of this genus were isolated from 11 animal species (11 of 44; 25%). Yersinia spp. were isolated from seven animal species (seven of 44; 15.9%) and included, Yersinia enterocolitica (five of seven isolates; 71.4%) and one isolate each of Yersinia frederiksenii and Yersinia kristensenii. Only one isolate of Salmonella was obtained throughout the entire study, which was an isolate of Salmonella dublin (O 1,9,12: H g, p), originating from tiger faeces after enrichment. None of the animal species found in public contact areas of the zoo were positive for any gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Also, water from the lake in the centre of the grounds, was examined for the same bacterial pathogens and was found to contain C. jejuni. This study is the first report on the isolation of a number of important bacterial pathogens from a variety of novel host species, C. jejuni from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), C. lari from a maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Y. kristensenii from a vicugna (Vicugna vicugna) and Y. enterocolitica from a maned wolf and red panda (Ailurus fulgens). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the faeces of animals in public contact areas of the zoo were not positive for the bacterial gastrointestinal pathogens examined. This is reassuring for the public health of visitors, particularly children, who enjoy this educational and recreational resource. PMID:18331520

Stirling, J; Griffith, M; Blair, I; Cormican, M; Dooley, J S G; Goldsmith, C E; Glover, S G; Loughrey, A; Lowery, C J; Matsuda, M; McClurg, R; McCorry, K; McDowell, D; McMahon, A; Cherie Millar, B; Nagano, Y; Rao, J R; Rooney, P J; Smyth, M; Snelling, W J; Xu, J; Moore, J E

2008-04-01

284

Mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium genavense in birds kept in a zoo: 11-year survey.  

PubMed Central

We report on a disease in 27 birds (1 bird belonging to the order Coraciiformes, 3 to Piciformes, 4 to Galliformes, 7 to Psittaciformes, and 12 to Passeriformes) caused by fastidious mycobacteria. All birds were caged at the Antwerp Zoo and died suddenly between 1983 and 1994. Seventeen birds had no previous signs of disease, and 10 birds showed emaciation. Gross necropsy findings were generally nonspecific, but all the birds were smear positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Histopathologic evaluation performed on 14 birds revealed predominantly intracellular AFB. Extracellular AFB were more abundant in advanced lesions, especially in necrotic areas. In the intestine the mucosal area was generally heavily infiltrated, suggesting an intestinal origin of the infection. There was extensive invasion of the lungs in most birds. In 11 birds sparse growth was obtained after at least 6 months of incubation on Löwenstein-Jensen medium or on Ogawa medium supplemented with mycobactin. Subculture was unsuccessful in all instances. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the cultured organisms or tissues from seven birds revealed the characteristic signature sequence for Mycobacterium genavense. Direct bird-to-bird transmission in the zoo was unlikely, and the pathogenicity of M. genavense in birds seems to be limited. The source of M. genavense in nature and the epidemiology of the disease in birds remain obscure. As suspected for human cases of M. genavense infection, an oral route of infection has been suggested, and contaminated local water distribution systems may have been the source of the infection. Our study confirms that infections caused by M. genavense should be suspected in birds (especially in Passeriformes and Psittaciformes orders) that die suddenly without previous symptoms and that have AFB in tissues that are difficult to grow on conventional media. PMID:8789007

Portaels, F; Realini, L; Bauwens, L; Hirschel, B; Meyers, W M; de Meurichy, W

1996-01-01

285

AsteroidZoo: A New Zooniverse project to detect asteroids and improve asteroid detection algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new citizen science project: AsteroidZoo. A collaboration between Planetary Resources, Inc., the Zooniverse Team, and the Catalina Sky Survey, we will bring the science of asteroid identification to the citizen scientist. Volunteer astronomers have proved to be a critical asset in identification and characterization of asteroids, especially potentially hazardous objects. These contributions, to date, have required that the volunteer possess a moderate telescope and the ability and willingness to be responsive to observing requests. Our new project will use data collected by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), currently the most productive asteroid survey, to be used by anyone with sufficient interest and an internet connection. As previous work by the Zooniverse has demonstrated, the capability of the citizen scientist is superb at classification of objects. Even the best automated searches require human intervention to identify new objects. These searches are optimized to reduce false positive rates and to prevent a single operator from being overloaded with requests. With access to the large number of people in Zooniverse, we will be able to avoid that problem and instead work to produce a complete detection list. Each frame from CSS will be searched in detail, generating a large number of new detections. We will be able to evaluate the completeness of the CSS data set and potentially provide improvements to the automated pipeline. The data corpus produced by AsteroidZoo will be used as a training environment for machine learning challenges in the future. Our goals include a more complete asteroid detection algorithm and a minimum computation program that skims the cream of the data suitable for implemention on small spacecraft. Our goal is to have the site become live in the Fall 2013.

Beasley, M.; Lewicki, C. A.; Smith, A.; Lintott, C.; Christensen, E.

2013-12-01

286

Chernobyl Forum: Forum Sharpens Focus on Human Consequences of Chernobyl Accident.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a concrete sarcophagus was built to enclose the remnants of the destroyed reactor. Now, nearly seventeen years later, engineers are faced with a new problem: the sarcophagus is literally falling apart. This site discusses events and topics of the February 2003 international forum on Chernobyl. Several documents are included on the site, including retrospectives and health analyses.

2003-01-01

287

Proceedings of the Fifth Triennial Software Quality Forum 2000, Software for the Next Millennium, Software Quality Forum  

SciTech Connect

The Software Quality Forum is a triennial conference held by the Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee for the Department of Energy's Quality Managers. The forum centers on key issues, information, and technology important in software development for the Nuclear Weapons Complex. This year it will be opened up to include local information technology companies and software vendors presenting their solutions, ideas, and lessons learned. The Software Quality Forum 2000 will take on a more hands-on, instructional tone than those previously held. There will be an emphasis on providing information, tools, and resources to assist developers in their goal of producing next generation software.

Scientific Software Engineering Group, CIC-12

2000-04-01

288

HMR Forum: Games, Simulations, and Teaching-Round Two.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the results of a forum on the use and misuse of computer games and simulations. Questions from History Microcomputer Review (HMR) readers are edited and then presented to a panel of history professors who answer them individually. (BSR)

McClymer, John F.

1987-01-01

289

Second National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology  

Cancer.gov

September 14-15, 2000 Forum Agenda - September 14, 2000 (PDF document) Workshop Agenda - September 15, 2000 (PDF document) Meeting Summary (PDF document) For further information, please contact: Cancer Imaging ProgramNational Cancer InstituteCancer Imaging

290

Science Teaching Forum (STF) Thursday, October 24, 2013  

E-print Network

Science Teaching Forum (STF) Thursday, October 24, 2013 4:00-4:50 pm, EEEL 345 Teaching Earth Science with Controversy: The role of the history and philosophy of science Presenter: Dr. Glenn Dolphin, Tamaratt Teaching Professor

de Leon, Alex R.

291

Fifth National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology  

Cancer.gov

January 29-30, 2004Bethesda, Maryland Meeting Summary (PDF document*) Program (PDF document*) * Note: PDF documents can be viewed by anyone with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the free Adobe Acrobat Reader Print This Page Fifth National Forum on Biomedical

292

LLW Forum meeting report, October 20--22, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Annapolis, Maryland, on October 20--22, 1997. Twenty-six Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 22 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Discussion with NRC Commissioner McGaffigan; Regulatory issues session; Executive session; LLW forum business session; DOE low-level waste management program; Transportation of radioactive waste; Environmental equity: Title VI; Congressional studies on Ward Valley Site; Implementation of DOE`s strategy for waste management; Relicensing Envirocare; Draft agreement for uniform application of manifesting procedures; CRCPD report; Panel: Future of low-level radioactive waste management; Agenda planning: February 1998; Resolutions; and Attendance.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-12-31

293

Hepatic calodium hepaticum (Nematoda) infection in a zoo colony of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).  

PubMed

Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica), a nematode parasite commonly found in the liver of wild rodents, infects a wide variety of mammals, including humans. A retrospective study of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at the Baltimore Zoo showed that 5 of 21 (24%) of the prairie dogs submitted for postmortem examination between 1981 and 2001 had hepatic capillariasis, with all the infections diagnosed during or after 1997. Affected livers contained multifocal granulomas containing numerous eggs and occasional adult nematodes. Asymptomatic wild rats in the zoo with a high prevalence of infection may have served as a reservoir for the disease. Wild rodent control is essential to minimize exposure of susceptible exhibition animals as well as humans to C. hepaticum. PMID:15077713

Landolfi, Jennifer A; Karim, Baktiar O; Poynton, Sarah L; Mankowski, Joseph L

2003-12-01

294

Proceedings of the third annual Nevada energy forum and exposition  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a forum on energy conservation. The papers include subjects on the following topics: third party financing; heat recovery and indirect evaporative cooling; computer literacy; practical power factor survey methodology; the measured energy performance of buildings; casino cogeneration; employees and energy conservation; daylighting; infrared heating; peak shaving and cogeneration. These subjects were orientated toward the management, purchasing and engineering professions and coincided with the forum goal of promoting energy conservation literacy.

Not Available

1984-01-01

295

Quality of weight loss advice on Internet forums  

PubMed Central

Background: Adults use the Internet for weight loss information, sometimes by participating in discussion forums. Our purpose was to analyze the quality of advice exchanged on these forums. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of messages posted to 18 Internet weight loss forums during one month in 2006. Advice was evaluated for congruence with clinical guidelines; potential for causing harm; and subsequent correction when it was contradictory to guidelines (erroneous) or potentially harmful. Message- and forum-specific characteristics were evaluated as predictors of advice quality and self-correction. Results: Of 3368 initial messages, 266 (7.9%) were requests for advice. Of 654 provisions of advice, 56 (8.6%) were erroneous and 19 of these 56 (34%) were subsequently corrected. Forty-three (6.6%) provisions of advice were harmful and 12 of these 43 (28%) were subsequently corrected. Messages from low-activity forums (fewer messages) were more likely than those from high-activity forums to be erroneous (10.6% vs. 2.4%, p<0.001) or harmful (8.4% vs. 1.2%, p<0.001). In high-activity forums, 2 of 4 (50%) erroneous provisions of advice and 2 of 2 (100%) potentially harmful provisions of advice were corrected by subsequent postings. Compared to general weight loss advice, medication-related advice was more likely to be erroneous (p=0.02) or harmful (p=0.01). Conclusions: Most advice posted on highly-active Internet weight loss forums is not erroneous or harmful. However, clinical and research strategies are needed to address the quality of medication-related advice. PMID:17602934

Hwang, Kevin O.; Farheen, Kiran; Johnson, Craig W.; Thomas, Eric J.; Barnes, Ann S.; Bernstam, Elmer V.

2007-01-01

296

Causes of mortality in captive Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri) at the San Antonio Zoo, 1997-2000.  

PubMed

Necropsy records for 102 Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri) that had been captive-reared and had died at the San Antonio Zoo over a 4-yr period were evaluated to determine the causes of mortality. Gross necropsy, histopathology, and bacterial culture findings are summarized. Mortality was highest in young birds (<6 mo) and embryos. Husbandry- and gastrointestinal-related diseases were the most common causes of mortality. PMID:12462490

West, Gary D; Garner, Michael M; Raymond, James T

2002-09-01

297

PROVIDING ENRICHMENT IN HIGHLY CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENTS: BLACK-FOOTED FERRET (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) ENRICHMENT PROGRAM AT THE PHOENIX ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The black-footed ferret was believed to have been extinct until 1981, when it was rediscovered in Wyoming. In 1987, several institutions led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service teamed up to save the species. The Phoenix Zoo has played a significant part in the recovery program since 1991. Enrichment options are being synchronized with recommendations from the U.S. Fish

Hilda Tresz; Phoenix Zoo

2007-01-01

298

Ecological ethics in captivity: balancing values and responsibilities in zoo and aquarium research under rapid global change.  

PubMed

Ethical obligations to animals in conservation research and management are manifold and often conflicting. Animal welfare concerns often clash with the ethical imperative to understand and conserve a population or ecosystem through research and management intervention. The accelerating pace and impact of global environmental change, especially climate change, complicates our understanding of these obligations. One example is the blurring of the distinction between ex situ (zoo- and aquarium-based) conservation and in situ (field-based) approaches as zoos and aquariums become more active in field conservation work and as researchers and managers consider more intensive interventions in wild populations and ecosystems to meet key conservation goals. These shifts, in turn, have consequences for our traditional understanding of the ethics of wildlife research and management, including our relative weighting of animal welfare and conservation commitments across rapidly evolving ex situ and in situ contexts. Although this changing landscape in many ways supports the increased use of captive wildlife in conservation-relevant research, it raises significant ethical concerns about human intervention in populations and ecosystems, including the proper role of zoos and aquariums as centers for animal research and conservation in the coming decades. Working through these concerns requires a pragmatic approach to ethical analysis, one that is able to make trade-offs among the many goods at stake (e.g., animal welfare, species viability, and ecological integrity) as we strive to protect species from further decline and extinction in this century. PMID:23904531

Minteer, Ben A; Collins, James P

2013-01-01

299

Complementary expertise in a zoo educator professional development event contributes to the construction of understandings of affective transformation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cultural Historical Activity Theory served as the analytical framework for the study of a professional development event for a zoo's education department, specifically designed to build understandings of "Affective Transformation," an element pertinent to the organization's strategic plan. Three key products—an Affective Transformation model, scaffolding schematic, and definition, "providing emotional experiences for visitors which increase caring for animals and nature that may lead to zoo-related nature-protective behaviors"—emerged as a result of ongoing deliberation among professional development community members over two days. Participants, including both management- and non-management-level staff, as well as an expert facilitator, contributed complementary expertise to the process. The discussions, therefore, crossed both vertical and horizontal layers of authority. Moreover, leadership was distributed across these levels in the development of these products. Members used pre-existing resources, as well as tools created in the course of the professional development event. Interactions among participants and resources were instrumental in Affective Transformation product development. Examination of one zoo's construction of understanding of affective goals, therefore, may offer insights to other organizations with similar aspirations.

Kelly, Lisa-Anne DeGregoria; Kassing, Sharon

2013-09-01

300

A new non-species dependent ELISA for detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. in zoo animals.  

PubMed

Although Lyme borreliosis is regarded as one of the most important zoonotic diseases, in Europe very few research reports have documented examinations on free-ranging wild animal populations and no study on zoo animals has been published. One of the problems regarding the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis in wild animals is often the lack of species specific secondary antibodies for serological tests. For our study on exposure of zoo animals to Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi s. l. and the occurrence of Lyme borreliosis in various German zoos, a non-species dependent ELISA was developed. Specific IgG antibodies against B. burgdorferi s. l. were detected by peroxidase labeled protein A or protein G conjugates. For this purpose, both conjugates were tested for their binding affinities to 160 different wild animal species representing 25 families and 7 orders. With 2 exceptions, all tested species reacted with either protein A or protein G, and 47 species reacted with both conjugates. In combination with an easy method for the long-term preservation of antigen-coated microtiter plates, the ELISA developed for this study could essentially facilitate serological examinations regarding Lyme borreliosis in wild animal sera. In summary, the results indicate commercially available protein A and protein G conjugates as useful alternatives to species specific secondary antibodies in various diagnostic assays on sera of a wide range of wild mammals. Therefore, this should be considered more often as versatile diagnostic tools in wildlife studies. PMID:12141767

Stöbel, Katrin; Schönberg, Arno; Staak, Christian

2002-06-01

301

Exploring the Dark Side of the Web: Collection and Analysis of U.S. Extremist Online Forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contents in extremist online forums are invaluable data sources for extremism reseach. In this study, we propose a systematic Web mining approach to collecting and monitoring extremist forums. Our proposed approach identifies extremist forums from various resources, addresses practical issues faced by researchers and experts in the extremist forum collection process. Such collection provides a foundation for quantitative forum analysis.

Yilu Zhou; Jialun Qin; Guanpi Lai; Edna Reid; Hsinchun Chen

2006-01-01

302

Do free-ranging common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) play a role in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii within a zoo environment?  

PubMed

To investigate the possible role of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii within a zoo environment, a serological survey of a free-ranging population resident within Taronga Zoo, Sydney, Australia was undertaken using the modified agglutination test (MAT). For comparison, the seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies was also assessed in a possum population inhabiting a felid-free, non-urban woodland habitat. Six of 126 possums (4.8%) from the zoo population had antibodies to T. gondii with a MAT titre of 25 or higher, while in contrast, all of the 17 possums from woodland were seronegative. These observations suggest that possums were at a higher risk of exposure to the parasite as a consequence of co-existing with domestic, stray and captive felids associated with urbanisation. Screening of captive felids at the zoo indicated 16 of 23 individuals (67%) and all 6 species were seropositive for T. gondii, implicating them as a possible source of the parasite within the zoo setting. In addition captive, non-felid carnivores including the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), dingo (Canis lupis) and leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) were tested for the presence of T. gondii antibodies as these species predate and are a leading cause of death amongst zoo possums. In total, 5 of 23 individuals (22%) were seropositive, representing 2 of the 4 carnivorous species; the dingo and chimpanzee. These data suggest that carnivory was not a highly efficient pathway for the transmission of T. gondii and the free-ranging possum population posed minimal threat to the health of zoo animals. PMID:18281157

Hill, N J; Dubey, J P; Vogelnest, L; Power, M L; Deane, E M

2008-04-15

303

Classifying Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site allows students to examine images of galaxies and learn to recognize the various shapes used in the Hubble classification system. The Hubble Tuning Fork Diagram is presented as a way to classify the various types of galaxies observed in space. Students will examine pictures of galaxies and discover that these pictures have been arranged according to a scheme or plan laid out by Edwin Hubble, which is still in use today. Students practice using the scheme to classify unidentified galaxies, as presented in pictures. At the end of the activity, students will be able to display the knowledge gained during this activity using a worksheet presented by the teacher and demonstrate an understanding of what classification means as it relates to science. They will also be able to examine an unidentified galaxy image and classify it based on the methods that they have learned.

304

Galaxies Galore  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online module includes three activities: Spiral Shapes, Elliptical Slide, and Imagine Irregular. By completing these activities, students discover that galaxies come in different shapes and learn about the process used by astronomers to classify them. Additional background information is provided in the Galaxy Gossip and Galaxy Gallery sections of this module. Students may complete this activity independently or in small groups. This activity should be completed before Galaxy Games. Detailed teacher pages, identified as Teaching Tips on the activity title page, provide science background information, lesson plan ideas, related resources, and alignment with national education standards. This activity is part of the online exploration "Galaxies Galore, Games and More" available on the Amazing Space website.

305

ICPD+5: The Hague International Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week's In the News covers an important international conference on population and development. The nine resources discussed provide background information, breaking news, social commentary, and primary materials. This week, official delegates representing governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from over 180 nations are convening in The Hague, Netherlands, on the fifth anniversary of the United Nations International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The 1994 ICPD, held in Cairo, Egypt, has been lauded as one of the most successful global congresses ever, culminating with the unanimous endorsement of a comprehensive 20-year Programme of Action. Recognizing that individual health, rights, and well-being provide the foundation for sustainable development, the ICPD Programme of Action emphasizes the need for universal access to affordable reproductive health services, underscores the promotion of women's rights issues, and highlights the impact of the world's expanding population on the environment. This week's international forum, dubbed ICPD+5, will review and appraise the progress made worldwide since the implementation of the Cairo agenda. With world population expected to exceed six billion in 1999, the UN plans to hold several special sessions on population and development throughout the year, based on the findings unearthed at this week's ICPD+5.

Osmond, Andrew.

1999-01-01

306

3 CFR 13522 - Executive Order 13522 of December 9, 2009. Creating Labor-Management Forums To Improve Delivery...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Creating Labor-Management Forums To Improve... Presidential Documents Executive Orders...Creating Labor-Management Forums To Improve...in its labor-management forums; and (iii) evaluate and document, in...

2010-01-01

307

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico.  

PubMed

Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico, using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus); 4 of 4 cougars (Puma concolor); 10 of 13 jaguars (Panthera onca); 5 of 5 leopards (Panthera pardus); 7 of 7 lions (Panthera leo); 2 of 3 tigers (Panthera tigris); 2 of 3 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis); 2 of 2 Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae); lof 2 Jaguarundi (Herpailurus jagouaroundi); but not in 0 of 2 oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus). Such high seroprevalence in wild felids is of public health significance because of the potential of oocyst shedding. Four of 6 New World primates (2 of 2 Geoffroy's spider monkeys [Ateles geoffroyi], 1 of 3 Patas monkeys [Erythrocebus patas], and 1 of 1 white-headed capuchin [Cebus capucinus]) had high MAT titers of 3,200, suggesting recently acquired infection; these animals are highly susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. However, none of these animals were ill. Seropositivity to T. gondii was found for the first time in a number of species. PMID:24063119

Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Gayosso-Dominguez, Edgar Arturo; Villena, Isabelle; Dubey, J P

2013-09-01

308

Diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of zoo elephants in an outdoor facility.  

PubMed

The present study examined the activity budgets of 15 African elephants (1 bull, 6 cows, 2 male juveniles, 2 female juveniles, and 4 male calves) living at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Onsite behavioral data (n?=?600?hr) were collected for approximately 12 weeks from 0400 to 0830 and 1100 to 2400 during the 2010 and 2011 summer season. Foraging was the most common behavior state during the day followed by resting, and walking. During the evening hours, the elephants spent majority of their time foraging, resting, and sleeping. The average rate of self-maintenance behavior events (dust, wallow, etc.) increased from 0600 to 0700, 1100 to 1500, and from 1700 to 1900. Positive social behavior events (touch other, play, etc.) remained high from 0500 to 2300, with peaks at 0600, 1300, 1500, and 1900. Negative social events occurred at low rates throughout the day and night, with peaks at 0600, 1900, and 2200. The majority of positive behavior events during the daylight and nighttime hours involved the mother-calf pairs. Furthermore, the calves and juveniles initiated approximately 60% of all social events during the daytime and 57% of all social interactions at night. The results of this study demonstrate the differences between diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of a multi-age and sex elephant herd in a zoological facility, which highlights the importance of managing elephants to meet their 24?hr behavioral needs. PMID:25113850

Horback, Kristina M; Miller, Lance J; Andrews, Jeff R M; Kuczaj, Stan A

2014-01-01

309

Effects of summer microclimates on behavior of lions and tigers in zoos.  

PubMed

The surrounding thermal environment has a direct influence on the well-being of an animal. However, few studies have investigated the microclimatic conditions that result from outdoor zoo enclosure designs and whether this affects where animals choose to spend time. Two African lions (Panthera leo) and two Siberian/Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) were observed for a total of 18 full days during the summer and fall of 2009. Their activities and locations were recorded to the nearest minute of each test day. Simultaneous on-site microclimate measurements were taken of air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind. Observations indicated that the locations where the animals chose to spend time were influenced by the microclimatic conditions. All subjects spent more time in the shade on their sunny warm days than on other days and differed from one another in their choice of shade source on all days. Temperature-comparable sunny and cloudy days showed a greater use of sun on the cloudy days. Species-specific differences between the lions (whose native habitat is hot) and the tigers (whose native habitat is temperate with cold winters) were observed with the tigers displaying more cooling behaviors than the lions in terms of solar radiation input and evaporative heat loss. The tigers were also more active than the lions. The results of this study provide new insight into how lions and tigers respond to microclimatic conditions in a captive environment. PMID:22707238

Young, Tory; Finegan, Esther; Brown, Robert D

2013-05-01

310

Friday Forum: Reading from the Primary Literature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Friday forum is an integral part of my course. I choose papers before the term begins based on my own interest, the interests of my students (e.g. senior thesis topics), and the types of projects we plan to complete in the course that term (e.g. term-long or multi-week research problem ). The number of papers is based on enrollment so that two students are responsible for one paper. I integrate the papers into my syllabus so the students know when each paper must be read and discussed. At the beginning of the term, I have the students rank order their choice of paper. Their decision is typically based on interest and timing with respect to the term. I then assign them a paper based on their ranking. This works well in that they typically get their first or second choice , and the students feel like they have a say in what they are going to present. At the beginning of the term I hand out the first paper we are going to read. Everyone in the course reads the paper, and must submit three questions about the paper to me via e-mail by 4:00 PM the day before we discuss the paper. After the deadline, I compile the questions, identified by name, and send to everyone in the course as soon as possible. This typically ensures that the students read the paper, and that we have plenty of ammunition for the discussion. On the day of Friday forum (typically Friday), the two students responsible for the paper give a 10-15 minute presentation on the paper emphasizing the main point(s) of the paper, along with any background information they think is necessary to fully understand the paper. Sometime before their presentation (usually the day before), I schedule a one-hour meeting with the presenters to give them the chance to ask me any questions they have before putting together their presentation. I believe this is an essential part of the process in order to clear up any fundamental questions. After the presentation, we sit around one large table (four lab tables put together) for the discussion. I think the round table format, with everyone facing each other, helps promote discussion. Its up to the student presenters how they want to lead the discussion, but typically they focus on themes that emerged from the question s submitted by the rest of the students. This has the added benefit of drawing the rest of the class into the discussion. The hardest part for me to control as an instructor is to try and keep my mouth shut, and allow the students to explore ideas on their own.

Cameron Davidson

311

Working Together Through NASA's Astrophysics Forum: Collaborations Across the Spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums are teams of scientists and educators that work closely with NASA SMD and its education and public outreach (EPO) community to organize individual SMD-funded EPO activities into a coordinated effort. One Forum exists for each of SMD's four science divisions: Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science. Through the Forums, NASA SMD and the members of its EPO community work together to interconnect a wide spectrum of SMD-funded EPO activities, resources, and expertise and to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the resulting ensemble of efforts. The Forums also support members of the broader science and education communities by identifying opportunities and strategies for scientists and educators to participate in and make use of SMD EPO activities and resources according to their needs. This article highlights examples of this work within NASA Astrophysics EPO, where the Forum and community members are extending the impact of existing EPO resources through collaborative online professional development activities for classroom educators, activities to engage girls in STEM in library settings, resources to support the Astronomy 101 instructional community, and practical tips for scientists interested in EPO.

Smith, D. A.; Sharma, M.; Watkins, M.; Lawton, B.; Eisenhamer, B.; McCallister, D.; Bartolone, L.; Nichols, M.; Withnell, H.; Schultz, G.; Fraknoi, A.; Manning, J. G.; Blair, W.; Bianchi, L.

2012-08-01

312

The Second National AIDS Research Forum.  

PubMed

On November 17-18, 1995, the Second National AIDS Research Forum was held in the Philippines to explore the theme "Responding to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic." Individual conference sessions on the first day focused on such topics as 1) national strategies in HIV/AIDS prevention, 2) experiences in HIV/AIDS prevention research, 3) ethics in HIV research, 4) the current status of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Western Pacific region, 5) an up-date of national HIV surveillance, 6) HIV testing in Frontline Laboratories, 7) cofactors in HIV disease progression, 8) the natural history of HIV infection in female sex workers, 9) the impact of and HIV prevention workshop for men in metro Manila, 10) targeted sexually transmitted disease (STD) interventions, and 11) an advocacy campaign on STD/HIV/AIDS for child and youth sex workers. The second day was devoted to reports on 1) fungal infections in patients, 2) diagnostic tools for pulmonary opportunistic infections, 3) the sex behavior of urban Filipino males, 4) HIV/AIDS control among women working in commercial sex establishments, 5) HIV/AIDS risk behavior and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among truck crews, 6) hospitality women in Davao city, and 7) the risk exposure reported by young users of the Remedios hotline. The final symposia were characterized by their attention to 1) AIDS-related conditions and STDs, 2) a clinical and microbiologic profile of tuberculosis in Filipino AIDS patients, 3) STD prevalence and behavioral correlates of STD among female sex workers, 4) a possible link between bacterial vaginosis and HIV, 5) living with AIDS, 6) coping mechanisms of households affected with HIV/AIDS, and 7) a nongovernmental organization's response to HIV prevention. PMID:12291704

Monzon, O T

1995-01-01

313

76 FR 12337 - Request for Applicants for Appointment to the United States-Brazil CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for Appointment to the United States- Brazil CEO Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...2007, the Governments of the United States and Brazil established the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2011-03-07

314

78 FR 32239 - Request for Applicants for Appointment to the United States-Brazil CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for Appointment to the United States- Brazil CEO Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...2007, the Governments of the United States and Brazil established the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2013-05-29

315

Part 4: NASA Future Forum Examines Nationâ??s Goals in Space - Duration: 5:38.  

NASA Video Gallery

Closing remarks wrap up the Dec. 9 NASA Future Forum held at The Museum of Flight in Seattle. (Part 4 of 4) Since 2008, the agencyâ??s ongoing series of Future Forums have provided NASA leadership,...

316

77 FR 26509 - Notice of Public Meeting-Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Public Meeting--Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V to be held...the U.S. Government (USG) Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap...

2012-05-04

317

76 FR 62373 - Notice of Public Meeting-Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Public Meeting--Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV AGENCY...SUMMARY: NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV to be held...the U.S. Government (USG) Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap...

2011-10-07

318

Active Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide accompanies an educational wallsheet that uses active galaxies as an engagement to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Web site. Active galaxies have super-massive black holes in their cores, some of which emit jets of particles and light. It features three curriculum enhancement activities, background information, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and detailed information about the physical science and mathematics content standards that are supported.

319

LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed..

NONE

1994-12-31

320

Narrating dementia: self and community in an online forum.  

PubMed

In this article, I examine how individuals diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease use illness narratives to construct community. The ability to narrate is a fundamental component of the self. Using 354 posts by 32 members of an Internet forum, I argue that people with Alzheimer's, whose ability to narrate, and thus create a self, was compromised, nonetheless managed to tell stories of redemption out of which a salvaged self emerged. Narratives are essential for the construction of self, but as I show in this article, they are also essential for the construction of community. Forum members shared stories, gave advice, offered encouragement, and commiserated about their symptoms in ways that generated solidarity. Internet forums provide a venue for people with illnesses who are unable to leave the home to construct community. PMID:23907588

Rodriquez, Jason

2013-09-01

321

Forum on Education American Physical Society: Spring 2011 Newsletter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Spring 2011 Newsletter from the Forum on Education for the American Physical Society. Features of the newsletter include "Forum on Engaging the Public" by Dan Dahlberg and Philip W. Hammer, "NanoJapan: Connecting U.S. Undergraduates with the Best of Nanoscience Resarch in Japan" by Cheryl Matherly and Junichiro Kono, and "Using Clickers in a University Physics Course to Improve Student Achievement" by Judith C. Stull, David M. Majerich, Andria C. Smythe, Susan Jansen Varnum, Joseph P. Ducette and Tiffany Gilles.

Society, American P.

2011-09-28

322

5th International High Energy Physics Technical Safety Forum  

SciTech Connect

The International High-Energy Physics Technical Safety Forum is a group of engineers, physicists, and safety professionals united in exchanging state-of-the-art ideas, processes, procedures, and technologies in personnel, environmental, and equipment safety from a variety of high-energy physics and synchrotron-radiation laboratories. Founded in 1998, the Forum meets roughly every 18 months. Previous fora have been held at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the German Electron-Synchrotron (DESY), the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) Gran Sasso Laboratory.

Hahn, Jack; /SLAC

2005-05-17

323

The Dark Web Forum Portal: From multi-lingual to video  

Microsoft Academic Search

Counter -terrorism, intelligence analysts, and other investigators continue to analyze the Internet presence of terrorists, hate groups, and other extremists through the study of primary sources including terrorists' own websites, videos, chat sites, and Internet forums. Forums and videos are both particularly rich sources of information. Forums -- discussion sites supporting online conversations --capture each conversation in a \\

Hsinchun Chen; Dorothy Denning; Nancy Roberts; Catherine A. Larson; Ximing Yu; Chun-Neng Huang

2011-01-01

324

Sentiment and affect analysis of Dark Web forums: Measuring radicalization on the internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dark Web forums are heavily used by extremist and terrorist groups for communication, recruiting, ideology sharing, and radicalization. These forums often have relevance to the Iraqi insurgency or Al-Qaeda and are of interest to security and intelligence organizations. This paper presents an automated approach to sentiment and affect analysis of selected radical international Ahadist Dark Web forums. The approach incorporates

Hsinchun Chen; Tianjun Fu

2008-01-01

325

Organization of Ministries of Education. Policy Forum on Education (Paris, France, June 20-21, 2001).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In June 2001, the International Institute for Educational Planning convened a policy forum on the organization, functioning, and effectiveness of national ministries of education. This book presents eight key papers from that forum. The forum discussed how differences in organizational structures and mechanisms affect adjustability and…

Hernes, Gudmund

326

The Stem Advisory Forum: A Means of Allowing People to Influence the Government's STEM Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper gives a short overview of the UK government's STEM agenda and then considers one aspect in depth--the STEM Advisory Forum. It explains how the Forum operates to draw together views from across the STEM community through online discussions and face-to-face events. Four examples are given of topics that have been dealt with by the Forum

Onion, Alice; Follett, Brian

2011-01-01

327

77 FR 74829 - Notice of Public Meeting-Cloud Computing and Big Data Forum and Workshop  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Meeting--Cloud Computing and Big Data Forum and Workshop AGENCY: National...announces a Cloud Computing and Big Data Forum and Workshop to be held on Tuesday...workshop. The NIST Cloud Computing and Big Data Forum and Workshop will bring...

2012-12-18

328

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior  

E-print Network

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior: Presentations and discussions at the two-day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior for High employer. #12;2013 CERC-BEE Forum on Human Behavior and Integrated Design for High Performance Buildings

329

Ancestry.com Online Forum Test Collection Jonathan L. Elsas (CMU)  

E-print Network

Ancestry.com Online Forum Test Collection Jonathan L. Elsas (CMU) CMU-LTI-017 Language Technologies.lti.cs.cmu.edu © 2011, Jonathan L. Elsas #12;The Ancestry.com Online Forum Test Collection Jonathan L. Elsas (jelsas and information retrieval test collection. The Ancestry.com Forum Dataset was created with the cooperation

Eskenazi, Maxine

330

TransForumNews from Argonne's Transportation Research Program www.transportation.anl.gov  

E-print Network

TransForumNews from Argonne's Transportation Research Program www.transportation.anl.gov Volume 14 Issue 1 Winter 2014 Contents #12;TransForumNews from Argonne's Transportation Research Program www.transportationForum | Volume 14 | Issue 1 | Winter 2014 Research Reviews 12 New EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center

Kemner, Ken

331

The Einstein Fellowship 2014 Awarded by the Einstein Forum and the Daimler and Benz Foundation  

E-print Network

, FROM THE APPLICANT'S PREVIOUS WORK. Albert Einstein-Stipendium 2014 Vergeben vom Einstein Forum und derThe Einstein Fellowship 2014 Awarded by the Einstein Forum and the Daimler and Benz Foundation The Einstein Forum and the Daimler and Benz Foundation are offering a fellowship for outstanding young thinkers

Heermann, Dieter W.

332

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology  

E-print Network

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 of IT and Telecommunications Industries, World Economic Forum USA 9:30 ­ 10:20 Cloud Computing: Adopters' Long-term View, Panel Computing Program & Forum (10 min Q&A) Dawn Leaf, NIST Senior Executive for Cloud Computing 10:50 ­ 11

333

MOLECULAR TYPING OF Giardia duodenalis ISOLATES FROM NONHUMAN PRIMATES HOUSED IN A BRAZILIAN ZOO  

PubMed Central

Giardia infections in captive nonhuman primates (NHP) housed at a Brazilian zoo were investigated in order to address their zoonotic potential. Fresh fecal samples were collected from the floors of 22 enclosures where 47 primates of 18 different species were housed. The diagnosis of intestinal parasites after concentration by sedimentation and flotation methods revealed the following parasites and their frequencies: Giardia (18%); Entamoeba spp. (18%); Endolimax nana (4.5%); Iodamoeba spp. (4.5%); Oxyurid (4.5%) and Strongylid (4.5%). Genomic DNA extracted from all samples was processed by PCR methods in order to amplify fragments of gdh and tpi genes of Giardia. Amplicons were obtained from samples of Ateles belzebuth, Alouatta caraya, Alouatta fusca and Alouatta seniculus. Clear sequences were only obtained for the isolates from Ateles belzebuth (BA1), Alouatta fusca (BA2) and Alouatta caraya (BA3). According to the phenetic analyses of these sequences, all were classified as assemblage A. For the tpi gene, all three isolates were grouped into sub-assemblage AII (BA1, BA2 and BA3) whereas for the gdh gene, only BA3 was sub-assemblage AII, and the BA1 and BA2 were sub-assemblage AI. Considering the zoonotic potential of the assemblage A, and that the animals of the present study show no clinical signs of infection, the data obtained here stresses that regular coproparasitological surveys are necessary to implement preventive measures and safeguard the health of the captive animals, of their caretakers and of people visiting the zoological gardens. PMID:24553608

David, Érica Boarato; Patti, Mariella; Coradi, Silvana Torossian; Oliveira-Sequeira, Teresa Cristina Goulart; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Guimarães, Semíramis

2014-01-01

334

Rickets in lion cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: some new insights.  

PubMed

In 1889, when Dr John Bland-Sutton, a prominent surgeon in London, England, was consulted concerning fatal rickets in more than 20 successive litters of lion cubs at the London Zoo, he evaluated the role of diet relative to the development of rickets. He prescribed goat meat and bones and cod-liver oil to be added to the lean horse-meat diet of the cubs and their mothers. Rickets reversed, the cubs survived, and litters were reared successfully. In classic controlled studies conducted in puppies and young rats 3 decades later, the crucial role of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D in both prevention and therapy of rickets was elucidated. Later studies led to the identification of the structural features of vitamin D. Although the Bland-Sutton interventional diet obviously provides calcium and phosphate from bones and vitamin D from cod-liver oil, other benefits of this diet were not initially recognized. Chewing bones promotes tooth and gum health and removes bacteria-laden tartar. Cod-liver oil also contains vitamin A, which is essential for the prevention of infection and for epithelial cell health. Taurine-conjugated bile salts are also necessary for the intestinal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, including A and D. Moreover, unlike dogs and rats, all feline species are unable to synthesize taurine yet can only conjugate bile acids with taurine. This sulfur-containing beta-amino acid must be provided in the carnivorous diet of a large cat. Taurine-conjugated bile salts were provided in the oil cold-pressed from cod liver. The now famous Bland-Sutton "experiment of nature," namely, fatal rickets in lion cubs, was cured by the addition of minerals and vitamin D. However, gum health and the presence of taurine-conjugated bile salts undoubtedly permitted absorption of vitamin A and D, the latter promoting the cure of rickets. PMID:19349374

Chesney, Russell W; Hedberg, Gail

2009-05-01

335

Molecular typing of Giardia duodenalis isolates from nonhuman primates housed IN a Brazilian zoo.  

PubMed

Giardia infections in captive nonhuman primates (NHP) housed at a Brazilian zoo were investigated in order to address their zoonotic potential. Fresh fecal samples were collected from the floors of 22 enclosures where 47 primates of 18 different species were housed. The diagnosis of intestinal parasites after concentration by sedimentation and flotation methods revealed the following parasites and their frequencies: Giardia (18%); Entamoeba spp. (18%); Endolimax nana (4.5%); Iodamoeba spp. (4.5%); Oxyurid (4.5%) and Strongylid (4.5%). Genomic DNA extracted from all samples was processed by PCR methods in order to amplify fragments of gdh and tpi genes of Giardia. Amplicons were obtained from samples of Ateles belzebuth, Alouatta caraya, Alouatta fusca and Alouatta seniculus. Clear sequences were only obtained for the isolates from Ateles belzebuth (BA1), Alouatta fusca (BA2) and Alouatta caraya (BA3). According to the phenetic analyses of these sequences, all were classified as assemblage A. For the tpi gene, all three isolates were grouped into sub-assemblage AII (BA1, BA2 and BA3) whereas for the gdh gene, only BA3 was sub-assemblage AII, and the BA1 and BA2 were sub-assemblage AI. Considering the zoonotic potential of the assemblage A, and that the animals of the present study show no clinical signs of infection, the data obtained here stresses that regular coproparasitological surveys are necessary to implement preventive measures and safeguard the health of the captive animals, of their caretakers and of people visiting the zoological gardens. PMID:24553608

David, Érica Boarato; Patti, Mariella; Coradi, Silvana Torossian; Oliveira-Sequeira, Teresa Cristina Goulart; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Guimarães, Semíramis

2014-01-01

336

Response of hatchling Komodo Dragons (Varanus komodoensis) at Denver Zoo to visual and chemical cues arising from prey.  

PubMed

Five hatchling Komodo Dragons (Varanus komodoensis) at Denver Zoo were observed in two experiments that studied the effects of visual and chemical cues arising from prey. Rate of tongue flicking was recorded in Experiment 1, and amount of time the lizards spent interacting with stimuli was recorded in Experiment 2. Our hypothesis was that young V. komodoensis would be more dependent upon vision than chemoreception, especially when dealing with live, moving, prey. Although visual cues, including prey motion, had a significant effect, chemical cues had a far stronger effect. Implications of this falsification of our initial hypothesis are discussed. PMID:19358316

Chiszar, David; Krauss, Susan; Shipley, Bryon; Trout, Tim; Smith, Hobart M

2009-01-01

337

Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife–Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

2014-01-01

338

Applied animal psychology at an American roadside attraction: animal behavior enterprises and the IQ Zoo of Hot Springs, Arkansas.  

PubMed

Keller and Marian Breland worked with B. F. Skinner on top-secret behavioral technology during World War II. They later applied that behavioral technology in postwar business ventures that included a roadside attraction called the IQ Zoo. It attracted motorists from across the United States and, like other roadside attractions of the period, was depicted in postcards available for purchase. While conducting research associated with the business, the Brelands discovered the phenomenon of instinctive drift, which significantly advanced subsequent theoretical accounts of the biological factors that influence learning. PMID:20066932

Drumm, Patrick

2009-01-01

339

Colliding Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colliding Galaxies Model is an implementation of Alar and Juri Toomresâ 1972 super computer model showing the formation of galactic bridges and tails under the assumption that galactic cores are point masses and that one galactic core is surrounded by 2D concentric rings of orbiting stars. The model assumes is that the stars (test particles) orbiting the galactic cores are non-interacting. When the two galaxies pass one another, tidal forces deform the star distribution into classic tidal features. Our EJS model reproduces this result showing that there is a long curving tail and that only the outermost ring of stars is affected by its companion galaxy. A thin bridge is also formed and some of the stars are captured by the companion galactic core. The Colliding Galaxies Model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_mech_orbits_CollidingGalaxies.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang; Lim, Kyung T.

2009-05-19

340

The Education Forum: A Web-Based Resource for Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the issues surrounding the successful integration of technology into teaching practices is teachers' lack of time to develop or modify lesson plans, units, or curricula to incorporate technology. The Education Forum Web site, http: //education.concordia.ca/~heidi_schnackenberg/educationfo rum, developed as a project for a graduate course on…

Schnackenberg, Heidi L.; Asuncion, Jennison; Rosler, Dean

341

AIAA 2014-3820 Propulsion and Energy Forum  

E-print Network

/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference Mars Aerial Nuclear Global Landing Explorer: A Global Mobility and Multi and ground system powered by nuclear propulsion to fly in Martian atmosphere with vertical takeAIAA 2014-3820 Propulsion and Energy Forum July 28-30, 2014, Cleveland, OH 50th AIAA

Zha, Gecheng

342

A Learning Alberta: Dialogue and Direction. The Forum Background  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participants in "A Learning Alberta--Dialogue and Direction," the Minister's Forum on Advanced Learning are an important part of a process that has been underway across Alberta since January of 2005. Led by the Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Advanced Education, a new vision and policy framework is being developed to guide future directions…

Alberta Advanced Education, 2005

2005-01-01

343

Semantic web and natural language in online discussion forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal weg pages, blogging services and discussion forums have gained widespread acceptance among casual Internet users to communicate their views and preferences across diverse areas of topics. Unfortunately, since these contributions are written in free-form natural language it is difficult and error-prone to automatically extract much more than a classification of postings into subject categories; the statements contained in the

Johann Mitlöhner

2008-01-01

344

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science  

E-print Network

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we Institution; and Dr. Michael Carron, Program Director for GoMRI. Since the 2010 DWH oil spill, Go of the dynamics of oil spills and their environmental stresses and public health implications. The ultimate goal

New Hampshire, University of

345

Alaska Justice Forum Page 1 INSIDE THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

's compliance with the mandates of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. The data, collectedAlaska Justice Forum Page 1 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE The Bureau of Justice Statistics UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 11, No. 3 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical

Pantaleone, Jim

346

The Forum, Volume 19. Numbers 1-4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four issues of "The Forum," a publication of the New York State Federation of Chapters of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), contain the following major articles: "Integration, Mainstreaming or Inclusion...Who's On First?" (Tim Knoster); "Links to the Community: Why Inclusion?" (John B. Kish and Leslie A. Kish); "Integration of Preschool…

Forum, 1994

1994-01-01

347

Shopping for Top Forums: Discovering Online Discussion for Product Research  

E-print Network

Shopping for Top Forums: Discovering Online Discussion for Product Research Jonathan L. Elsas researching products for the purposes of mak- ing purchasing decisions frequently visit online shopping por such as blogs, twitter and online discussion boards have been recognized as valuable sources of market intelli

Tomkins, Andrew

348

Ted Sizer's Opening Remarks, Fall Forum 2000, Providence, Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents Ted Sizer's opening remarks during the Fall Forum in 2000 at Providence, Rhode Island. In his opening remarks, Sizer reviews what the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is, and what it is not. CES, he contends, is not a fixed school design but rather, a set of ideas, ideas and conditions and convictions, called principles,…

Sizer, Theodore

2009-01-01

349

Participation and Cognitive Quality Profiles in an Online Discussion Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study was used to analyse the relationships between participation in an online discussion forum and the cognitive quality of the contributions made. Participation was calculated using two dimensions: presence (who accesses the environment, how often and for how long) and connectivity (who interacts with whom and the degree of intensity of…

Naranjo, Mila; Onrubia, Javier; Segues, Ma Teresa

2012-01-01

350

The National Teaching & Learning Forum, Volume 1, 1991-92.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volume One of this 12 page newsletter includes six issues. Typical features include: a lead article; Research Watch; ERIC Tracks; Case Studies; Case Study Responses; Curriculum; Teaching Assistants (TA) Forum; and Profile (personal and Programmatic). Major articles included in volume one are: "Faculty and Students: Different Ways of Understanding"…

Rhem, James, Ed.

1992-01-01

351

An Online Forum As a Qualitative Research Method: Practical Issues  

PubMed Central

Background Despite positive aspects of online forums as a qualitative research method, very little is known about practical issues involved in using online forums for data collection, especially for a qualitative research project. Objectives The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical issues that the researchers encountered in implementing an online forum as a qualitative component of a larger study on cancer pain experience. Method Throughout the study process, the research staff recorded issues ranged from minor technical problems to serious ethical dilemmas as they arose and wrote memos about them. The memos and written records of discussions were reviewed and analyzed using the content analysis suggested by Weber. Results Two practical issues related to credibility were identified: a high response and retention rate and automatic transcripts. An issue related to dependability was the participants’ easy forgetfulness. The issues related to confirmability were difficulties in theoretical saturation and unstandardized computer and Internet jargon. A security issue related to hacking attempts was noted as well. Discussion The analysis of these issues suggests several implications for future researchers who want to use online forums as a qualitative data collection method. PMID:16849979

Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik

2008-01-01

352

Developing Story: A Forum on Improving Remedial Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why is "remedial" or "developmental" education such a hot issue? Partly because it costs time and money and casts doubt on the elementary and secondary education systems that we assume will prepare students for college. The New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) explored solutions to the problem at a recent forum in Kennebunkport, Maine,…

Harney, John O.

2012-01-01

353

Standards-Based IEP: Implementation Update. inForum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In May 2006, Project Forum published a document entitled "Standards-Based IEPs: Implementation in Selected States" based on staff interviews in 18 states about their use of standards-based individualized education programs (IEPs). The definition of a standards-based IEP as presented in that document is: "a process and document that is framed by…

Ahearn, Eileen

2010-01-01

354

The Co-operative Business Model Hort 2020 Forum  

E-print Network

The Co-operative Business Model Hort 2020 Forum November 14, 2009 Co-op Start-ups - The Basics #12;Business Models Co-operative Traditional Not-for-Profit Sole Proprietor Partnerships Business Corporations. #12;Business Model Comparison Purpose Community Service Co-operative (Not-for-profit) Co

Peak, Derek

355

Understanding MOOC Discussion Forums using Seeded LDA Arti Ramesh, 1  

E-print Network

Discussion forums serve as a platform for student discussions in massive open online courses (MOOCs, which include student introductions, discussions about online courses (GENERAL). In order to capture' intentions and motiva- tion and provide useful information in predicting course completion. MOOC discussion

Getoor, Lise

356

The Challenge to Manufacturing: A Proposal for a National Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a letter report and supporting materials prepared in response to a request for an investigation of the desirability of creating a forum for the discussion of the broad problems that confront the manufacturing sector. The letter report, submitted by Frank Press, president of the National Academy of Sciences, and Robert White,…

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

357

Senate Forum XXV, No. 2 Spring 2010 Strategic Initiatives  

E-print Network

Forum XXV, No. 2 Spring 2010 It All Starts Here: Strategic Real Estate Acquisition To meet current needs in- clude transitioning to an online archive, addressing the climate control challenges and space. And for every one we can accept, there is a significant gap between the actual cost of their nursing edu- cation

de Lijser, Peter

358

RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS  

E-print Network

Fowler (Ph.D. candidate) #12;California Renewable Energy Center 9:00 Introduction and Overview 9RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS Public Workshop at the California Energy Commission (CEC) September 3, 2014 California Renewable Energy Center #12;California

California at Davis, University of

359

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY WITH  

E-print Network

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 ­ 302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY WITH MIDDLE­DIMENSIONAL SINGULAR SETS. I Anthony #(f) # W (G, Y ), called the surgery obstruction of f such that the vanishing of #(f) in W (G, Y ) guarantees that f can converted by G­surgery to a homotopy equivalence. Acknowledgement. We wish to express

Bak, Anthony

360

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 -302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY WITH  

E-print Network

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 - 302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY(G,* * Y ), called the surgery obstruction of f such that the vanishing of oe(f) in W(G, Y ) guar* *antees that f can converted by G-surgery to a homotopy equivalence. Acknowledgement. We wish

Bak, Anthony

361

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 -302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY WITH  

E-print Network

Forum Math 8 (1996), 267 - 302 EQUIVARIANT SURGERY WITH MIDDLE-DIMENSIONAL SINGULAR SETS. I Anthony ), called the surgery obstruction of f such that the vanishing of (f) in W (G, Y ) guarantees that f can converted by G-surgery to a homotopy equivalence. Acknowledgement. We wish to express our gratitude to I

Bak, Anthony

362

Biofuels in the ASEAN Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Forum  

E-print Network

9/20/2012 1 Biofuels in the ASEAN Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Forum Bangkok, Thailand 19-21 September 2012 Biofuel Policy Group Asian Institute of Technology Outline of the Presentation 1. Objectives of this Presentation 2. Background 3. Status of Biofuel Development in ASEAN 4

363

Temporal Transitions in Participation Flow in an Asynchronous Discussion Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the overarching issue of how temporal transitions, specifically duration of message flow, affects momentum or wellness of discussion in an asynchronous forum. Quantitative data representing time indicators in discussion activity included posting patterns related to duration (density, intensity, latency, and response count),…

Dringus, Laurie P.; Ellis, Timothy

2010-01-01

364

Public Forum The Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine  

E-print Network

to Obesity and Cancer John A. Milner, Ph.D. Chief Nutritional Science Research Group Division of Cancer Program Sponsors The Cancer Institute of New Jersey The New Jersey Institute of Food, Nutrition and HealthPublic Forum Room 010 The Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine Kids and Cancer

Goodman, Robert M.

365

North-South Forum Education for Sustainable Development  

E-print Network

North-South Forum Education for Sustainable Development The Perspective of Swiss Universities Prof. Dr. Doris Wastl-Walter Universität Bern #12;14. November 2012 Education for Sustainable Development Koordination im schweizerischen Hochschulbereich (HFKG)). > Sustainable Development (SD) as a requirement

Richner, Heinz

366

The Healthy Exchange: An Interdisciplinary Forum for Health Research  

E-print Network

The Healthy Exchange: An Interdisciplinary Forum for Health Research Fall 2010 Schedule September 8, 2010 Practical Tips for Writing Effective Abstracts Diane B. Monsivais, PhD, CRRN Assistant Professor in the park: Exploring neighborhood and park influences on physical activity and health Andrew T. Kaczynski

Ward, Karen

367

Innovation to Enterprise Showcase & Forum Page 1 of 3  

E-print Network

IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Showcase & Forum Page 1 of 3 EMPHYMAB BIOTECH, MEDICAL THERAPIES, Pharmaceutical Product Category: Therapeutic antibody Opportunity Overview EmphymabTM Biotech was formed activities #12;EMPHYMAB BIOTECH, MEDICAL THERAPIES FOR EMPHYSEMA 19 MAR 2013, cont. Page 2 of 3 Researcher

Zhou, Yaoqi

368

"Who Am I?": Exploring Identity in Online Discussion Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identity became apparent as an important theme while investigating the role of interaction in the asynchronous discussion forums of an online post-graduate TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) education subject. Identity emerged through dialogic choices as students projected an impression of themselves, negotiated their…

Delahunty, Janine

2012-01-01

369

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V Agenda Department of Commerce  

E-print Network

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V Agenda Department of Commerce Herbert C. Hoover Building, 14th Session: Global Government Views on the Potential for Cloud Computing Technology to Transform Public VanRoekel, United States Chief Information Officer 11:15 - 11:30 USG Cloud Computing Technology

370

A Qualitative Analysis of the Lesbian Connection's Discussion Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Letters submitted to the discussion forum of the Lesbian Connection between 2000 and 2002 were analyzed to identify issues of importance to lesbians. The analysis revealed 5 discussion categories: (a) isolation, safety, and aging; (b) children; (c) lesbian relationships and sexuality; (d) physical and mental health; and (e) political issues. The…

Erwin,Terry McVannel

2006-01-01

371

Galaxy Clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8? on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations of galaxy clusters will be at locations of the peaks in the true underlying (mostly) dark matter density field. Kaiser (1984) [19] called this the high-peak model, which we demonstrate in Figure 16.1. We show a two-dimensional representation of a density field created by summing plane-waves with a predetermined power and with random wave-vector directions. In the left panel, we plot only the largest modes, where we see the density peaks (black) and valleys (white) in the combined field. In the right panel, we allow for smaller modes. You can see that the highest density peaks in the left panel contain smaller-scale, but still high-density peaks. These are the locations of future galaxy clusters. The bottom panel shows just these cluster-scale peaks. As you can see, the peaks themselves are clustered, and instead of just one large high-density peak in the original density field (see the left panel), the smaller modes show that six peaks are "born" within the broader, underlying large-scale density modes. This exemplifies the "bias" or amplified structure that is traced by galaxy clusters [19]. Clusters are rare, easy to find, and their member galaxies provide good distance estimates. In combination with their amplified clustering signal described above, galaxy clusters are considered an efficient and precise tracer of the large-scale matter density field in the Universe. Galaxy clusters can also be used to measure the baryon content of the Universe [43]. They can be used to identify gravitational lenses [38] and map the distribution of matter in clusters. The number and spatial distribution of galaxy clusters can be used to constrain cosmological parameters, like the fraction of the energy density in the Universe due to matter (Omega_matter) or the variation in the density field on fixed physical scales (sigma_8) [26,33]. The individual clusters act as “Island Universes” and as such are laboratories here we can study the evolution of the properties of the cluster, like the hot, gaseous intra-cluster medium or shapes, colors, and star-

Miller, Christopher J. Miller

2012-03-01

372

Galaxy formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies.

Silk, J.

1984-01-01

373

Detection of RD(Rio) strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) from a zoo in Brazil.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis is a chronic infection caused by strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and occurs in both animal and human populations. The death of a tapir showing purulent material and a hard mass in the lungs at necropsy raised suspicion of a potential disease caused by mycobacteria species in a Brazilian zoo. Later, two other tapirs with similar signs died and were further investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from bronco-alveolar lavages was performed, and both animals tested positive for the RD(Rio) strain of M. tuberculosis, which is a recently discovered Latin American-Mediterranean sublineage and the main cause of human tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To investigate the possibility of human infection and the source of transmission, all 50 zoo employees underwent tuberculin skin testing; four were reactive, but radiographic exams and direct sample staining did not suggest tuberculosis. Thus, direct human to animal transmission was not proven. However, the presence of RD(Rio) M. tuberculosis in tapirs highlights the lack of attention to diseases that human beings may transmit to wildlife. PMID:23272356

Murakami, Patricia Sayuri; Monego, Fernanda; Ho, John L; Gibson, Andrea; Javorouski, Manoel Lucas; Bonat, Marcelo; Lacerda, Oneida; Brockelt, Sonia Regina; Biesdorf, Sonia Maria; Nakatani, Sueli Massumi; Riediger, Irina Nastassja; Fuverki, Renata Benício Neves; Biava, Janaína Socolovski; Vieira, Rafael Felipe Costa; do Santos, Andrea Pires; de Barros Filho, Ivan Roque; Biondo, Alexander Welker

2012-12-01

374

Echinococcus multilocularis infection of a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) and a nutria (Myocastor coypus) in a French zoo.  

PubMed

Echinococcus multilocularis is a tapeworm responsible in its larval stage for alveolar echinococcosis, a disease which is lethal when left untreated. Multivesiculated parasitic lesions in the liver were diagnosed at necropsy in a captive-born nutria (Myocastor coypus) and in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) which had been in a French zoo for 16months. Molecular analyses confirmed the diagnosis of E. multilocularis obtained by histological analyses. These were the first cases of infection by E. multilocularis reported in lemurs in Europe, and the first case in nutria in European enclosures. Lemurs are confirmed to be particularly sensitive to E. multilocularis with a massive infection. In both cases, the infection appears to have been contracted in the zoo indirectly via environmental contamination by feces from roaming foxes. Due to the large endemic area for E. multilocularis, the increasing prevalence in foxes in France, and an increase in awareness of the disease, other cases of infection in captive animals will probably be recorded in France in the coming years. PMID:23994606

Umhang, Gérald; Lahoreau, Jennifer; Nicolier, Alexandra; Boué, Franck

2013-12-01

375

NASA Heliophysics Education and Public Outreach Forum Product Analysis Effort  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF) have as two of their goals to improve characterization of the contents of the Science Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach (SMD EPO) portfolio (Objective 2.1) and assist SMD in addressing gaps in the portfolio of SMD EPO products and project activities (Objective 2.2). The Heliophysics Forum has undertaken the task of product analysis for the entire heliophysics portfolio of K-12, informal, and outreach products and programs. The product analysis process determines the alignment of the portfolio to the AAAS Benchmarks. Along with the work of the other forums, the goal of this project is to conduct a "gap analysis" to ascertain how many products and programs align to the Benchmarks and to discover where the "gaps" are located, i.e. those benchmarks that are not covered sufficiently (or at all) by the portfolio. Two anticipated outcomes of this work are to inform the creation of the future online "one-stop-shop" catalogue of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) educational materials and help inform NASA EPO professionals of the need for portfolio materials to "bridge the gaps" that would address the needs of our audiences. The goal of product analysis is not to redo the work of the NASA Review processes, only to analyze the degree of alignment of these approved products to the AAAS benchmarks and a characterization of the instructional strategies and assessment tools (as well as other details) that would inform the future online catalogue. This paper highlights the product analysis process, the Heliophysics Forum team's progress, and the results of Heliophysics Forum product analysis to date.

Bartolone, L.; Nichols, M.; Withnell, H.; Ali, N. A.; Mendez, B.; Paglierani, R.; Peticolas, L.

2012-08-01

376

Starship Asterisk: APOD and General Astronomy Discussion Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A main discussion venue for the popular Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) website has been recently redesigned and upgraded. The online bulletin board is directly linked from the bottom of recent APODs served from http://apod.nasa.gov/ . Formerly known as "The Asterisk," the site's new design is called "Starship Asterisk" and now declares its forums to be places on a starship, with the current APOD considered as appearing on the main view screen on the Bridge. A central "mission" of Starship Asterisk is to support APOD in various ways. Toward this end, the Bridge forum exists primarily for the (archived) discussion of that day's APOD, the Observation Deck forum facilitates APOD image submissions, and the Library creates a forum where no student question about astronomy is considered to be too easy or too hard. Additionally, Starship Asterisk now includes an astronomy news-oriented links forum titled the Communications Center, a citizen science-oriented links collection called the Science Labs, and classrooms including a free online, textbook-free Astro 101 course, taught by the author, complete with video lectures and powerpoint slides. Typically, over 1,000 astronomy enthusiasts will browse Starship Asterisk on any given day. Although the vast majority of readers prefer to browse anonymously, the site has now garnered over 60,000 posts. A small but dedicated group of volunteer "officers" administer the bulletin board, answer questions about astronomy from curious APOD readers, and openly discuss various astronomy topics, frequently with intended humor. Perhaps surprisingly, the majority of volunteer officers tend NOT to be professional astronomers, but typically quite knowledgeable retirees exercising a lifelong interest in astronomy.

Nemiroff, Robert J.

2011-01-01

377

ZOO 4603C -Embryology & Development -Fall 2014 Section 0001: WF 09:00 -10:20 am Lecture (BA1-214) 5 Credits  

E-print Network

ZOO 4603C - Embryology & Development - Fall 2014 Section 0001: WF 09:00 - 10:20 am Lecture (BA1-214) 5 Credits Section 0011: WF 11:00 - 01:00 pm Laboratory (BIO 304) Instructor: Dr. Cynthia Bayer by the Golden Rule. Please become familiar with this document at: http

378

Baylisascaris procyonis encephalitis in Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus), crested screamers (Chauna torquata), and a western Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum epixanthus) in a Manitoba zoo  

PubMed Central

Neurological disease occurred in 4 Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus), 2 crested screamer chicks (Chauna torquata), and 1 western Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum epixanthus) at a Manitoba zoo. Baylisascaris procyonis, the common raccoon roundworm, not previously identified in Manitoba, is considered the likely cause of neural larval migrans in these cases. PMID:19043485

Thompson, Amy B.; Glover, Gordon J.; Postey, Rosemary C.; Sexsmith, Jennifer L.; Hutchison, Thomas W.S.; Kazacos, Kevin R.

2008-01-01

379

Baylisascaris procyonis encephalitis in Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus), crested screamers (Chauna torquata), and a western Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum epixanthus) in a Manitoba zoo.  

PubMed

Neurological disease occurred in 4 Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonus), 2 crested screamer chicks (Chauna torquata), and 1 western Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum epixanthus) at a Manitoba zoo. Baylisascaris procyonis, the common raccoon roundworm, not previously identified in Manitoba, is considered the likely cause of neural larval migrans in these cases. PMID:19043485

Thompson, Amy B; Glover, Gordon J; Postey, Rosemary C; Sexsmith, Jennifer L; Hutchison, Thomas W S; Kazacos, Kevin R

2008-09-01

380

210 Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 62(4) December 2005 ZooBank: the open-access register for zoological taxonomy  

E-print Network

/ 210 Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 62(4) December 2005 ZooBank: the open-access register for zoological taxonomy: Technical Discussion Paper Andrew Polaszek1 '2 , Miguel Alonso-Zarazaga3 '1 , PhilippeInternational Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, London U.K.; 2 Natural History Museum, London U.K.; 3 Museo

Mathis, Wayne N.

381

REGULATION OF INSULIN AND GLUCAGON SECRETION IN GOATS Department of Zoo%gy, State University of Groningen and Research Institute for Livestock Feeding  

E-print Network

REGULATION OF INSULIN AND GLUCAGON SECRETION IN GOATS A. de JONG Department of Zoo%gy, State ; Bassett, 1975). Furthermore, intravenous injections of VFA (except acetate) as well as glucagon result in increased glucose levels. Therefore, it might be asked whether or not VFA stimulate glucagon secretion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Crashing galaxies, cosmic fireworks  

SciTech Connect

The study of binary systems is reviewed. The history of the study of interacting galaxies, the behavior of gas in binary systems, studies to identify the processes that occur when galaxies interact, and the relationship of Seyfert galaxies and quasars to binary systems are discussed. The development of an atlas of peculiar galaxies (Arp, 1966) and methods for modeling galaxy interactions are examined.

Keel, W.C.

1989-01-01

383

Health Literacy Public Health Forums: Partners for Action. A "How-To" Guide on Designing and Implementing Health Literacy Forums at Departments of Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide provides suggestions and materials for the development and implementation of a Health Literacy Forum to be coordinated by a local, county, or state Department of Public Health. Health Literacy Forums, already implemented in several cities and states, have increased awareness about literacy skills of U.S. adults and health implications.…

Rudd, Rima E.; Zobel, Emily K.

2004-01-01

384

The SAMI Galaxy Survey: first 1000 galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey is an ongoing project to obtain integral field spectroscopic observations of ~3400 galaxies by mid-2016. Including the pilot survey, a total of ~1000 galaxies have been observed to date, making the SAMI Galaxy Survey the largest of its kind in existence. This unique dataset allows a wide range of investigations into different aspects of galaxy evolution. The first public data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey, consisting of 107 galaxies drawn from the full sample, has now been released. By giving early access to SAMI data for the entire research community, we aim to stimulate research across a broad range of topics in galaxy evolution. As the sample continues to grow, the survey will open up a new and unique parameter space for galaxy evolution studies.

Allen, J. T.

2015-02-01

385

Electronic Forum on Biotechnology in Food and Agriculture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This new site from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) complements a current series of email conferences: the Electronic Forum on Biotechnology in Food and Agriculture. The four conferences, which run from March 20 to August 20, discuss biotechnologies presently available in the crop, forestry, animal, and fish sectors (respectively) for food production and agriculture in developing countries. For the two forums completed (Conference 1) or underway (Conference 2), users can read the full background document and message logs. Users can sign up to join Conference 2 and Conferences 3 and 4 when they begin. A glossary of biotechnology terminology and contact information is also provided. For more information on current issues in biotechnology, see the May 10, 2000 Scout Report for Science & Engineering.

386

Second Annual Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) held its Second Annual Forum on September 23-24, 1994. The forum consisted of two days of technical sessions with invited talks, submitted talks, and a student poster session. Participants in the technical sessions included students and researchers from CCNY/CUNY, Fisk University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hampton University, University of Maryland, the Univeristy of Michigan, NASA Langley Research Center, North Caroline A and T University, Steven's Institute of Technology, and NAWC-Warminster. Topics included chaotic lasers, pumped optical filters, nonlinear responses in polythiophene and thiophene based thin films, crystal growth and spectroscopy, laser-induced photochromic centers, raman scattering in phorphyrin, superradiance, doped fluoride crystals, luminescence of terbium in silicate glass, and radiative and nonradiative transitions in rare-earth ions.

Allario, Frank (editor); Temple, Doyle (editor)

1995-01-01

387

Galaxy formation  

PubMed Central

It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ? 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

Peebles, P. J. E.

1998-01-01

388

2007 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology  

E-print Network

1 $40.8M $60.2M $71.0M $83.7M $91.4M $101.2M 2007 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology Our Nation's Transportation Infrastructure: Heading Toward a Crisis? A SummAry rePOrT 14.2% 17 as Key Factor Affecting U.S. Transportation Infrastructure U of M Researchers Share Views

Minnesota, University of

389

Welcome ASCO Community Research Forum members! | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

The American Society of Clinical Oncology sponsors a 'Community Research Forum', designed to provide community-based researchers an opportunity to unite and develop solutions to common challenges to conducting research. A hearty group of souls has been working hard over the past year to compile a great list of online resources to facilitate the conduct and management of clinical trials in the community setting. The site is designed for physician investigators and research staff.

390

Higher Education Resources from the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of individual NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects and their teams into a coherent, effective, efficient, and sustainable effort. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. Here we describe how the Astrophysics Forum and the Astrophysics E/PO community have focused efforts to support and engage the higher education community on enhancing awareness of the resources available to them. To ensure Astrophysics higher education efforts are grounded in audience needs, we held informal conversations with instructors of introductory astronomy courses, convened sessions with higher education faculty and E/PO professionals at conferences, and examined existing literature and findings of the SMD Higher Education Working Group. To address the expressed needs, the Astrophysics Forum collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for higher education audiences. Among these resources are two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets. These fields are ripe with scientific developments that college instructors have told us they find challenging to stay current. Each guide includes a wide variety of sources and is available through the ASP website: http://www.astrosociety.org/education/astronomy-resource-guides/ To complement the resource guides, we are developing a series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries from individual SMD Astrophysics missions in their classrooms. The “Astro 101 slide sets” are 5-7 slide presentations on a new development or discovery from a NASA SMD Astrophysics mission relevant to an Astronomy 101 topic. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new, unfamiliar developments (discoveries not yet in their textbooks) into the “big-picture” context of the course.

Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schultz, Gregory R.; Manning, James; Smith, Denise A.; Bianchi, Luciana; Blair, William P.; Fraknoi, Andrew

2014-06-01

391

Submillimeter Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Universe was a more exciting place at moderate to high redshifts z˜3, after reionization took place, but before the present day galaxy properties were firmly established. From a wide variety of directions, we are gaining insight into the Universe at these epochs. Less gas was sequestered into stars and had been ejected into the interstellar medium as weakly emitting, slowly cooling debris, because a significant amount of star formation and supermassive blackhole growth in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was still to occur. Furthermore, the processes that shape today’s galaxies were at work, and can be seen in real time with the appropriate tools. The most active regions of galaxies at these redshifts are deeply obscured at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths by an opaque interstellar medium (ISM) that absorbs most of their radiation, and then re-emits at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths. This emission provides us with a very powerful probe of the regions within galaxies where the most intense activity takes place; both their total energy output, and from spectroscopy, about the physics and chemistry of the atomic and molecular gas that fuels, hides and surrounds these regions. This information is unique, but not complete: radio, mid- and near-IR, optical and X-ray observations each provide unique complementary views. Nevertheless, probing the obscured Universe, with the Atacama Large (Sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Herschel Space Observatory, Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and missions and telescopes that are not yet in construction, like an actively cooled sub-10-m class IR space telescope and a 25-m class ground-based submillimeter/THz telescope (CCAT) will provide a more complete picture of in which neighborhoods, by what means and how quickly the most vigorous bursts of activity take place.

Blain, A. W.

2009-12-01

392

Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

1994-01-01

393

The Belmont Forum - Facilitating International Collaboration through New Funding Opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Belmont Forum is an international group of the world's main funders of environmental change research and international science councils, committed to 'delivering knowledge needed for action to avoid and adapt to detrimental environmental change, including extreme hazardous events.' It aims to do so by mobilizing international resources at a scale that matches this challenge 'in order to catalyze delivery of the environmental science-derived solutions that society needs.' To achieve this goal, the member countries of the Belmont Forum have formed a new working partnership that launched the International Opportunities Fund (IOF) - an open call for proposals with focus themes and the intention of new themes for a new funding round each year. The IOF effectively lowers the activation energy needed for international collaboration while preserving national control over funding monies that stay within borders. This mechanism enables international collaboration to tackle global problems, while removing barriers such as the uncertainty of multiple proposal review processes for funding when partners from multiple countries wish to collaborate. During this presentation, perspectives on the Belmont Forum process will be shared, including the development of research themes for the IOF calls, mechanisms for collaboration, methods of information dissemination to various communities, lessons learned, and plans for future cooperation.

von Schneidemesser, E.

2012-12-01

394

The formation of galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current models of galaxy formation are examined in a review of recent observational and theoretical studies. Observational data on elliptical galaxies, disk galaxies, luminosity functions, clustering, and angular fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background are summarized. Theoretical aspects discussed include the origin and early evolution of small fluctuations, matter and radiation fluctuations, the formation of large-scale structure, dissipationless galaxy formation, galaxy mergers, dissipational galaxy formation, and the implications of particle physics (GUTs, massive neutrinos, and gravitinos) for cosmology.

Efstathiou, G.; Silk, J.

1983-01-01

395

4 Gy of Mantle Recycling: Evolution of Species in the Mantle Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reigning 'Standard Model' for Earth's chemically heterogeneous mantle is that of Hofmann and White (1982). Oceanic lithosphere is subducted into the mantle, and sequestered somewhere there to age and evolve for aeons. Various 'species' of the resulting mantle heterogeneity have been taxonomically classified: the depleted upper mantle (DMM), a radiogenic Pb species (HIMU), a ubiquitous high 3He/4He species (FOZO) and several enriched species (EM1, EM2). The ongoing challenge has been to correlate these various time-evolved species with their parental lithospheric components, and to define their existing length scales and lithologies. Parental inputs (and initial length scales) include: sediments (1-2 km), oceanic or continental crust (5-50 km), depleted and/or metasomatized oceanic or subcontinental mantle (~ 100 km). The largest scale of observed mantle heterogeneity (1000's of km, e.g. the DUPAL anomaly) may only reflect domains that are richer in some of these smaller components. The smallest scale of mantle heterogeneity (sub-meter?) may result from stretching and thinning during dynamic stirring, or veining during metasomatism or melt migration. Scale length constraints are seriously confounded by the 5-50 km scale of melt sampling and mixing. Yet heterogeneities on virtually all possible scales are evidenced in erupted melts, from phenocryst-hosted melt inclusions (sub-mm) to the DUPAL scale. The chemical mapping between erupted melts and mantle sources remains an enduring frontier. DMM is our best mapped and understood mantle domain. While it doubtless contains recycled materials, it is dominantly a residue of extraction and sequestration of floatable (continental crust) and sinkable (oceanic crust) material. With a stirring time of less than 1 Gy, it also retains an indelible memory of more ancient evolution. The Hofmann-White model invoked recycled sediment (continental crust) as a parent for EM2. This has been spectacularly confirmed by Jackson et al (2007) for Samoan lavas that show the undeniable presence of an ancient sediment component. The parentage of EM1 and HIMU are less certain. While typically ascribed to recycled sediment and ocean crust, respectively, adequate models for their derivation and evolution still invoke believable but ad hoc chemical processing during subduction. Recycled metasomatized lower oceanic mantle lithosphere is an alternative model for EM1, with perhaps a similar believability quotient. FOZO was discovered hiding in the mantle zoo post-Hofmann and White 1982, and is perhaps the least understood of the mantle critters. Numerous models and variants exist for FOZO; many involve recycled components and most require ancient processing ages. FOZO unequivocally is not 'primordial' mantle. My current world view: DMM - depleted upper mantle, perhaps containing small meter-scale mafic lithologies. FOZO - very ancient ubiquitous meso- scale (50-100 km) lower mantle association of recycled lithospheric peridotites and highly refractory mafic crust. HIMU - similar, but containing mafic crust that is less processed during subduction. EM1 - old metasomatized lower oceanic lithosphere. EM2 - peridotite with recycled continental crustal components. In any of these species, the mafic or metasomatic components need not exist as separate lithologies, but may be subsumed into a single peridotitic lithology. HIMU, EM1 and EM2 exist in their most pure-bred forms in the lower mantle piles demarcated seismically as the Pacific and African Superplumes. A mantle regime change occurred ~ 1.8 Gy ago, leading to increased plume access to these piles.

Hart, S. R.

2008-12-01

396

What Influences Patient Participation in an Online Forum for Weight Loss Surgery? A Qualitative Case Study  

PubMed Central

Background Many patients who undergo weight loss (bariatric) surgery seek information and social support in online discussion forums, but the vast amount of available information raises concerns about the impact of such information. A secure online discussion forum was developed and offered to bariatric surgery patients. The forum was moderated and allowed contact with peers and health care professionals. Objective The purposes of this study were to explore how individuals undergoing bariatric surgery used the moderated discussion forum and to better understand what influenced their participation in the forum. Methods The study was designed as an explorative case study. We conducted participant observation of the discussion forum over a time period of approximately six months. For further insight, we carried out in-depth semistructured interviews with seven patients who had access to the forum. We analyzed the material inductively, using content and thematic analysis. Results The patients used the forum as an arena in which to interact with peers and providers, as well as to provide and achieve informational and social support. The analysis suggests that there are three major themes that influenced participation in the online discussion forum: (1) the participant’s motivation to seek information, advice, and guidance, (2) the need for social support and networking among peers, and (3) concerns regarding self-disclosure. Conclusions The findings of this study imply that a moderated discussion forum for bariatric surgery patients has potential for use in a therapeutic context. The discussion forum fulfilled the informational and support needs of the bariatric surgery patients and was particularly useful for those who excluded themselves from the traditional program and experienced barriers to expressing their own needs. Even though our findings imply that the patients benefitted from using the forum regardless of their active or passive participation, restraining factors, such as considerations regarding self-disclosure, must be further investigated to prevent certain users from being precluded from participation. PMID:24509408

Faxvaag, Arild

2014-01-01

397

Optimization of knowledge sharing through multi-forum using cloud computing architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge sharing is done through various knowledge sharing forums which requires multiple logins through multiple browser instances. Here a single Multi-Forum knowledge sharing concept is introduced which requires only one login session which makes user to connect multiple forums and display the data in a single browser window. Also few optimization techniques are introduced here to speed up the access time using cloud computing architecture.

Madapusi Vasudevan, Sriram; Sankaran, Srivatsan; Muthuswamy, Shanmugasundaram; Ram, N. Sankar

2011-12-01

398

2014 First-trimester ultrasound forum from the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology  

PubMed Central

A first-trimester ultrasound scan has become an essential part of antenatal care. The Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology held a first-trimester ultrasound forum on April 5, 2014. The forum aimed to present an updated review of the literature on the topic of first-trimester ultrasound in specific lectures and to host a panel discussion on several important issues regarding first-trimester scans. The forum provided evidence- and consensus-based best practice patterns for obstetricians in Korea. Here, we report the review and checklists presented from the forum. PMID:25629012

Oh, Soo-Young; Hong, Joon Seok; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hwang, Han Sung; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Kunwoo; Ko, Hyun Sun; Kwak, Dong-Wook; Kim, Moon Young; Park, Mi Hye; Oh, Min Jeong; Park, Joong Shin

2015-01-01

399

Simulations of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing by SDSS Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weak gravitational lensing is a powerful probe of the amount and distribution of dark matter in the universe. Here we present results of simulations of galaxy-galaxy lensing using large, contiguous regions of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We compute the expected galaxy-galaxy lensing signal due to the SDSS galaxies (zmed ~ 0.1) on a plane of source galaxies with fixed redshift (zsource = 0.4), and we explicitly compute the net weak lensing shear for each source due to all foreground galaxies. This is important because previous work has shown that in typical galaxy-galaxy lensing data sets, background sources have been lensed at a comparable level by two or more foreground galaxies and, for a given source, the lens with the smallest impact parameter is frequently not the dominate lens. We model the dark matter halos of the lens galaxies by Navarro, Frenk & White profiles, where the virial masses and concentration parameters are obtained from known scaling relations of the galaxy luminosity and rest frame color. The coordinates and redshifts (spectroscopic where available, photometric otherwise) of the lens galaxies are assigned using the SDSS values. We compute the mean tangential shear, ?T(?), using the final, lensed shapes of the source galaxies and we explore the degree to which ??(?) = ?c ?T(?), where ??(?) is the mean excess surface mass density and ?c is the mean critical surface mass density. We find that when ?c is simply computed as a mean over all lenses, the excess surface mass density inferred from the mean tangential shear tends to underestimate the actual excess surface mass density.

Harrison, Brandon; Brainerd, Tereasa G.

2015-01-01

400

Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) to a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and humans in an Australian zoo.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is primarily a pathogen of humans. Infections have been reported in animal species and it is emerging as a significant disease of elephants in the care of humans. With the close association between humans and animals, transmission can occur. In November 2010, a clinically healthy Asian elephant in an Australian zoo was found to be shedding M. tuberculosis; in September 2011, a sick chimpanzee at the same zoo was diagnosed with tuberculosis caused by an indistinguishable strain of M. tuberculosis. Investigations included staff and animal screening. Four staff had tuberculin skin test conversions associated with spending at least 10 hours within the elephant enclosure; none had disease. Six chimpanzees had suspected infection. A pathway of transmission between the animals could not be confirmed. Tuberculosis in an elephant can be transmissible to people in close contact and to other animals more remotely. The mechanism for transmission from elephants requires further investigation. PMID:23537562

Stephens, N; Vogelnest, L; Lowbridge, C; Christensen, A; Marks, G B; Sintchenko, V; McAnulty, J

2013-07-01

401

Galaxy Groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}? } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{?}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

Tully, R. Brent

2015-02-01

402

Forum draws attention to water supply in the developing world  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Big water companies quit poor countrieshttp://society.guardian.co.uk/aid/story/0,,1736649,00.html?gusrc=rss10,000 protest at water summithttp://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/16D30D0D-916D-4484-9C3B-EA56CE20A7C0.htmWater with strings attachedhttp://politics.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1736247,00.html4th World Water Forum [Real Player, pdf]http://www.worldwaterforum4.org.mx/home/home.aspWorld Water Day [pdf]http://www.worldwaterday.org/It goes without saying that water is an essential aspect of everyday life, but for literally billions of people in the world, securing even small amounts of water is tremendously difficult, if not impossible. As the 4th World Water Forum concluded this week in Mexico City, there were a number of questions that remained on the minds of a number of organizations, policy groups, protestors, and other concerned parties. One question that was particularly vexing was the fact that in recent years, a number of large private multinational companies had been purchasing municipal water systems, particularly in the developing world, and then making significant rate increases. This development was not one lost on concerned citizens and activists either, as close to 10,000 demonstrated in Mexico City, chanting, â??Water is not for sale!â? While well intended, the chant might have been a bit inaccurate, as bottled water is frequently for sale in the developing world, and often it is the only kind that is drinkable. Of course, as one official pointed out at the Forum, bottled water is exponentially more expensive than providing tap water through a municipally held water facility. The first site will take visitors to a good article on the provisioning of water by multinational companies to the worldâ??s poor from this Wednesdayâ??s San Jose Mercury-News. The second link leads visitors to a piece from The Guardian, which reviews a recent report from the UN that discusses how a number of companies have withdrawn from the business of supplying water in the developing world. The third link leads to a piece from Al-Jazeera on the recent protest at the World Water Forum in Mexico City. The fourth link whisks visitors away to a trenchant opinion piece about the lack of safe water supplies in the developing world authored by Joanne Green, a public policy adviser at the Tearfund organization. The fifth link leads to the homepage of the 4th World Water Forum. Here, visitors can learn about the different sessions offered at the Forum, and also review a number of working papers and archived webcasts. The final link leads to the homepage of World Water Day, where visitors can learn about the event, and examine a number of fact sheets on the state of the worldâ??s water.

Grinnell, Max

2006-01-01

403

Urgent call for further breeding of the relic zoo population of the critically endangered Barbary lion ( Panthera leo leo Linnaeus 1758)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Barbary lion became extinct in the wild around 1942. Since the end of the 19th century, a last purebred captive breeding\\u000a stock existed at the court of Morocco. The rest of these animals became the core exhibition of the new Rabat Zoo after passing\\u000a through repeated bottlenecks and possibly some introgression events by foreign lions. This study uses mitochondrial

Joachim Burger; Helmut Hemmer

2006-01-01

404

The Universe of Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is a collection of lecture notes for a course called the universe of galaxies. These notes discuss the integrated properties, classification, stellar and gaseous content of galxies; galaxies within, gasesous content, and the evolution of clusters of galaxies; QSOs, Seyfert nuclei, radio galaxies, and the central engine of active nuclei; the Gunn-Peterson effect and QSO absorption systems; observations and theories of galaxy formation and evolution; cosmological models, dark matter, and gravitational lensing.

Keel, William

2005-05-23

405

77 FR 7132 - Request for Applicants for the Appointment to the United States-India CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for the Appointment to the United States- India CEO Forum AGENCY: Market Access and Compliance...2005, the Governments of the United States and India established the U.S.-India CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2012-02-10

406

78 FR 65290 - Request for Applicants for the Appointment to the United States-India CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for the Appointment to the United States- India CEO Forum AGENCY: Global Markets, International...2005, the Governments of the United States and India established the U.S.-India CEO Forum. On February 10, 2012, we...

2013-10-31

407

76 FR 65696 - Request for Applicants for the Appointment to the United States-Brazil CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for the Appointment to the United States- Brazil CEO Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...2007, the Governments of the United States and Brazil established the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2011-10-24

408

75 FR 78338 - Meeting of the United States-Oman Joint Forum on Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...7261] Meeting of the United States-Oman Joint Forum on Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United States-Oman Memorandum of Understanding on Environmental...Notice of the meeting of the U.S.-Oman Joint Forum on Environmental...

2010-12-15

409

78 FR 54453 - Notice of Public Meeting-Intersection of Cloud Computing and Mobility Forum and Workshop  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Meeting--Intersection of Cloud Computing and Mobility Forum and Workshop...INFORMATION: NIST hosted six prior Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop events in May...Government's experience with cloud computing, report on the status of...

2013-09-04

410

NASA-HBCU Space Science and Engineering Research Forum Proceedings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) forum are presented. A wide range of research topics from plant science to space science and related academic areas was covered. The sessions were divided into the following subject areas: Life science; Mathematical modeling, image processing, pattern recognition, and algorithms; Microgravity processing, space utilization and application; Physical science and chemistry; Research and training programs; Space science (astronomy, planetary science, asteroids, moon); Space technology (engineering, structures and systems for application in space); Space technology (physics of materials and systems for space applications); and Technology (materials, techniques, measurements).

Sanders, Yvonne D. (editor); Freeman, Yvonne B. (editor); George, M. C. (editor)

1989-01-01

411

New England Wind Forum, Volume 1, Issue 1 -- January 2006  

SciTech Connect

The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 1 features an interview with Brother Joseph of Portsmouth Abbey. A commercial-scale Vestas V47 wind turbine will soon be installed on the grounds of the Benedictine monastery and prep school in Rhode Island, with the assistance of a grant from the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund. This will be the first large-scale turbine located behind the customer meter in the region.

Not Available

2006-01-01

412

Using non-invasive methods to characterize gonadal hormonal patterns of southern three-banded armadillos (Tolypeutes matacus) housed in North American zoos.  

PubMed

Understanding the basic reproductive biology and limitations to successful breeding of the southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus) is necessary to maintain viable zoo populations. Our objectives were to: 1) describe the reproductive biology using non-invasive, fecal hormone analysis; 2) assess influence of season on gonadal hormonal patterns in both the sexes; 3) characterize reproductive cyclicity and pregnancy in the female; and 4) characterize the onset of sexual maturity in males. Nineteen armadillos were monitored including: 13 (7 males, 6 females) from Lincoln Park Zoo and six (3 males, 3 females) from San Antonio Zoological Garden. Fecal samples (n=5220; 275/animal/yr) were collected 5 to 7 times a week for 1 year. Hormones were extracted from feces and analyzed for progestagen (females) and androgen (males) metabolite concentrations using enzyme immunoassays. Mean estrous cycle length (26.4±1.3 days) did not vary (P<0.05) among individuals (n=9). Mean gestation length (n=3) was 114.0±0.6 days long with mean fecal progestagen metabolites increasing 10-fold during pregnancy. Seasons did not influence (P<0.05) fecal androgen or progestagen metabolites. These data can assist with management decisions, which will directly affect the success of this species in zoos. PMID:23541612

Howell-Stephens, J; Bernier, D; Brown, J S; Mulkerin, D; Santymire, R M

2013-05-01

413

Serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, vitamins A and E, and carotenoids in six canid and four ursid species at four zoos.  

PubMed

Nutritional status for six captive canid species (n=34) and four captive ursid species (n=18) were analyzed. The species analyzed included: African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), arctic fox (Alopex lagopus), gray wolf (Canis lupus), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baleiyi), red wolf (Canis rufus), brown bear (Ursus arctos), polar bear (Ursus maritimus), spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus), and sun bear (Ursus malayanus). Diet information was collected for these animals from each participating zoo (Brookfield Zoo, Fort Worth Zoo, Lincoln Park Zoological Gardens, and North Carolina Zoological Park). The nutritional composition of the diet for each species at each institution met probable dietary requirements. Blood samples were collected from each animal and analyzed for vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D, vitamin A (retinol, retinyl stearate, retinyl palmitate), vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol) and selected carotenoids. Family differences were found for 25(OH)D, retinol, retinyl stearate, retinyl palmitate and gamma-tocopherol. Species differences were found for all detectable measurements. Carotenoids were not detected in any species. The large number of animals contributing to these data, provides a substantial base for comparing the nutritional status of healthy animals and the differences among them. PMID:11137448

Crissey, S; Ange, K; Slifka, K; Bowen, P; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, M; Langman, C; Sadler, W; Ward, A

2001-01-01

414

Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence. Forum on Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report constitutes one of the first activities of the Forum on Adolescence, a cross-cutting activity of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council of the National Academies. Established under the auspices of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, the forum's overarching mission is to synthesize, analyze, and evaluate…

Kipke, Michele D., Ed.

415

Forum on Flexible Education. Reaching Nomadic Populations in Africa. Summary Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the Forum on Flexible Education: Reaching Nomadic Populations in Africa, which was held in Garissa, Kenya, from 20-23 June 2006. The objectives of the Forum were to share experiences and best practices, create linkages and encourage collaboration in order to make education more accessible to nomadic communities.…

de Souza, Alba

2007-01-01

416

Providing Adequate Interactions in Online Discussion Forums Using Few Teaching Assistants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to encourage students to participate in online learning forums, prompt responses to their questions are essential. To answer students' online questions, teaching assistants are assigned to manage discussions and answer questions in online learning forums. To minimize the response time, many teaching assistants may be needed to interact…

Chang, Chih-Kai; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Hsu, Ching-Kun

2011-01-01

417

Debating Global Warming in Media Discussion Forums: Strategies Enacted by "Persistent Deniers" and Implications for Schooling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Newspapers and other media are often used as a source of information on science issues, both by the public and teachers in classrooms. Over six months, we collected discussions of global warming issues from the online forums of a national newspaper. Our analysis of these contributions suggests there is a considerable effort in these forums

Bowen, G. Michael; Rodger, Valerie

2008-01-01

418

The Creative Writing Forum--High Schools and Colleges Working Together.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Creative Writing Forum of Essex Community College is a cooperative venture sponsored by three community colleges and the public school system in Baltimore County, Maryland, in which presentations and workshops are given by a featured creative writer and a scholarship to a community college is awarded. The forum was designed to remind high…

Starr, Al

419

The Education Reform Act 1988: Success or Failure? A Short Report of a BELMAS Discussion Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty years after the introduction of the 1988 Education Reform Act (ERA), BELMAS (British Educational Leadership, Management & Administration Society) held a discussion forum for academics, teachers and all those interested in education policy and practice. Was the ERA a success or a failure? The one-day forum of presentations and discussions in…

Strain, Michael

2009-01-01

420

Proceedings of the 1998 Migrant Farmworker Stream Forums: Annual Midwest Farmworker Stream Forum (8th, San Antonio, Texas, November 5-8, 1998); Annual East Coast Migrant Stream Forum (11th, Springfield, Massachusetts, November 13-15, 1998); Annual Western Migrant Stream Forum (8th, Sacramento, California, January 29-31, 1999).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers, advocates, and clinicians met at the three 1998 migrant stream forums to develop strategies for farmworker health research. The introductory section of this proceedings discusses this year's focus--building research partnerships to improve migrant health--and describes planning and implementation of the forums' research track.…

National Center for Farmworker Health, Inc., Austin, TX.

421

NASA Scientific Forum on Climate Variability and Global Change: UNISPACE 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Forum on Climate Variability and Global Change is intended to provide a glimpse into some of the advances made in our understanding of key scientific and environmental issues resulting primarily from improved observations and modeling on a global basis. This publication contains the papers presented at the forum.

Schiffer, Robert A.; Unninayar, Sushel

1999-01-01

422

TRANSPORTATION IN RURAL AMERICA...CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM  

E-print Network

TRANSPORTATION IN RURAL AMERICA...CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM on Transportation Policy & Technology 2004 A Summary Report #12;June 2004 TOTHE READER, This report summarizes the third James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we examined

Minnesota, University of

423

Breaking the Barriers: Linking Children and Nature. Report of the Forum (October 1988).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Roger Tory Peterson Institute is concerned with creating experiences in which children face the mysteries and wonders of the natural world and understand their connection with nature. The purpose of the forum was to support the growth of these experiences and the people who create them. The forum covered three broad topics: (1) visions for the…

Roger Tory Peterson Inst. of Natural History, Inc., Jamestown, NY.

424

Getting Started with The Math Forum Problems of the Week Library. Teacher's Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Math Forum Problems of the Week Library is designed to leverage the power of interactive technology to hold student interest while increasing their success as strategic thinkers. The Math Forum Library is an online source of non-routine challenges in which problem solving and mathematical communication are key elements of every problem. This…

Math Forum @ Drexel, 2009

2009-01-01

425

The Public Library as a Public Forum: The (De)Evolution of a Legal Doctrine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When dealing with First Amendment free speech issues in the context of public libraries, courts have merely cited the supposition that constitutional public forum analysis leads to the conclusion that the public library is a limited public forum for the purposes of First Amendment analysis. By focusing narrowly on the issue of whether Internet…

Gathegi, John N.

2005-01-01

426

Incentivizing Participation in Online Forums for Education Arpita Ghosh, Cornell University  

E-print Network

X Incentivizing Participation in Online Forums for Education Arpita Ghosh, Cornell University Jon Kleinberg, Cornell University We present a game-theoretic model for online forums for education, where of students in the class. 1. INTRODUCTION The increasing use of online applications for education raises

Kleinberg, Jon

427

Forum Analysis in Cyberspace: The Case of Public Sector Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the uncertainty surrounding the application of the First Amendment to electronic bulletin boards, listservs, electronic conferences, and other exchanges of electronic information at public colleges and universities. Applies the notions of nonpublic forums and designated open forums to the computer network. (MLF)

Beckham, Joseph C.; Schmid, William, Jr.

1995-01-01

428

MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH FORUM AND POSTER DAY KECK SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH FORUM AND POSTER DAY KECK SCHOOL OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA The 2011 Medical Student Research Forum and Poster Day is an annual event which allows USC Medical and Robert Decker, Ph.D., Director of Medical Student Research Training, for their support and participation

Zhang, Li I.

429

Ai Dreams Forum Robotics Robotics News DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge Winners Please login or register.  

E-print Network

Ai Dreams Forum » Robotics » Robotics News » DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge Winners Please login or register. home forum help search calendar media login register DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge Winners Author Topic: DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge Winners (Read 92 times) 0 Tyler Trusty Member Senior

Stryk, Oskar von

430

A Bit More to It: Scholarly Communication Forums as Socio-Technical Interaction Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the conceptual models that help to understand the development and sustainability of scholarly and professional communication forums on the Internet. An alternative information processing model that considers information technologies as Socio-Technical Interaction Networks (STINs) and a method for modeling electronic forums as STINs are…

Kling, Rob; McKim, Geoffrey; King, Adam

2003-01-01

431

A Review of Research Methods for Assessing Content of Computer-Mediated Discussion Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies are becoming increasingly important components of online educational environments (Romiszowski & Mason, 2004). The online discussion forum that is a significant component of many web-based courses is one type of CMC. Instructors and students rely on these asynchronous forums to engage one another…

Marra, Rose

2006-01-01

432

Alaska Justice Forum 18(3), Fall 2001 1 INSIDE THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

Unmasked, an insider's account of transitional justice in post-apartheid South Africa (page 2Alaska Justice Forum 18(3), Fall 2001 1 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE · A review of South Africa Justice Forum 18(3), Fall 2001 Review Essay: A Country Unmasked: Inside South Africa's Truth

Pantaleone, Jim

433

Classification via Clustering for Predicting Final Marks Based on Student Participation in Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper proposes a classification via clustering approach to predict the final marks in a university course on the basis of forum data. The objective is twofold: to determine if student participation in the course forum can be a good predictor of the final marks for the course and to examine whether the proposed classification via clustering…

Lopez, M. I.; Luna, J. M.; Romero, C.; Ventura, S.

2012-01-01

434

Great Expectations: Reforming Urban High Schools. An Education Forum with Urban Educators and Leaders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from a forum held in 2000 with urban educators representing 15 districts nationwide. The forum, which was facilitated by educational researchers from Columbia University's Teachers College, shared best practices for reforming high poverty urban high schools and reviewed the Department of Education's "Transforming…

Lewis, Sharon; Baker, Nicole D.; Jepson, Jack; Casserly, Mike; Powell, Linda C.; Barrengos, John R.; Johnson, Judith; Eisner, Caroline, Ed.

435

The Nuts and Bolts of a Forum Spam Automator Youngsang Shin, Minaxi Gupta, Steven Myers  

E-print Network

@indiana.edu Abstract Web boards, blogs, wikis, and guestbooks are forums fre- quented and contributed to by many Web bots, all while keeping the spammer hidden. Insights gained from our study suggest specific measures is a website where visitors can contribute content. Examples of forums include web boards, blogs, wikis

Gupta, Minaxi

436

Home News Reviews Advice Member Reviews Forum Shop Competitions Site Sections... Categories... Manufacturers  

E-print Network

Home News Reviews Advice Member Reviews Forum Shop Competitions Find by: Site Sections... Categories... Manufacturers Home » News > News and comment Friday 15 February 2008 | Personalise | Help Free The Plasma Centre Russ Andrews Hi-Fi and Home Cinema accessories Ricam Store Forum Hot Threads NEWS

Rogers, John A.

437

Internet discussion forums as part of a student-centred teaching concept of pharmacology  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The world wide web opens up new opportunities to interconnect electronic and classroom teaching and to promote active student participation. In this project article we describe the use of internet discussion forums as part of a student-centred teaching concept of pharmacology and discuss its advantages and disadvantages based on evaluation data and current literature. Methods and Results: Final year medical students at the Technische Universität München (Munich, Germany) with the elective pharmacology moderated an internet forum that allowed all students to discuss pharmacology-related questions. Evaluation results of forum participants and elective students demonstrated a learning benefit of internet forums in pharmacology teaching. Conclusion: Internet discussion forums offer an easy-to-implement and effective way to actively engage students and increase the learning benefit of electronic and classroom teaching in pharmacology. PMID:23467549

Sucha, Michael; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

2013-01-01

438

Go Polar! Network: a Museum-Zoo-Aquarium Approach to Disseminate IPY Research to Children and their Families  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With proper programming, informal learning environments of children's museums, zoos and aquariums can be fertile frontiers for communicating the excitement, the significance and even the complexity of Polar scientific research to the public, including children under 12 old. These venues can also be effective in enhancing public understanding of the global dimensions of the issues facing the Polar Regions in the coming decades. We base these assertions not just on scholarly research in how children learn in informal environments but also from an experiential program we created in 2003-04 called Go Polar! Cool Science in the Arctic. Funded by the US National Science Foundation in 2003 (ESI-0336928), Go Polar! was a partnership between the EdVenture Children Museum, the largest children's museum in the southeastern US, and the University of South Carolina, the State's largest research university. Go Polar! involved active Arctic researchers, university undergraduate students, the EdVenture museum staff, family education specialists, and educational psychologists to disseminate on-going NSF funded research on the Arctic hydrologic cycle (ODP-0229737). The Go Polar program provided opportunities for South Carolina children and families to meet real scientists engaged in Arctic research with hands-on activities that introduced children and families not only to the scientific process but also to new science concepts and knowledge. The Go Polar! also resulted in the development and testing of new educational materials Arctic Discovery Boxes specially designed hands-on informal education activities on three themes #1 The Arctic and Global Change, #2 Arctic Cultures and #3 Animal Adaptations in the Arctic. In 2005 the Go Polar! partnership expanded the reach of their programming and materials to include the Antarctic. Using the theme "Exploring and Connecting the Opposite Ends of the Earth," the Go Polar! team created a Polar Festival featuring a giant floor puzzle of the Arctic and Antarctic with the ocean basins and surrounding continents connecting the poles (http://schc.sc.edu/gopolar/). Having received endorsement from the IPY Education and Outreach Committee, our plans are to disseminate the Go Polar! programming through a national and even international network of museums, zoos and aquariums.

Williams, D. D.; Horne, C.

2006-12-01

439

Ko University Social Impact Forum is looking for Post-Doctoral Research Fellows September 2013-September 2015  

E-print Network

1 Koç University Social Impact Forum is looking for Post-Doctoral Research Fellows September 2013-September 2015 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Position at Koç University Social Impact Forum Location: Koç University Rumeli Feneri Campus, stanbul, Turkey Koç University Social Impact Forum (KUSIF) was founded

Wu, Yih-Min

440

An Analysis of Underground Forums Marti Motoyama, Damon McCoy, Kirill Levchenko, Stefan Savage and Geoffrey M. Voelker  

E-print Network

An Analysis of Underground Forums Marti Motoyama, Damon McCoy, Kirill Levchenko, Stefan Savage ABSTRACT Underground forums, where participants exchange information on abusive tactics and engage- ditional OSNs such as Facebook, in underground forums the pat- tern of communications does not simply

Savage, Stefan

441

Negative emotions boost user activity at BBC forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an empirical study of user activity in online BBC discussion forums, measured by the number of posts written by individual debaters and the average sentiment of these posts. Nearly 2.5 million posts from over 18 thousand users were investigated. Scale-free distributions were observed for activity in individual discussion threads as well as for overall activity. The number of unique users in a thread normalized by the thread length decays with thread length, suggesting that thread life is sustained by mutual discussions rather than by independent comments. Automatic sentiment analysis shows that most posts contain negative emotions and the most active users in individual threads express predominantly negative sentiments. It follows that the average emotion of longer threads is more negative and that threads can be sustained by negative comments. An agent-based computer simulation model has been used to reproduce several essential characteristics of the analyzed system. The model stresses the role of discussions between users, especially emotionally laden quarrels between supporters of opposite opinions, and represents many observed statistics of the forum.

Chmiel, Anna; Sobkowicz, Pawel; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Thelwall, Mike; Ho?yst, Janusz A.

2011-08-01

442

Report from a forum on US heart allocation policy.  

PubMed

Since the latest revision in US heart allocation policy (2006), the landscape and volume of transplant waitlists have changed considerably. Advances in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) prolong survival, but Status 1A mortality remains high. Several patient subgroups may be disadvantaged by current listing criteria and geographical disparity remains in waitlist time. This forum on US heart allocation policy was organized to discuss these issues and highlight concepts for consideration in the policy development process. A 25-question survey on heart allocation policy was conducted. Among attendees/respondents were 84 participants with clinical/published experience in heart transplant representing 51 US transplant centers, and OPTN/UNOS and SRTR representatives. The survey results and forum discussions demonstrated very strong interest in change to a further-tiered system, accounting for disadvantaged subgroups and lowering use of exceptions. However, a heart allocation score is not yet viable due to the long-term viability of variables (used in the score) in an ever-developing field. There is strong interest in more refined prioritization of patients with MCS complications, highly sensitized patients and those with severe arrhythmias or restrictive physiology. There is also strong interest in distribution by geographic boundaries modified according to population. Differences of opinion exist between small and large centers. PMID:25534656

Kobashigawa, J A; Johnson, M; Rogers, J; Vega, J D; Colvin-Adams, M; Edwards, L; Meyer, D; Luu, M; Reinsmoen, N; Dipchand, A I; Feldman, D; Kormos, R; Mancini, D; Webber, S

2015-01-01

443

[Position Paper of the Youth Forum DGOU 2010 - part 2].  

PubMed

The aim of the "Youth Forum of the DGOU" during the Convention 2010 in Heidelberg was to place a statement concerning the professional politics in the field of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery. The Bologna Process realizes a standardization of the academic training within the European Union. For medicine this concept would raise the opportunity to opt out after three years with a bachelor degree applying for alternative occupations within the health care system. However, these alternative occupations are rarely defined and, in addition, the current structure of medical school in Germany provides the highest possible education for doctors in a direct and very well established way. Thus, reforming medical school in Germany into a Bachelor-master's system is an ambivalent approach, which considers a thorough reappraisal. There is currently no necessity for an speciality training in emergency medicine. The rapid and qualified treatment by the specific subspecialty provides a high standard of care for the patient. The high frequency exposure of the trauma and orthopaedic resident with emergency cases is an essential part of the current professional training.The "Junge Forum der DGOU" continues to understand the speciality training "Facharzt für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie" as the basic module of the profession. After that it should be possible to continuing subspecialty training and obtaining "spezielle Unfallchirurgie" bzw "spezielle orthopädische Chirurgie". After that further subspecialty training should be encouraged. PMID:21847794

Münzberg, M; Perl, M; Kubosch, D C; Kopschina, C; Schüttrumpf, J P; Kühle, J; Häne, R; Kreutz, M; Moradi, B; Dragowsky, K; Depeweg, D

2011-04-01

444

Galaxies with Binary Nuclei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that among active galaxies (AG) with strong emission lines (UV-galaxies, Sy1 and Sy2, Markarian and Kazarian galaxies, radio-galaxies, QSOs host galaxies and so on) there is a large percentage of objects with double and multiple (or complex) nuclei. The common sizes of these nuclei are of the order of a few hundred parsecs or kiloparsecs. We shall discuss the results of morphological and spectroscopic observations of a number of ``active galaxies'' carried out with the 5m Palomar telescope, 2.6m telescope of Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, 6m telescope of Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia, and newer Hubble Space Telescope data.

Terzian, Yervant; Khachikian, Edward

2014-07-01

445

UV excess galaxies: Wolf-Rayet galaxies  

E-print Network

We discuss V and R band photometry for 67% of the Sullivan et al. 2000 SA57 ultraviolet-selected galaxy sample. In a sample of 176 UV-selected galaxies, Sullivan et al. 2000 find that 24% have (UV-B) colors too blue for consistency with starburst spectral synthesis models. We propose that these extreme blue, UV excess galaxies are Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies, starburst galaxies with strong UV emission from WR stars. We measure a median (V-R)=0.38+-0.06 for the UV-selected sample, bluer than a sample optically selected at R but consistent with starburst and WR galaxy colors. We demonstrate that redshifted WR emission lines can double or triple the flux through the UV bandpass at high redshifts. Thus the (UV-B) color of a WR galaxy can be up to 1.3 mag bluer at high redshift, and the expected selection function is skewed to larger redshifts. The redshift distribution of the extreme blue, UV excess galaxies matches the selection function we predict from the properties of WR galaxies.

Warren R. Brown; Scott J. Kenyon; Margaret J. Geller; Daniel G. Fabricant

2000-07-20

446

Metabolic bone disease in lion cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: the original animal model of rickets  

PubMed Central

In 1889 Dr. John Bland-Sutton, a prominent London surgeon, was consulted about fatal rickets in over 20 successive litters of lion cubs born at the London Zoo. He evaluated the diet and found the cause of rickets to be nutritional in origin. He recommended that goat meat with crushed bones and cod-liver oil be added to the lean horsemeat diet of the cubs and their mothers. Rickets were reversed, the cubs survived, and subsequent litters thrived. Thirty years later, in classic controlled studies conducted in puppies and young rats, the definitive role of calcium, phosphate and vitamin D in prevention and therapy of rickets was elucidated. Further studies led to identifying the structural features of vitamin D. Although the Bland-Sutton diet provided calcium and phosphate from bones and vitamins A and D from cod-liver oil, some other benefits of this diet were not recognized. Taurine-conjugated bile salts, necessary for intestinal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, were provided in the oil cold-pressed from cod liver. Unlike canine and rodent species, felines are unable to synthesize taurine, yet conjugate bile acids exclusively with taurine; hence, it must be provided in the diet. The now famous Bland-Sutton “experiment of nature,” fatal rickets in lion cubs, was cured by addition of minerals and vitamin D. Taurine-conjugated bile salts undoubtedly permitted absorption of vitamins A and D, thus preventing the occurrence of metabolic bone disease and rickets. PMID:20804612

2010-01-01

447

Extended spectrum beta-lactamase and fluoroquinolone resistance genes and plasmids among Escherichia coli isolates from zoo animals, Czech Republic.  

PubMed

Commensal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy zoo animals kept in Ostrava Zoological Garden, Czech Republic, were investigated to evaluate the dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. A total of 160 faecal samples of various animal species were inoculated onto MacConkey agar with cefotaxime (2 mg L(-1)) or ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg L(-1)) to obtain ESBL- or PMQR-positive E. coli isolates. Clonality of E. coli isolates was investigated by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Plasmids carrying ESBL or PMQR genes were typed by PCR-based replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Forty-nine (71%, n = 69) cefotaxime-resistant and 15 (16%, n = 94) ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates harboured ESBL or PMQR genes. Isolates were assigned to 18 sequence types (ST) and 20 clusters according to their macrorestriction patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The genes blaCTX -M-1 and qnrS1 were detected on highly related IncI1 plasmids assigned to clonal complex 3 (ST3, ST38) and on non-related IncN plasmids of ST1 and ST3, respectively. The gene qnrS1 was located on related IncX1 plasmids. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance is associated with spreading of particular E. coli clones and plasmids of specific incompatibility groups among various animal species. PMID:23679004

Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika; Jamborova, Ivana; Brhelova, Eva; Blazkova, Lucie; Papousek, Ivo; Kozlova, Marketa; Klimes, Jiri; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

2013-09-01

448

Lethal infection by a novel reassortant H5N1 avian influenza A virus in a zoo-housed tiger.  

PubMed

In early 2013, a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) in a zoo died of respiratory distress. All specimens from the tiger were positive for HPAI H5N1, which were detected by real-time PCR, including nose swab, throat swab, tracheal swab, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, aquae pericardii and cerebrospinal fluid. One stain of virus, A/Tiger/JS/1/2013, was isolated from the lung sample. Pathogenicity experiments showed that the isolate was able to replicate and cause death in mice. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that HA and NA of A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 clustered with A/duck/Vietnam/OIE-2202/2012 (H5N1), which belongs to clade 2.3.2.1. Interestingly, the gene segment PB2 shared 98% homology with A/wild duck/Korea/CSM-28/20/2010 (H4N6), which suggested that A/Tiger/JS/1/2013 is a novel reassortant H5N1 subtype virus. Immunohistochemical analysis also confirmed that the tiger was infected by this new reassortant HPAI H5N1 virus. Overall, our results showed that this Bengal tiger was infected by a novel reassortant H5N1, suggesting that the H5N1 virus can successfully cross species barriers from avian to mammal through reassortment. PMID:25461468

He, Shang; Shi, Jianzhong; Qi, Xian; Huang, Guoqing; Chen, Hualan; Lu, Chengping

2015-01-01

449

Genetic evaluation of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) captive breeding program.  

PubMed

Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) is an endangered species that has been bred in captivity since the 1970s. In 1992, the Tree Kangaroo Species Survival Plan(®) (TKSSP) was established to coordinate the captive management of Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) D. matschiei. The TKSSP makes annual breeding recommendations primarily based on the mean kinship (MK) strategy. Captive breeding programs often use the MK strategy to preserve genetic diversity in small populations-to avoid the negative consequences of inbreeding and retain their adaptive potential. The ability of a captive breeding program to retain the population's genetic diversity over time can be evaluated by comparing the genetic diversity of the captive population to wild populations. We analyzed DNA extracted from blood and fecal samples from AZA (n = 71), captive (n = 28), and wild (n = 22) D. matschiei using eight microsatellite markers and sequenced the partial mitochondrial DNA control region gene. AZA D. matschiei had a similar expected heterozygosity (H(e) = 0.595 ± 0.184) compared with wild D. matschiei (H(e) = 0.628 ± 0.143), but they had different allelic frequencies (F(ST) = 0.126; P < 0.001). AZA D. matschiei haplotype diversity was almost two times lower than wild D. matschiei ? = 0.740 ± 0.063. These data will assist management of AZA D. matschiei and serve as a baseline for AZA and wild D. matschiei genetic diversity values that could be used to monitor future changes in their genetic diversity. PMID:22147592

McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

2011-01-01

450

Galaxy Evolution and Environment  

E-print Network

The properties of galaxies are strongly correlated with their environment, with red galaxies dominating galaxy clusters and blue galaxies dominating the general field. However, not all field galaxies are young: studies of the colors, line strengths, and M/L ratios of massive early-type galaxies at 0galaxies do not seem to care about their surroundings, and have very similar ages irrespective of their environment. There is good evidence that the growth of these galaxies does continue longer in the field than in clusters, via (nearly) dissipationless mergers of already old galaxies. These results are consistent with predictions of recent galaxy formation models, which incorporate AGN feedback to suppress star formation in the most massive halos. Systematic studies of the relation of galaxies with their environment beyond z=1 are difficult, and still somewhat contradictory. Intriguingly both the DEEP2 and VVDS surveys find that the color-density relation disappears at z~1.3, unfortunately just at the point where both surveys become highly incomplete. On the other hand, clustering studies at z~2.5 have shown that red galaxies cluster more strongly than blue galaxies, implying that the color-density relation was already in place at that redshift.

Pieter van Dokkum; Ryan Quadri

2007-04-13

451

Star Formation in Galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

1987-01-01

452

The Galaxy / Cluster Ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most baryons in galaxy clusters are in the hot ICM. Together with cluster galaxies, they form the cluster ecosystem and their mutual interaction has significant impact on their evolution. In this talk, we summarize the observational results of thermal X-ray components for both early-type galaxies and late-type galaxies in galaxy clusters, as well as the related results in other bands and the implications. For cluster early-type galaxies, the survival of small X-ray coronae for most massive galaxies provide constraints on gas stripping, microscopic transport, and radio-mode feedback processes. For cluster late-type galaxies, ram pressure stripped tails have been detected in multiple wavelengths and star formation in the stripped gas is a common process.

Sun, Ming

2014-08-01

453

Diverse Galaxies Lithograph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the diversity of galaxies in the universe. A huge elliptical galaxy, designated ESO 325-G004, dominates the image. In addition to many elliptical and spiral galaxies, the image contains a few small irregular galaxies, and red, yellow, and blue foreground stars. The accompanying classroom activity is a current support tool designed for use as an introductory inquiry activity. It can be incorporated into a unit that has a scientific inquiry and/or a galaxy classification theme. During the classroom activity, In Search of ...Galaxy Types, students use the lithograph images and text to generate questions about the diverse collection of galaxies on the front of the lithograph. They conduct research to answer their questions, identify patterns, and/or compare and contrast galaxy characteristics, depending on the teacherâs objectives. Students will organize their material and present a report, providing supporting evidence from their research.

2007-09-01

454

NASA SMD Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: A Five-Year Retrospective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) created four competitively awarded Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Heliophysics, Planetary Science, Earth Science) in 2009. The objective is to enhance the overall coherence of SMD education and public outreach (E/PO), leading to more effective, efficient, and sustainable use of SMD science discoveries and learning experiences. We summarize progress and next steps towards achieving this goal with examples drawn from Astrophysics and cross-Forum efforts. Over the past five years, the Forums have enabled leaders of individual SMD mission and grant-funded E/PO programs to work together to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for audiences, conveying the big picture of scientific discovery based on audience needs. Forum-organized collaborations and partnerships extend the impact of individual programs to new audiences and provide resources and opportunities for educators to engage their audiences in NASA science. Similarly, Forum resources support scientists and faculty in utilizing SMD E/PO resources. Through Forum activities, mission E/PO teams and grantees have worked together to define common goals and provide unified professional development for educators (NASA’s Multiwavelength Universe); build partnerships with libraries to engage underserved/underrepresented audiences (NASA Science4Girls and Their Families); strengthen use of best practices; provide thematic, audience-based entry points to SMD learning experiences; support scientists in participating in E/PO; and, convey the impact of the SMD E/PO program. The Forums have created a single online digital library (NASA Wavelength, http://nasawavelength.org) that hosts all peer-reviewed SMD-funded education materials and worked with the SMD E/PO community to compile E/PO program metrics (http://nasamissionepometrics.org/). External evaluation shows the Forums are meeting their objectives. Specific examples of Forum-organized resources for use by scientists, faculty, and informal educators are discussed in related presentations (Meinke et al.; Manning et al.).

Smith, Denise A.; Peticolas, Laura; Schwerin, Theresa; Shipp, Stephanie

2014-06-01

455

Experimenting with galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study to demonstrate how the dynamics of galaxies may be investigated through the creation of galaxies within a computer model is presented. The numerical technique for simulating galaxies is shown to be both highly efficient and highly robust. Consideration is given to the anatomy of a galaxy, the gravitational N-body problem, numerical approaches to the N-body problem, use of the Poisson equation, and the symplectic integrator.

Miller, Richard H.

1992-01-01

456

Cambridge Cosmology: Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of Cambridge Cosmology explores the topic of galaxies. It discusses statistics and parts of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, as well as other classes of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, lenticular, and irregular). Galaxy clusters and large-scale structures such as superclusters and voids are explored in terms of their characteristics and origin. Also discussed is the fact that the Universe is comprised mainly of dark matter.

Paul Shellard

457

NatureQuest's Science Forum Debates with the Science Annex  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A Science Network Enterprise, this impressive current awareness site, NatureQuest, is organized into two main sections: the Science Site and the Annex site. The Science Site provides a forum for debates in physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, philosophy, and history of science and religion. Classical and theoretical problems are discussed either in question and answer format, or by new discoveries. The Annex Site includes general information on opportunities and resources in science. Most notable is The Academia Exchange, which includes Colloquia & Seminars, Conferences & Symposia, Summer Schools, Workshops, Faculty & Research Openings, and Nature Expos. Note that some sections are still under construction. NatureQuest is a solid current awareness resource for academics at a variety of levels.

1999-01-01

458

Association for Death Education and Counseling: The Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Coping with the loss of a loved one can be a difficult process, and one that confounds even the most prepared individual. It can be equally difficult for those who work in the funerary industry, particularly those who are relatively new to the profession. Both groups will find that this online resource to be very helpful. Created by the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC), this publication, The Forum, provides articles about such sensitive topics as bereavement rituals, perinatal loss, the grief of grandparents, and group methods in thanatology. In total, visitors can browse over complete newsletters at their leisure. Additionally, users may also wish to share these resources with those dealing with similar issues.

459

The Aspen Institute: Forum on Communications and Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Aspen Institute has a broad range of thematic programs covering global security, the environment, and American politics. They also are quite interested in the relationship between society and new and innovative forms of communication. Since 2008, they have sponsored the Forum of Communications and Society (FOCAS) to bring together innovative thinkers and policy makers to talk about this subject. This site offers links to these sessions from the past four years, and visitors will find working papers, discussion questions, and presentation videos. Some of the recent topics include "Active Government Service Through Smarter Data Use" and "Beyond Transmedia: Narrative Systems and Population Mobilization." Visitors can view the archived session schedules for each meeting and they can also view a list of all the participants. Additionally, the site contains information on how to get involved with upcoming FOCAS meetings.

2012-08-17

460

The standards forum: Volume 6, Number 3 -- December 1998  

SciTech Connect

This issue contains the following articles: NIST--A call for a national standards strategy; Fourth integrated safety management lessons learned workshop; TSP [Technical Standards Program] publications support moves to headquarters; Comments on the role of the federal government in environmental technology development; Technical standards manager spotlight; Topical committee developments: Quality assurance topical committee plays an active role in the TSP, New DOE accreditation committee targets issues and resolutions at first annual meeting, DOE fire safety committee meeting in New Orleans, Third annual DOE metrology committee meeting coming in March 1999, The biota dose assessment committee providing a major forum and technical resource for DOE, and A performance-based management handbook in the works; DOE technical standards projects initiated; Recently published DOE documents; Non-government standards: American National Standards Institute and American Society for Testing and Materials; Most DOE comments on ISO 17025 upheld by ANSI review committee; and ISO 9000 compliance--Changes in the future.

NONE

1998-12-01

461

The Math Forum: Mathematics Awareness Month, April 2004  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Joint Policy Board for Mathematics sponsors Mathematics Awareness Month (MAM) every April with the goal of increasing public understanding of and appreciation for mathematics. MathForum offers this website with activity announcements and other information on MAM. Resources that are forthcoming include: a Theme Poster, Essays, and Related Resources. This year's theme is The Mathematics of Networks. Activities for Mathematics Awareness Month are usually organized by college and university departments, institutional public information offices, student groups, and related associations and interest groups and include workshops, competitions, exhibits, festivals, lectures, and symposia. High schools have also become more involved in Mathematics Awareness Month activities in recent years. An online form allows other groups to submit their events in celebration of the Mathematics of Networks for posting online.

462

Galaxy Trading Cards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of nine cards focuses on the three types of galaxies: spiral, elliptical, and irregular. Each card displays a color image of a galaxy on one side and describes the galaxy's type, its location within a constellation, and interesting facts on the other side. The Hubble Space Telescope card includes interesting facts, as well as suggestions for using the cards.

1999-01-01

463

Identifying Unusual Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students match unusual galaxies with their distinctive names and justify their reasoning. Students discover that often, galaxies acquire their names based upon how they appear to observers. This activity includes a student worksheet and background information for the teacher. This is activity four in "The Hidden Lives of Galaxies" information and activity booklet.

464

Geopressure industrial forums, newsletter and lease support. Final report, April 7, 1981-December 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

In the course of this contract C. K. GeoEnergy: (1) planned, organized, conducted, and reported on six DOE/Industry Forum meetings where the progress of DOE's resource development program was outlined and discussed (these six forum meetings included three meetings of the Drilling and Testing Subgroup and three meetings of the Overview Group), (2) prepared and distributed 15 newsletters, and (3) prepared three reports for DOE lease support. This final report includes summaries of each of the forum meetings as well as the three lease support meetings and the newsletter program.

Knutson, C.F.

1983-12-01

465

Spin a Spiral Galaxy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Of the 100 billion or more galaxies visible through existing telescopes, most are either spiral or elliptical in shape and about one-fourth are irregular in shape. In addition to their shape, star systems can be further classified using other characteristics, such as the type of material they contain or the angle from which they're viewed. This interactive feature invites users to examine galaxy M83 and our own Milky Way galaxy in virtual reality, rotating and tilting the images to see the shape and distribution of stars in the galaxies. The annotated visible light photographs and composites offer opportunities to learn about a galaxy's scale, composition, and rotational pattern.

466

Spin a Spiral Galaxy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Of the 100 billion or more galaxies visible through existing telescopes, most are either spiral or elliptical in shape and about one-fourth are irregular in shape. In addition to their shape, star systems can be further classified using other characteristics, such as the type of material they contain or the angle from which they're viewed. This interactive feature invites users to examine galaxy M83 and our own Milky Way galaxy in virtual reality, rotating and tilting the images to see the shape and distribution of stars in the galaxies. The annotated visible light photographs and composites offer opportunities to learn about a galaxy's scale, composition, and rotational pattern.

2011-04-14

467

Morphological Evolution of Galaxies  

SciTech Connect

We simulate the growth of large-scale structure for three different cosmological models, an Einstein{endash}de Sitter model (density parameter {Omega}{sub 0} = 1), an open model ({Omega}{sub 0} = 0.2), and a flat model with nonzero cosmological constant ({Omega}{sub 0} = 0.2, cosmological constant {lambda}{sub 0} = 0.8), using a cosmological {ital N}-body code (particle-particle/particle-mesh) with 64{sup 3} dark matter particles in a comoving cubic volume of present comoving size 128 Mpc. The calculations start at {ital z} = 24 and end at {ital z} = 0. We use the results of these simulations to generate distributions of galaxies at the present ({ital z} = 0), as follows: Using a Monte Carlo method based on the present distribution of dark matter, we located {approximately}40,000 galaxies in the computational volume. We then ascribe to each galaxy a morphological type based on the local number density of galaxies in order to reproduce the observed morphology-density relation. The resulting galaxy distributions are similar to the observed ones, with most ellipticals concentrated in the densest regions, and most spirals concentrated in low-density regions. By {open_quotes}tying{close_quotes} each galaxy to its nearest dark matter particle, we can trace the trajectory of that galaxy back in time by simply looking at the location of that dark matter particle at earlier time slices provided by the {ital N}-body code. This enables us to reconstruct the distribution of galaxies at high redshift and the trajectory of each galaxy from its formation epoch to the present. We use these galaxy distributions to investigate the problem of morphological evolution. Our goal is to determine whether the morphological type of galaxies is determined primarily by the initial conditions in which these galaxies form or by evolutionary processes (such as mergers or tidal stripping) occurring after the galaxies have formed and eventually altering their morphology, or a combination of both effects. Our main technique consists of comparing the environments in which galaxies are at the epoch of galaxy formation (taken to be at redshift {ital z} = 3) with the environment in which the same galaxies are at the present. Making the null hypothesis that the morphological types of galaxies do not evolve, we compare the galaxies that form in low-density environments but end up later in high-density environments to the ones that also form in low-density environments but remain in low-density environments. The first group contains a larger proportion of elliptical and S0 galaxies than the second group. We assume that the initial galaxy formation process cannot distinguish a low-density environment that will always remain low density from one that will eventually become high density. Therefore, these results are absurd and force us to discard the null hypothesis that morphological evolution does not occur. Our study suggests that {approximately}75{percent} of the elliptical and S0 galaxies observed at present formed as such, while the remaining {approximately}25{percent} of these galaxies formed as spiral galaxies and underwent morphological evolution for all three cosmological models considered (the percentages might be smaller for elliptical than for S0 galaxies). These numbers assume a morphological evolution process that converts one spiral galaxy into either a S0 or an elliptical galaxy. If the morphological evolution process involves mergers of spiral galaxies, these numbers be would closer to 85{percent} and 15{percent}, respectively. We conclude that most galaxies did not undergo morphological evolution, but a nonnegligible fraction did. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

Martel, H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Premadi, P.; Matzner, R. [Center for Relativity, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Center for Relativity, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Premadi, P.; Matzner, R. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

1998-04-01

468

Renal trematode infection due to Paratanaisia bragai in zoo housed Columbiformes and a red bird-of-paradise (Paradisaea rubra)?  

PubMed Central

Trematode infections affect a diverse range of avian species and the organs that are parasitised are also very varied. The family Eucotylidae contains seven genera of renal flukes that parasitise various birds. In birds, mild to severe lesions have been reported for species of the genus Paratanaisia, which was originally described from columbiform and galliform specimens collected in South America and has been identified in a number of wild avian species. This paper investigates eight cases of renal trematode infection at Chester Zoo in the UK due to Paratanaisia bragai in five previously unreported species: red bird-of-paradise, Socorro dove, Mindanao bleeding heart dove, laughing dove and emerald dove. Pathological changes, which varied between species, are discussed. A known intermediate snail host Allopeas clavulinum was present in the enclosures but there was no direct evidence of trematode infection. The size of the snails, possible low prevalence and the difficulty of visualising sporocysts contributed to this. Thus the development and application of further molecular diagnostic markers that can be applied to snail tissues is warranted. Parasite identification was confirmed utilizing DNA amplification from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using PCR and trematode specific primers. Sequencing full ssrDNA and D1-D3 lsrDNA confirmed the identity in all cases as P. bragai. However, the short 310 bp fragment used provides insufficient variation or sequence length for wider application. The epidemiology, pathology and consequences for the management of these endangered species are discussed. Preliminary work on developing an effective ante mortem diagnostic PCR test kit is also highlighted. PMID:24533313

Unwin, Steve; Chantrey, Julian; Chatterton, James; Aldhoun, Jitka A.; Littlewood, D. Timothy J.

2012-01-01

469

Effect of bungee-carcass enrichment on behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two species of zoo-housed felids.  

PubMed

Enrichment can improve animal physiological and psychological well-being. This study sought to promote more natural felid behavior and prevent development or incidence of stereotypies through the use of a feeding enrichment. Our objectives are to use fecal glucocorticoid metabolites values and behavioral observations to quantify the effectiveness of the enrichment device for two species of large cats, Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris; n?=?2) and cougar (Felis concolor; n?=?2). The feeding enrichment, a white-tailed deer carcass flank securely attached to an AussieDog Products(©) Felid 120-cm bungee, was implemented twice for each individual separated by 1 month. Fecal samples were obtained from each felid and analyzed for pre- and post-enrichment fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) concentrations using a cortisol enzyme immunoassay. An ethogram with 12 mutual exclusive behavioral categories was utilized to record behavioral responses to the enrichment. Results demonstrate that: 1) there were no differences (P?>?0.05) in FGMs for either species between pre- and post-enrichment; 2) pacing decreased (P?=?0.025) and walking increased (P?=?0.017) after exposure to enrichment in both cougars; and 3) tigers reduced (P?=?0.025) 'other' behavioral category after the first enrichment exposure and laid down more (P?=?0.025) after the second enrichment exposure. The neutral hormonal impact on the animals coupled with the behavioral changes indicates that this enrichment is successful at altering the animals' behavior without adding physiological stress to their environments. These findings, combined with the low cost and versatility of the enrichment, promote the use of this enrichment to enhance large felid enclosures. Zoo Biol. 9999:1-8, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25492384

Ruskell, Amber D; Meiers, Susan T; Jenkins, Sean E; Santymire, Rachel M

2014-12-01

470

Low-Level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 23--24, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

NONE

1990-12-31

471

Using Structured e-Forum to Support the Legislation Formation Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many public policy problems are 'wicked', being characterised by high complexity, many heterogeneous views and conflicts among various stakeholders, and also lack of mathematically 'optimal' solutions and predefined algorithms for calculating them. The best approach for addressing such problems is through consultation and argumentation among stakeholders. The e-participation research has investigated and suggested several ICT tools for this purpose, such as e-forum, e-petition and e-community tools. This paper investigates the use of an advanced ICT tool, the structured e-forum, for addressing such wicked problems associated with the legislation formation. For this purpose we designed, implemented and evaluated two pilot e-consultations on legislation under formation in the Parliaments of Austria and Greece using a structured e-forum tool based on the Issue Based Information Systems (IBIS) framework. The conclusions drawn reveal the advantages offered by the structured e-forum, but also its difficulties as well.

Xenakis, Alexandros; Loukis, Euripides

472

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1130_Moore_MHM_BPs_Forum_Seattle_012808_final.ppt  

Cancer.gov

Assessing the Effects of Preanalytical Variables on Molecular Research: The Biospecimen Research Network Helen M. Moore, Ph.D. NCI Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources Forum January 28, 2008 Translational Research Promises to Advance Molecular Medicine

473

Part 1: NASA Future Forum Hosted by Seattle's Museum of Flight - Duration: 49:45.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Dec. 9 event opens with an address by NASA Deputy Administrator, Lori Garver. (Part 1 of 4) Since 2008, the agencyâ??s ongoing series of Future Forums have provided NASA leadership, technologis...

474

75 FR 82400 - Development of Health Risk Assessment Guidance; Public Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Control and Prevention Development of Health Risk Assessment Guidance; Public Forum...assist development of guidance for Health Risk Assessments (HRAs). Section...L. 111-148) requires that a Health Risk Assessment be included in the...

2010-12-30

475

Microsoft Word - Final_ChicagoForum_Summary_02-28-08_Ed.doc  

Cancer.gov

i National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research SUMMARY National Cancer Institute Biospecimen Best Practices Forum Northwestern Memorial Hospital Conference Center Chicago, Illinois

476

Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Summer meeting, July 21--23, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

NONE

1993-12-31

477

Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 25--26, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

NONE

1991-12-31

478

78 FR 14840 - U.S.-EU High Level Regulatory Cooperation Forum-Stakeholder Session  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of a future transatlantic regulatory...Background: Transatlantic trade and investment among and between...and services trade, as well as...vibrant economic partnership by reducing...Forum, and the Transatlantic Economic...

2013-03-07

479

Are brightest halo galaxies central galaxies?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally assumed that the central galaxy in a dark matter halo, that is the galaxy with the lowest specific potential energy, is also the brightest halo galaxy (BHG), and that it resides at rest at the centre of the dark matter potential well. This central galaxy paradigm (CGP) is an essential assumption made in various fields of astronomical research. In this paper, we test the validity of the CGP using a large galaxy group catalogue constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each group, we compute two statistics, ? and ?, which quantify the offsets of the line-of-sight velocities and projected positions of brightest group galaxies relative to the other group members. By comparing the cumulative distributions of ? and ? to those obtained from detailed mock group catalogues, we rule out the null hypothesis that the CGP is correct. Rather, the data indicate that in a non-zero fraction fBNC(M) of all haloes of mass M the BHG is not the central galaxy, but instead a satellite galaxy. In particular, we find that fBNC increases from ˜0.25 in low-mass haloes (1012 h-1?M? 2 × 1013 h-1 M?) to ˜0.4 in massive haloes (M? 5 × 1013 h-1 M?). We show that these values of fBNC are uncomfortably high compared to predictions from halo occupation statistics and from semi-analytical models of galaxy formation. We end by discussing various implications of a non-zero fBNC(M), with an emphasis on the halo masses inferred from satellite kinematics.

Skibba, Ramin A.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; More, Surhud; Mo, Houjun; Fontanot, Fabio

2011-01-01

480

NREL's Industry Growth Forum Boosts Clean Energy Commercialization Efforts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

For more than a decade, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Industry Growth Forum has been the nation's premier event for early-stage clean energy investment. The forum features presentations from the most innovative, promising, and emergent clean energy companies; provocative panels led by thought leaders; and organized networking opportunities. It is the perfect venue for growing cleantech companies to present their business to a wide range of investors.

Not Available

2010-12-01

481

The future of imaging biomarkers in radiologic practice: proceedings of the thirteenth annual ACR Forum.  

PubMed

The 2013 ACR Forum focused on the emerging field of imaging biomarkers and how best to integrate imaging biomarkers into clinical practice, promote research into imaging biomarkers, and leverage advances in bioinformatics. The recommendations generated from the Forum seek to inform ACR leadership on the best strategies to pursue to ensure that radiologists secure a preeminent role in the new era of precision and personalized medicine. PMID:24289906

Krishnaraj, Arun; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Ellenbogen, Paul H; Allen, Bibb; Norbash, Alexander; Kazerooni, Ella A

2014-01-01

482

Strengthening Agricultural Education in Africa: The Approach of the Forum for Agricultural Resource Husbandry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The attainment of sustainable food security in sub-Saharan Africa requires the efforts of a large cadre of well-trained agricultural resource specialists familiar with the constraints and perspectives of smallhold farmers and experienced in interdisciplinary problem-solving. The Forum for Agricultural Resource Husbandry (FORUM) was initiated in 1992 by The Rockefeller Foundation to stabilize Faculties of Agriculture in Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Uganda

Bharati K. Patel; Paul L. Woomer

2000-01-01

483

Presentations from the Sixth National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology  

Cancer.gov

The focus of the Sixth National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology was on Quantitative Oncologic Imaging. The meeting opened with updates from NEMA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), summarizing progress made on issues raised at the 2004 Forum. Also in the opening session, the NCI updated on the review of the clinical trials process and current imaging activities.

484

Triggering transitions towards sustainable development of the Dutch agricultural sector: TransForum’s approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

TransForum is an innovation program which aims to make a substantial contribution to the transition towards more sustainable\\u000a development of the Dutch agricultural sector. This article describes the scientific foundation and architecture of this program.\\u000a TransForum operates on the basis of five working hypotheses which together constitute one integrated analytical framework.\\u000a These hypotheses are: (1) sustainable development is a dynamic

A. Veldkamp; A. C. Van Altvorst; R. Eweg; E. Jacobsen; A. Van Kleef; H. Van Latesteijn; S. Mager; H. Mommaas; P. J. A. M. Smeets; L. Spaans; J. C. M. Van Trijp

2009-01-01

485

Information Sharing in the Process Control Systems Forum Assessing Liability Issues  

SciTech Connect

The Process Control Systems Forum (http://www.pcsforum.org) is an open, collaborative, voluntary forum established by the Department of Homeland Security. The purpose of the Forum is to accelerate the development of technology that will enhance the security, safety, and reliability of process control systems (PCS) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. It is intended as a venue for technologists from user sectors, vendors, and academia. The Forum is not a standards body. Within the Forum, there is a variety of working groups and interest groups that are focused on specific subject areas. One such Interest Group is addressing how to create a ''safe zone'' for critical information sharing. This Interest Group is concerned with topics such as: trade-offs between maintaining security and sharing best practices; secure mechanisms for sharing of critical information; legal issues associated with sharing information; institutional impediments to sharing best practices and relevant incidents; finding a meaningful manner of exchange for sharing process control security events, incidents, audit logs, etc.; and creating a database of relevant industrial cyber events. The purpose of this white paper is to address liability issues that might arise from sharing of critical information such as recommended ''best practices''. There is a concern that by publishing ''best practices'' or similar information, the Forum or its members might be inadvertently assuming some liability. The following scenarios illustrate the concerns about potential liability.

Ray Fink

2005-10-01

486

The Hidden Lives of Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This educators guide provides content and classroom activities about galaxies, galaxy morphology, x-ray properties of galaxies, and evidence for dark matter in galaxies. The classroom activities have been designed to be appropriate for students with a range of abilities and learning styles. The guide may be used with The Hidden Lives of Galaxies poster.