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Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into `bulgy' (early-type) and `discy' (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or fDeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of `bulgy' spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of `discy' spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disc ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with discy spirals at Mr ~ -21.5mag having the most reddening - more than twice as much as both the lowest luminosity and most massive, bulge-dominated spirals. An increase in dust content is well known for more luminous galaxies, but the decrease of the trend for the most luminous has not been observed before and may be related to their lower levels of recent star formation. We compare our results with the latest dust attenuation models of Tuffs et al. We find that the model reproduces the observed trends reasonably well but overpredicts the amount of u-band attenuation in edge-on galaxies. This could be an inadequacy in the Milky Way extinction law (when applied to external galaxies), but more likely indicates the need for a wider range of dust-star geometries. We end by discussing the effects of dust on large galaxy surveys and emphasize that these effects will become important as we push to higher precision measurements of galaxy properties and their clustering. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 160000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-05-01

2

Galaxy Zoo: passive red spirals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red (or passive) spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on disc-dominated spirals, we construct a sample of truly passive discs (i.e. they are not dust reddened spirals, nor are they dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spiral galaxies and red early types, making up ~6 per cent of late-type spirals. We use optical images and spectra from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. We find red spirals preferentially in intermediate density regimes. However, there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment suggesting that environment alone is not sufficient to determine whether a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a very small fraction of all spirals at low masses (M* < 1010 Msolar), but are a significant fraction of the spiral population at large stellar masses showing that massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that as expected, red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than the main spiral population. While the presence of spiral arms suggests that a major star formation could not have ceased a long ago (not more than a few Gyr), we show that these are also not recent post-starburst objects (having had no significant star formation in the last Gyr), so star formation must have ceased gradually. Intriguingly, red spirals are roughly four times as likely than the normal spiral population to host optically identified Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER; at a given stellar mass and even accounting for low-luminosity lines hidden by star formation), with most of the difference coming from the objects with LINER-like emission. We also find a curiously large optical bar fraction in the red spirals (70 +/- 5 verses 27 +/- 5 per cent in blue spirals) suggesting that the cessation of star formation and bar instabilities in spirals are strongly correlated. We conclude by discussing the possible origins of these red spirals. We suggest that they may represent the very oldest spiral galaxies which have already used up their reserves of gas - probably aided by strangulation or starvation, and perhaps also by the effect of bar instabilities moving material around in the disc. We provide an online table listing our full sample of red spirals along with the normal/blue spirals used for comparison. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 160000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

Masters, Karen L.; Mosleh, Moein; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Bamford, Steven P.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C.; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-06-01

3

Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers' motivations for participating. This paper analyzes results from an online survey of nearly 11000 volunteers in Galaxy Zoo, an astronomy citizen…

Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Cardamone, Carie; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2013-01-01

4

Tasking Citizen Scientists from Galaxy Zoo to Model Galaxy Collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The huge data volumes across the sciences require us to consider new approaches to data analysis and simulations. In this project, we investigate how citizen scientists from GalaxyZoo.org can be tasked to address this data flood by providing the human input to classify simulations of galaxy interactions. The primary science goal in the galaxy collision project is developing numerical models

J. Wallin; A. Holincheck; K. Borne; C. Lintott; A. Smith; S. Bamford; L. Fortson

2010-01-01

5

Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers had made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this paper, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and demographics of Galaxy Zoo volunteers,

M. Jordan Raddick; Georgia Bracey; Pamela L. Gay; Chris J. Lintott; Phil Murray; Kevin Schawinski; Alexander S. Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

2010-01-01

6

An Interpretive Study of Meanings Citizen Scientists Make When Participating in Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the Web 2.0 world lurches forward, so do intellectual opportunities for students and the general public to meaningfully engage in the scientific enterprise. In an effort to assess the intrinsic motivation afforded by participation in Galaxy Zoo, we have inductively analyzed more than 1,000 contributions in the Galaxy Zoo Forum and coded posts thematically. We find that participants overwhelmingly want to meaningfully contribute to a larger scientific enterprise as well as have seemingly unique access to high quality, professional astronomical data. While other citizen science projects work through large data sets, Galaxy Zoo is unique in its motivations and retention abilities. Many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses, while not compromising the scientific value of the project. From the data emerged several trends of motivation, the primary being the sense of community created within the project that promotes professional-amateur collaboration; fulfilling a dream of being an astronomer, physicist, or astronaut; tapping into a potential well of interest created during the space race era; the spiritual aspect generated when the imagination interacts with Galaxy Zoo; and, uniting them all, the aesthetic appeal of the galaxy images. In addition, a very powerful tool also emerged as a method of retention unique to Galaxy Zoo. This tool, known as variable ratio reinforcement in behavioral psychology, uses the most appealing images as positive reinforcement to maintain classification rates over time.

Mankowski, T. S.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

2011-09-01

7

Galaxy Zoo: Morphological Classification and Citizen Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

We provide a brief overview of the Galaxy Zoo and Zooniverse projects, including a short discussion of the history of, and motivation for, these projects as well as reviewing the science these innovative internet-based citizen science projects have produced so far. We briefly describe the method of applying en-masse human pattern recognition capabilities to complex data in data-intensive research. We

Lucy Fortson; Karen Masters; Robert Nichol; Kirk Borne; Edd Edmondson; Chris Lintott; Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; John Wallin

2011-01-01

8

Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet\\u000aconnection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan\\u000aDigital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers had made\\u000amore than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this paper, we present results\\u000aof a pilot study into the motivations and demographics of Galaxy Zoo\\u000avolunteers,

M. Jordan Raddick; Georgia Bracey; Pamela L. Gay; Chris J. Lintott; Phil Murray; Kevin Schawinski; Alexander S. Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

2009-01-01

9

Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers have made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this article, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and…

Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-01-01

10

Ultraviolet Extinction in Backlit Galaxies - from Galaxy Zoo to GALEX  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the ultraviolet extinction of galaxies on large scales, combining optical and GALEX UV data on backlit galaxies (most found in the Galaxy Zoo citizen-science project). We analyze the images in matching ways, modelling both foreground and background galaxies by symmetry or elliptical isophote families as appropriate, and using the non-overlapping regions of the galaxies to estimate errors in the derived transmission T=e-?. Spirals appear less symmetric in the UV, as star-forming regions become more dominant, so that our most reliable results are mean values across multiple regions and multiple galaxies. Our mean effective extinction curve is dominated by the contribution of luminous spirals,and shows a fairly flat gray" extinction law into the ultraviolet. For example, the median of ?NUV/?B in spiral arms is only 1.3. Along with previous high-resolution HST studies of a few nearby backlit galaxies, this suggests that on kpc scales the effective extinction is dominated by the dust clumping rather than the intrinsic reddening law. This implies that extrapolation of local properties to short wavelengths, a step toward the history of dust in galaxies through comparison of local properties with a similar analysis in deep HST fields, can be done without introducing much additional error. This work was supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX10AD54G.

Keel, William C.; Manning, A.; Holwerda, B. W.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2012-01-01

11

Galaxy Zoo: bulgeless galaxies with growing black holes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growth of supermassive black holes appears to be driven by galaxy mergers, violent merger-free processes and/or `secular' processes. In order to quantify the effects of secular evolution on black hole growth, we study a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxies with a calm formation history free of significant mergers, a population that heretofore has been difficult to locate. Here we present an initial sample of 13 AGN in massive (M* ? 1010 M?) bulgeless galaxies - which lack the classical bulges believed inevitably to result from mergers - selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using visual classifications from Galaxy Zoo. Parametric morphological fitting confirms that the host galaxies lack classical bulges; any contributions from pseudo-bulges are very small (typically <5 per cent). We compute black hole masses for the two broad-line objects in the sample (4.2 × 106 and 1.2 × 107 M?) and place lower limits on black hole masses for the remaining sample (typically MBH ? 106 M?), showing that significant black hole growth must be possible in the absence of mergers or violent disc instabilities. The black hole masses are systematically higher than expected from established bulge-black hole relations. However, if the mean Eddington ratio of the systems with measured black hole masses (L/LEdd ? 0.065) is typical, 10 of 13 sources are consistent with the correlation between black hole mass and total stellar mass. That pure disc galaxies and their central black holes may be consistent with a relation derived from elliptical and bulge-dominated galaxies with very different formation histories implies the details of stellar galaxy evolution and dynamics may not be fundamental to the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes.

Simmons, Brooke D.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Moran, Edward C.; Han, Anna; Kaviraj, Sugata; Masters, Karen L.; Urry, C. Megan; Willett, Kyle W.; Bamford, Steven P.; Nichol, Robert C.

2013-03-01

12

Morphological types from Galaxy Zoo 2 (Willett+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Morphological classifications of galaxies from Galaxy Zoo 2. Each galaxy has several objIDs (from SDSS) and positions that can be used for cross-matching. Morphological classifications include six parameters for each of 37 categories: unweighted and weighted versions of both the total number of votes and the vote fraction for that response, the vote fraction after being debiased, and flags for systems identified as being in clean samples. (5 data files).

Willett, K. W.; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Masters, K. L.; Simmons, B. D.; Casteels, K. R. V.; Edmondson, E. M.; Fortson, L. F.; Kaviraj, S.; Keel, W. C.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Raddick, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R. J.; Skibba, R. A.; Smith, A. M.; Thomas, D.

2013-09-01

13

Galaxy Zoo User Behaviors 1: User classification trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this poster we examine patterns of classification behavior among Galaxy Zoo users. The Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott 2008) asks users to look at images of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to classify them based on their appearance. The success of this project, measured through 14 scientific journal articles, comes in large part from the dedicated contributions from over 230,000 registered users. These users have each contributed anywhere from a small handful of galaxy classifications to a few tens-of-thousands of classifications. While user behaviors vary greatly, we find that there are certain patterns of behavior that predict which individuals will make significant numbers of classifications over the course of their involvement in the project. Specifically, we study how the number of classifications a person makes shortly after they register for the site can predict future classification behavior. We also look for patterns in what events trigger users registering for the site and returning to site. Where possible, we break patterns of behavior down by gender, and study differences between populations who join at pivotal moments (site launch, major announcement, etc), join as the result of one-on-one contact with a member of the Galaxy Zoo collaboration, and the remaining population. The research was funded by NASA ROSES NNX09AD34G.

Pritchett, Brian; Gay, P. L.; CS390/490 Class, SIUE; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

14

Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

2014-03-01

15

Morphological types from Galaxy Zoo 1 (Lintott+, 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Morphology is a powerful indicator of a galaxy's dynamical and merger history. It is strongly correlated with many physical parameters, including mass, star formation history and the distribution of mass. The Galaxy Zoo project collected simple morphological classifications of nearly 900000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, contributed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers. This large number of classifications allows us to exclude classifier error, and measure the influence of subtle biases inherent in morphological classification. This paper presents the data collected by the project, alongside measures of classification accuracy and bias. The data are now publicly available and full catalogues can be downloaded in electronic format from http://data.galaxyzoo.org . (7 data files).

Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S.; Slosar, A.; Land, K.; Thomas, D.; Edmondson, E.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Raddick, M. J.; Szalay, A.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Vandenberg, J.

2011-02-01

16

Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one\\u000amust first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive\\u000asystems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project,\\u000aGalaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one\\u000amillion galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This\\u000aachievement was made possible by inviting

Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anÿze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

2008-01-01

17

Galaxy Zoo 1: data release of morphological classifications for nearly 900 000 galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Morphology is a powerful indicator of a galaxy's dynamical and merger history. It is strongly correlated with many physical parameters, including mass, star formation history and the distribution of mass. The Galaxy Zoo project collected simple morphological classifications of nearly 900 000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, contributed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers. This large number of classifications allows us to exclude classifier error, and measure the influence of subtle biases inherent in morphological classification. This paper presents the data collected by the project, alongside measures of classification accuracy and bias. The data are now publicly available and full catalogues can be downloaded in electronic format from . This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at

Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven; Slosar, Anå¾e; Land, Kate; Thomas, Daniel; Edmondson, Edd; Masters, Karen; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Szalay, Alex; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Vandenberg, Jan

2011-01-01

18

Galaxy Zoo 2: A Detailed Morphological Catalog of 295,000 Galaxies from SDSS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) citizen science project was designed to obtain detailed morphological classifications of roughly a quarter million bright galaxies in the SDSS North Galactic Cap. This was enabled by more than 16 million classifications of images by 80,000 volunteer citizen scientists. Galaxy Zoo 2 greatly extends the original classifications of the Galaxy Zoo project (which primarily identified spiral and elliptical galaxies) by adding quantification of details such as oblateness, bars, bulge strength and shape, spiral arm multiplicity and tightness, and the existence of rarer features such as mergers, lenses, and dust lanes. We present preliminary results on our debiasing methods, addressing both biases from individual citizen scientist classifiers and intrinsic biases as a function of redshift, size, and absolute magnitude. We compare the GZ2 data to catalogs produced by professional astronomers and by machine-learning algorithms. Citizen science results can be directly compared to these techniques by examining the galaxies that appear in both samples. The weighted vote fractions in GZ2 show good agreement with expert classifications for fine structure morphology, particularly in identifying galactic bars and prominent bulges. The bulge classification in particular is shown to be a reasonable proxy from which T-Types can be derived using GZ2 data. A notable strength of the final catalog will be its size, with more than an order of magnitude more galaxies than extant morphological catalogs. GZ2 will be a unique resource to establish the full panoply of galaxy morphologies, as well as a baseline for studying how galaxies evolve over cosmic timescales.

Willett, Kyle; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Masters, K. L.; Simmons, B.; Fortson, L.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.

2013-01-01

19

End of red sequence galaxies in Galaxy Zoo (Wong+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we obtain the photometric and spectroscopic data from the SDSS DR7 (Abazajian et al., 2009, Cat. II/294) for all objects classified as `galaxy' (Strauss et al., 2002AJ....124.1810S). (1 data file).

Wong, O. I.; Schawinski, K.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Lintott, C.; Keel, W. C.; Darg, D.; Bamford, S. P.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Raddick, M. J.; Szalay, A.; Thomas, D.; Vandenberg, J.

2012-09-01

20

Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: atomic gas and the regulation of star formation in barred disc galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large-scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' H I content from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) blind H I survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas-rich disc galaxies than gas-poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangulation removing gas). All three explanations are consistent with the observed correlations. In addition our observations suggest bars may reduce or halt star formation in the outer parts of discs by holding back the infall of external gas beyond bar co-rotation, reddening the global colours of barred disc galaxies. This suggests that secular evolution driven by the exchange of angular momentum between stars in the bar, and gas in the disc, acts as a feedback mechanism to regulate star formation in intermediate-mass disc galaxies. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at South East Physics Network, E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.ukEinstein fellow.

Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

2012-08-01

21

Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304 122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304 122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with mr > 17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original GZ2 project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relative strengths of galactic bulges and spiral arms. This paper presents the full public data release for the project, including measures of accuracy and bias. The majority (?90 per cent) of GZ2 classifications agree with those made by professional astronomers, especially for morphological T-types, strong bars and arm curvature. Both the raw and reduced data products can be obtained in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org.

Willett, Kyle W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Bamford, Steven P.; Masters, Karen L.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, Arfon M.; Thomas, Daniel

2013-11-01

22

Galaxy Zoo: building the low-mass end of the red sequence with local post-starburst galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of local post-starburst galaxies (PSGs) using the photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results from the Galaxy Zoo project. We find that the majority of our local PSG population have neither early- nor late-type morphologies but occupy a well-defined space within the colour-stellar mass diagram, most notably, the low-mass end of the 'green valley' below the transition mass thought to be the mass division between low-mass star-forming galaxies and high-mass passively evolving bulge-dominated galaxies. Our analysis suggests that it is likely that local PSGs will quickly transform into 'red', low-mass early-type galaxies as the stellar morphologies of the 'green' PSGs largely resemble that of the early-type galaxies within the same mass range. We propose that the current population of PSGs represents a population of galaxies which is rapidly transitioning between the star-forming and the passively evolving phases. Subsequently, these PSGs will contribute towards the build-up of the low-mass end of the 'red sequence' once the current population of young stars fade and stars are no longer being formed. These results are consistent with the idea of 'downsizing' where the build-up of smaller galaxies occurs at later epochs. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 250 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at .

Wong, O. I.; Schawinski, K.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Lintott, C.; Keel, W. C.; Darg, D.; Bamford, S. P.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Raddick, M. J.; Szalay, A.; Thomas, D.; Vandenberg, J.

2012-02-01

23

Galaxy Zoo Morphology and Photometric Redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has recently been demonstrated that one can accurately derive galaxy morphology from particular primary and secondary isophotal shape estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging catalog. This was accomplished by applying Machine Learning techniques to the Galaxy Zoo morphology catalog. Using the broad bandpass photometry of the SDSS in combination with precise knowledge of galaxy morphology should help in estimating more accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies. Using the Galaxy Zoo separation for spirals and ellipticals in combination with SDSS photometry we attempt to calculate photometric redshifts. In the best case we find that the root-mean-square error for luminous red galaxies classified as ellipticals is as low as 0.0118. Given these promising results we believe better photometric redshift estimates for all galaxies in the SDSS (~350 million) will be feasible if researchers can also leverage their derived morphologies via Machine Learning. These initial results look to be promising for those interested in estimating weak lensing, baryonic acoustic oscillation, and other fields dependent upon accurate photometric redshifts.

Way, M. J.

2011-06-01

24

Galaxy Zoo: dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies with prominent dust lanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore the properties of dust and associated molecular gas in 352 nearby (0.01 < z < 0.07) early-type galaxies (ETGs) with prominent dust lanes, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two-thirds of these 'dusty ETGs' (D-ETGs) are morphologically disturbed, which suggests a merger origin, making these galaxies ideal test beds for studying the merger process at low redshift. The D-ETGs preferentially reside in lower density environments, compared to a control sample drawn from the general ETG population. Around 80 per cent of D-ETGs inhabit the field (compared to 60 per cent of the control ETGs) and less than 2 per cent inhabit clusters (compared to 10 per cent of the control ETGs). Compared to their control-sample counterparts, D-ETGs exhibit bluer ultraviolet-optical colours (indicating enhanced levels of star formation) and an active galactic nucleus fraction that is more than an order of magnitude greater (indicating a strikingly higher incidence of nuclear activity). The mass of clumpy dust residing in large-scale dust features is estimated, using the SDSS r-band images, to be in the range 104.5-106.5 M?. A comparison to the total (clumpy + diffuse) dust masses - calculated using the far-infrared fluxes of 15 per cent of the D-ETGs that are detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) - indicates that only 20 per cent of the dust is typically contained in these large-scale dust features. The dust masses are several times larger than the maximum value expected from stellar mass loss, ruling out an internal origin. The dust content shows no correlation with the blue luminosity, indicating that it is not related to a galactic scale cooling flow. Furthermore, no correlation is found with the age of the recent starburst, suggesting that the dust is accreted directly in the merger rather than being produced in situ by the triggered star formation. Using molecular gas-to-dust ratios of ETGs in the literature, we estimate that the median current molecular gas fraction in the IRAS-detected ETGs is ˜1.3 per cent. Adopting reasonable values for gas depletion time-scales and starburst ages, the median initial gas fraction in these D-ETGs is ˜4 per cent. Recent work has suggested that the merger activity in nearby ETGs largely involves minor mergers (dry ETG + gas-rich dwarf), with mass ratios between 1:10 and 1:4. If the IRAS-detected D-ETGs have formed via this channel, then the original gas fractions of the accreted satellites are between 20 and 44 per cent. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 250 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at .

Kaviraj, Sugata; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Bureau, Martin; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Crockett, R. Mark; Silk, Joseph; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon; Keel, William C.; Masters, Karen L.; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven P.

2012-06-01

25

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

26

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

2012-07-10

27

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10(sup 11) solar mass that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) less than or approximately 1.1 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (less than 40 counts per nucleus; f(sub 2-10 keV) less than or approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -13) ergs per second per square centimeter) to separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H.; Schwainski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

28

Tasking Citizen Scientists from Galaxy Zoo to Model Galaxy Collisions: Preliminary Results, Interface, Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last decade several automated or semi-automated systems have been developed for determining the best-fit orbital parameters for interacting galaxies. These systems make use of a fitness function or a pattern matching capability for rating how well simulation outputs match the observed galaxies. The fitness functions are then optimized to find the best-fit parameters, frequently with a genetic algorithm.

A. Holincheck; J. Wallin; K. Borne; C. Lintott; A. Smith; S. Bamford; L. Fortson

2010-01-01

29

The green valley is a red herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use SDSS+GALEX+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disc to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant discs, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of cosmic gas supply and gas reservoirs. We conclude that late-type galaxies are consistent with a scenario where the cosmic supply of gas is shut off, perhaps at a critical halo mass, followed by a slow exhaustion of the remaining gas over several Gyr, driven by secular and/or environmental processes. In contrast, early-type galaxies require a scenario where the gas supply and gas reservoir are destroyed virtually instantaneously, with rapid quenching accompanied by a morphological transformation from disc to spheroid. This gas reservoir destruction could be the consequence of a major merger, which in most cases transforms galaxies from disc to elliptical morphology, and mergers could play a role in inducing black hole accretion and possibly active galactic nuclei feedback.

Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Simmons, Brooke D.; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Sarzi, Marc; Skibba, Ramin; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W.; Wong, O. Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K.

2014-05-01

30

Galaxy Zoo: The Fundamentally Different Co-Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes and Their Early- and Late-Type Host Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and visual classifications of morphology from the Galaxy Zoo project to study black hole growth in the nearby universe (z < 0.05) and to break down the active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxy population by color, stellar mass, and morphology. We find that the black hole growth at luminosities L[{O III] >1040 erg s-1 in early- and late-type galaxies is fundamentally different. AGN host galaxies as a population have a broad range of stellar masses (1010-1011 M sun), reside in the green valley of the color-mass diagram and their central black holes have median masses around 106.5 M sun. However, by comparing early- and late-type AGN host galaxies to their non-active counterparts, we find several key differences: in early-type galaxies, it is preferentially the galaxies with the least massive black holes that are growing, while in late-type galaxies, it is preferentially the most massive black holes that are growing. The duty cycle of AGNs in early-type galaxies is strongly peaked in the green valley below the low-mass end (1010 M sun) of the red sequence at stellar masses where there is a steady supply of blue cloud progenitors. The duty cycle of AGNs in late-type galaxies on the other hand peaks in massive (1011 M sun) green and red late-types which generally do not have a corresponding blue cloud population of similar mass. At high-Eddington ratios (L/L Edd>0.1), the only population with a substantial fraction of AGNs are the low-mass green valley early-type galaxies. Finally, the Milky Way likely resides in the "sweet spot" on the color-mass diagram where the AGN duty cycle of late-type galaxies is highest. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the role of AGNs in the evolution of galaxies. .

Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Virani, Shanil; Coppi, Paolo; Bamford, Steven P.; Treister, Ezequiel; Lintott, Chris J.; Sarzi, Marc; Keel, William C.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Masters, Karen L.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alex S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-03-01

31

Bulgeless Galaxies Hosting 107 M? AGN in Galaxy Zoo: The Growth of Black Holes via Secular Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) appears to proceed via multiple pathways including mergers and secular processes, but these are difficult to disentangle for most galaxies given their complex evolutionary histories. In order to understand the effects of secular galaxy evolution on black hole growth, we require a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxies with a calm formation history free of significant mergers, a population that heretofore has been difficult to locate. Here we present a sample of 13 AGN in massive galaxies lacking the classical bulges believed inevitably to result from mergers; they also either lack or have extremely small pseudobulges, meaning they have had very calm accretion histories. This is the largest sample to date of massive, bulgeless AGN host galaxies selected without any direct restriction on the SMBH mass. The broad-line objects in the sample have black hole masses of 106-7 M? Eddington arguments imply similar masses for the rest of the sample, meaning these black holes have grown substantially in the absence of mergers or other bulge-building processes such as violent disk instabilities. The black hole masses are systematically higher than expected from established bulge-black hole relations. However, these systems may be consistent with the correlation between black hole mass and total stellar mass. We discuss these results in the context of other studies and consider the implication that the details of stellar galaxy evolution and dynamics may not be fundamental to the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes.

Simmons, Brooke; Lintott, C. J.; Schawinski, K.; Moran, E. C.; Han, A.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Urry, C. M.; Willett, K.; Bamford, S. P.; Nichol, R.

2013-01-01

32

Zoo Day.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo Day was one of the culminating activities of Art Extravaganza, a pilot summer art program for high ability first-and second-graders. Field trips, art history lessons, box sculpture, and a study of cavemen were included. (SJL)

Warden, Marian

1978-01-01

33

Soda Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visit the SodaZoo! Check out other peopleÂs creations, and then design your own. If you like racing, you can also choose to race your Soda constructions. You will need a Java Virtual Machine (VM) installed and enabled to design your own creations.

34

Elemental ZOO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

Helser, Terry L.

2003-04-01

35

Our Zoo to You  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes, and Madagascar hissing cockroaches.

Mayo, Lois; Abuloum, Amjad; Mancuso, Brian; Brooks, David W.; Wickless, Mimi; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.

2003-09-01

36

Our Zoo to You  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes,…

Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David W.; Abuloum, Amjad; Mancuso, Brian; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Mayo, Lois

2003-01-01

37

Group 10 - Zoos  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

BACKGROUND People have different opinions about zoos. Some feel it is animal cruelty. Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. TASK - Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. Explain to the class both sides of the issue of whether animals in zoos is cruelty or not. Give your opinions on zoos and what value they may have today. RESOURCES Crocodile Hunter Zoo Born Free.org PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) Endangered Species San Diego Zoo World Wildlife Fund The Nature Conservancy All groups may also search on The Student Research Center and The National Science Digital Library ...

Mecham, Mrs.

2006-11-30

38

Lincoln Park Zoo & Brookfield Zoo Educators Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is important to understand the ways in which zoos can serve as a resource in the development of classroom teachers, parents, and community organization staff members as environmental educators. This project consists of three distinct, but related investigations of zoo use by different groups of educators. The project methodology included…

Lincoln Park Zoological Society, Chicago, IL.

39

Zoo Praxis and Theories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Zoo projects that encourage reflective learning and are legitimate undertakings for untrained undergraduates are hard to develop. The two themes of the author's primate studies course lead students to observe and evaluate the social behavior of nonhuman primates. Students use a rigorous methodology focused on the use of space, and their findings are forwarded to zoo administrators. This results in improvements in zoo housing and makes the exercise intrinsically meaningful.

Burton, Frances

2004-07-01

40

Bronx Zoo cogeneration project  

SciTech Connect

The New York Zoological Society commenced feasibility studies for a proposed cogeneration and district heating system for the Bronz Zoo in spring 1982. Early studies focused on evaluating the Zoo's energy loads, infrastructure, and energy delivery and financing systems. The Zoological Society and New York City joined in the decision to support the construction of a system which would serve not only the Bronx Zoo but also five nearby City-funded installations, including the adjacent New York Botanical Garden. Since the submission of that study, the project has been modified in scope, scaling back to a generating capacity designed to serve only the Bronz Zoo.

Rivet, P.H.

1988-09-01

41

The Musical Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the experience a collegiate Music Educators National Conference (MENC) chapter had when running a musical petting zoo, which is an exhibit of musical instruments that passersby, under the guidance of "zookeepers" (the MENC students), are allowed to touch, handle, and attempt to play. Considers the success of the musical petting zoo. (CMK)

Hansen, Kristen S.

1999-01-01

42

Who's in the Zoo?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To make the concept of biomes fresh for high school students and help them achieve more conceptual depth, the author Amy Slack created the "Who's in the Zoo?" project. Working in groups, students design a zoo that represents five of Earth's biomes and the climate found in their respective habitats. These groups prepare a proposal and a poster of…

Slack, Amy

2010-01-01

43

Who's in the Zoo?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To make the concept of biomes fresh for high school students and help them achieve more conceptual depth, the author Amy Slack created the "Who's in the Zoo?" project. Working in groups, students design a zoo that represents five of Earth's biomes and the

Slack, Amy

2010-03-01

44

Zoo-Risa [Fun at the Zoo].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Spanish language picture and rhyme book about animals in the zoo was designed for Spanish-speaking students in grades 1 through 5. It is intended to meet the early reading needs of these students and to establish a foundation for the acquisition of reading skills. It may be used in compensatory education classes for Spanish-speaking students,…

Galarza, Ernesto

45

The Electronic Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Electronic Zoo: A List of Animal-Related Computer Resources (Internet/Bitnet Mailing Lists, Gophers, World Wide Web Sites, Mail Servers, Usenet Newsgroups, FTP Archives, Commercial Online Services, and Bulletin Board Systems.)

Boschert, Ken.

1997-01-01

46

San Diego Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Zoological Society of San Diego brings to the web the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Wild Animal Park, and the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species. Each unit of the zoo has a main page, from which the user can meet the animals and find out about the humans who watch over them. The photographs of new arrivals at the zoo should be a big draw, and there is informative text underlying the visuals. The "Guest Book" is a game in which users attempt to match animals with their "signatures": the tracks they leave. Use the table of contents to find your way to the animals you're most interested in.

1998-01-01

47

ChimpanZoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"A collective effort between the Jane Goodall Institute, zoological facilities, and universities," ChimpanZoo is a research and education program that aims to "apply uniform research methods to learn more about chimpanzees and their psychological and behavioral responses to a captive environment." The program involves participating zoos, researchers, and volunteers collecting and submitting chimpanzee behavior data to the program. The site contains a great deal of information on chimpanzee behavior for a variety of different educational levels, high school and beyond. Topics include general chimpanzee behavior, biology, evolution, and results determined from the Chimpanzoo database.

48

The Invisible Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, identified on the Infrared Zoo website as Lesson 3, students explore the Cool Cosmos Infrared Zoo database and investigate the differences between warm and cold-blooded animals. As a result, students discover how infrared imagery provides biologists/zoologists detailed information on how warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals thermoregulate. This lesson features background information for the teacher, background information for students, a mini-exploration of Infrared Image Technology, image sets, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and additional resources.

49

Compromised survivorship in zoo elephants.  

PubMed

We analyzed data from over 4500 elephants to show that animals in European zoos have about half the median life span of conspecifics in protected populations in range countries. This discrepancy is clearest in Asian elephants; unlike African elephants in zoos, this species' infant mortality is very high (for example, twice that seen in Burmese timber camps), and its adult survivorship in zoos has not improved significantly in recent years. One risk factor for Asian zoo elephants is being moved between institutions, with early removal from the mother tending to have additional adverse effects. Another risk factor is being born into a zoo rather than being imported from the wild, with poor adult survivorship in zoo-born Asians apparently being conferred prenatally or in early infancy. We suggest stress and/or obesity as likely causes of zoo elephants' compromised survivorship. PMID:19074339

Clubb, Ros; Rowcliffe, Marcus; Lee, Phyllis; Mar, Khyne U; Moss, Cynthia; Mason, Georgia J

2008-12-12

50

Microbe Zoo Water World  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is maintained by the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology. A Microbe Zoo and the Microbe of the Month are included. The site provides some background material on many different types of Microbes, in ponds, around the deep sea vents, and various other locations. Two water regions are represented on the site, although mention is made of several others.

2004-01-28

51

The modern zoo: How do people perceive zoo animals?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the recent growth in scientific attention focusing upon human-animal relationships, very little research has been conducted in relation to the human experience of, and relationship with, zoo animals. In order to assess how the general public perceive zoo animals, a street survey questionnaire was used (Study 1, n = 200). In addition, a second study was carried out within

Louise S. Reade; Natalie K. Waran

1996-01-01

52

It's a Zoo out There!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos can provide exciting educational opportunities for students to learn about a wide range of science subject matter. Zoos and similar nonschool sites have the added advantage of getting students out of school and into another environment, demonstrating that science learning can take place anywhere--not only in formal school settings. Through…

Henson, Kate

2008-01-01

53

The future of zoo biology.  

PubMed

The science of zoo biology and the journal of the same name are appropriately perceived as central to the issues that zoological gardens must address in managing large collections of hundreds of different species of animals. However, zoos are also cultural institutions that are seeking relevance in wildlife conservation by reaching out to their enormous audiences collectively numbered in the hundreds of millions worldwide. This article suggests that if zoos are to be effective in realizing significant conservation outcomes, they will need to engage the much broader range of sciences in developing institutionally compatible conservation agendas that do not rest on untested assumptions. Some of the research questions that zoos might ask themselves are provided as examples. Zoo Biol 27:498-504, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19360643

Wharton, Dan

2008-11-01

54

Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in Zoo Animals in Selected Zoos in the Midwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplas- mosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of

Silvia de Camps; J. P. Dubey; W. J. A. Saville

2008-01-01

55

World Zoo Conservation Strategy: a blueprint for zoo development  

Microsoft Academic Search

People need a sense of purpose, the setting of clear targets, the encouragement and support of others in striving for and\\u000a achieving tasks that have been set. This is particularly true for zoo personnel, a profession which is often under critical\\u000a attack, especially from those who have a philosophical difficulty in accepting the idea of animals in captivity. The zoo

Roger Wheater

1995-01-01

56

Dirtland Microbe Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology, this web site features "Dirtland", an interactive microbe zoo. The site explores the endless varieties of microorganisms and the environments they inhabit. These habitats include composts, at home, agriculture, hot springs, snow and ice, mines, root cellars, toxic waste, animals, soil, food, space, and water. Each habitat link provides a description of the environment as well as images and descriptions of particular species of microorganisms that thrive there. The site also contains a �What is a microbe?� link with an interactive image comparing the size of a microbe to a mouse and a tree of life with an outline of the major groups of organisms.

Heeter, Carrie; Ecology, Digital L.

57

New at the Zoo: ZIMS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer reviewed resource is on the topic "New at the Zoo" by Jeffrey P Cohn. A new database about to be launched for zoos and aquariums will overhaul outdated record-keeping systems. Through the Zoological Information Management System, keepers, curators, and veterinarians will have access to integrated, up-to-date information about collections worldwide to track animals, diagnose diseases, and communicate treatments.

JEFFREY P. COHN (;)

2006-07-01

58

What Do We Learn at the Zoo?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The zoo's role in public education is analyzed. Despite good intentions, zoos may be creating animal stereotypes that are not only incorrect but that actually work against the interests of wildlife preservation. (BL)

Sommer, Robert

1972-01-01

59

Teaching Operant Conditioning at the Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a partnership between Zoo Atlanta and the Georgia Institute of Technology in teaching the principles of operant conditioning to students in an experimental psychology class. Maintains that the positive training techniques used in zoos are models of applied operant conditioning. Includes a discussion of zoo training goals. (MJP)

Lukas, Kristen E.; Marr, M. Jackson; Maple, Terry L.

1998-01-01

60

Mental models students hold of zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to depict the mental models high school students, ages 14-18, hold of zoos. This study also examined how students define conservation and the role of zoos in conservation. This study examined the differences in mental models of 84 students (1) 21 students who had visited a zoo with their teacher in the same semester in which the study was conducted, (2) 21 students who had visited a zoo during another school year with their teacher, (3) 21 students who had visited the zoo without a teacher, and (4) 21 students who had never visited a zoo. It also examined the mental models of students of different ethnicities and examined differences in mental models of young men and women. This study was conducted and the data analyzed using a qualitative methodology research design. All 84 students completed a demographic questionnaire, a concept map, and a ranking concepts exercise. Twenty-four students were interviewed. The findings indicated that: (1) students who had visited a zoo have a richer mental model of zoos than students who have never visited a zoo, (2) students who had visited a zoo with their teacher provided a deeper richer understanding of the roles of zoos in conservation and education, (3) students who have never visited a zoo do have mental models of zoos, (4) students do not mention conservation with respect to zoos unless specifically asked about the role of zoos in conservation, and (5) students did not mention the zoo's connection to species survival nor did they view zoos as a source of information for conservation-related topics. The data indicated that the mental models student hold of zoos consist of seven themes: (1) organisms, (2) people, (3) amenities, (4) descriptive terms, (5) habitats, (6) education, and (7) conservation. The seven themes were defined and used to create the Zoo Acuity Model. The central constructs of the Zoo Acuity Model are the Observation Framework, the Interaction Framework, and the Information Framework. Most important to this study is the development of the Information Framework, which described the information students knew about zoos.

Patrick, Patricia Gail

61

Teaching Scientific Inquiry with Galaxy Zoo  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The universe of topics to choose from when teaching an astronomy course is astronomically immense. This wide array of opportunity presents some inherently difficult choices for teachers at all levels on how to limit the scope of the course to make the syllabus manageable. As but one example, consider that even the most experienced astronomy…

Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.; Lyons, Daniel J.

2011-01-01

62

Teaching Scientific Inquiry with Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The universe of topics to choose from when teaching an astronomy course is astronomically immense. This wide array of opportunity presents some inherently difficult choices for teachers at all levels on how to limit the scope of the course to make the syllabus manageable. As but one example, consider that even the most experienced astronomy teacher must choose between focusing on the astrophysics of stellar processes or on the nomenclature for stars and constellations because there is rarely time to give both justice. One might go as far as saying that planning an astronomy course is similar to the perspective offered by Michael Pollan in his book The Omnivore's Dilemma, which can be paraphrased as, ``When entering a modern grocery store in the U.S. with unlimited choices, what is it that one chooses to eat and why?'' Indeed, teaching about the entire universe in a single astronomy course involves some serious choices, as one can most certainly not teach everything.

Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.; Lyons, Daniel J.

2011-02-01

63

Bring the Zoo to You!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hands-on, minds-on zoo project provides a fun and safe opportunity for students to experience the world of animals and nature right in their own classroom. Students have the chance to work individually or in small groups to explore, observe, and discover answers to their questions about the natural world. In addition, it provides numerous…

Wilcox, Dawn Renee; Sterling, Donna R.

2008-01-01

64

The Art of Zoo Keeping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a science program in Hawaii for high school students in which students are trained in a variety of tasks at a local zoo during the morning hours and then return to campus for coursework. The program offers opportunities to develop responsibility and self-esteem. (SA)

Kimura, Arthur I.

1979-01-01

65

Zoos in Transition: Enriching Conservation Education for a New Generation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Children's Zoo Design Project, the purpose of which is to provide a central resource to which zoos contemplating design change might turn. Reports on surveys of zoos, site visits, and the thinking and conclusions of a workshop/seminar participated in by students, zoo professionals, and others involved in zoo design and education.…

Wineman, Jean; And Others

1996-01-01

66

The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

2002

67

How Zoos Are Meeting the Challenges Facing Biodiversity: Bristol Zoo Gardens as a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As ideas about effective conservation of biodiversity develop, zoos are adapting their roles to meet the new challenges. This article considers these changes, using the work of Bristol and other UK zoos as a case study. The significance of zoos in both global and local conservation of biodiversity, their role in promoting public engagement and…

Garrett, Simon

2010-01-01

68

A Ubiquitous and Interactive Zoo Guide System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We describe a new prototype for a zoo information system. The system is based on RFID and allows to retrieve information about\\u000a the zoo animals in a quick and easy way. RFID tags identifying the respective animals are placed near the animal habitats.\\u000a Zoo visitors are equipped with PDAs containing RFID readers and WLAN cards. The PDAs may then read

Helmut Hlavacs; Franziska Gelies; Daniel Blossey; Bernhard Klein

2005-01-01

69

Happy Hollow Park and Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Happy Hollow Park and Zoo participates in conservation and propagation of rare and endangered species by providing hands-on experience with many animals along with the education that's necessary to secure the future of endangered species. The Zoo is in partnership with a number of organizations, including the Belize Audubon Society, the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force, the Center for Ecosystem Survival, the Orangutan Conservancy, and the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, to help educate the public and raise funds to protect endangered species. The interactive exhibit, Backyard Habitat, was constructed in partnership with Watershed Watch by the Happy Hollow staff using conservation grant dollars. It provides visitors with ideas on how they might turn their own backyard into wildlife habitats. Guests may also obtain a handy pamphlet at this exhibit, Invite Wildlife Into Your Backyard. Educational programs also include Pre-K classes, teacher/classroom programs, camps, Scouts programs and Zoofaris guided tours.

70

Zoo and Wildlife Libraries: An International Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conservation and well-being of exotic animals is core to the mission of zoos, aquariums and many small nonprofit wildlife groups. Increasingly, these organizations are committed to scientific research, both basic and applied. To ascertain the current state of the libraries that support their efforts, librarians at the San Diego Zoo conducted…

Coates, Linda L.; Tierney, Kaitlyn Rose

2010-01-01

71

San Francisco's New Zoo's Connections for Conservation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides information on a redevelopment project at the San Francisco Zoo known as the New Zoo. The explicit goal of the project is to inspire a sense of caring and appreciation for wildlife that is the foundation of a conservation ethic. (DDR)

Routman, Emily

2001-01-01

72

Zoos, Aquariums, and Expanding Students' Data Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo and aquarium educators are increasingly providing educationally rigorous programs that connect their animal collections with curriculum standards in mathematics as well as science. Partnering with zoos and aquariums is a powerful way for teachers to provide students with more opportunities to observe, collect, and analyze scientific data. This…

Mokros, Jan; Wright, Tracey

2009-01-01

73

The greening of polar bears in zoos  

Microsoft Academic Search

POLAR BEARS (Thalarctos maritimus) normally have creamy-white fur, presumably an adaptation for camouflage in a snowy environment. However, during the summer of 1978, the fur on the back and sides of three adults in the San Diego Zoo turned green, though the animals remained otherwise healthy. (Of these bears, one female was born in the zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada,

Ralph A. Lewin

1979-01-01

74

Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]?5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

2012-02-01

75

Development Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An electronic venue for "dialogue and knowledge sharing" among international development community members, the World Bank's Development Forum includes ongoing Development Dialogues, or discussion groups, geared to share "high-value information" on key development issues. Each dialogue is open to the public but varies in content, format, and duration. Currently, dialogues on violence against women, rural communications in Africa, foreign direct investment, and social capital are active, with archives maintained at the Join the Discussion page. Complete registration is available online. Note: the World Bank invites the public to join the following upcoming dialogues by February 1, 1999: Knowledge and Information for Development (IKD), Gender and Law (GENDER-LAW), Les Consequences de la Maternite Precoce sur l'Education des Filles en Afrique (EDUC-FILLES), and Attacking Poverty (WDR2001), the first public forum on the World Development Report for 2000/02.

1998-01-01

76

Bring the Zoo to You!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This hands-on, minds-on zoo project provides a fun and safe opportunity for students to experience the world of animals and nature right in their own classroom. Students have the chance to work individually or in small groups to explore, observe, and discover answers to their questions about the natural world. In addition, it provides numerous occasions to integrate science, math, reading, and art. The nearly month-long experience described here was conducted with a group of top-notch first-grade zookeepers!

Wilcox, Dawn R.; Sterling, Donna R.

2008-04-01

77

Moon Zoo: Educating side-by-side with Doing Science (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon Zoo citizen science project (http://www.moonzoo.org) engages individuals - primarily members of the public - in identifying geological (and sometimes technological) features on the lunar surface. Using a flash-based interface that runs in a web browser, users can mark craters, linear features, and even left-behind lunar landers on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images. These science tools are embedded in an environment designed to encourage learning and collaboration. On the main Moon Zoo site users can explore educational content, including video tutorials, articles, glossary terms, and flash interactive activities. Additionally, there is a blog and a forum to encourage collaboration and social learning, and a twitter feed for general communications. Through this suite of software Moon Zoo users can contribute to science while learning about the Moon and geology. The Moon Zoo educational content is designed with one purpose in mind: To make sure that a curious user can find information quickly, easily, and on (or within 1-click of) the Moon Zoo site. The Internet is filled with many excellent lunar educational products, and many high-quality digital products exist in offline archives. Finding desired resources, however, can sometimes be a challenge even for professional educators. In order to make finding content easier, we developed a glossary list and a basic concept map for our website that addresses geology, lunar exploration, observing, and the moon in history and culture, and then we populated these terms and concepts with already available materials. We also do things in a way that encourages both doing science tasks and learning at the same time! Specifically, we use pop-out audio and video players that allow users to listen, learn, and classify the lunar surface all at once. To try and understand our users better we are conducting both learning and motivations studies while also monitoring site usage. Our learning assessments use an assessment tool designed by Sebastien Cormier and Ed Prather. At the time of this writing, data collection is still in progress. We are asking users with a variety of different experience levels within Moon Zoo to answer concept questions to assess if we can measure a higher conceptual knowledge in people who have spent more time in Moon Zoo and see change over time in individual users. We are also doing interview-based grounded theory investigations into what motivates people to come to Moon Zoo and to continue using the site. Preliminary results of the investigations will be presented, along with user behaviors, and other website statistics-based research. This work is funded through NASA ROSES grant NNX09AD34G and NSF grant DRL-0917608.

Gay, P. L.; Moon Zoo Team

2010-12-01

78

Dermatophytosis in zoo macropods: a questionnaire study.  

PubMed

Limited published data are available on dermatophytosis in zoo macropods, despite anecdotal reports of disease occurrence and recurrent mob outbreaks. The aim of this questionnaire study was to analyze data from Australian and international zoos to evaluate estimated disease prevalence in zoos housing macropods, affected macropod species, causative organisms, predisposing factors, clinical presentations, diagnostics, treatments, and disease risk management. Two questionnaires (initial detailed and subsequent brief) were distributed via email to zoo veterinarians, with an estimated response rate of 23%. The overall estimated disease prevalence from responding zoos was 28%, with 73% of responding Australian zoos and 14% of responding non-Australian zoos reporting disease. The first cases of confirmed and suspected dermatophytosis in several macropod species and in association with Trichophyton verrucosum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. nodulare are reported, with young red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) appearing predisposed. Diagnosis was most commonly based on fungal culture or presumptively on typical clinical signs of minimally/nonpruritic alopecia, crusting, and scaling distributed most frequently on the tail, pinnae, and hind limbs. Both disease resolution without treatment and resolution after an average of 1 to 2 mo of treatment were reported. PMID:24063082

Boulton, Katie Alyce; Vogelnest, Linda Jean; Vogelnest, Larry

2013-09-01

79

Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Topic in Depth presents the science and research of galaxies. First, the University of Cambridge offers clear, logical descriptions and images of the Milky Way, spiral and elliptical galaxies, clusters, and dark matter of the Universe (1). Users can also find educational tutorials on many other cosmology topics. Next, the Space Telescope Science Institute's "Galaxies Galore, Games and More is a learning module designed to allow elementary students to use their observational skills, recognize patterns, and learn how galaxies are classified" (2). Through the fun, interactive materials, students can learn about spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies. The third website, developed by NASA, introduces students to Seyfert Galaxies, quasars, and blazars (3). Visitors can find cool facts about the topic, quizzes, an advanced-level article on galaxies and pulsars, and additional resources. Next, Professor Bill Keel at Leiden University and the University of Alabama supplies graduate level virtual lectures on the topic of extragalactic astronomy (4). While the website is only updated to the most recent class he taught (Spring of 2003), the wealth of high-quality information offered on topics such as star formation, environmental effects on galaxies, and galaxy interactions and mergers makes it worth the visit. The fifth website, produced by the Jodrell Bank Observatory, is "an electronic publication dedicated to the observations and theory of active galaxies" (5). The newsletter promotes new papers, conferences, dissertations, employment opportunities, and more. Sixth, the Science Museum of Virginia educates users about the differences among galaxies through a series of images and clear text (6). Visitors can view images collected by the Hubble telescope and can test their skills at classifying galaxies. The seventh website, produced by National Academy of Engineering member Edward Barlow, presents concepts of general relativity and the new developments and tools used to study galaxies and other cosmological phenomena (7). The complex materials offer great examples of how models are used to help scientists understand facets of the universe. Lastly, Wikipedia offers concise explanations of the characteristics of galaxies, their history, and etymology (8). Throughout the text, visitors can find links to more information on the concepts discussed.

80

Programmatic Evaluation in Association of Zoos and Aquariums--Accredited Zoos and Aquariums: A Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluation of educational programs in zoos and aquariums is a growing area of interest for researchers and professionals. In this review, the authors examine the literature that focuses on these settings. They then discuss evaluations that have been conducted in institutions accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in relation to…

Khalil, Kathayoon; Ardoin, Nicole

2011-01-01

81

Art Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for Art Forum magazine offers a wide range of features, including a Chinese language version, and a host of interactive extras and reports from the art world. The interactive feature "Artguide", which can be accessed via a tab near the top of the page, or by clicking on the box with a world map made of colorful continents, provides a list of "Art Fairs Everywhere", "Special Events", and hotels and restaurants, under "Eat & Sleep". Looking for art exhibits in a particular country? Visitors can click on one of the colorful continents, or choose a "region" or a "country/city" from the drop down boxes underneath the colorful map. Clicking on "Calendar" lets visitors browse by date. Visitors interested in the picks of art critics will find "Picks" helpful, which can be linked to via a tab near the top of any page. Currently there are almost two dozen cities in which work has been chosen, and some cities have more than one exhibit.

82

An Investigation into the Determining Factors of Zoo Visitor Attendances in UK Zoos  

PubMed Central

The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126 and n?=?34, r?=??0.430, P?=?0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations.

Whitworth, Andrew William

2012-01-01

83

Assessment of Change in Conservation Attitudes through Zoo Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in fall 2010 and subjects were students' ages 14-18 who either participated in a formal conservation education class led by zoo educators or in a field trip in which they were engaged in free-choice learning. Two research questions were: 1) Does a trip to the zoo affect conservation attitudes and…

Randall, Teresa

2011-01-01

84

At the Zoo: Kindergartners Reinvent a Dramatic Play Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a South Dakota early childhood program, children and adults in the kindergarten classroom collaborated to build a "classroom zoo" in support of the children's pretend play. Creation of the zoo incorporated information about animals and zoos that the children and their families and teachers located in secondary sources such as nonfiction books…

Bowne, Mary; Brokmeier, Sue

2008-01-01

85

Research in Review: Assessing the Educational Impact of Zoos.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews a research study that examined zoo visitors' understanding of wildlife before and after zoo visits. Low posttest scores suggested that a zoo experience is regarded as a recreational outing rather than an educational event. Implications for educational improvement are presented. (ML)

DeRosa, Bill

1985-01-01

86

The Risk of Delivering Disturbing Messages to Zoo Family Audiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the roles of the modern zoo is to provide environmental education. Zoo visitation comprises primarily family groups seeking to spend time together. There is potential for tension between message and audience expectation as zoos seek to raise awareness of the effects of irresponsible human behavior on the environment. This may unsettle…

Esson, Maggie; Moss, Andrew

2013-01-01

87

Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

Klasson, KT

2003-04-07

88

Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.  

PubMed

In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation. PMID:19598253

Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

2010-01-01

89

Enhancing the Educational Effectiveness of Zoos.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study addressed whether the educational impact of a zoo visit can be enhanced through the provision of appropriate instructional supports such as preparatory trainings or orientations. One important function of the educational process, in contrast to providing direct information or skill development, is to make the learner more sensitive to…

Braverman, Marc T.; Yates, Mary Ellen

90

IQ Zoo and Teaching Operant Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychology texts often cite the work of Marian and Keller Breland and their business, Animal Behavior Enterprises (ABE), to demonstrate operant conditioning and the "misbehavior of organisms" from an evolutionary perspective. Now available on the Internet at the official IQ Zoo website (http://www3.uca.edu/iqzoo/), the artifacts of ABE's work, in…

Bihm, Elson M.; Gillaspy, J. Arthur, Jr.; Lammers, William J.; Huffman, Stephanie P.

2010-01-01

91

The Virtual Astronomical Observatory Users Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the online forum astrobabel.com, which has the goal of being a gathering place for the collective community intelligence about astronomical computing. The audience for this forum is anyone engaged in the analysis of astronomical or planetary data, whether that data be observational or theoretical. It is a free, community driven site where discussions are formulated primarily around the "question and answer" format. Current topics on the forum range from “Is there a photometry package in Python?” to “Where are the support forums for astronomy software packages?” and “Why is my SDSS SkyQuery query missing galaxies?” The poster will detail the full scope of discussions in the forum, and provide some basic guidelines for ensuring high quality forum posts. We will highlight the ways astronomers can discover and participate in discussions. Further, we view this as an excellent opportunity to gather feedback and feature requests from AAS221 attendees. Acknowledgement: The Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is managed by the VAO, LLC, a non-profit company established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. The VAO is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Muench, August A.; Emery Bunn, S.; Astronomical Observatory, Virtual

2013-01-01

92

Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.  

PubMed

For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22753040

Lacy, Robert C

2013-01-01

93

World Urban Forum III  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are forums on many topics, ranging from animal husbandry to the latest trends in fashion technology, but there is only one forum sponsored by the United Nations that draws such a tremendously diverse mix of practitioners, politicians, and pundits: the World Urban Forum. In its third edition, the Forum and its participants have descended upon Vancouver, and this website brings together materials they are working on during their time at this third meeting. Visitors can learn about the governing bodies that oversee the Forum’s operations, read speeches and statements from those speaking at the event, and also learn about a related event, the World Youth Forum. Visitors with specific interests in various aspects of urbanism will want to look over their “Programmes” area, which contains specific information about the Forum’s initiatives, including land tenure, housing policies, and urban economic development.

2006-01-01

94

Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Summary Super star clusters are groups of hundreds of thousands of very young stars packed into an unbelievably small volume. They represent the most extreme environments in which stars and planets can form. Until now, super star clusters were only known to exist very far away, mostly in pairs or groups of interacting galaxies. Now, however, a team of European astronomers [1] have used ESO's telescopes to uncover such a monster object within our own Galaxy, the Milky Way, almost, but not quite, in our own backyard! The newly found massive structure is hidden behind a large cloud of dust and gas and this is why it took so long to unveil its true nature. It is known as "Westerlund 1" and is a thousand times closer than any other super star cluster known so far. It is close enough that astronomers may now probe its structure in some detail. Westerlund 1 contains hundreds of very massive stars, some shining with a brilliance of almost one million suns and some two-thousand times larger than the Sun (as large as the orbit of Saturn)! Indeed, if the Sun were located at the heart of this remarkable cluster, our sky would be full of hundreds of stars as bright as the full Moon. Westerlund 1 is a most unique natural laboratory for the study of extreme stellar physics, helping astronomers to find out how the most massive stars in our Galaxy live and die. From their observations, the astronomers conclude that this extreme cluster most probably contains no less than 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, and all of its stars are located within a region less than 6 light-years across. Westerlund 1 thus appears to be the most massive compact young cluster yet identified in the Milky Way Galaxy. PR Photo 09a/05: The Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1 (2.2m MPG/ESO + WFI) PR Photo 09b/05: Properties of Young Massive Clusters Super Star Clusters Stars are generally born in small groups, mostly in so-called "open clusters" that typically contain a few hundred stars. From a wide range of observations, astronomers infer that the Sun itself was born in one such cluster, some 4,500 million years ago. In some active ("starburst") galaxies, scientists have observed violent episodes of star formation (see, for example, ESO Press Photo 31/04), leading to the development of super star clusters, each containing several million stars. Such events were obviously common during the Milky Way's childhood, more than 12,000 million years ago: the many galactic globular clusters - which are nearly as old as our Galaxy (e.g. ESO PR 20/04) - are indeed thought to be the remnants of early super star clusters. All super star clusters so far observed in starburst galaxies are very distant. It is not possible to distinguish their individual stars, even with the most advanced technology. This dramatically complicates their study and astronomers have therefore long been eager to find such clusters in our neighbourhood in order to probe their structure in much more detail. Now, a team of European astronomers [1] has finally succeeded in doing so, using several of ESO's telescopes at the La Silla observatory (Chile). Westerlund 1 ESO PR Photo 09a/05 ESO PR Photo 09a/05 The Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1 (2.2m MPG/ESO + WFI) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 472 pix - 58k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 943 pix - 986k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1261 x 1486 pix - 2.4M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 09a/05 is a composite image of the super star cluster "Westerlund 1" from 2.2-m MPG/ESO Wide-Field Imager (WFI) observations. The image covers a 5 x 5 arcmin sky region and is based on observations made in the V-band (550 nm, 2 min exposure time, associated to the blue channel), R-band (650nm, 1 min, green channel) and I-band (784nm, 18 sec, red channel). Only the central CCD of WFI was used, as the entire cluster fits comfortably inside it. The foreground stars appear blue, while the hot massive members of the cluster look orange, and the cool massive ones come out red. The open cluster Westerlund 1 is located in the Southern constellation Ara (the Altar). It was discovered

2005-03-01

95

Patterns of Visits and Impacts of Zoo Animals on Visitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The patterns of visits to the University of Ibadan Zoological Garden was studied retrospectively within a four-year period (2002–2005), followed by a year-long survey of the zoo with the aim of assessing the impacts of the animals on visitors to the zoo. Annual visit to the zoo was 95,107 with children making 74% of this population. The peak periods of

TITILAYO O. OLUKOLE; OLUKOLE SAMUEL GBADEBO

2008-01-01

96

Cool Cosmos: The Infrared Zoo Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As students tour this online Infrared Zoo, they gather new information about the animals they would not get from a visible light picture. Infrared light shows us the heat radiated by the world around us. By viewing animals with a thermal infrared camera, we can actually see the differences between warm and cold-blooded animals. Infrared also allows us to study how well feathers, fur and blubber insulate animals.

Ipac/caltech, Nasa

2009-09-01

97

RAPTOR REHABILITATION AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program of raptor rehabilitation has been conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in an effort to conserve wildlife, to assist the publid, and to gain knowledge about the care and treatment of injured birds. From October 1973 through December 1974 Red-tailed Hawks and Great Horned Owls constituted 45.3 percent of all birds donated. Donations from the public comprised 89.0

John C. Snelling

1975-01-01

98

Pneumocystis carinii infections in zoo animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Pneumocystis carinii was found to be present in the lungs of twenty-three zoo animals in the Netherlands. The following species were represented: red kangaroo, common tree shrew, Senegal-Galago, Demidoff's-Galago, brown howler monkey, woolly monkey, long-haired spider monkey, white-eared marmoset, chimpanzee, three-toed sloth, palm squirrel, red panda, fennec fox, tree hyrax and large-toothed hyrax.

F. G. Poelma

1975-01-01

99

Pneumocystis carinii infections in zoo animals.  

PubMed

Pneumocystis carinii was found to be present in the lungs of twenty-three zoo animals in the Netherlands. The following species were represented: red kangaroo, common tree shrew, Senegal-Galago, Demidoff's-Galago, brown howler monkey, woolly monkey, long-haired spider monkey, white-eared marmoset, chimpanzee, three-toed sloth, palm squirrel, red panda, fennec fox, tree hyrax and large-toothed hyrax. PMID:1079994

Poelma, F G

1975-01-01

100

13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN FOREGROUND. - Connecting Railway, Schuylkill River Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, north of Girard Avenue Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

101

LLW Forum meeting report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01

102

2013 Interferometry Forum Report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2013 Interferometry Forum was organized around a list of topics - each topic had a moderator and an archivist. Each participant in the forum had one or more assignments - this was not a meeting for passive participation. The following summaries are a slightly edited version of those notes; conclusions and recommendations are presented at the end of the document(An expanded version of the Forum Report may be found online at the IAU Commission 54 website, http://iau-c54.wikispaces.com/2013+Interferometry+Forum).

van Belle, G.; Ridgway, S.; ten Brummelaar, T.

2014-04-01

103

World Economic Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

World Economic Forum is a nonprofit organization dedicated to "economic growth and social progress." The forum is located in Geneva, Switzerland, and its members include those in business, politics, and the academic world. The World Economic Forum Website contains a variety of information about the Forum as well as information about global economics. Latest news is highlighted, with reports from several recent economic summits including photographs and Webcasts. A menu at the top left corner of the site directs users to the rest of the site, including resources about regional networks, reports and publications, and centers and projects.

104

Visitors or visits? An examination of zoo visitor numbers using the case study of Australia.  

PubMed

Usually cited in reference to the potential reach of zoo education, one of the popular figures for global zoo visitation is that 600 million people visit zoos annually. However, this number needs clarification on two fronts. First, there are many zoo visitors who are not included in the calculation because they visited a zoo that was not included in the count. Second, it does not take into consideration the people visit either the same or different zoos more than once annually. Using data collected from several sources, including zoo visitors themselves, this article focuses on one country--Australia--that contributes 15.6 million to the visitation total, and contends that the correct number of unique annual zoo visitors to Australian zoos is likely to be between 8 and 10 million. However, rather than suggesting an overemphasis on the potential of zoos for educating visitors, having regular repeat visitors represents a distinct advantage for zoos, allowing for progressive education opportunities. PMID:22674839

Smith, Liam

2013-01-01

105

Internet Fuel Cells Forum  

SciTech Connect

The rapid development and integration of the Internet into the mainstream of professional life provides the fuel cell industry with the opportunity to share new ideas with unprecedented capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has undertaken the task to maintain a Fuel Cell Forum on the Internet. Here, members can exchange ideas and information pertaining to fuel cell technologies. The purpose of this forum is to promote a better understanding of fuel cell concepts, terminology, processes, and issues relating to commercialization of fuel cell power technology. The Forum was developed by METC to provide those interested with fuel cell conference information for its current concept of exchanging ideas and information pertaining to fuel cells. Last August, the Forum expanded to an on-line and world-wide network. There are 250 members, and membership is growing at a rate of several new subscribers per week. The forum currently provides updated conference information and interactive information exchange. Forum membership is encouraged from utilities, industry, universities, and government. Because of the public nature of the internet, business sensitive, confidential, or proprietary information should not be placed on this system. The Forum is unmoderated; therefore, the views and opinions of authors expressed in the forum do not necessarily state or reflect those of the U.S. government or METC.

Sudhoff, Frederick A.

1996-08-01

106

Conservation and Education: Prominent Themes in Zoo Mission Statements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors examine the mission statements of 136 zoos in the United States that the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) has accredited, and report on the predominant themes of education and conservation in the statements. To explore the relation between these two themes, the authors present a literature review of the roles…

Patrick, Patricia G.; Matthews, Catherine E.; Ayers, David Franklin; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

2007-01-01

107

Zoo School for Preschoolers: Laying the Foundation for Environmental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The traditional approach to education in zoo settings operated under the premise that meaningful learning and improved attitudes toward environmental education would occur by simply exposing children to wild animals. This study was a preliminary evaluation of an innovative environmental education program at a medium-sized Florida zoo. The study…

Pringle, Rose; Hakverdi, Meral; Cronin-Jones, Linda; Johnson, Courtney

108

People's Perceptions of AnimalsThe Influence of Zoo Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven semantic differential scales were developed to assess the effects of contextual setting on peoples' perceptions of animals. The scales were given to subjects viewing slides of eight species of animals in either the wild, naturalistic zoo, or caged zoo environments. A control group, which saw no slides, also rated the animals. The ratings on the semantic differential scales were

Ted Finlay; Lawrence R. James; Terry L. Maple

1988-01-01

109

36 CFR 520.4 - Protection of zoo animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of zoo animals. 520.4 Section 520.4 Parks, Forests, and...PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.4 Protection of zoo animals. Except for official purposes, no person...

2010-07-01

110

Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Indicates that the zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning but that visitors' prime purpose is for entertainment. Concludes that science learning at the zoo is limited for general visitors, but is enhanced for school children by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricular…

Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

2003-01-01

111

The "Science" Behind a Successful Field Trip to the Zoo  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field trip to the local zoo is often a staple in many elementary school curricula. Many zoos offer free entry to local teachers and their students. Teachers take students on field trips to enrich the curriculum, make connections to what students are learning in school, and provide students with meaningful learning experiences (Kisiel 2007).…

Scott, Catherine Marie; Matthews, Catherine E.

2011-01-01

112

Extraordinary Animals and Expository Writing: Zoo in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A zoo outreach program led to placing animals in classrooms where those animals became foci for numerous learning activities such as writing, observing, and care. Systematic debriefings suggested uniqueness to learning outcomes connected to zoo animals. Subsequent analysis of student writing indicated that students responded to situational…

Trainin, Guy; Wilson, Kathleen; Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David

2005-01-01

113

36 CFR 520.4 - Protection of zoo animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Protection of zoo animals. 520.4 Section 520.4 Parks, Forests, and...PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.4 Protection of zoo animals. Except for official purposes, no person...

2009-07-01

114

Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

2014-01-01

115

Programs for Invasive Research in North American Zoos and Aquariums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoo-based research in North America is an emerging field, which has progressed from an ad hoc approach in a small number of zoos to a coordinated, integrated network of scientists with recognized research programs in approxi- mately one half of the accredited institutions in North America. The disciplines most active in these programs— veterinary medicine and pathology, nutrition, reproductive biology,

Karen L. Goodrowe

116

Factors Influencing Zoo Visitors' Conservation Attitudes and Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Predicts that Zoo Atlanta visitors who had interactive experience with the zoo's elephant demonstration and bio-fact program would be more likely to actively support elephant conservation than those who simply viewed the animals in their exhibit and read graphics. Uses survey instruments including 25 closed-ended questions, petitions, and…

Swanagan, Jeffrey S.

2000-01-01

117

A ZOO-WIDE EVALUATION INTO THE CURRENT FEEDER INSECT SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAM AT THE BROOKFIELD ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Commercially raised insects are an important food source for captive animals. For those animals that are purely insectivorous, the nutrient concentrations of the food source are vitally important for the health and welfare of the animal, particularly the Ca to P ratio. In the summer of 2002, a zoo-wide evaluation of the current methods of insect supplementation was conducted at

Roy D. McClements; Barbara A. Lintzenich; Jennifer Boardman

118

Current husbandry of red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in zoos.  

PubMed

The endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is held in zoos worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine how red pandas are kept and managed in captivity and to compare it with the management guidelines. Sixty-nine zoos, mainly from Europe but also from North America and Australia/New Zealand, responded to our survey. The results revealed that in general zoos follow the management guidelines for most of the investigated issues. The average enclosure is almost four times larger than the minimum size recommended by the management guidelines, although seven zoos have smaller enclosures. About half the zoos do not follow the guidelines concerning visitor access and number of nest boxes. Other issues that may compromise animal welfare include proximity of neighboring carnivore species and placement of nest boxes. PMID:21182101

Eriksson, P; Zidar, J; White, D; Westander, J; Andersson, M

2010-01-01

119

Evaluating Children's Conservation Biology Learning at the Zoo.  

PubMed

Millions of children visit zoos every year with parents or schools to encounter wildlife firsthand. Public conservation education is a requirement for membership in professional zoo associations. However, in recent years zoos have been criticized for failing to educate the public on conservation issues and related biological concepts, such as animal adaptation to habitats. I used matched pre- and postvisit mixed methods questionnaires to investigate the educational value of zoo visits for children aged 7-15 years. The questionnaires gathered qualitative data from these individuals, including zoo-related thoughts and an annotated drawing of a habitat. A content analysis of these qualitative data produced the quantitative data reported in this article. I evaluated the relative learning outcomes of educator-guided and unguided zoo visits at London Zoo, both in terms of learning about conservation biology (measured by annotated drawings) and changing attitudes toward wildlife conservation (measured using thought-listing data). Forty-one percent of educator-guided visits and 34% of unguided visits resulted in conservation biology-related learning. Negative changes in children's understanding of animals and their habitats were more prevalent in unguided zoo visits. Overall, my results show the potential educational value of visiting zoos for children. However, they also suggest that zoos' standard unguided interpretive materials are insufficient for achieving the best outcomes for visiting children. These results support a theoretical model of conservation biology learning that frames conservation educators as toolmakers who develop conceptual resources to enhance children's understanding of science. Evaluación del Aprendizaje de Biología de la Conservación por Niños en el Zoológico Jensen. PMID:24684607

Jensen, Eric

2014-08-01

120

Learning on Zoo Field Trips: The Interaction of the Agendas and Practices of Students, Teachers, and Zoo Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the findings of a case study that investigated the interaction of the agendas and practices of students, teachers, and zoo educators during a class field trip to a zoo. The study reports on findings of the analysis of two case classes of students and their perceptions of their learning experiences during the field trip. The…

Davidson, Susan Kay; Passmore, Cynthia; Anderson, David

2010-01-01

121

A Trip to the Infrared Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this multi-day activity, students use infrared and visible images of animals and sort them into broad categories based upon the learner's own reasoning and observations of the images. Further explorations reveal that warm and cold-blooded animals can be identified and characterized using infrared images. The lesson features background information for the teacher, pre-requisite skills and knowledge for the student, a mini-exploration of Infrared Image Technology, multiple image sets, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and additional resources. This is lesson 1 on the Infrared Zoo website.

122

How does the zoo environment affect the behaviour of captive primates?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important for us to be able to understand the behaviour of primates in zoos for at least three reasons: firstly as a means towards ensuring their welfare, secondly to use that understanding to ensure a positive zoo experience for zoo visitors, and thirdly so that results of basic research undertaken on zoo primates can be properly evaluated. Often,

Geoffrey R. Hosey

2005-01-01

123

Math Forum: Geometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geometry Forum is "An Electronic Community for Lovers of Geometry." An NSF-funded project at Swarthmore College, the Geometry Forum is a great place for geometry and math teachers to locate curriculum ideas, software for mathematics, Internet math projects, and information about professional organizations. The student center offers a problem of the week, project of the month, the Internet geometry hunt, student hangouts on the Internet (where students talk about school and math), and students publications. The Geometry Forum has been re-designed and is attractive, easy to navigate, and very friendly. The site is searchable, a Help Desk is included, and the staff is available for questions.

1997-01-01

124

EPA SCIENCE FORUM  

EPA Science Inventory

Every year, the world's leading environmental scientists and policy makers meet at the EPA Science Forum to explore the latest discoveries in the world of environmental research. Background EPA's Research & Development's Office has been hosting the EPA Scien...

125

Science Forum II: Bioethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes the affective nature of bioethical issues, the role of the teacher in implementing programs and directing students, and specific guidelines for using the Science Forum technique in considering bioethical issues. (Author/MA)

Cusimano, Vincent J.; Halpern, Stephen

1979-01-01

126

The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

2000-01-01

127

American Zoo and Aquarium Association Multi-Institutional Research Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the results of a literature review of the level of conservation-related knowledge, attitudes, affect, and behavior among visitors to zoos and aquariums. Includes some details of the pilot project related to the literature review. (DDR)

Dierking, Lynn D.

2001-01-01

128

20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 87.25. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

129

Wild Jobs with Wildlife: Jobs in Zoos and Aquariums.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides job descriptions and information for keepers and other animal caretakers at zoos and aquariums. Includes information about skills and training needed, working conditions, employment outlook, and earnings. Includes a list of resources for further information. (JOW)

Crosby, Olivia

2001-01-01

130

JiTT - Should Elephants be in Zoos?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

1) What are some of the health problems elephants in captivity face? 2) Pickrell (2002) states that, "apart from their drawing power as major wildlife attractions, zoo elephants are important for conservation, ...

Guertin, Laura

131

Wild and zoo animal interactive management and habitat conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review considers interactive management of wild and zoo populations as a stratesy to support habitat preservation, help\\u000a sustain key endangered species, and hasten the evolution of zoos and aquaria as proactive conservation organizations. Interactive\\u000a management supports key species' subpopulations in an integrated fashion, using their study in nature as a way to understand\\u000a wildlife habitats, ecological processes and conservation

William Conway

1995-01-01

132

Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on an inquiry into the use of zoos as a source of informal or free choice learning. The study was contexualised within the zoo's environmental enrichment programme (an animal husbandry principle that seeks to develop species-typical behaviour for captive animals by using naturalistic enclosures or artificial items that stimulate animal interest). Visitor perceptions and actual use of the zoo were investigated using structured interviews based on an interview protocol that elicited their perspectives of the nature and character of zoo settings including the use of photographs of selected exhibits to induce stimulated recall. These data were triangulated with unobtrusive observation at the same exhibits (Bitgood et al., 1988). The visitors spent little time at a given exhibit, and rated the more naturalistic or enriched exhibits more favourably, but older visitors seemed less concerned with naturalness of exhibits. The zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning for both general visitors and school groups. Both general visitors and school groups reported that the prime purpose of their visit was for entertainment. It appears learning of science at the zoo is limited for general visitors, however, the learning of science for school children is enhanced by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricula links.

Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

2003-01-01

133

Math Forum@Drexel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Math Forum is an online resource for mathematics education intended for teachers, parents, students, and others interested in math and math education. The site includes a help page with an ask-the-expert feature, a searchable, annotated library of links to math-related web sites, and a searchable archive of teacher-to-teacher discussions about teaching mathematics. There is also a problems page that includes problems and puzzles, a problem-of-the-week feature, and "Write Math with the Math Forum," a tool for curriculum support that features grade-specific problems aligned to state and national standards. Other materials include links to online forums and discussion groups, links to resources and tools (including a teacher exchange page for user-contributed lessons and activities), links to discussions of key issues, a newsletter, and information about professional development opportunities.

134

Stanford University: Computer Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Stanford Computer Forum is sponsored by the Industrial Affiliates Program for the Computer Science Department and CS/EE Computer Systems Laboratory. The Forum brings together students, faculty, and industry leaders through events and programs, and offers members "facilitated interaction with faculty, students, and colleagues at other member companies." The website announces upcoming meetings, symposia and job fairs. The Events Archive includes a few short video clips on previous workshops on emerging technologies and future research. The Forum also posts information on the members and their research interests, which fall within the following research areas: BioCompuation, Database, Graphics, Hardware & Architecture, Knowledge Management, Mobile Computing, Networks, Operating Systems & Apps., Robotics, and Security.

135

VoiceXML Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The market for voice-operated applications has steadily grown for several years, and wireless and mobile devices are an added incentive to develop a standard for voice processing. An established standard is VoiceXML, which dates back to 1999. The VoiceXML Forum has introductory tutorials about the standard, and the full specifications can be downloaded (including a draft of version 2.0, published in early 2003). A more recent initiative is the Speech Application Language Tags (SALT) specification. Similar documents and resources can be found at the SALT Forum homepage, as well as links to Webcasts and other items for developers.

136

Forestry: Forum summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A synopsis of a forum addressing the use of LANDSAT data in forestry is given. Broad inventory studies, clear-cut monitoring, and insect and disease detection were among the subject areas discussed. Concerns regarding the vailability of data, cloud cover, resolution and classification accuracy, and product format were expressed by foresters.

Whitmore, R.

1981-01-01

137

Alzheimer Research Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"The Alzheimer Research Forum is an independent nonprofit organization" of science and medical professionals dedicated to research and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The site includes up-to-date information in the form of news, papers of the week, journal article abstracts in advance, live discussions, and more. A wide variety of resources focus on many different aspects of Alzheimer's research.

1996-01-01

138

Residential Energy Conservation Forum  

SciTech Connect

A public forum for homeowners on how to reduce energy usage in the home. Representatives from Long Island Power Authority, Renewable Energy Long Island, and BNL explored alternative energy solutions for the home, analyzing energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and environmental-friendliness. Some of the technologies discussed include solar panels, Energy Star-certified products, and modern wood-burning stoves.

2008-06-26

139

HRD Town Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These two papers were presented at a "town forum" on human resource development (HRD) moderated by Martin Mulder at the 1996 Academy of Human Resource Development Conference. "Human Resource Development with Integrity" (Ronald L. Jacobs) reflects on the conference theme and offers two definitions of integrity as applied to HRD. The second paper,…

1996

140

Interstellar Colonization and the Zoo Hypothesis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Michael Hart and others have pointed out that current estimates of the number of technological civilizations arisen in the Galaxy since its formation is in fundamental conflict with the expectation that such a civilization could colonize and utilize the e...

E. M. Jones

1978-01-01

141

A Cosmic Zoo in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomers often turn their telescopes to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the closest galaxies to our own Milky Way, in their quest to understand the Universe. In this spectacular new image from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, a celestial menagerie of different objects and phenomena in part of the LMC is on display, ranging from vast globular clusters to the remains left by brilliant supernovae explosions. This fascinating observation provides data for a wide variety of research projects unravelling the life and death of stars and the evolution of galaxies. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is only about 160 000 light-years from our own Milky Way - very close on a cosmic scale. This proximity makes it a very important target as it can be studied in far more detail than more distant systems. The LMC lies in the constellation of Dorado (the Swordfish), deep in the southern sky and well placed for observations from ESO's observatories in Chile. It is one of the galaxies forming the Local Group surrounding the Milky Way [1]. Though enormous on a human scale, the LMC is less than one tenth the mass of our home galaxy and spans just 14 000 light-years compared to about 100 000 light-years for the Milky Way. Astronomers refer to it as an irregular dwarf galaxy [2]. Its irregularity, combined with its prominent central bar of stars suggests to astronomers that tidal interactions with the Milky Way and fellow Local Group galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, could have distorted its shape from a classic barred spiral into its modern, more chaotic form. This image is a mosaic of four pictures from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image covers a region of sky more than four times as large as the full Moon. The huge field of view of this camera makes it possible to see a very wide range of objects in the LMC in a single picture, although only a small part of the entire galaxy can be included. Dozens of clusters of young stars can be seen as well as traces of glowing gas clouds. Huge numbers of faint stars fill the image from edge to edge and in the background, more galaxies, far beyond the LMC, are visible. Globular clusters are collections of hundreds of thousands to millions of stars bound by gravity into a roughly spherical shape just a few light-years across. Many clusters orbit the Milky Way and most are ancient, over ten billion years old, and composed mainly of old red stars. The LMC also has globular clusters and one is visible as the fuzzy white oval cluster of stars in the upper right part of the image. This is NGC 1978, an unusually massive globular cluster. Unlike most other globular clusters, NGC 1978 is believed to be just 3.5 billion years old. The presence of this kind of object in the LMC leads astronomers to think that the LMC has a more recent history of active star formation than our own Milky Way. As well as being a vigorous region of star birth, the LMC has also seen many spectacular stellar deaths in the form of brilliant supernova explosions. At the top right of the image, the remnant of one such supernova, a strangely shaped wispy cloud called DEM L 190, often also referred to as N 49, can be seen. This giant cloud of glowing gas is the brightest supernova remnant in the LMC, and is about 30 light-years across. At the centre, where the star once burned, now lies a magnetar, a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. It was only in 1979 that satellites orbiting Earth detected a powerful gamma-ray burst from this object, drawing attention to the extreme properties of this new class of stellar exotica created by supernova explosions. This part of the Large Magellanic Cloud is so packed with star clusters and other objects that astronomers can spend entire careers exploring it. With so much activity, it is easy to see why astronomers are so keen to study the strange creatures in this heavenly zoo. Notes [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Group [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_mor

2010-06-01

142

Glanders outbreak at Tehran Zoo, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives In December 2010 four, lions and one tiger died at the Tehran zoo. Out of all samples, Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of Glanders) was isolated just from ulcer sample of the tiger which was imported to Iran from Russia. Materials and Methods One nasal swab from a tiger and fifteen blood samples with anticoagulant belonging to one tiger and fourteen lions (four dead lions and eleven live lions) were collected and were inoculated directly onto the selective media. The isolate was identified by morphological and biochemical and API BBL tests and PCR using specific primers (Bma- IS407-flip). The standard (Razi Type Culture Collection RTCC: 2375) and tiger isolates were inoculated into 2 guinea pigs. All residue solipeds and carnivores were checked by Malleination test and Complement Fixation (CF) Test respectively. Results One isolate of B. mallei was isolated from tiger's nasal swab. Both of B.mallei strains were recovered from inoculated animals. All of solipeds were negative by malleination test, however, 11 lions including 4 dead and 7 live lions out of 14 lions were positive in CF test for Glanders and all were put down by the authorities. Conclusion Active surveillance of Glanders is essential for solipeds, especially it's more important while being used to feed valuable carnivores like lions and tigers. Therefore, a reliable test like malleination must be carried out twice (first before transferring and one month after quarantine). Both test results should be negative for use for feeding.

Khaki, P; Mosavari, N; Khajeh, Nasiri S; Emam, M; Ahouran, M; Hashemi, S; Taheri, Mohammad M; Jahanpeyma, D; Nikkhah, S

2012-01-01

143

The Role of Zoos and Aquariums in Education for a Sustainable Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos and aquariums today consider education to be a central role. The vision of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (2005, p. 35) is that "Zoos and aquariums with their unique resource of live animals, their expertise, and their links to field conservation will be recognized as leaders and mentors in formal and informal education for…

Packer, Jan; Ballantyne, Roy

2010-01-01

144

Monkeying Around: Examining the Effects of a Community Zoo on the Science Achievement of Third Graders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the efficacy of a model of integrated science and literacy instruction situated at a community zoo. Three intact cohorts of third grade urban students received instruction via different treatments: inquiry-based instruction at a zoo; inquiry-based instruction at school; and activity-based instruction at a zoo. All three…

Kenny, Heather A.

2010-01-01

145

Ethics and Animal Welfare Evaluations in South East Asian Zoos: A Case Study of Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern for zoo animals is palpable throughout society in many countries in South East Asia. It is important to understand problems of animal welfare in order for zoos to make significant improvement in maintaining high standards. With a case study of 3 zoos in Thailand, this article presents results for the first time on how ethics and wel- fare evaluations

Govindasamy Agoramoorthy; Bernard Harrison

2002-01-01

146

The PRIVACY Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Begun in 1992, the PRIVACY Forum is a moderated digest of "the discussion and analysis of issues relating to the general topic of privacy (both personal and collective) in the 'information age'." It is sponsored by the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), internetMCI and Cisco Systems, but they do not influence its content. The digest mailing itself is a once- or twice-weekly publication, and submissions are generally, though not always, signed by the author. The archive includes all of the Privacy Forum's digests as well as various reports, legislative acts, fact sheets and other materials that are topically related. The archive is keyword searchable but results contain no descriptive information--only the volume and number of the issue.

1992-01-01

147

Talk 2000 Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Talk 2000 Forum mailing list, 2000ad-l, is an open, moderated academic discussion list on the folklore, festivities and future of the year 2000. Topics include millennial influence on today's culture, millennial books, previous mega-anniversaries, the great calendar, bimillennial groups, proposed mega-events for 1999-2001 and reflections on the advent of the third millennium. The 2000ad-l list will be bidirectionally gatewayed with the newsgroup misc.future.2000-ad, assuming it passes its CFV. To receive a more information: send email to: LISTPROC@USC.EDU in the body of the message type: GET 2000ad-l invite2000 To subscribe: send email to: LISTPROC@USC.EDU in the body of the message type: SUBSCRIBE 2000ad-l yourfirstname yourlastname Or visit the Talk 2000 Forum Web page:

148

Math Forum 2004 Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The well known Math Forum (formerly from Swarthmore College, discussed in the October 20, 1995 issue of The Scout Report), offers a new game where students find out how many expressions they can write for all the numbers from 1 to 100 using only the digits in the current year. Complete rules, worksheets and printable manipulatives are available from this website. Student solutions may be submitted starting January 1, 2004, using the webform, and solutions will be posted starting February 1, 2004.

Brown, Judy A.

149

Organic Chemistry Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

2005-12-01

150

Organic Chemistry Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

2005-01-01

151

Young physicists' forum  

SciTech Connect

The Young Physicists' Forum was an opportunity for the younger members of the particle-physics community to gather at Snowmass 2001 and to study and debate major issues that face the field over the next twenty years. Discussions were organized around three major topics: outreach and education, the impact of globalization, and building a robust and balanced field. We report on the results of these discussions, as presented on July 17, 2001.

T. Adams et al.

2001-11-02

152

Prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo in Mexico.  

PubMed

Salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease but little is known about the role that free-living animals play as carriers of this pathogen. Moreover, the primary route of infection in the wild needs to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the source and the route of transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany (S. Albany) infection in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo. A total of 267 samples were analyzed including 220 fecal samples from zoo animals, 15 fecal samples from rodents, 5 pooled samples each of two insects (Musca domestica and Periplaneta americana), and 22 samples of animal feed. We detected S. Albany in 28 (10.5%) of the samples analyzed, including in samples from raw chicken meat. Characterization of isolates was performed by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All isolates shared a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile, indicating a possible common origin. These data suggest that the infected meat consumed by the wild felines was the primary source of infection in this zoo. It is likely that the pathogen was shed in the feces and disseminated by insects and rats to other locations in the zoo. PMID:23505697

Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Moreno, Héctor Samuel; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney Francisco; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rendón-Maldonado, José Guadalupe; López-Valenzuela, José Angel; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Juárez-Barranco, Felipe

2013-03-01

153

[Social support in suicide forums].  

PubMed

Suicide forums--interactive forums on the Internet--are attractive to suicidal youth. The question if participation in these forums might be dangerous (because of imitation and contagion) or if it should be considered as helpful (being a chance to talk openly with others) is still discussed controversely. Mutual social support seems to be an important factor. By means of an online survey in German suicide forums and a content analysis of forum postings, we gathered information about this subject. Selected results from our study are presented in this paper. Social support in suicide forums is rated as high as support from friends and higher than support from family. Social support is higher in suicide forums where discussion of suicide methods does not occur. Higher social support in suicide forums correlates with participants' ratings of reduction of suicidality. Furthermore, some information about the contents of communication in suicide forums will be given, based on the results of the content analysis. Results are discussed regarding the potential risks of these forums. PMID:16305019

Winkel, Sandra; Groen, Gunter; Petermann, Franz

2005-11-01

154

Salmonella prevalence among reptiles in a zoo education setting.  

PubMed

Clinically healthy reptiles may shed Salmonella and therefore act as a potential zoonotic threat. Most people in Northern European countries are rarely exposed to reptiles, but many zoos have education departments where children have direct contact with this group of animals. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and serotype distribution of Salmonella among reptiles in the Education Department (n?=?55) at Copenhagen Zoo and compare it to the Zoo's main reptile collection (n?=?145) to evaluate the zoonotic risk. Salmonella was isolated from cloacal swabs by selective enrichment, and a single isolate from each positive sample was further identified by biochemical tests and serotyped. The overall prevalence was 35% (69/200) with significant difference between the Education Department (64%, 35/55) and the main reptile collection (23%, 34/145). A total of 28 serotypes were detected. Ten serotypes were isolated from more than one specimen and four from more than one species. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Eastbourne was the predominant serotype (32%, 22/69) and was also the serotype isolated from most reptile species (n?=?7). Transmission of serotypes from one department to another was very limited indicated by the serotype distribution. Despite the relative high prevalence observed among the reptiles in the Zoo's Education Department compared to the reptiles in the Zoo's main reptile collection, no Salmonella cases have been linked to the Zoo, and Salmonella ser. Eastbourne is very rarely isolated from humans in Denmark. Simple hygienic procedures such as hand washing which is consistently carried out following handling of reptiles at the Education Department may reduce the risk and therefore contribute to this low prevalence. PMID:22835051

Hydeskov, H B; Guardabassi, L; Aalbaek, B; Olsen, K E P; Nielsen, S S; Bertelsen, M F

2013-06-01

155

Assessment of change in conservation attitudes through zoo education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in fall 2010 and subjects were students' ages 14-18 who either participated in a formal conservation education class led by zoo educators or in a field trip in which they were engaged in free-choice learning. Two research questions were: 1) Does a trip to the zoo affect conservation attitudes and 2) does learning experience, free-choice or formal, affect conservation attitudes? A criterion group design was used and the instrument used to measure conservation attitudes was Tool 4 from the Visitor Evaluation Toolbox produced by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums MIRP study (Falk, J., Bronnenkant, K., Vernon, C., & Heimlich, J., 2009). Group one (N=110) engaged in a free-choice (field trip only) experience and group two (N=367) engaged in a formal conservation education class. The survey was administered retrospectively to both groups upon completion of their learning experience at the zoo. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 17.0. A paired sample t-test showed the overall mean within both groups increased in a positive direction from 67.965 (retrospective) to 72.345 (present). With alpha set at .05 the two-tailed probability was <0.001, therefore confirming that the change in conservation attitudes was significant. An independent sample t-test of the change in scores between the groups produced p values of 0.792 and 0.773 and revealed that the change was not significant. Findings did illustrate that a trip to the zoo did positively and significantly affect conservation attitudes among teens and that the type of learning experience did not significantly affect change in conservation attitude scores.

Randall, Teresa

156

Reproductive health surveillance in zoo and wildlife medicine.  

PubMed

For over 25 years, the Reproductive Health Surveillance Program has collected, processed, evaluated, and archived reproductive tracts from nondomestic mammals submitted by zoos. The analysis of the data from this archive has been used to recognize lesions associated with exposure to certain contraceptives; but arguably more importantly, to also document naturally occurring lesions. The goals of this program are to enhance the reproductive management of captive and free-ranging species by providing information about the effects of various contraceptives and to provide basic information regarding the natural reproductive histories and naturally occurring lesions in male and female zoo animals. PMID:24437082

Moresco, Anneke; Agnew, Dalen W

2013-12-01

157

Science in the 19th-century zoo.  

PubMed

The 19th century saw the advent of the modern zoological garden. The newly founded zoos not only claimed to educate and entertain their audiences, but also to serve science by providing direct access to exotic animals. However, reality did not live up to the promise of such rhetoric. The vast majority of biologists preferred to use dead bodies as the material for their morphological research. Nevertheless, there was still a strong interaction between the zoo and science. In the debate on Darwinism, the apes in the cage played a vital role. PMID:15749152

Hochadel, Oliver

2005-03-01

158

Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos.  

PubMed

Serum samples from 37 captive exotic felids in 12 zoos from six Brazilian states were assayed for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using formalin-fixed whole tachyzoites. Titers greater than or equal to 1:20 were considered positive. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 24 of 37 (64.9%) felids, including one European lynx (Lynx lynx), two jungle cats (Felis chaus), two servals (Leptailurus serval), two tigers (Panthera tigris), three leopards (Panthera pardus), and 14 of 27 lions (Panthera leo). This is the first serologic analysis for T. gondii infection in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos. PMID:12785684

Silva, J C; Ogassawara, S; Marvulo, M F; Ferreira-Neto, J S; Dubey, J P

2001-09-01

159

Forum on Economic Freedom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Forum on Economic Freedom web site was developed by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) to build and strengthen democracy around the world through promoting private enterprise. The highlight of the site is Economic Reform Today, a journal published by CIPE to help educate policymakers on successful economic strategies. Recent issues have focused on challenges for policymakers in new democracies, globalization, reshaping government and market solutions to social issues. Other resources available include materials from CIPE "Central and Eastern Europe: Economic Policy Roundtables" and "Women in Business" programs.

1998-01-01

160

Mobile Manufacturers Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Mobile Manufacturer's Forum, an international association of several leading "radio communications equipment manufacturers." Its purpose is to inform the general public about health policies and standards regarding radio frequency (RF) energy emitted by mobile phones and base stations. There are several documents and press releases that can be accessed on the Web site. One in particular, called the Health Policy Update, outlines the research findings of government agencies and independent organizations. These include recommendations for safe design and use, and assessments of health risks associated with cellular phones and other RF devices. An overview of mobile phone technology is also presented.

1998-01-01

161

School visits to zoos and museums: a missed educational opportunity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies in exhibitions have begun to consider the cognitive content of the ‘dialogue’ between visitor and exhibit designer. Such studies have focused on the leisure visitor and not on organised school visits. The study reported here compares the conversational content of primary school and family visitors at the London Zoo and the Natural History Museum, London. The data show

Sue Dale Tunnicliffe; A. M. Lucas; Jonathan Osborne

1997-01-01

162

Observing Animal Behavior at the Zoo: A Learning Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate students in a learning laboratory course initially chose a species to study; researched that species' physical and behavioral characteristics; then learned skills necessary to select, operationalize, observe, and record animal behavior accurately. After their classroom preparation, students went to a local zoo to observe the behavior…

Hull, Debra B.

2003-01-01

163

Beyond Borders: Zoo as Training Location for Wildlife Biologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of institutions such as zoos in global conservation efforts is critical. In addition to serving as informal learning centers for the general public, these institutions are well-positioned to provide training and professional development for the next generation of conservation scientists. And while many organizations traditionally have…

Melber, Leah M.; Bergren, Rachel; Santymire, Rachel

2011-01-01

164

The slashdot zoo: mining a social network with negative edges  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyse the corpus of user relationships of the Slash- dot technology news site. The data was collected from the Slashdot Zoo feature where users of the website can tag other users as friends and foes, providing positive and negative en- dorsements. We adapt social network analysis techniques to the problem of negative edge weights. In particular, we con- sider

Jérôme Kunegis; Andreas Lommatzsch; Christian Bauckhage

2009-01-01

165

Hediger revisited: how do zoo animals see us?  

PubMed

Contact with people, both familiar (e.g., caretakers) and unfamiliar (e.g., members of the public), is a significant part of the lives of nonhuman animals in zoos. The available empirical evidence shows that in many cases this contact represents a source of stress to the animals, although there is sufficient overall ambiguity in these studies to suggest that the effect of people on the animals is much more complex than this. A possible way to try to understand human-animal relationships in the zoo is to ask how the animals might perceive the humans with whom they have contact, and here this question is explored further, using a framework first published by Hediger as a starting point. Hediger suggested that zoo animals might perceive people as an enemy, as part of the inanimate environment, or as a member of the same species. He supported these categories with anecdotal evidence, which was all that was available at the time, but more empirical evidence is available now, so it is appropriate to revisit these categories. The evidence suggests that animals discriminate both conspecific and heterospecific others, rather than just viewing familiar people as members of their own species, and that additional categories (stimulating part of the environment and friendship) may be warranted. These categories are then placed in a general model that suggests how relationships of different qualities, and hence different perceptions of each other, might develop between animals and the people they are in contact with in zoos. PMID:24079488

Hosey, Geoff

2013-01-01

166

Designing a Zoo-Based Endangered Species Database.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a class activity that uses the database feature of the Appleworks program to create a database from which students may study endangered species. The use of a local zoo as a base of information about the animals is suggested. Procedures and follow-up activities are included. (CW)

Anderson, Christopher L.

1989-01-01

167

Formulating Diets for Tamandua (T. tetradactyla) in Brazilian Zoos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diet has long been suspected to be the primary cause of Tamanduas inability to thrive in some Brazilian zoos. It is known that free ranging animals consume diets consisting of termites and ants. Unfortunately, little is known about the nutrient requirements of insectivorous species. In addition, incomplete data exist on the nutrient content of many prey species. An assessment of

Ann M. Ward; Susan D. Crissey; Katia Cassaro; Elizabeth Frank

168

Introduction to the special issue on zoo animal welfare.  

PubMed

In May 2008, the Chicago Zoological Society's Center for the Science of Animal Welfare (CSAW) held a two-day international workshop designed to establish and foster new connections between zoo animal welfare scientists and welfare scientists in other fields, and to take the first step toward the development of a research agenda for zoo animal welfare science. Such a research agenda by its very nature would need to be highly multi-disciplinary and collaborative. In support of this purpose this article serves as an introduction for a collection of invited papers presented at the workshop. Workshop themes included the investigation of welfare metrics currently used and in development, elucidating gaps and determining needs for zoo welfare research, and gaining a deeper understanding of the value that understanding animals in the wild can bring to zoo animal welfare. Here we discuss some of the most relevant points made at the workshop and describe the seven most salient research needs that were suggested in consensus. PMID:19885912

Watters, Jason V; Wielebnowski, Nadja

2009-11-01

169

Automatic morphological classification of galaxy images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an image analysis supervised learning algorithm that can automatically classify galaxy images. The algorithm is first trained using manually classified images of elliptical, spiral and edge-on galaxies. A large set of image features is extracted from each image, and the most informative features are selected using Fisher scores. Test images can then be classified using a simple Weighted Nearest Neighbour rule such that the Fisher scores are used as the feature weights. Experimental results show that galaxy images from Galaxy Zoo can be classified automatically to spiral, elliptical and edge-on galaxies with an accuracy of ~90 per cent compared to classifications carried out by the author. Full compilable source code of the algorithm is available for free download, and its general-purpose nature makes it suitable for other uses that involve automatic image analysis of celestial objects.

Shamir, Lior

2009-11-01

170

(Tribology conferences and forums)  

SciTech Connect

The principal meeting attended during this trip was the Japan International Tribology Conference Nagoya 1990. The conference encompassed a wide range of topics, including the tribology of ceramics, the tribology in high-performance automobiles, and many aspects of lubrication technology. Associated forums were also held on the tribology of advanced ceramics, on solid lubrication, and on automotive lubricants. Presentations made during the latter forum discussed anticipated trends in engine development and anticipated improvements in lubricants required for the next generation of engines. In addition to meetings, site visits were made to five industrial organizations to discuss ceramic tribology. Nippon Steel Corporation and Toshiba Corporation are both very active in the ceramic area, Nippon Steel from their interest in research on new materials and Toshiba from both an interest in new materials and in support of their work in electronic devices. Two engine manufacturers were also visited, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. These companies were somewhat reserved in their discussion of progress in the utilization of ceramics in automobile engines.

Yust, C.S.

1990-11-30

171

The Great Issues Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Big ideas are important, and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York (CUNY) has created the Great Issues Forum in order to "explore critical issues of our time through a single thematic lens." The program was started in 2007, and the initiative includes free public conversations, online seminars, and a number of other features designed to bring these conversations to people around the globe. Visitors can get a sense of these conversations by clicking on the "Online Audio/Video Archive" to view past sessions. These sessions have included discussion on political power, economic power, and the African-American church and American politics. After checking one (or more) of these sessions out, visitors should then click on over to the "Seminars" area. Here they can read and comment on online discussions about subjects such as global natural resource conflicts and depictions of power in cinema. Along the way, visitors can also view participants' bios, and also learn about the upcoming seminar topics and public presentations and forums.

172

London International Youth Science Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

Auty, Geoff

2010-01-01

173

Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or discussion boards, are web applications that provide online discussions. Like wikis, your forum

Kahn, Sami

2009-01-01

174

Cosmic Collisions: Galaxy Mergers and Evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the years evidence has mounted for a significant mode of galaxy evolution via mergers. This process links gas-rich, spiral galaxies; starbursting galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); post-starburst galaxies; and gas-poor, elliptical galaxies, as objects representing different phases of major galaxy mergers. The post-starburst phase is particularly interesting because nearly every galaxy that evolves from star-forming to quiescent must pass through it. In essence, this phase is a sort of galaxy evolution “bottleneck” that indicates that a galaxy is actively evolving through important physical transitions. In this talk I will present the results from the ‘Galaxy Zoo Quench’ project – using post-starburst galaxies to place observational constraints on the role of mergers and AGN activity in quenching star formation. `Quench’ is the first fully collaborative research project with Zooniverse citizen scientists online; engaging the public in all phases of research, from classification to data analysis and discussion to writing the article and submission to a refereed journal.

Trouille, Laura; Willett, Kyle; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Christopher; Whyte, Laura; Lynn, Stuart; Tremonti, Christina A.

2014-08-01

175

Office managers' forum.  

PubMed

This article is a summary of the key elements presented during the conference held as part of the Practice Management and Development course sponsored by the Multi-Specialty Foundation in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2009. This article represents an amalgam of perspectives from practices across the United States. The Office Managers' Forum brought together the office managers and surgeons from practices across the United States as panelists. The panelists answered a multitude of practice management questions that included wide-ranging topics such as accounting and financing, staff well being, working with a spouse, hiring and firing, staff meetings, accreditation, motivation, and problems and perks specifically associated with a facial plastic surgery practice. PMID:20974384

Lam, Samuel M; Hankins, Launa; Dieter, Andrea; Garcia, Sandie; Hepp, Delphine; Jordan, Janet L; Silver, William E; Shorr, Jay Alan; Sullivan, Susan E; Whatcott, Pam; Williams, Edwin F; Waldman, S Randolph

2010-11-01

176

Musical Instrument Makers Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With links to over 400 pages on acoustic guitar building, violin, dulcimer, flute, recorder, and bagpipe making, brass instrument building and repair, drum making and much, much more this is the site to visit to better understand how musical instruments are made and maintained. The Forum itself hosts a long list of topics which include discussions related to everything from splitting spruce billets to how to alter a violin to better fit a musician's hand to how to use bird's eye maple in guitar building. And as if all of that were not enough the site also provides links to appropriate books, magazines and hosts a tools store section with links to wood turning tools, hand tools and everything else that's needed to keep your fiddle, guitar or flute in tip top shape.

2006-10-17

177

A Virtual Publications Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the continuing effort to inform members about the publications program and get their input, the Publications Committee scheduled an open forum at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting. This was to allow any members or guests the opportunity to ask questions about the AGU publications program, processes, progress, or any other publications-related concerns. Here, we are using the pages of Eos to share several ``good news'' messages about AGU publications and open a dialog with the membership about the publications program. The first thing to remember about AGU publications is that historically they have supported many of the non-revenue generating activities of the Union that we hold to be important-examples include workshops for high school teachers, career information for pre-college students and school counselors, and information for the press and for decision makers at various levels of government. Publications are very important to the mission of AGU both intellectually and financially (Figure 1).

Hornberger, George; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Bowring, Samuel; Collins, Curtis; Costa, John; Jackson, Robert; Jaumann, Ralf; Stein, Ross; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Xubin

2004-03-01

178

Harvard Law School Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1946 by 30 law students returned from the war, the Harvard Law School Forum has remained a nonprofit, student-run organization that sponsors a variety of speakers and panel discussions featuring political, literary, and cultural luminaries from around the world. Over the years, many of these discussions have been broadcast on the radio or otherwise recorded and are now available online in their entirety. Past programs currently offered in RealPlayer format include, to name just a few, Henry Kissinger, Timothy Leary, Jimmy Hoffa, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Shimon Peres, Carl Sagan, F. Lee Bailey, Mario Cuomo, Ralph Nader, Helen Thomas, Charlton Heston, and Vince McMahon. The site also features a guide to past programs (sorted by decade and some with photos or associated press clippings), a photo gallery, and information on upcoming speakers. The site is an ongoing project, and additional recordings and other materials will be added as they are prepared or become available.

179

Math Forum: K-12 Geometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geometry Forum is "An Electronic Community for Lovers of Geometry." An NSF-funded project at Swarthmore College, the Geometry Forum is a great place for geometry and math teachers to locate curriculum ideas, software for mathematics, Internet math projects, and information about professional organizations. The student center offers a problem of the week, project of the month, the Internet geometry hunt, student hangouts on the Internet (where students talk about school and math), and students publications. The Geometry Forum has been re-designed and is attractive, easy to navigate, and very friendly. The site is searchable, a Help Desk is included, and the staff is available for questions.

1997-01-01

180

Isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni from zoo animals.  

PubMed

Over a 1-year period, 619 fecal specimens from animals at the Denver Zoo were cultured for Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni. The organism was isolated from 35 animals, including 12 primates, 2 felids, a red panda, 13 hooved animals, 6 birds, and 1 reptile. Of 44 cultured fecal specimens from diarrheal animals, 31.8% were positive for Campylobacter, whereas only 5.6% of 575 specimens from animals without diarrhea were positive (P less than 0.001). Among 25 isolates tested, 12 serotypes were represented; several of these serotypes are commonly associated with Campylobacter enteritis in human beings. Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni was isolated from 8% of 75 wild pigeons trapped on the zoo premises during winter months and from 26% of 75 trapped during March and April (P less than 0.01). PMID:6799468

Luechtefeld, N W; Cambre, R C; Wang, W L

1981-12-01

181

Leptospirosis antibodies in mammals from Rio de Janeiro Zoo, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples from 77 animals belonging to 38 species and 19 families in Rio de Janeiro Zoo, Brazil were tested for antibodies against serovars of Leptospira interrogans by microscopic agglutination test. Antibodies were detected in serum samples of 37.7% of all animals belonging to 10 families. Seropositivity was more common in the Carnivora Canidae (7\\/9), Procyonidae (5\\/9) and the Edentata

W Lilenbaum; R. V Monteiro; P Ristow; S Fraguas; V. S Cardoso; L. P. L Fedullo

2002-01-01

182

Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or disc

Kahn, Sami

2009-07-01

183

Floodwater Forum Proceeding: June 2007  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On June 12 and 13, 2007, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC), the General Services Administration (GSA), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the District of Columbia government sponsored a flood forum for federal and local officials...

2008-01-01

184

Forum on orthophotography: Summary Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Forum on Orthophotography was held on May 15, 1990, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The forum was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Governors' Association, and the National Association of Counties. The purpose of the forum was to expand the understanding and use of orthophoto products among the user community, as well as among those currently considering, or as yet unfamiliar with, the use of these products. It was also intended to provide a forum for assessing requirements for, and interest in, orthophoto products and for the identification and discussion of issues and future needs concerning orthophoto use and coordination. The 1-day forum was organized into three major sessions that focussed on technical aspects, user applications, and management issues. The first session presented a brief background and overview of the technical characteristics of standard and digital orthophotos. The second session included formal presentations by Federal, State, and county government agencies on their current and planned applications of orthophoto products, with particular emphasis on their use within geographic information systems. In the third session, private industry addressed their community's interest, capabilities, and potential role. This session also included a proposal by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service for a national cooperative program for the production of l:12,000-scale orthophotoquad products. In addition to the formal presentations, the forum provided a time for open discussion in which attendees had an opportunity to exchange information and make statements about their needs or other items pertinent to the production and dissemination of orthophoto products. Several agency orthophoto product exhibits and interactive demonstrations were also available throughout the day. This report includes a forum agenda and summaries of the various presentations given by the program participants. The appendixes to the report include a list of forum cosponsoring agencies and cooperating organizations, a summary listing of forum registrants by organizational affiliation, and the forum registration list. Also included in the appendkes is the Higher Resolution Orthophoto Products Survey that was sent to each participant following the forum to assist in the identification of near- and longer-term applications, and the determination of requirements, for higher-resolution orthophoto products.

U.S. Geological Survey

1990-01-01

185

A survey of diabetes prevalence in zoo-housed primates.  

PubMed

In humans, type II diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas is capable of producing insulin but cells do not appropriately respond to insulin with an uptake of glucose. While multiple factors are associated with type II diabetes in humans, a high calorie diet and limited exercise are significant risk factors for the development of this disease. Zoo primates, with relatively high caloric density diets and sedentary lifestyles, may experience similar conditions that could predispose them to the development of diabetes. We surveyed all Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) facilities with primates in their collections to determine the prevalence of diabetes, diagnosis and treatment methods, and treatment outcomes. Nearly 30% of responding institutions reported at least one diabetic primate in their current collection. Although the majority of reported cases were in Old World Monkeys (51%), all major taxonomic groups were represented. Females represented nearly 80% of the diagnosed cases. A wide variety of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment techniques were reported. It is clear from these results diabetes should be considered prominently in decisions relating to diet, weight and activity levels in zoo-housed primates, as well as discussions surrounding animal health and welfare. PMID:22847472

Kuhar, C W; Fuller, G A; Dennis, P M

2013-01-01

186

Endoparasite Infections in Pet and Zoo Birds in Italy  

PubMed Central

Faecal samples were individually collected from pet (n = 63) and zoo (n = 83) birds representing 14 orders and 63 species. All the samples were examined by faecal flotation technique. In a subgroup of samples (n = 75), molecular assays were also used to detect Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts. Overall, 35.6% of the birds harboured parasites (42.2% of zoo birds and 27% of pet birds), including Strongyles-Capillarids (8.9%), Ascaridia (6.8%), Strongyles (5.5%), G. duodenalis Assemblage A (5.3%), Coccidia (4.1%), Cryptosporidium (4%), Porrocaecum (2.7%), Porrocaecum-Capillarids (2%), and Syngamus-Capillarids (0.7%). The zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A and Cryptosporidium were exclusively found in Psittaciformes, with prevalences of 10.3% and 7.7% within this bird group. Zoo birds were more likely to harbor mixed infections (OR?=?14.81) and symptomatic birds to be parasitized (OR?=?4.72). Clinicians should be aware of the public health implications posed by zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblages and Cryptosporidium species in captive birds.

Papini, Roberto; Girivetto, Martine; Marangi, Marianna; Mancianti, Francesca; Giangaspero, Annunziata

2012-01-01

187

Intestinal parasites in various animals at a zoo in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal parasites from different groups of mammals housed in a zoological garden in Malaysia. A total of 197 faecal samples were collected randomly from various primates (99), hoofed mammals (70) and feline (28). It was discovered that 89.3% of feline, 54.5% of primates and 45.7% of hoofed mammals were infected with intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasites found in primates were Balantidium coli (19.2%), Cryptosporidium spp. (14.1%), hookworm (10.1%), Trichuris spp. (5.1%), Ascaris (4.0%) and Blastocystis spp. (2.0%). For hoofed mammals, hookworm had the highest prevalence (34.3%) followed by Trichuris spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. (5.7%). Meanwhile, for feline, Toxocara cati was the most prevalent (64.3%), followed by Cryptosporidium spp. (14.3%), Spirometra spp. (7.1%), and hookworm (3.6%). Animals that were infected were all asymptomatic with low parasite load. Routine monitoring of the presence of parasites in animals kept in the zoo is imperative in assisting zoo management in the formulation and implementation of preventive and control measures against the spread of infectious parasitic diseases among animals within the zoo or to humans. PMID:18723289

Lim, Y A L; Ngui, R; Shukri, J; Rohela, M; Mat Naim, H R

2008-10-20

188

Global Policy Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Global Policy Forum (GPF) monitors the United Nations' global policy making. Based in New York City, the internationally represented GPF has consultative status at the UN. Their visually simple, information-rich Website is divided into the following subsections: UN Financial Crisis, Security Council, Social/ Economic Policy, NGOs, Nations and States, and UN Reform. The content includes essays from the GPF staff, issue summaries, excerpts from conference presentations, news articles, and reports from the UN and other government agencies. Other special in-depth sections on the Iraq crisis, international justice, globalization, and additional timely topics are definitely worth a look. Also, check out GPF's What's New section to keep on top of current UN issues -- for instance, this week's What's New contains critical articles and essays on middle east peace negotiation, sanctions against Iraq, and the rumblings of a possible second genocide in Rwanda, among other topics. In addition, the GPF site offers a publications list, numerous links, an electronic mailing list, a search engine, an index, and a virtual visitors center.

189

The green highway forum  

SciTech Connect

In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

NONE

2006-07-01

190

Zoos through the Lens of the IUCN Red List: A Global Metapopulation Approach to Support Conservation Breeding Programs  

PubMed Central

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful.

Conde, Dalia A.; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K.; Jones, Owen R.

2013-01-01

191

Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs.  

PubMed

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K; Jones, Owen R

2013-01-01

192

Golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) acclimation to a new zoo habitat: The effect of visitor presence on behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoos play an increasingly important role in primate conservation due to the fact that primate species are increasingly endangered in the wild. Zoos now play a key role by preserving examples of genetic variation. The well-being of zoo animals is therefore of utmost concern. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of visitor presence on a newly

Lindsay Jane Ingram

2009-01-01

193

77 FR 43167 - Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Number USCG-2012-0588] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY AGENCY: Coast...as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0588 Safety Zone; Electronic Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY. (a)...

2012-07-24

194

The educational claims of zoos: where do we go from here?  

PubMed

Zoos exude a certain self-confidence regarding their roles as education providers. Indeed, the education outputs of zoos are, at face value, pretty impressive, with most investing in learning opportunities for leisure visitors, education groups and in some cases, as part of their in situ programs. However, these outputs are not necessarily reliable indicators of the educational achievements of zoos. Quantity does not necessarily equate to quality, just as outputs do not necessarily lead to outcomes. Zoo-accreditation organizations such as the AZA and EAZA offer us clear insight into the strategic vision underpinning the education goals for zoo visitors; a heightened appreciation of the value of biodiversity and a connectedness with the natural world. Unsurprisingly, most zoos have educational goals that ally neatly with the vision of their respective accreditation body. Consequently, we are left with fairly narrow, top-down educational goals. This does not necessarily sit well with what we know about the unpredictability of "free choice" learning in environments such as zoos and aquariums, or what is known about public science communication. Research that seeks to explore the impacts of zoo visits often focuses on evaluating performance based on educational goals and the findings are used as a means of providing evidence of institutional achievement. However, any visitor outcome that falls outside of this narrow range could well be missed by the research. In this article, we propose that research that takes unpredictable and unexpected outcomes into account is necessary and overdue. PMID:22674295

Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

2013-01-01

195

An outbreak of salmonellosis among children attending a reptile exhibit at a zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In January 1996, an outbreak of diarrhea caused by Salmonella Enteritidis occurred in children attending a Komodo dragon exhibit at a metropolitan zoo. We sought to determine the extent of the outbreak and mode of transmission. Study design: A case-control study was conducted. Controls were randomly selected from zoo membership lists and matched to patients by age group and

Cindy R. Friedman; Christine Torigian; Pamela J. Shillam; Richard E. Hoffman; David Heltze; James L. Beebe; Georgia Malcolm; Wallis E. DeWitt; Lori Hutwagner; Patricia M. Griffin

1998-01-01

196

A Curriculum Plan for the Columbus Zoo Aquarium. Grades 3 through 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum plan is submitted as a framework for developing educational programs at the Columbus Zoo Aquarium (CZA) for elementary school students in grades 3 through 6. It is intended to provide support and assistance to those involved with CZA programs. Major sections include: (1) "Review of Columbus Zoo's Educational Programs"; (2)…

Alsdorf, Brian

197

Fruit Bats, Cats, and Naked Mole Rats: Lifelong Learning at the Zoo. ERIC/CSMEE Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An informal study found that zoo visitors want to know not just the name, weight, and age of animals in a collection, but also about diet, reproduction, life span, and behavioral characteristics. What kinds of learning opportunities, beyond enhanced signage, can be offered to the sophisticated new breed of visitors in zoos, aquariums, and nature…

Thomson, Barbara S.; Diem, Jason J.

198

Serologic survey of trichinellosis in wild mammals kept in a Mexico City Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

A serologic survey of Trichinella infection was carried out to determine the prevalence of this parasitosis among wild mammals kept in captivity at the Chapultepec Zoo. This was prompted by the necropsy finding of a heavy Trichinella infection in a Canadian polar bear (Ursus maritimus) that had been kept at the Zoo for more than 11 years. The parasites recovered

L. Yépez-Mulia; C. Arriaga; M. A. Peña; F. Gual; G. Ortega-Pierres

1996-01-01

199

Patterns of injury in zoo-housed spider monkeys: A problem with males?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aggression among wild spider monkeys is most frequently reported to occur between the sexes, with adult males directing aggression towards adult females and the aggression is normally non-injurious. After two severe instances of aggression in the group of spider monkeys housed at Chester Zoo, we developed a questionnaire to investigate the frequency, direction and possible reasons for aggression in zoo-housed

Nick Davis; Colleen M. Schaffner; Stephanie Wehnelt

2009-01-01

200

Identification of Plasmodium relictum causing mortality in penguins ( Spheniscus magellanicus) from São Paulo Zoo, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum in Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) from São Paulo Zoo. The disease was highly infective among the birds and was clinically characterized by its acute course and high mortality. The penguins of São Paulo Zoo were housed for at least 2 years without malaria; however, they had always been maintained in an

Marina Galvão Bueno; Rodrigo Pinho Gomez Lopez; Regiane Maria Tironi de Menezes; Maria de Jesus Costa-Nascimento; Giselle Fernandes Maciel de Castro Lima; Radamés Abrantes de Sousa Araújo; Fernanda Junqueira Vaz Guida; Karin Kirchgatter

2010-01-01

201

Monkeying around: Examining the effects of a community zoo on the science achievement of third graders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This investigation examined the efficacy of a model of integrated science and literacy instruction situated at a community zoo. Three intact cohorts of third grade urban students received instruction via different treatments: inquiry-based instruction at a zoo; inquiry-based instruction at school; and activity-based instruction at a zoo. All three treatment conditions promoted increased science achievement. There was no difference between the zoo groups at post-test; however the classroom group outperformed both zoo groups. When examined in light of contextual factors (differences in socioeconomic status, teacher level of experience, familiarity of the learning environment), results suggest the effectiveness of the integrated instructional model in promoting increased science achievement. In planning instruction, teachers should consider the novelty of a learning environment, student interest, and how texts can support inquiry.

Kenny, Heather A.

202

Solid state sciences committee forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 1991 SSSC Forum was conducted under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy's Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) and cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). The Forum was the culmination of a year-long dissemination effort following up the NCR study Materials Science and Engineering for the 1990s that was released in September of 1989 and successfully brought together experts and policy makers in the field of advanced materials processing to discuss issues pertinent to the field. Support for the Forum was provided by the Air Force office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the office of Naval Research (ONR).

Smith, Philip

1992-05-01

203

The Animal Welfare Act and the zoo: A positive approach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Interpretations of the Animal Welfare Act and other regulations governing use of research animals in the United States are changing. Recent amendments to the Act have resulted in the inclusion of more species under the umbrella of regulation. The role of the zoo and wildlife veterinarian should be that of leading his or her institution into a positive endorsement of these regulations and their application. Recent additions to the Code of Federal Regulations spell out the roles of the veterinarian and the Animal Care and Use Committee at an institution.

Olsen, G.H.

1989-01-01

204

Teachers' Online Discussion Forums in Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia has special online discussion forums for teachers as part of its internet website. The study surveys those teachers' online forums and reports the number of participants, number of threads and responses, topics with the highest and lowest posts and the forums role in teachers' professional development and…

Al-Jarf, Reima

2006-01-01

205

Signal Processing for Biometric Systems [DSP Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

This IEEE signal processing magazine (SPM) forum discuses signal processing applications, technologies, requirements, and standardization of biometric systems. The forum members bring their expert insights into issues such as biometric security, privacy, and multibiometric and fusion techniques. The invited forum members are Prof. Anil K. Jain of Michigan State University, Prof. Rama Chellappa of the University of Maryland, Dr. Stark

Anil K. Jain; Rama Chellappa; Stark C. Draper; Nasir Memon; P. Jonathon Phillips; Anthony Vetro

2007-01-01

206

Guide to Indexing "The Forum."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents the policies and procedures used by the North Dakota State University Libraries for indexing "The Forum," a daily newspaper serving eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota. The guide includes lists of material to be included and excluded, timetables for updating the index, duties of the editor and the library clerk, rules…

Bakken, Lori; Miller, Michael M.

207

The next step. Youth Forum.  

PubMed

Almost 20% of the world's population is aged 15-24 years. Since young people's needs are different from those of adults, they should play a key role in population and development issues. In an attempt to ensure that young people are involved in all stages of the implementation of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) program of action, the Youth Forum was held in The Hague, Netherlands, during February 6-7, 1999, just before the Hague Forum. Bringing together 132 young people from youth and other organizations from 111 countries, the Youth Forum provided young people with the opportunity to review achievements made since the ICPD, express their views and concerns, and offer recommendations to governments, the UN system, other intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and other young people. Key themes and issues considered during the forum were education, individual development, sexual and reproductive health, violence, human rights, gender, governments and democracy, and youth participation. Young people have been sharing their experiences and innovative ideas to strengthen their ability to contribute to the implementation of the ICPD program of action at the grassroots level. PMID:12322197

1999-01-01

208

Math Forum: Elementary Problems Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The well known Math Forum (formerly from Swarthmore College, discussed in the October 20, 1995 issue of The Scout Report), has meta-pages specifically for elementary school math teachers. One of the highlights of the Problems and Activities section is Ruth Carver's elementary problem of the week, with an interactive problem and solution archive back to the fall of 1995.

1995-01-01

209

An exploratory study of zoo visitors' exhibit experiences and reactions.  

PubMed

Visiting a zoo or aquarium is not only fun, but can also have a positive impact on visitors' knowledge and attitudes regarding animals and the environment. The biggest challenge, however, is for these institutions to strategically provide opportunities for cognitive and affective learning while simultaneously facilitating enjoyment and fun. Recent studies in zoos and aquaria have examined various factors that can influence learning such as engaging visitors' emotions or connecting with visitors' prior knowledge and interests. The intent of the current study was to further this line of investigation and explore the relationship between visitors' predispositions and their cognitive and affective experiences and reactions as they walked through an animal exhibit. We selected three indoor immersion exhibits and one outdoor naturalistic exhibit for the study to obtain a wide range of different animals and exhibit settings. Research assistants randomly intercepted visitors leaving the exhibits and asked, among other things, the extent they experienced certain thoughts and feelings while they were walking through the exhibits. Results revealed that visitors' emotional responses to viewing animals were key experiences along with opportunities for introspection and reflection during their time in the exhibits. Implications of the study are discussed in reference to providing both fun and meaningful learning experiences for visitors. PMID:23740472

Luebke, Jerry F; Matiasek, Jennifer

2013-01-01

210

Nuclear waste disposal educational forum  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-10-18

211

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program hosted the 2012 NCI SBIR Investor Forum on April 18, 2012 in Santa Clara, CA. This year’s meeting brought together nearly 200 SBIR-funded companies, investors, venture capitalists, strategic partners, and business leaders from the biotech and pharmaceutical industries, and featured presentations from 18 top NCI SBIR-funded companies with innovative cancer-related technologies on the brink of commercialization.

212

2nd World Water Forum.  

PubMed

The world is facing a water crisis. About one billion people lack access to safe water and three billion to appropriate sanitation. There will probably be two billion extra people on the planet by 2025; so while today's shortages are for fresh water and sanitation, tomorrow's are predicted to be for growing crops. Already, 10% of world food production is drawing down underground water faster than the recharge rates. Water also threatens to cause conflicts between regions--a state of affairs that is expected to worsen as this century progresses. To raise public awareness of these issues and pressurize politicians to act, the World Water Commission (WWC) held a Forum in March 2000 in The Hague. The Forum collected together a huge range of people from governments, non-government organizations (NGOs), workers for the environment and development, private sector water providers, trades unions and scientific institutes. They all discussed a document (World Water Vision: A Water Secure World, referred to as the Vision) drawn up by the WWC as a basis for action. The Forum culminated in a meeting of ministers from over 140 governments. PMID:11037279

Barnaby, W

2000-01-01

213

Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in South Carolina Zoos  

PubMed Central

Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals.

Nelder, Mark P.; Swanson, Dustin A.; Adler, Peter H.; Grogan, William L.

2010-01-01

214

Biting midges of the genus Culicoides in South Carolina zoos.  

PubMed

Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

Nelder, Mark P; Swanson, Dustin A; Adler, Peter H; Grogan, William L

2010-01-01

215

Brookfield Zoo: In Search of The Ways of Knowing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In Search of Ways of Knowing is an online Adventure Trail from the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois. The Adventure Trails each offer an "interactive journey to explore conservation efforts worldwide." Visitors to this Web site -- geared toward kids but fun for anyone -- will find a lively, virtual journey to the village of Epulu in central Africa's Ituri forest. With a choose-your-own-adventure-style educational game format, players hide from a rampaging elephant, snack on beetle grubs, and identify animal sounds in the dark of night. Players also learn about the people and wildlife of the area (with help from your Forest Factbook and the four local kids you meet on the way). Moral of the story: have respect for other ways of knowing. Great graphics and diverse story options make this fun Web site worth a repeat visit.

216

Efficient and Exact Visibility Sorting of Zoo-Mesh Data Sets.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The authors describe the SXMPVO algorithm for performing a visibility ordering zoo-meshed polyhedra. The algorithm runs in practice in linear time and the visibility ordering which it produces is exact.

R. Cook N. Max C. Silva P. Williams

2001-01-01

217

Why Are They Doing That? Animal Investigations at the Local Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities that link classroom science to real world scientific ventures. Uses field trips to zoos or wildlife centers for in-depth learning experiences that help students observe, investigate, and explore issues in animal science. (SAH)

Melber, Leah M.

2001-01-01

218

Effects of porcine zona pellucida immunocontraceptives in zoo felids.  

PubMed

Methods of contraception are necessary for management of zoo felids; however, the most commonly used contraceptive (melengestrol acetate implant) is associated with serious adverse reactions with long-term use. Porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccines are promising as contraceptives, but their safety in zoo felids has not been tested. pZP vaccine was administered to 27 female felids representing 10 species, including African lion (Panthera leo), Asian leopard (P. pardus), jaguar (P. onca), tiger (P. tigris), snow leopard (P. uncia), cougar (Felis concolor), Siberian lynx (F. lynx), Canada lynx (F. canadensis), serval (F. serval), and bobcat (F. rufus), in 15 facilities. Over 6 wk, each animal received three i.m. injections of 65 microg pZP with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or carbopol as the adjuvant. Behavioral signs of estrus were seen in 14 of the vaccinated felids. An unacceptably high incidence of adverse reactions was seen including injection site swelling, lameness, limb swelling, or abscessation (or all) in five felids after injection with FCA as the initial adjuvant. Adverse behavioral signs, including increased irritability and aggression, were seen in four felids. Six of the felids were assayed for antibodies against pZP during the 12 mo after vaccination; all showed antibody production. Antibody levels appeared to peak 1-4 mo after vaccination began, although elevated antibody levels persisted in two animals for > 12 mo after the first injection. All vaccinated felids were ovariohysterectomized 3-13 mo after vaccination. Folliculogenesis was present in all treated animals, and there was no histopathologic evidence of inflammatory damage to ovaries. Contraceptive efficacy was not specifically evaluated in this study; however, two of the three felids housed with an intact male became pregnant during the study, one of which gave birth to healthy cubs. PMID:15526881

Harrenstien, Lisa A; Munson, Linda; Chassy, Lisa M; Liu, Irwin K M; Kirkpatrick, Jay F

2004-09-01

219

Low pathogenic influenza A virus activity at avian interfaces in Ohio zoos, 2006-2009.  

PubMed

This investigation to examine influenza A virus activity in avian species at four Ohio zoos was initiated to better understand the ecology of avian-origin influenza A (AIV) virus in wild aquatic birds and the possibility of spill-over of such viruses into captive zoo birds, both native and foreign species. Virus isolation efforts resulted in the recovery of three low pathogenic (LP) AIV isolates (one H7N3 and two H3N6) from oral-pharyngeal or cloacal swabs collected from over 1000 zoo birds representing 94 species. In addition, 21 LPAIV isolates possessing H3N6, H4N6, or H7N3 subtype combinations were recovered from 627 (3.3%) environmental fecal samples collected from outdoor habitats accessible to zoo and wild birds. Analysis of oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected from free-ranging mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) live-trapped at one zoo in 2007 resulted in the recovery of 164 LPAIV isolates (48% of samples) representing five HA and six NA subtypes and at least nine HA-NA combinations. The high frequency of isolate recovery is undoubtedly due to the capture and holding of wild ducks in a common pen before relocation. Serologic analyses using an agar gel immune diffusion assay detected antibodies to the influenza A virus type-specific antigen in 147 of 1237 (11.9%) zoo bird sera and in 14 of 154 (9%) wild mallard sera. Additional analyses of a limited number of zoo bird sera demonstrated HA- and NA-inhibition activity to 15 HA and nine NA subtypes. The spectrum of HA antibodies indicate antibody diversity of AIV infecting zoo birds; however, the contribution of heterologous cross-reactions and steric interference was not ruled out. This proactive investigation documented that antigenically diverse LPAIVs were active in all three components of the avian zoologic-wild bird interfaces at Ohio zoos (zoo birds, the environment, and wild birds). The resulting baseline data provides insight and justification for preventive medicine strategies for zoo birds. PMID:24283133

Nolting, Jacqueline M; Dennis, Patricia; Long, Lindsey; Holtvoigt, Lauren; Brown, Deniele; King, Mary Jo; Shellbarger, Wynonna; Hanley, Chris; Killian, Mary Lea; Slemons, Richard D

2013-09-01

220

Conservation caring: measuring the influence of zoo visitors' connection to wildlife on pro-conservation behaviors.  

PubMed

Zoos in the 21st century are striving to make effective contributions to conservation. Although zoos are extremely popular and host over 600 million visitors worldwide, one challenge zoos face is how to effectively engage visitors and raise awareness and action for conservation. To this end, zoos commonly rely on charismatic megafauna, which have been shown to elicit a connection with zoo visitors. However, little is known about how to measure a connection to a species or how this connection may influence conservation behaviors. This study had two sequential objectives. The first was to develop a scale to measure visitors' connection to a species (Conservation Caring). The second was to investigate the relationship of Conservation Caring to pro-conservation behaviors, following a zoo experience. Pre- (n = 411) and post-visit (n = 452) responses were collected from three sites in order to assess the reliability and validity of a scale to measure Conservation Caring. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between Conservation Caring and pro-conservation behaviors. Conservation Caring was deemed a valid and reliable scale and was a strong predictor of species oriented behaviors (? = 0.62), for example, "adopting" an animal, but a weak predictor for biodiversity oriented behaviors (? = 0.07), for example, supporting sustainability policies. Results support the role zoos can play in fostering a connection to wildlife and stimulating pro-conservation behaviors. Additionally, visitors connected to a wide array of animals. On the basis of these results, zoos may recruit a wider assemblage of species as potential flagships. PMID:23877958

Skibins, Jeffrey C; Powell, Robert B

2013-01-01

221

Prevalence of antibody to bovine herpesvirus 1 in wild ruminants captive in United States zoos.  

PubMed

Serum samples (n = 1,146) representing 100 species of exotic ruminants now captive in United States zoos were assayed for neutralizing antibody to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus (bovine herpesvirus 1). Thirty-four animals (3%) of 11 species had antibody to IBR virus. Because of the low prevalence of IBR antibody found, it was concluded that vaccination against IBR virus probably is not necessary for captive wild ruminants in United States zoos. PMID:6315661

Doyle, L G; Heuschele, W P

1983-12-01

222

Peculiar Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A peculiar galaxy is an object that cannot be easily classified as a SPIRAL, ELLIPTICAL, or IRREGULAR GALAXY based on its optical morphology. They constitute between 5% and 10% of the known galaxy population, although most `normal' galaxies will show peculiar features if examined carefully. Peculiar galaxies show a great diversity of form. The vast majority can be attributed to strong gravitation...

Higdon, J.; Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

223

An epidemiological approach to welfare research in zoos: the Elephant Welfare Project.  

PubMed

Multi-institutional studies of welfare have proven to be valuable in zoos but are hampered by limited sample sizes and difficulty in evaluating more than just a few welfare indicators. To more clearly understand how interactions of husbandry factors influence the interrelationships among welfare outcomes, epidemiological approaches are needed as well as multifactorial assessments of welfare. Many questions have been raised about the housing and care of elephants in zoos and whether their environmental and social needs are being met in a manner that promotes good welfare. This article describes the background and rationale for a large-scale study of elephant welfare in North American zoos funded by the (U.S.) Institute of Museum and Library Services. The goals of this project are to document the prevalence of positive and negative welfare states in 291 elephants exhibited in 72 Association of Zoos and Aquariums zoos and then determine the environmental, management, and husbandry factors that impact elephant welfare. This research is the largest scale nonhuman animal welfare project ever undertaken by the zoo community, and the scope of environmental variables and welfare outcomes measured is unprecedented. PMID:24079487

Carlstead, Kathy; Mench, Joy A; Meehan, Cheryl; Brown, Janine L

2013-01-01

224

An Exploratory Study of Canadian Aboriginal Online Health Care Forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet-based discussion forums provide access to health information and social support, and serve as a resource for others. This investigation analyzed health-oriented Aboriginal Internet discussion forum (Forum A; Forum B) conversations. The findings were framed with Nutbeam's model of health literacy. Discussions within Forum B were centralized around issues of political activism and advocacy regarding Aboriginal health care. Activity in

Lorie Donelle; Laurie Hoffman-Goetz

2008-01-01

225

The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum.  

PubMed

The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, 9-12 September 2013The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum was attended by a little over 100 participants from pharma, contract research, instrument vendors and academia. The Forum was divided into six broad themes, which included collaborative partnerships between CROs and pharmaceutical companies, technology developments, problem solving, the bioanalytical toolbox, biomarker analysis and regulations in bioanalysis. PMID:24423590

Houghton, Richard

2014-01-01

226

DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the deepest images to date of the universe, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST), reveals thousands of faint galaxies at the detection limit of present day telescopes. Peering across a large volume of the observable cosmos, Hubble resolves thousands of galaxies from five to twelve billion light-years away. The light from these remote objects has taken billions of years to cross the expanding universe, making these distant galaxies fossil evidence' of events that happened when the universe was one-third its present age. A fraction of the galaxies in this image belong to a cluster located nine billion light-years away. Though the field of view (at the cluster's distance) is only two million light-years across, it contains a multitude of fragmentary objects. (By comparison, the two million light-years between our Milky Way galaxy and its nearest large companion galaxy, in the constellation Andromeda, is essentially empty space!) Very few of the cluster's members are recognizable as normal spiral galaxies (like our Milky Way), although some elongated members might be edge-on disks. Among this zoo of odd galaxies are ``tadpole-like'' objects, disturbed and apparently merging systems dubbed 'train-wrecks,' and a multitude of faint, tiny shards and fragments, dwarf galaxies or possibly an unknown population of objects. However, the cluster also contains red galaxies that resemble mature examples of today's elliptical galaxies. Their red color comes from older stars that must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2. The picture was taken in intervals between May 11 and June 15, 1994 and required an 18-hour long exposure, over 32 orbits of HST, to reveal objects down to 29th magnitude. [bottom right] A close up view of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C324 used to locate the cluster. The galaxy is nine billion light-years away as measured by its spectral redshift (z=1.2), and located in the constellation Serpens. Based on the colors and the statistical distribution of the galaxies in 3C 324's vicinity, astronomers conclude a remote cluster is at the same distance as a radio galaxy. [center right] This pair of elliptical galaxies, seen together with a few fainter companions, is remarkably similar in shape, light distribution, and color to their present day descendants. This Hubble image provides evidence that ellipticals formed remarkably early in the universe. [top right] Some of the objects in this compact tangled group resemble today's spiral galaxies. However, they have irregular shapes and appear disrupted and asymmetric. This might be due to a high frequency of galaxy collisions and close encounters in the early universe. Credit: Mark Dickinson (STScI) and NASA

2002-01-01

227

Chromosomal homeologies between human, harbor seal ( Phoca vitulina ) and the putative ancestral carnivore karyotype revealed by Zoo-FISH  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We report on the construction of the first comparative Zoo-FISH map of a marine mammal. Zoo-FISH with DNA probes from a human\\u000a chromosome-specific library to metaphase spreads of the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) disclosed 31 conserved syntenic segments covering the complete autosomal complement and the X chromosome. Comparison with\\u000a Zoo-FISH maps of other species reveals that the harbor seal

Lutz Frönicke; Jutta Müller-Navia; Konstantinos Romanakis; Harry Scherthan

1997-01-01

228

Columbia News Video Forum Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over the past few years, more and more universities and colleges have created video archives of important and timely conferences, proceedings, scholarly lectures, and have placed them online. Columbia University has created this fine archive that highlights many of these types of events, with many of them featuring the scholars in residence at the school. The video forum archive features thematically bundled commentaries (usually lasting close to one hour) on a variety of topics, such as globalization (featuring Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz), and the 21st century American city, which features Bernard Tschumi and Kenneth Jackson, the noted urban historian.

229

"Our Zoo to You": The Link between Zoo Animals in the Classroom and Science and Literacy Concepts in First-Grade Journal Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined first-grade students' journal writing to determine how placing live zoo animals in classrooms for science education links to students' emergent and early writing. Students were asked to write journal entries during the daily language arts period. Although no direct instruction in informational text writing was offered, teachers…

Wilson, Kathleen; Trainin, Guy; Laughridge, Virginia; Brooks, David; Wickless, Mimi

2011-01-01

230

Our Zoo To You: The link between zoo animals in the classroom and science and literacy concepts in first-grade journal writing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined first-grade students’ journal writing to determine how placing live zoo animals in classrooms for science education links to students’ emergent and early writing. Students were asked to write journal entries during the daily language arts period. Although no direct instruction in informational text writing was offered, teachers suggested that journal writing about the current science topic or

Kathleen Wilson; Guy Trainin; Virginia Laughridge; David Brooks; Mimi Wickless

2011-01-01

231

Forum, Changing Values: Where are We Going?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This issue of "Forum" magazine for adults and accompanying teaching units for use with students of all age levels deals with recent value trends. "Forum" is one of a group of educational publications and teaching units that JC Penney stores provide for local community groups and school consumer education programs. The magazine contains varied…

Haney, Peggy H., Ed.; And Others

232

Journal of the Proceedings, School Law Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the speeches given at the 1972 New Jersey School Law Forum. The Forum is held to encourage the research of timely legal issues involving the structure and operation of the New Jersey public schools, to assist the school law practitioner by affording him the opportunity to hear and discuss research and opinion on selected…

New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

233

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Registration  

Cancer.gov

Thank you for your interest in the 2014 NCI SBIR Investor Forum. The forum is designed for investors, venture capitalists, and strategic partners including pharmaceutical and device companies, and philanthropic organizations that fund innovative cancer-related technologies. We hope to have the opportunity to see you at the event.

234

The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum effectively acts as the United Kingdom's Nuclear Data Committee. As such it is the interface between the UK nuclear data community and international nuclear data centres. This paper outlines the Forum's terms of reference and describes some of its recent activities.

Desmond MacMahon; Robin Forrest; Steven Judge

2005-01-01

235

An object-oriented graphical preprocessor FORUM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report presents issues related to building an aggregative model of an object to be analyzed and transforming this kind of model into a detailed finite element model using a problem-oriented graphical preprocessor FORUM which is part of the SCAD software system. The FORUM preprocessor builds an aggregative object model that includes structural parts such as columns, beams, walls, floor

Eduard Z. Kryksunov; Evgeny B. Zelivyanskiy

236

Sarcocystosis among Wild Captive and Zoo Animals in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Sarcocystis sp. infection was investigated in 20 necropsied captive wild mammals and 20 birds in 2 petting zoos in Malaysia. The gross post-mortem lesions in mammals showed marbling of the liver with uniform congestion of the intestine, and for birds, there was atrophy of the sternal muscles with hemorrhage and edema of the lungs in 2 birds. Naked eye examination was used for detection of macroscopic sarcocysts, and muscle squash for microscopic type. Only microscopically visible cysts were detected in 8 animals and species identification was not possible. Histological examination of the sections of infected skeletal muscles showed more than 5 sarcocysts in each specimen. No leukocytic infiltration was seen in affected organs. The shape of the cysts was elongated or circular, and the mean size reached 254 × 24.5 µm and the thickness of the wall up to 2.5 µm. Two stages were recognized in the cysts, the peripheral metrocytes and large numbers of crescent shaped merozoites. Out of 40 animals examined, 3 mammals and 5 birds were positive (20%). The infection rate was 15% and 25% in mammals and birds, respectively. Regarding the organs, the infection rate was 50% in the skeletal muscles followed by tongue and heart (37.5%), diaphragm (25%), and esophagus (12.5%). Further ultrastructural studies are required to identify the species of Sarcocystis that infect captive wild animals and their possible role in zoonosis.

Vellayan, Subramaniam; Omar, Effat; Abdullah, Suliman; Mat Desa, Noryatimah

2010-01-01

237

Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after…

Patrick, Patricia; Mathews, Cathy; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

2013-01-01

238

MoZis: mobile zoo information system: a case study for the city of Osnabrueck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a new project of the Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing, funded by the German Federal Foundation for the Environment (DBU, Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt www.dbu.de). The goal of this project is to develop a mobile zoo information system for Pocket PCs and Smart phones. Visitors of the zoo will be able to use their own mobile devices or use Pocket PCs, which could be borrowed from the zoo to navigate around the zoo's facilities. The system will also provide additional multimedia based information such as audio-based material, animal video clips, and maps of their natural habitat. People could have access to the project at the zoo via wireless local area network or by downloading the necessary files using a home internet connection. Our software environment consists of proprietary and non-proprietary software solutions in order to make it as flexible as possible. Our first prototype was developed with Visual Studio 2003 and Visual Basic.Net.

Michel, Ulrich

2007-10-01

239

Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Strain from Fecal Samples of Zoo Animal  

PubMed Central

The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment.

Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

2013-01-01

240

Siamangs (Hylobates syndactylus) and White-Cheeked Gibbons (Hylobates leucogenys) Show Few Behavioral Differences Related to Zoo Attendance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of visitors on behavior and welfare of nonhuman animals in the zoo has been an active research topic during the last few decades. Although research has variously shown negative or positive impacts of zoo visitors on animals in captivity, previous primate research at Disney's Animal Kingdom® suggests the importance of visual barriers in allowing animals to cope with

Kathleen N. Smith; Christopher W. Kuhar

2010-01-01

241

Pathways for Success in Developing a Nature Trail at a Zoo: A Mixed-Methods Evaluative Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Modern zoos serve as tourist attractions and recreational facilities, while providing educational outreach programs in ecology, conservation, and animal needs. However, in the 21st century, there has been a negative backlash of people associating zoos with animals being shut away in cages or pits. This case study included an examination of the…

Hendrickson, Carol F.

2010-01-01

242

Influence of visitor presence on the behaviour of captive lion-tailed macaques ( Macaca silenus) housed in Indian zoos  

Microsoft Academic Search

To study the influence of ‘visitor presence’ on captive lion-tailed macaques, a behavioural study (Short Term Effects) was conducted on 30 individuals housed in 8 zoos across India. The study animals were observed on ‘visitor presence’ days and on ‘visitor absence’ days, which were zoo holidays. To record the long-term impact of ‘visitor presence’ on captive primate behaviour, a study

Avanti Mallapur; Anindya Sinha; Natalie Waran

2005-01-01

243

Adolescent Learning in the Zoo: Embedding a Non-Formal Learning Environment to Teach Formal Aspects of Vertebrate Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of a zoo visit in terms of learning and retention of knowledge concerning the adaptations and behavior of vertebrate species. Basis of the work was the concept of implementing zoo visits as an out-of-school setting for formal, curriculum based learning. Our theoretical framework centers on the…

Randler, Christoph; Kummer, Barbara; Wilhelm, Christian

2012-01-01

244

Measuring Zoo Visitor Learning and Understanding about Orangutans: Evaluation to Enhance Learning Outcomes and to Foster Conservation Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the endangered status of the orangutan, very little research has sought to understand what people know about this species or the conservation challenges they face. As zoos are well placed to influence such understandings, the present study sought to explore knowledge following a visit to orangutan exhibits at three Australian zoos

Pearson, Elissa L.; Dorrian, Jillian; Litchfield, Carla A.

2013-01-01

245

An examination of environmental collective identity development across three life-stages: The contribution of social public experiences at zoos  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research breaks ground toward a revised theory of how collective environmental identity is associated with pro-environmental behaviors. My research comprises three activities that examined the experiences of three groups of people who claim zoo visiting as an important part of their life-story. The three studied groups were; conservation biologists who describe zoo experiences as having significant formative role in

John Robert Fraser

2009-01-01

246

Other Galaxies and Active Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter covers the characteristics of other normal galaxies, active galaxies, and finding distances to other galaxies, including the distance-scale ladder. It also includes large-scale structure (galaxy clusters and collisions and superclusters). This website is part of Astronomy notes, an educational resource for introductory astronomy classes for undergraduates.

Strobel, Nick

2007-12-11

247

An ecological study of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a The seasonal changes for a year in the physico-chemical variables of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton are traced.\\u000a The important features of the pond water are its low oxygen content, slight alkalinity, high organic content, scarcity of\\u000a phyto-plankton and abundance of zoo-plankton and mussels.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a The dominant zoo-plankton consisted of Copepods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 3. \\u000a Interrelationship existing between the environmental

S. V. Ganapati

1943-01-01

248

Analysis of post-blood meal flight distances in mosquitoes utilizing zoo animal blood meals  

PubMed Central

We assessed the post-blood meal flight distance of four mosquito species in a unique environment using blood meal analysis. Mosquitoes were trapped at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, NM, and the blood source of blood-engorged mosquitoes was identified. The distance from the enclosure of the animal serving as a blood source to the trap site was then determined. We found that mosquitoes captured at the zoo flew no more than 170 m with an average distance of 106.7 m after taking a blood meal. This is the first study in which the flight distance of wild mosquitoes has been assessed using blood meal analysis and the first in which zoo animals have served as the exclusive source of blood meals.

Greenberg, Jacob A.; DiMenna, Mark A.; Hanelt, Ben

2012-01-01

249

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo Academy: Where Science Education Comes to Life!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo has become a leader in both informal and formal science education. Its Zoo Academy is one example of an effective nontraditional teaching model for science education. The academy has become an excellent work-based learning model and demonstrates how to collaborate and form partnerships successfully between school districts and the nonprofit/business world. From the Zoo Academy model, over 24 academy programs and five informal summer career camps have been developed and used with students in the Omaha Metropolitan area. This unique opportunity places students in a rich learning environment where they can make discoveries about the natural world and apply the knowledge gained to real-world situations.

Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

2008-01-01

250

Occupational exposure to allergenic mites in a Polish zoo.  

PubMed

The study was carried out from April 2000-March 2001. During this period 49 samples of dust, litter, debris and residues from cages and run-offs of mammals, birds and reptiles in the Silesian Zoo, were examined for the presence of mites, especially the allergenic taxa. Mites were extracted using the Berlese method and preserved in 70 % ethanol. For identification, the mites were mounted in Hoyer's medium on microscope slides. Mites were found in 44 of 49 samples analyzed (89.8 %). A total of 5,097 mites were collected, from which 60.3 % were found in samples collected in spring, whereas only 13 % in summer and 24.1 % in autumn. The remaining 2.6 % of the total mite population was found in winter. Majority of mites (82.7 %) were collected from aviaries of macaws and cockatiels (Ara ararauna and Nymphicus hollandicus). A total of 10 species of astigmatid mites were identified that belong to 4 families--Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, Anoetidae and Pyroglyphidae. Generally, the allergenic mites of the order Astigmata constituted 49.5 % of the total count. Among them Acarus farris was predominant (34 % of the total count), followed by Tyrophagus putrescentiae (4.7 %), Caloglyphus sp. (4.35 %) and Acarus immobilis (4.31 %). Dermatophagoides farinae, the house-dust-mite species, was for the first time found in this environment. D. farinae (0.05 % of the total population) was associated with parrots, canids and artiodactyls. Summarizing, it should be stressed, that cages and run-offs of different mammals, aviaries of parrots and terrariums of snakes are important sources of some allergenic mites, especially A. farris and T. putrescentiae, that might cause allergies in workers. PMID:15236495

Solarz, Krzysztof; Szilman, Piotr; Szilman, Ewa

2004-01-01

251

Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_zoo\\/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) and video (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/videos\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for

D. Daou; A. Gauthier

2003-01-01

252

Occupational allergy to birds within the population of Polish bird keepers employed in zoo gardens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  To evaluate the risk factors for the development of occupational allergy to birds among Polish zoo garden keepers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 200 bird zookeepers employed in the Polish zoo gardens in KLód?, Warsaw, Gda?sk, Chorzów and P?ock and exposed\\u000a occupationally to bird allergens were examined using a questionnaire, skin prick tests (SPTs) to common allergens and bird\\u000a allergens, spirometry and

Sylwia ?widerska-Kie?bik; Anna Krakowiak; Marta Wiszniewska; Ewa Nowakowska-?wirta; Jolanta Walusiak-Skorupa; Konrad ?liwkiewicz; Cezary Pa?czy?ski

2011-01-01

253

Note on optimizing environmental enrichment: a study of fennec fox and zoo guests.  

PubMed

Environmental enrichment is widely used to stimulate animal time budgets that seem more natural and diverse than those of unenriched animals. Uncertainty of reward is a suggested means to maintain enrichment's efficacy. Foraging tasks are widely applied in zoo animal enrichment, yet few rely on the logic of optimal foraging theory to help maintain animal motivation. We applied a foraging strategy to zoo housed fennec foxes as enrichment. We varied only the probability of when and where food would occur in the animals' exhibit. Our methods increased behavioral diversity, animal activity, and stimulated guest interest in the exhibit. PMID:22147593

Watters, Jason V; Miller, Jessica T; Sullivan, Timothy J

2011-01-01

254

Galaxy Crash  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides an interactive java applet which allows the user to model galaxy collisions. With this applet the user can study how galaxies collide and merge gravitationally and how the effects of the collision depend on the properties of the galaxies. The user can also recreate collisions between real interacting galaxies observed in the sky. This website also provides background information on galaxies like: interaction dynamics, starbursts, AGN, elliptical galaxies, and minor galactic mergers. There are also lab questions that teachers can use along with the applet and links to helpful resources.

Mihos, Christopher

2007-03-20

255

APS Forum on Education Newsletter - Fall 2007  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fall edition of the APS Forum on Education newsletter contains an extensive discussion of teacher preparation resources in ComPADRE, FEd sessions at the 2007 March meeting, and an update of the Gathering Storm.

2008-02-08

256

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.) is a week long activity in preparation for a group presentation on a human genetic condition, such as dwarfism, Marfan's Syndrome, albinsim, Huntington's disease, PKU, or any other inheritable genetic condition. The activity is designed to encourage and teach students how to research and present scientific information on human genetic conditions. The teacher provides a list of conditions from which students select their research topic. The students, in groups of three, choose a topic to present at the Genetic Health Forum at the conclusion of that week. The students also choose from one of three jobs: the Forum Delegate, the Research Reporter, or the Graphic Artist. This will be the basis for teacher evaluation of their share of the project. Halfway through the week, students are invited to the Genetic Health Forum to be held the following two days.

Tamsen Profit (Borah High School REV)

1995-06-30

257

California Emerging Technology Forum Part II  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of the California Emerging Technology Forum Part II is to foster the removal of barriers for the development and use of clean technologies through the development of collaborative technology research projects on promising technologies. The collaborative technology resear...

258

Active Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource covers Seyfert galaxies, radio galaxies, BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, quasars, supermassive black holes, determining masses in galactic centers using the virial theorem, and a model for active galactic nuclei.

2007-06-07

259

Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sustainable fishing is on everyone's lips lately, but the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) has been committed to "the highest level of economic and social benefits that is compatible with sustainable use of our tuna resources" since 1979. Visitors unfamiliar with how combating illegal fishing is accomplished should check out the "Monitoring, Control, Surveillance" link, which contains details about Operation Kurukuru, a recent surveillance operation. The operation was aimed at boats fishing without licenses or taking an amount of fish over the legal limit, such as the fishing vessel in Tuvalu that was found to have excessive shark fins onboard, and was thus fined $10,000 USD. Visitors might also like an article here that reports on a tuna data workshop in the Solomon Islands that addressed the role women could play as observers on fishing vessels to ensure proper catch data. As fishing vessels have typically had all male crews, employing a woman on the boat would require gender awareness measures and safety training, but the employment benefits for the women would be most welcome.

260

Feeding Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Halo clouds have been found about the three largest galaxies of the Local Group and in the halos of nearby spirals. This suggests they are a relatively generic feature of the galaxy evolution process and a source of fuel for galaxy disks. Here we discuss two major sources of star formation fuel for the Galaxy, satellite material and clouds condensing from the hot halo medium. Evidence for both methods of fueling are presented and their contribution quantified.

Putman, Mary E.; Grcevich, Jana; Peek, J. E. G.

2008-08-01

261

Galaxy Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A very large body of information has been collected on the structure of the Galaxy. Here we can only concentrate on a small selection of the most recent and most important observational facts and theoretical findings. The MILKY WAY GALAXY belongs to the Local Group, a smaller group of three large and over 30 small galaxies, and is the second largest (after the Andromeda Galaxy M31) but perhaps th...

Eckart, A.; Englmaier, P.; Murdin, P.

2002-01-01

262

Galaxy Photometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity asks students to observe the images of three spiral galaxies of different surface brightnesses. Each of the loaded images is active in the sense that you can place a rectangular aperture on them and determine the flux. The flux through the aperture equals the galaxy flux + the sky flux. Hence to determine the galaxy flux you need to put an aperture on the sky background (where there is little or no galaxy light) and measure that.

Department, University O.

2005-06-17

263

Identifying Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students describe the characteristics of different types of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, barred spiral, peculiar, or irregular) in their own words. They also classify galaxies seen in the Hubble Deep Field. This activity includes a student worksheet and background information for the teacher. This is activity two in "The Hidden Lives of Galaxies" information and activity booklet.

264

Galaxy Transformations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage has descriptions and animations from numerical simulations of colliding galaxies. Normal observation shows interacting galaxies apparently frozen in the midst of billion-year-long collisions. These movies transcend a limited view of time by indicating the past and future of such encounters. The webpage examines interactions between galaxies, paths of different orbits, and theories of structure.

Barnes, Joshua E.

2007-09-21

265

Conservation learning in wildlife tourism settings: lessons from research in zoos and aquariums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non?captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential impact of wildlife encounters on visitors’ conservation attitudes and behaviour

R. Ballantyne; J. Packer; K. Hughes; L. Dierking

2007-01-01

266

A survey of Blastocystis sp. in livestock, pets, and zoo animals in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of Blastocystis sp. was examined in fecal samples collected from cattle, pigs, dogs, and a variety of zoo animals (primates, carnivores, herbivores, pheasants, and ducks) by direct observation of fresh fecal suspensions or cultured materials, using light microscopy. The cattle and pigs were randomly sampled from 11 and 12 commercial farms, respectively, located in the western region of

Niichiro Abe; Mizuho Nagoshi; Kazutoshi Takami; Yoshinori Sawano; Hisao Yoshikawa

2002-01-01

267

Recognition of an important water quality issue at zoos: prevalence and potential threat of toxic cyanobacteria.  

PubMed

Zoo animals may be particularly vulnerable to water sources contaminated with cyanobacterial toxins given their nonvoluntary close association with this resource. However, the prevalence and potential threat of toxic cyanobacteria in this setting are unknown. Several otherwise unexplained yellow-bellied slider (Trachemys scripta scripta) deaths were documented in a zoo moat with recurring blooms of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa. Furthermore, an extremely high and potentially lethal concentration of the hepatotoxin microcystin (166 ng/g) was found in the liver of a necropsied turtle that died in this moat. A subsequent monthly survey of water quality revealed detectable concentrations of microcystin in all moats (0.0001 to 7.5 microg/L), with moats higher than 1 microg/L being significantly higher than the threshold for safe drinking water recommended by the World Health Organization. These results demonstrate that cyanobacterial blooms are an important water quality issue in zoos, and future research is necessary to identify potential associations among water quality, zoo animal health, and moat management strategies. PMID:24712178

Doster, Enrique; Chislock, Michael F; Roberts, John F; Kottwitz, Jack J; Wilson, Alan E

2014-03-01

268

Genetic characterization of orf viruses isolated from various ruminant species of a zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, an outbreak of proliferative dermatitis in musk ox (Ovibos moschatus), Sichuan takin (Budorcas taxicolor tibetana) and domestic Shetland sheep (Ovis aries) in a zoo is described. Skin lesions consisted of severe, persistent, multifocal, proliferative dermatitis in musk ox, and mild, transient, focal, dermatitis in the Sichuan takin and Shetland sheep. Parapoxviruses were isolated from skin lesions,

J Guo; J Rasmussen; A Wünschmann; A de la Concha-Bermejillo

2004-01-01

269

Factors influencing breeding success, ovarian cyclicity, and cub survival in zoo-managed tigers (Panthera tigris).  

PubMed

Understanding factors that influence reproduction and offspring survival in zoo populations is critical for management of threatened and endangered species. Examination of long-term data (1989-2011) compiled from the Association of Zoos and Aquarium's zoo-managed tiger breeding program provides the basis for a more thorough understanding of reproduction and scientifically based decisions for effective population management in this endangered felid. Biological and management-related factors that could influence tiger breeding success and cub survival were evaluated using logistic mixed models. Breeding success improved with female age until approximately age five, then declined thereafter. Experienced female breeders had greater breeding success than inexperienced females. Litter size was most predictive of cub survival, with average-sized litters (3-4 cubs) experiencing the highest proportional survival. Management-related factors, such as whether the breeding institution had a recent tiger litter and whether both animals were already located at the same institution, also influenced breeding success and cub survival. These results highlight the importance of institutional husbandry experience and the need to retain knowledge through staff turnovers to achieve optimal reproductive success. Using fecal estrogen data, frequency of ovarian cyclicity and mean cycle length did not differ by female age or parity; thus, lack of cyclicity and/or increased cycle duration are not likely explanations for declining breeding success with age. These results provide valuable reproductive information that should improve scientific management of zoo-based tiger populations. PMID:24326286

Saunders, Sarah P; Harris, Tara; Traylor-Holzer, Kathy; Beck, Karen Goodrowe

2014-01-10

270

Representing the Zoo World and the Traffic World in the language of the Causal Calculator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work described in this report is motivated by the desire to test the expressive possibilities of action language C+. The Causal Calculator (CCalc) is a system that answers queries about action domains described in a fragment of that language. The Zoo World and the Traffic World have been proposed by Erik Sandewall in his Logic Modelling Workshop—an environment for communicating

Varol Akman; Selim T. Erdogan; Joohyung Lee; Vladimir Lifschitz; Hudson Turner

2004-01-01

271

Conservation Learning in Wildlife Tourism Settings: Lessons from Research in Zoos and Aquariums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non-captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential…

Ballantyne, Roy; Packer, Jan; Hughes, Karen; Dierking, Lynn

2007-01-01

272

Implementing a low-starch biscuit-free diet in zoo gorillas: the impact on health.  

PubMed

In the wild, western lowland gorillas consume a diet high in fiber and low in caloric density. In contrast, many gorillas in zoos consume a diet that is high-calorie and low in fiber. Some items commonly used in captive gorilla diets contain high levels of starch and sugars, which are minimal in the natural diet of gorillas. There is a growing concern that captive gorillas may qualify as obese. Furthermore, the leading cause of death for adult male gorillas in zoos is heart disease. In humans, a diet that is high in simple carbohydrates is associated with both obesity and the incidence of heart disease. In response to these issues, we implemented a biscuit-free diet (free of biscuits and low in fruit) and measured serum biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance pre- and post-diet change at three institutions: North Carolina Zoological Garden, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. We also added a resistant starch supplement to gorilla diets at two of the above institutions. We anticipated that these diet changes would positively affect biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance. Both diet manipulations led to a reduction in insulin. Resistant starch also decreased overall serum cholesterol levels. Future research will examine these health changes in a greater number of individuals to determine if the results remain consistent with these preliminary findings. PMID:24420273

Less, E H; Lukas, K E; Bergl, R; Ball, R; Kuhar, C W; Lavin, S R; Raghanti, M A; Wensvoort, J; Willis, M A; Dennis, P M

2014-01-01

273

Spatio-temporal constraints on the zoo hypothesis, and the breakdown of total hegemony  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Zoo Hypothesis posits that we have not detected extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) because they deliberately prevent us from detecting them. While a valid solution to Fermi's Paradox, it is not particularly amenable to rigorous scientific analysis, as it implicitly assumes a great deal about the sociological structure of a plurality of civilisations. Any attempt to assess its worth must begin

Duncan H. Forgan

2011-01-01

274

How Full Is Your Luggage? Background Knowledge of Zoo Visitors Regarding Sharks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the general population, sharks have a reputation that does not really fit with their biological and ecological nature. Informal surveys often classify sharks as dangerous, aggressive and/or man-eaters. This apparent common knowledge seems difficult to detach from the conscience of many worldwide zoo visitors, even with the help of…

das Neves, João Pedro Correia; Monteiro, Rute Cristina Rocha

2013-01-01

275

View the Zoo! Evaluation of Visual Communication in an Outdoor Educational Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Almost all of what people learn from outdoor educational settings such as zoos and gardens stems from the exhibits themselves or signs about the exhibits. Evaluation of the various forms of visual communication in outdoor educational settings is necessary to determine the effectiveness of exhibitions, educational activities, and/or conservation…

Schnackenberg, Heidi L.; And Others

276

Cryptococcus neoformans in bird excreta in the city zoo of Cali, Colombia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in bird excreta and in the air circulating in and around bird cages in the City Zoo of Cali, Colombia, between August 1994 and April 1995, using a sunflower seed agar culture medium for fungus isolation. A total of 380 samples was studied, 110 from droppings and 270 from Petri dishes placed inside(148)

Luz Dary Caicedo; María Inés Alvarez; Maritza Delgado; Alaín Cárdenas

1999-01-01

277

Mighty Math[TM] Zoo Zillions[TM]. [CD-ROM].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo Zillions contains five activities for grades K-2: Annie's Jungle Trail, 3D Gallery, Number Line Express, Gnu Ewe Boutique, and Fish Stories. These activities enable children to review and practice basic mathematics skills; identify three-dimensional shapes, watch them in motion, and create their own three-dimensional designs; locate numbers…

1996

278

Occupational exposure to allergenic mites among workers of the Silesian Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study was carried out from April 2004 to March 2005, when 65 samples of dust, litter, debris and residues from the Silesian Zoo were examined for the presence of mites. Mites were found in all the samples; a total of 5,†315 mites were isolated and 26 species of astigmatid mites were identified. These mites constituted 84% of the total

PIOTR SZILMAN; EWA SZILMAN; MAGDALENA SZILMAN; HANNA MANIURKA; KRZYSZTOF SOLARZ

2006-01-01

279

AN OUTBREAK OF TOXOPLASMOSIS IN WALLAROOS (Macropus robustus) IN A CALIFORNIA ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four wahlaroos (Macropus nobustus) from a central California zoo colony of 22 died within a three week period. Histopathologic findings in all four cases were suggestive of toxoplasmosis. Brain, lung and heart were the most frequently involved organs. Within 4 months of the last death sera from nine colony members were tested for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii using the indirect

G. A. BOORMAN; I G. V. KOLLIASIS; R. F. TAYLORIS

280

Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maxi- mus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associ- ated with training elephants

Peter Oh; Reuben Granich; Jim Scott; Ben Sun; Michael Joseph; Cynthia Stringfield; Susan Thisdell; Jothan Staley; Donna Workman-Malcolm; Lee Borenstein; Eleanor Lehnkering; Patrick Ryan; Jeanne Soukup; Annette Nitta; Jennifer Flood

281

Zoo Praxis and Theories: Teaching the Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo projects that encourage reflective learning and are legitimate undertakings for untrained undergraduates are hard to develop. In this article, the author, as a professor in anthropology, discusses and teaches primate studies. His pedagogical goal in teaching primate studies is to enhance the process of learning, and to consider that students…

Burton, Frances

2004-01-01

282

Diversity and prevalence of metastrongyloid nematodes infecting the red panda ( Ailurus fulgens) in European zoos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metastrongyloid induced pneumonia has been described sporadically in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens). Early descriptions in pandas recently imported to the USA from China involved parasites morphologically similar to Angiostrongylus spp. and Crenosomatidae. More recently, four cases of severe verminous pneumonia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum have been reported from European zoos. A coprological survey of the red panda population within

Mads F. Bertelsen; Frederik Meyland-Smith; Jakob L. Willesen; Ryan Jefferies; Eric R. Morgan; Jesper Monrad

2010-01-01

283

Animal–visitor interactions in the modern zoo: Conflicts and interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal welfare, education, conservation, research, and entertainment are major goals of modern zoos, but they can be in conflict. For example, visitors enjoy learning about and observing natural behavior in captive animals, but visitors often want to observe and interact with the animals in close proximity. Unfortunately, proximity to and social interactions with humans induce stress for many species, particularly

Eduardo J. Fernandez; Michael A. Tamborski; Sarah R. Pickens; William Timberlake

2009-01-01

284

Learning at Workstations in the Zoo: A Controlled Evaluation of Cognitive and Affective Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to test the cognitive and affective benefits gained through the provision of educational materials at workstations in the Wilhelma Zoo in Stuttgart, Germany. Structured learning materials were developed for use with visiting school groups. The materials focused on the adaptations of 6 selected groups of bird species and were organized as a self-guided learning environment (workstations). The

Christoph Randler; Sandra Baumgärtner; Heiko Eisele; Wilhelm Kienzle

2007-01-01

285

Gender difference analysis of political web forums: An experiment on an international islamic women's forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an important type of social media, the political Web forum has become a major communication channel for people to discuss and debate political, cultural and social issues. Although the Internet has a male-dominated history, more and more women have started to share their concerns and express opinions through online discussion boards and Web forums. This paper presents an automated

Yulei Zhang; Yan Dang; Hsinchun Chen

2009-01-01

286

Ubiquitous Discussion Forum: Introducing Mobile Phones and Voice Discussion into a Web Discussion Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Web-based discussion forums enable users to share knowledge in straightforward and popular platforms. However, discussion forums have several problems, such as the lack of immediate delivery and response, the heavily text-based medium, inability to hear expressions of voice and the heuristically created discussion topics which can impede the…

Wei, Fu-Hsiang; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Li, Liang-Yi

2007-01-01

287

The Catalog of Edge-on Disk Galaxies from SDSS. I. The Catalog and the Structural Parameters of Stellar Disks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

2014-05-01

288

Conference Report: Masters Forum IV, February 2002  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the APPL Masters Forum is to bring together some of the best project managers at NASA, as well as those in industry and other government agencies, for 2 1/2 days of knowledge sharing. The project managers come eager to reflect on their project experiences, to learn new things from one another--and to unlearn a few things, too. This was the fourth Masters Forum, and the first one held outside Washington, DC. Fifty participants from across the country came to Dallas at the American Airlines Conference Center, a wonderful facility that was conveniently located by the airport and yet still seemed isolated from the rest of the world. Masters Forum IV was also the first one held during the winter. Previous Masters Forums have been during the summer. Hot, sticky Washington, D.C. in the summer may sound unpleasant, but frankly the popularity of earlier Forums is what led to this annual event becoming a semiannual one.

Post, Todd

2002-01-01

289

The 3rd World Water Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Convened in March 2003 in Japan, the 3rd World Water Forum dealt with 38 interlocked themes concerning how to bring safe water and sanitation to the world. Considered the most important international water meeting to date, the forum hosted close to 24,000 persons from 182 countries. On this well-designed site, users can read various documents presented at the Forum, along with reading the daily newspaper produced at the meeting and its newsletter. The finest feature of the site is the streaming video archive of select meetings and plenary sessions. Here, visitors can listen and watch the participants discuss a number of timely topics, such as dams and development, water and transport, and floods. Equally valuable is the ability to browse through the different sessions, and, in some cases, users can download background documents and entire papers. [KMG

290

Discussion Forum for Technical Codes Users  

SciTech Connect

One goal of the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is to provide useful, easy to understand information about the national energy codes. A forum where users could ask for, and receive clarification on these codes and software from other users would allow the Energy codes project to reach and instruct a broader audience for a modest resource cost. The forum proposed would be a staff moderated discussion board where staff would post topics, and users would post discussion of those topics, with staff joining in to the discussions. The forum would be moderated by staff members, to remove objectionable and irrelevant postings, and to answer any technical questions that arise. The topics and discussions would be archived and searchable to allow users to answer their own questions, if they pertain to a previously discussed topic.

Kaspar, Bryce P.; Dillon, Heather E.

2006-03-30

291

Plasmodium (Bennettinia) juxtanucleare infection in a captive white eared-pheasant (Crossoptilon crossoptilon) at a Japanese zoo.  

PubMed

An adult male white eared-pheasant (Crossoptilon crossoptilon) at a Japanese zoo exhibited lethargy and emaciation. Microscopic examination of a blood smear revealed a haemosporidian parasitic infection. Based on the morphological characteristics and molecular analysis of the parasite, it was identified as Plasmodium (Bennettinia) juxtanucleare. This is the first report of P. juxtanucleare infection in bird species belonging to the genus Crossoptilon. Caution against avian malaria infection is required for the conservation of endangered bird species in zoos. PMID:18319584

Murata, Koichi; Nii, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Emi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Sato, Yukita; Sawabe, Kyoko; Tsuda, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Rei; Suda, Akemi; Ueda, Miya

2008-02-01

292

Second Annual HEDS-UP Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

HEDS-UP (Human Exploration and Development of Space-University Partners) conducted its second annual forum on May 6-7, 1999, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. This year, the topics focused on human exploration of Mars, including considerations ranging from systems analysis of the transportation and surface architecture to very detailed considerations of surface elements such as greenhouses, rovers, and EVA suits. Ten undergraduate projects and four graduate level projects were presented with a total of 13 universities from around the country. Over 200 students participated on the study teams and nearly 100 students attended the forum meeting.

Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

1999-01-01

293

Galaxy masses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The different sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and gas-poor galaxies, with some attention paid to our Milky Way, and masses from weak and strong lensing methods all provide review material on galaxy masses in a self-consistent manner.

Courteau, Stéphane; Cappellari, Michele; de Jong, Roelof S.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Hoekstra, Henk; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mamon, Gary A.; Maraston, Claudia; Treu, Tommaso; Widrow, Lawrence M.

2014-01-01

294

A retrospective study of mortality in varanid lizards (Reptilia: Squamata: Varanidae) at the Bronx Zoo: implications for husbandry and reproductive management in zoos.  

PubMed

Varanid lizards have been maintained in zoological parks for more than a century, yet few studies to date have attempted to pinpoint significant health issues affecting their management or areas of captive husbandry that are in need of improvement. In an effort to identify and better understand some of the husbandry-related challenges and health issues specifically affecting varanids in zoos, this study examined mortality in 16 species maintained at the Bronx Zoo between 1968 and 2009. Out of 108 records reviewed, complete necropsy reports were available for 85 individuals. Infection-related processes including bacterial (15.3%), protozoal (12.9%), nematode (9.4%), and fungal (3.5%) infections accounted for the greatest number of deaths (47.1%). Noninfectious diseases including female reproductive disorders (7.1%), neoplasia (7.1%), gout (10.8%), and hemipenal prolapse (1.3%) accounted for 29.4% of deaths. Multiple disease agents were responsible for 5.9% of deaths, and a cause for death could not be determined for 17.7% of individuals. Reproductive complications accounted for 11.5% of female deaths, but were identified in 23.1% of females. Although not necessarily the cause for death, gout was present in 18.8% of individuals. Differences in mortality between species, genders, and origin (captive-bred vs. wild-caught) were also evaluated. The results of this study corroborate earlier findings that identify bacterial infections, neoplasia, female reproductive disorders, gout, and endoparasitism as major sources of mortality in captive varanids. In light of these results, we discuss potential etiologies and offer recommendations for improving captive management practices in zoos. PMID:22997089

Mendyk, Robert W; Newton, Alisa L; Baumer, Megan

2013-03-01

295

Starburst galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

Weedman, Daniel W.

1987-01-01

296

Engagement with and Participation in Online Discussion Forums  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a small-scale study that examined student engagement with and participation in a university online discussion forum site. The main aim of the study was to identify factors that encourage or discourage student participation in the forum. The study involved the tasks posted on the forum site with which students could engage…

Mokoena, Sello

2013-01-01

297

White House Forum on Health Reform, March 5, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On March 5, President Obama hosted a White House Forum on Health Reform at the White House. Working with Democratic and Republican Governors across the country, the White House has put together five White House Regional Forums on Health Reform. The forums...

2009-01-01

298

National Charter School Policy Forum (Washington, DC, May 5, 2008)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Charter School Policy Forum of May 5, 2005 brought together 100 charter school leaders representing philanthropy, research, and practice. The panel discussants and forum participants participated in an interactive conversation about the next generation of charter schools. The forum's panels focused on three key topics: (1) The…

US Department of Education, 2008

2008-01-01

299

Helminthiasis and toxoplasmosis among exotic mammals at the Santiago National Zoo.  

PubMed

Parasitologic evaluations of 112 fecal specimens from 292 mammals from the Santiago National Zoo (36 specimens were pooled specimens from greater than or equal to 2 animals) indicated that 51 mammals had protozoa or helminths in their feces. Most of the parasites in the herbivorous species were trichurids and strongylids, whereas most of the parasites in the carnivorous species were ascarids. Coccidia spp and Giardia spp were the most frequently detected protozoans in the mammals evaluated. Of 127 captive mammals serologically evaluated for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii (indirect hemagglutination test), 35 (27.5%) were positive for T gondii: 7 (46.6%) of 15 carnivores, 24 (25.2%) of 95 artyodactyls, and 4 (22.5%) of 17 nonhuman primates. Antibodies against T gondii also were found in 8 of 10 domestic cats captured within the zoo and in 6 of 13 volunteer zookeepers. PMID:3505930

Gorman, T R; Riveros, V; Alcaíno, H A; Salas, D R; Thiermann, E R

1986-11-01

300

Behavioral monitoring in zoos and aquariums: a tool for guiding husbandry and directing research.  

PubMed

Behavioral monitoring is the scientific collection of animal behavior data to understand normal patterns of behavior and changes in these patterns. This tool is underutilized in the zoo industry although it can be an effective indicator of many potential problems that compromise zoo animal well-being. We suggest that a behavioral monitoring program should be a core component of a zoological institution's care program. We detail the benefits of such a program and describe its components. We provide guidelines for implementing such a program and make recommendations that will help institutions to employ behavioral monitoring programs with reasonable expense. We argue that the benefits of such a program, primarily increased detection of rising or potential problems, far outweigh the minor costs of implementation. PMID:19358317

Watters, Jason V; Margulis, Susan W; Atsalis, Sylvia

2009-01-01

301

Advocacy workshop: a forum in regulatory communication  

SciTech Connect

Rate-case decisions made by regulatory bodies are the result of hearings in which a great many statements of fact and opinion are made. This article describes a forum designed for the sake of improving the communication of such facts and opinions and indicates the preparation necessary to accomplish the aim of producing better witness-lawyer teams.

Faust, G.R.; Prep, V.M.

1982-03-04

302

THE “GOD'S COUNTRY?” FORUM: A REPLY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Walter Russell Mead responds to the forum panelists critiquing his Sept.\\/Oct. 2006 Foreign Affairs article, “God's Country?”, grouping their responses in two categories: questions about whether the article accurately captures the forces at work in American evangelical religion; and questions about whether the positive assessment of the capacity of evangelicals to play a constructive role in American foreign policy is

Walter Russell Mead

2006-01-01

303

Solar Server: Forum for Solar Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based in Germany, this site provides a forum for news and information regarding all aspects of solar energy. The site provides background information on the technical aspects pertaining to solar energy and photovoltaics. A variety of images and descriptions provide useful background information about photovoltaic roof tiles and their role in solar buildings.

2007-08-28

304

2009 NCI SBIR Investor Forum Program Book  

Cancer.gov

LETTER FROM NCI SBIR Welcome to the inaugural National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Investor Forum. Thank you for joining us. I hope that today will be a valuable opportunity for you to learn more about the most

305

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

NONE

1990-12-31

306

Making Bodies Talk in Forum Theatre  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most Forum Theatre practice encourages as many 'spect-actors' as possible to intervene directly on stage as part of the investigation of an oppressive social situation. Such practice is in line with Boal's advice (in "Games for actors and non-actors") that 'the keener the desire to take action, the more the spect-actors hurry on to the stage'.…

Dwyer, Paul

2004-01-01

307

Ranking mechanisms in twitter-like forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the problem of designing a mechanism to rank items in forums by making use of the user reviews such as thumb and star ratings. We compare mechanisms where fo- rum users rate individual posts and also mechanisms where the user is asked to perform a pairwise comparison and state which one is better. The main metric used to

Anish Das Sarma; Atish Das Sarma; Sreenivas Gollapudi; Rina Panigrahy

2010-01-01

308

The Science Forum: A New Learning Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the "science forum" as a means of initiating discussion between students in different schools in a cooperative educational experience. Students from advanced biology classes in two high schools presented research papers and panel discussion followed. Involved persons included all levels of the educational community--administrators, PTA…

Cusimano, Vincent J.; Halpern, Stephen

1977-01-01

309

APS Forum on Education Newsletter - Fall 2008  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The fall 2008 edition of the Forum on Education newsletter contains a discussion of the new PhysTEC program at the University of Minnesota by Jon Anderson, a discussion of intercity teaching by Richard Steinberg, and a discussion of some less well known pressure forcing out of field physics teaching by Marty Alderman.

2009-01-05

310

Educational Opportunity Forum. Volume I, Number 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this second edition of a NY State Education Department publication devoted to higher educational opportunity, the title of the newsletter has changed from COLLEGIATE NEWSLETTER ON THE DISADVANTAGED to the EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FORUM. The change reflects more clearly the broader emphasis that should be placed on efforts to extend the reach of…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Higher Education.

311

Facilitating Learning Spaces in Forum Theatre  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the extent to which forum theatre interventions can support non-hierarchical approaches to learning, development and change management initiatives in organisations. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with theatre consultancies, actors/facilitators,…

Rae, Jan

2013-01-01

312

Literacy Program. National Issues Forums Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the spring of 1988, 33 representatives from 20 institutions or organizations sponsoring National Issues Forum (NIF) literacy programs attended a national conference in Washington, D.C. Throughout the conference, representatives from the organizations sponsoring NIF literacy programs made statements on the importance of NIF as a tool for…

National Issues Forums, Dayton, OH.

313

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

NONE

1995-12-31

314

FDA Science Forum: advancing public health.  

PubMed

You don't have to know the difference between a virus and a bacterium to benefit from the Food and Drug Administration's 2005 Science Forum, an annual event aimed at sharing the science behind the agency's regulatory decisions. PMID:16121417

Meadows, Michelle

2005-01-01

315

An exogenous retrovirus isolated from koalas with malignant neoplasias in a US zoo  

PubMed Central

Leukemia and lymphoma account for more than 60% of deaths in captive koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in northeastern Australia. Although the endogenizing gammaretrovirus koala endogenous retrovirus (KoRV) was isolated from these koalas, KoRV has not been definitively associated with leukemogenesis. We performed KoRV screening in koalas from the San Diego Zoo, maintained for more than 45 y with very limited outbreeding, and the Los Angeles Zoo, maintained by continuously assimilating captive-born Australian koalas. San Diego Zoo koalas are currently free of malignant neoplasias and were infected with only endogenous KoRV, which we now term subtype “KoRV-A,” whereas Los Angeles Zoo koalas with lymphomas/leukemias are infected in addition to KoRV-A by a unique KoRV we term subtype “KoRV-B.” KoRV-B is most divergent in the envelope protein and uses a host receptor distinct from KoRV-A. KoRV-B also has duplicated enhancer regions in the LTR associated with increased pathology in gammaretroviruses. Whereas KoRV-A uses the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 1 (PiT1) as a receptor, KoRV-B employs a different receptor, the thiamine transporter 1 (THTR1), to infect cells. KoRV-B is transmitted from dam to offspring through de novo infection, rather than via genetic inheritance like KoRV-A. Detection of KoRV-B in native Australian koalas should provide a history, and a mode for remediation, of leukemia/lymphoma currently endemic in this population.

Xu, Wenqin; Stadler, Cynthia K.; Gorman, Kristen; Jensen, Nathaniel; Kim, David; Zheng, HaoQiang; Tang, Shaohua; Switzer, William M.; Pye, Geoffrey W.; Eiden, Maribeth V.

2013-01-01

316

Evaluating the Conservation Mission of Zoos, Aquariums, Botanical Gardens, and Natural History Museums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collection-based institutions—zoos, aquariums, museums, and botanical gardens—exhibit wildlife and thus have a special connection with nature. Many of these institutions emphasize a mission of conserva- tion, and, undeniably, they do contribute directly to conservation education and conservation science. They present an exceptional opportunity for many urban residents to see the wonders of life, and they can contribute to education and

BRIAN MILLER; WILLIAM CONWAY; RICHARD P. READING; CHRIS WEMMER; DAVID WILDT; DEVRA KLEIMAN; STEVEN MONFORT; ALAN RABINOWITZ; BETH ARMSTRONG; MICHAEL HUTCHINS

2004-01-01

317

How Abnormal Is the Behaviour of Captive, Zoo-Living Chimpanzees?  

PubMed Central

Background Many captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) show a variety of serious behavioural abnormalities, some of which have been considered as possible signs of compromised mental health. The provision of environmental enrichments aimed at reducing the performance of abnormal behaviours is increasing the norm, with the housing of individuals in (semi-)natural social groups thought to be the most successful of these. Only a few quantitative studies of abnormal behaviour have been conducted, however, particularly for the captive population held in zoological collections. Consequently, a clear picture of the level of abnormal behaviour in zoo-living chimpanzees is lacking. Methods We present preliminary findings from a detailed observational study of the behaviour of 40 socially-housed zoo-living chimpanzees from six collections in the United States of America and the United Kingdom. We determined the prevalence, diversity, frequency, and duration of abnormal behaviour from 1200 hours of continuous behavioural data collected by focal animal sampling. Results, Conclusion and Significance Our overall finding was that abnormal behaviour was present in all sampled individuals across six independent groups of zoo-living chimpanzees, despite the differences between these groups in size, composition, housing, etc. We found substantial variation between individuals in the frequency and duration of abnormal behaviour, but all individuals engaged in at least some abnormal behaviour and variation across individuals could not be explained by sex, age, rearing history or background (defined as prior housing conditions). Our data support a conclusion that, while most behaviour of zoo-living chimpanzees is ‘normal’ in that it is typical of their wild counterparts, abnormal behaviour is endemic in this population despite enrichment efforts. We suggest there is an urgent need to understand how the chimpanzee mind copes with captivity, an issue with both scientific and welfare implications.

Birkett, Lucy P.; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas E.

2011-01-01

318

A serologic survey of viral infections in captive ungulates in Turkish zoos.  

PubMed

Zoos and zoologic gardens make optimal environments for interspecies transmission of viral infections. There are seven zoos and several small zoologic collections in Turkey. This study aimed to determine the current status of viral infections in captive ungulates living in these environments. Blood samples were taken from 163 captive animals from two zoos. There were 39 Cameroon sheep (Ovis ammon f aries), 11 Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), 57 pygmy goats (Capra hircus), 9 Angora goats (Capra hircus), 21 mountain goats (Capra aegagrus-aegagrus), 7 llamas (Lama glama), 8 Persian goitred gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa), 7 Caspian red deer (Cervus elaphus maral), 2 fallow deer (Dama dama), and 2 camels (Camelus dromedarius). Antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine adenoviruses (BAV-1 and -3), parainfluenzavirus 3 (PI-3), and bluetongue viruses (BTV-4 and -9) were investigated using the virus neutralization test, and malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) antibodies were screened by ELISA. All animals were negative for BVDV and BHV-1 antibodies. Seroprevalence of BAV-1, BAV-3, PI-3, BRSV, BT-4, BT-9, and MCF were detected as follows: 46.6%, 60.1%, 0.6%, 7.3%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 51.6%, respectively. Seroprevalence of BAVs and MCF were more common than all other viruses (P < 0.0001). Ten sheep (37.0%), 48 goats (84.2), and 1 Ilama (14.2%) were the only species positive for MCF antibodies. Prevalence of BRSV and MCF antibodies were found to be significantly higher in goats than in sheep. BTV antibodies were detected both in Cameroon sheep and mountain goats and suggest that zoo animals are at risk for BTV in endemic regions. PMID:22946369

Ye?ilba?, Kadir; Alpay, Gizem; Karakuzulu, Hatice

2011-03-01

319

The Sizes of Elephant Groups in Zoos: Implications for Elephant Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the distribution of 495 Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and 336 African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in 194 zoos, most of which were located in Europe (49.1%) and North America (32.6%). Cows outnumbered bulls 4 to 1 (Loxodonta) and 3 to 1 (Elephas). Groups contained 7 or fewer: mean, 4.28 (? = 5.73). One fifth of elephants lived alone

Paul A. Rees

2009-01-01

320

Assessment of the functional state of soils in Moscow Zoo on the basis of microbiological parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The functional state of soils in the Moscow Zoo was assessed on the basis of the indices of intensity of the main biological\\u000a processes. Studies of the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the soils, the soil enzyme activity, the microbial biomass, and the\\u000a functional diversity of soil microorganisms (using the method of multisubstrate testing) were performed in aviaries, open-air\\u000a animal

N. E. Yurkova; A. M. Yurkov; A. V. Smagin

2008-01-01

321

HAEMOPROTEUS AND LEUCOCYTOZOON INFECTIONS IN BIRDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRA(:T: A total of 222 birds, captive or free-flying in the Oklahoma City Zoo, were examined for blood parasites; 31 (14%) harbored Haenzoproteus and\\/or Leucocytozoon. While 21% of the indigenous avifauna were infected, only 891 of the exotic bird species harbored haemoproteids and these parasites were also exotic to North America. There was no evidence to indicate that exotic infections

Nancy Halpern; Gordon F. Bennett

322

Diversity and prevalence of metastrongyloid nematodes infecting the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in European zoos.  

PubMed

Metastrongyloid induced pneumonia has been described sporadically in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens). Early descriptions in pandas recently imported to the USA from China involved parasites morphologically similar to Angiostrongylus spp. and Crenosomatidae. More recently, four cases of severe verminous pneumonia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum have been reported from European zoos. A coprological survey of the red panda population within European zoos was conducted in 2008. Faecal samples from 115 pandas originating from 54 zoos were collected on 3 consecutive days. Using Baermann technique, 40 animals (35%) from 20 zoos (37%) were found to shed metastrongyloid first stage larvae (L(1)). Based on their morphology and size, the L(1) observed could be divided into three morphologically distinct types: (1) a Crenosoma sp. type (n=5, overall prevalence: 4.3%), (2) an A. vasorum type (n=3, 2.6%), and (3) an unidentified metastrongyloid species, similar to, but morphologically distinct from A. vasorum (n=32, 27.8%). Further confirmation of species identification was provided by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene, which confirmed three different species. The novel Crenosoma species was most genetically analogous to Crenosoma mephitidis and the unidentified metastrongyloid species was most similar to Stenurus minor and Torynurus convulutus. Routine and quarantine health care of red pandas in captivity should take account of the risk of Angiostrongylus and Crenosoma infection in endemic areas, but should also be cognisant of the widespread presence of an apparently less pathogenic species of lungworm. The identity of the two potentially novel species is subject to further work. PMID:20570049

Bertelsen, Mads F; Meyland-Smith, Frederik; Willesen, Jakob L; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Monrad, Jesper

2010-09-20

323

Moon Zoo: Educating side-by-side with Doing Science (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Moon Zoo citizen science project (http:\\/\\/www.moonzoo.org) engages individuals - primarily members of the public - in identifying geological (and sometimes technological) features on the lunar surface. Using a flash-based interface that runs in a web browser, users can mark craters, linear features, and even left-behind lunar landers on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images. These science tools are embedded in an

P. L. Gay

2010-01-01

324

Evidence of Public Engagement with Science: Visitor Learning at a Zoo-Housed Primate Research Centre  

PubMed Central

Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation) compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre). The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

Waller, Bridget M.; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Micheletta, Jerome

2012-01-01

325

Detection and characterization of bovine-like coronaviruses from four species of zoo ruminants.  

PubMed

Five coronaviruses (CoVs) were detected in diarrheal feces from four zoo ruminant species: one wisent (Bison bonasus), two Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus), one sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekii), and one nyala (Tragelaphus angasii). We sequenced and analyzed the spike (S) and hemagglutinin/esterase (HE) genes of these viruses and compared the nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences with those of other bovine CoV (BcoV) strains. Comparison of the entire deduced aa sequences of the S and HE glycoproteins revealed no specific differences that would account for discrimination between bovine-like CoV strains from zoo ruminants and BcoVs strains. In addition, the 99.9% aa identity among the five CoV strains revealed that the ruminants were infected by the same strain. Phylogenetically, bovine-like CoVs belong to group 2a CoVs, which are related most closely to the BcoV strains recently isolated in Korea. These data suggest that cattle are potential reservoirs for CoVs that are capable of infecting zoo ruminants. PMID:20880639

Chung, Joon-Yee; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Bae, You-Chan; Lee, O-Soo; Oem, Jae-Ku

2011-03-24

326

Comparative cytogenetic analysis of sex chromosomes in several Canidae species using zoo-FISH.  

PubMed

Sex chromosome differentiation began early during mammalian evolution. The karyotype of almost all placental mammals living today includes a pair of heterosomes: XX in females and XY in males. The genomes of different species may contain homologous synteny blocks indicating that they share a common ancestry. One of the tools used for their identification is the Zoo-FISH technique. The aim of the study was to determine whether sex chromosomes of some members of the Canidae family (the domestic dog, the red fox, the arctic fox, an interspecific hybrid: arctic fox x red fox and the Chinese raccoon dog) are evolutionarily conservative. Comparative cytogenetic analysis by Zoo-FISH using painting probes specific to domestic dog heterosomes was performed. The results show the presence of homologous synteny covering the entire structures of the X and the Y chromosomes. This suggests that sex chromosomes are conserved in the Canidae family. The data obtained through Zoo-FISH karyotype analysis append information obtained using other comparative genomics methods, giving a more complete depiction of genome evolution. PMID:22428301

Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Sojecka, Agnieszka; Pawlina, Klaudia; Jakubczak, Andrzej; Jezewska-Witkowska, Grazyna

2012-01-01

327

Galaxies Galore  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online module includes three activities: Spiral Shapes, Elliptical Slide, and Imagine Irregular. By completing these activities, students discover that galaxies come in different shapes and learn about the process used by astronomers to classify them. Additional background information is provided in the Galaxy Gossip and Galaxy Gallery sections of this module. Students may complete this activity independently or in small groups. This activity should be completed before Galaxy Games. Detailed teacher pages, identified as Teaching Tips on the activity title page, provide science background information, lesson plan ideas, related resources, and alignment with national education standards. This activity is part of the online exploration "Galaxies Galore, Games and More" available on the Amazing Space website.

328

Colliding galaxies  

SciTech Connect

Galaxies, like people, are social: they tend to gather in pairs, small groups and even large crowds. In most such aggregates, galaxies are separated by large distances, typically 10 to 100 times their own diameters. Yet under the influence of gravity, these galaxies travel a galactic diameter every few hundred million years. Over the lifetime of the universe - 10 to 20 billion years by most cosmologists' estimates - some galactic collisions are inevitable. A decade ago many astronomers had serious doubts about the frequency or import of galactic collisions. But recent observations, combined with advances in theory and greatly improved computer models, have demonstrated that collisions must be far more common than previously thought. Moreover, mounting evidence suggests that colliding galaxies often merge into a new kind of object. The authors have become increasingly convinced that such collisions control the evolution of many galaxies and lead to the formation of a variety of peculiar objects, possibly including the distant and extraordinarily luminous quasars.

Barnes, J.; Hernquist, L.; Schweizer, F.

1991-08-01

329

Building the low-mass end of the red sequence with local post-starburst galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of local post-starburst galaxies (PSG) using the photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the results from the Galaxy Zoo project. We find that 74% of the local PSG are of indeterminate morphology. These local PSG also occupy a well-defined space within the color-stellar mass diagram, most notably in the low-mass end of the green valley below the transition mass described by Kauffmann et al. to be the mass division between low-mass star-forming galaxies and high-mass passively-evolving bulge-dominated galaxies. Our analysis suggests that it is likely that a local PSG will quickly transform into low-mass early-type galaxies as the stellar morphologies of the green PSG largely resemble that of the early-type galaxies within the same mass range. We propose that the current populations of PSG represent one population of galaxies which are rapidly transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence and subsequently, contributing towards the build-up of the low-mass end of the red sequence. This finding is consistent with the idea of downsizing where the build-up of smaller galaxies occurs at later epochs.

Wong, O. Ivy; Schawinski, K.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.; Lintott, C.; Keel, W.; Darg, D.; Bamford, S.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2011-05-01

330

Measuring the impact of informal science education in zoos on environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the emphasis in modern zoos and aquaria on conservation and environmental education, we know very little about what people learn in these settings, and even less about how they learn it. Research on informal learning in settings such as zoos has suffered from a lack of theory, with few connections being made to theories of learning in formal settings, or to theories regarding the nature of the educational goals. This dissertation consists of three parts: the development and analysis of a test instrument designed to measure constructs of environmental learning in zoos; the application of the test instrument along with qualitative data collection in an evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of a zoo's education programs; and the analysis of individually matched pre- and post-test data to examine how environmental learning takes place, with respect to the constructivist view of learning, as well as theories of environmental learning and the barriers to pro-environmental behavior. The test instrument consisted of 40 items split into four scales: environmental knowledge, attitudes toward the environment, support for conservation, and environmentally responsible behavior. A model-driven approach was used to develop the instrument, which was analyzed using Item Response Theory and the Rasch dichotomous measurement model. After removal of two items with extremely high difficulty, the instrument was found to be unidimensional and sufficiently reliable. The results of the IRT analyses are interpreted with respect to a modern validity framework. The evaluation portion of this study applied this test instrument to measuring the impact of zoo education programs on 750 fourth through seventh grade students. Qualitative data was collected from program observations and teacher surveys, and a comparison was also made between programs that took place at the zoo, and those that took place in the school classroom, thereby asking questions regarding the role of setting in environmental education. It was found that students in both program types significantly increased their environmental knowledge as a result of the program, but only students in the school-based programs significantly improved their attitudes towards the environment. Analyzing by grade, seventh grade students scored significantly lower on all aspects of the test than the younger students, suggesting a detrimental effect of novel settings on learning in adolescents. Teacher survey data suggests that teachers place great importance on how the education program would fit in with their school-based curriculum, but did little to integrate the program into their classroom teaching. Observations of the programs revealed some logistical issues, and some concerns regarding the zoo instructors' use of curriculum materials. Analyzing the test data from a constructivist perspective revealed that students with high incoming environmental attitudes had significant increases in environmental knowledge. That is, students with positive attitudes towards the environment are predisposed to engage in learning about the environment. Some gender-specific findings are also discussed.

Wilson, Christopher David

331

Observation of public health risk behaviours, risk communication and hand hygiene at Kansas and Missouri petting zoos--2010-2011.  

PubMed

Outbreaks of human illness have been linked to visiting settings with animal contact throughout developed countries. This study details an observational study of hand hygiene tool availability and recommendations; frequency of risky behaviour; and handwashing attempts by visitors in Kansas (9) and Missouri (4), USA, petting zoos. Handwashing signs and hand hygiene stations were available at the exit of animal-contact areas in 10/13 and 8/13 petting zoos, respectively. Risky behaviours were observed being performed at all petting zoos by at least one visitor. Frequently observed behaviours were as follows: children (10/13 petting zoos) and adults (9/13 petting zoos) touching hands to face within animal-contact areas; animals licking children's and adults' hands (7/13 and 4/13 petting zoos, respectively); and children and adults drinking within animal-contact areas (5/13 petting zoos each). Of 574 visitors observed for hand hygiene when exiting animal-contact areas, 37% (n?=?214) of individuals attempted some type of hand hygiene, with male adults, female adults and children attempting at similar rates (32%, 40% and 37%, respectively). Visitors were 4.8× more likely to wash their hands when a staff member was present within or at the exit to the animal-contact area (136/231, 59%) than when no staff member was present (78/343, 23%; P?zoos with a fence as a partial barrier to human-animal contact were 2.3× more likely to wash their hands (188/460, 40.9%) than visitors allowed to enter the animals' yard for contact (26/114, 22.8%; P?zoos outlining risks associated with animal contact, or providing recommendations for precautions to be taken to reduce these risks. PMID:22846186

Erdozain, G; KuKanich, K; Chapman, B; Powell, D

2013-06-01

332

An examination of environmental collective identity development across three life-stages: The contribution of social public experiences at zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research breaks ground toward a revised theory of how collective environmental identity is associated with pro-environmental behaviors. My research comprises three activities that examined the experiences of three groups of people who claim zoo visiting as an important part of their life-story. The three studied groups were; conservation biologists who describe zoo experiences as having significant formative role in their childhood development of environmental values; parents who prioritize zoo visits as an important cultural experiences for their children; and a active zoo volunteers. This research also investigated whether the group experiences these participants had at zoos contributed to the value these people place on their current collective and environmental identities. Field conservationists' interest in learning from animals was validated by parents who also valued education and helped these children develop identities that included other animals in their scope of justice. Parents used zoos instrumentally to promote caring for others as a skill that will serve their children's socio-political future as part of human society. In both cases, these experiences appeared to be shaped around developing attitudes that would include animals in these children's scope of justice in later life. Zoo volunteers included animals in their scope of justice, believing that other species were also important sources of for their knowledge development. Shared positive attitudes toward animals were central to volunteers feeling part of a community and contributing to their collective self-esteem. The group may serve a restorative function in their lives, allowing them to take on a more activist role in society, seeking to promote social norms that are more inclusive of animal rights, and helping them to change their behaviors toward more environmentally responsible ends. This research contributes to the understanding of the theory of planned behavior and the values/beliefs/norms theory by demonstrating that pro-environmental behavior may originate with parenting activities in out-of-home cultural institutions like zoos, and is associated with involvement in social groups at later points in the life-course. It demonstrates that sharing a collective identity like that of a zoo volunteer is associated with engaging in pro-environmental behaviors even before those beliefs and values are fully understood. Although the contribution of parenting and group activity to pro-environmental behaviors demonstrated in this research was small, these results do suggest that focusing on out-of-home support for parents teaching social skills through animal based experiences, and support of activities that promote group attachment for environmentally concerned citizens, may be a possible strategies to advance more environmentally responsible behavior in society for both the short and long term.

Fraser, John Robert

333

The Space For Nature Wildlife Gardening Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This informative Space For Nature Wildlife Gardening Forum website was developed for naturalists, horticulturalists and others interested in creating garden habitats for wildlife. The site editor is Richard Burkmar, who received his PhD from University College of Cardiff in avian ecology, and believes "that gardens are an increasingly valuable habitat in real terms for wildlife, and that they are uniquely positioned, as accessible natural spaces, to influence our behaviour and attitudes towards the wider environment." The forum offers a wealth of information and incredible photos under the categories of Features, Diary, News, Links and Refs, and Galleries. Selected examples from these different categories include: Making a Nest Box for Hole Nesting Birds, Natural Gardening in Small Spaces, New Sisken Gallery, and many more. The website invites anyone with relevant stories or pictures to contribute.

334

Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Launched in 2001, the Pew Form on Religion & Public Life "seeks to promote a deeper understanding of issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs." To create and maintain such a dialogue, the Forum has created this website which functions as both a clearinghouse and as a town hall of sorts. The Forum focuses on four primary areas, including religion and politics, religion and the law, and religion and world affairs. With an elegantly designed homepage, visitors can view recent news highlights in the center of the page, or scan through some of the latest religious news of note on the right-hand side of the page. The most substantive material on the site can be found on the left-hand side of the homepage, which includes transcripts of recent events, survey results, and their press room.

335

United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During the 20th century, there has been a concerted effort by a number of transnational organizations and advocacy groups to effectively lobby for the rights and protection of indigenous groups in all parts of the world. In 2000, the United Nations Economic and Social Council established the Permanent Form on Indigenous Issues to effectively address the needs of the 370 million indigenous peoples around the world. On the site, visitors can read official documents and proceedings created by the Forum's work, peruse a photo gallery of indigenous peoples, and read the text of various speeches on indigenous issues. Finally, visitors will also want to peruse the list of upcoming events sponsored by the Forum and also review its latest press releases.

336

Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and tick-borne encephalitis virus in zoo animal species in the Czech Republic.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of antibodies against Borrelia bugdorferi (Bb) s.l. and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in zoo animals in the Czech Republic. We collected 133 serum samples from 69 animal species from 5 zoos located in different parts of the country. The samples were obtained from even-toed ungulates (n=78; 42 species), odd-toed ungulates (n=32; 11 species), carnivores (n=13; 9 species), primates (n=2, 2 species), birds (n=3; 2 species), and reptiles (n=5; 3 species). A high antibody prevalence (60%) was observed for Bb s.l. On the other hand, only two animals had TBEV-specific antibodies: a markhor (Capra falconeri) and a reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), both from the same zoo, located in an area endemic for TBEV. Both of these animals were also positive for Bb s.l. antibodies. Our results indicate that a high number of animal species in the Czech zoos were exposed to Bb s.l. and that TBEV infection occurred at least in one of the investigated zoos. Considering the pathogenic potential of these two tick-borne pathogens, clinical and serological monitoring should be continued, and therapeutic and preventive measures should be taken when necessary. PMID:24889036

Sirmarová, Jana; Tichá, Lucie; Golovchenko, Marina; Salát, Ji?í; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia; Nowotny, Norbert; R?žek, Daniel

2014-09-01

337

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies  

Cancer.gov

The 18 SBIR-funded companies that presented at the 2012 Investor Forum represented the most promising innovators developing the next generation of cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices primed for commercialization. The presenting companies were selected based on the strength of their technology and commercialization potential by a competitive process and review panel comprised of life science investment and business development experts from companies such as Merck, Pfizer, Varian, Mohr Davidow Ventures, and Fidelity Biosciences.

338

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York`s challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria.

NONE

1992-12-31

339

Distant Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about the Hubble Deep Field image, an observation of one small area of sky that contained no previously-detected objects. The long time exposure of this image allows us to detect some of the most distant objects seen in our Universe. Learners will view an image of the Hubble Deep Field and identify how many distant galaxies are visible as well as the types of galaxies they might be. Observations will be taken a step further to infer predominant age of a galaxy and determine if there are any trends in age (color) versus galaxy size or type and, ultimately, if the distant Universe appears relatively uniform. This activity is Astronomy Activity 4 in a larger resource, titled "Space Update."

340

Our Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent decade has seen a significant improvement in our knowledge of the Milky Way, both on large scales, mainly driven by infrared data, and in the Solar neighborhood. The Milky Way appears to be an ordinary barred disk galaxy with a maximum disk, i.e. with little or no dark matter in its inner parts. While some of our host galaxy's properties, in particular in the Solar neighborhood, are observed to a detail never achievable for external galaxies, other, more global properties, are still not well known owing, mainly, to the present lack of accurate distance measurements on the kpc scale. Future space missions (FAME, DIVA, SIM & GAIA) will hopefully resolve this problem and turn the Milky Way into the Rosetta stone for our understanding of galaxy evolution.

Dehnen, W.

2002-12-01

341

Y? The National Forum on People's Differences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Y? forum, the first of its kind to our knowledge, is a moderated and edited online environment that is "designed to give readers a way to ask people from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds the questions they've always been too embarrassed or uncomfortable to ask." The site provides guidelines for both asking a question and providing the answer; however, both are read by the editor before posting "for space and readability, and to paraphrase questions and answers to render them suitable for general viewing." The result is a space where readers can safely follow a dialogue on sensitive topics without the fear of having to wade through racist attacks, foul language, or "flame wars." Topics welcome at Y? include those related to differences in age, class, disability, gender, geography, occupation, race/ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation. The Y? Forum was developed and is managed by Phillip J. Milano, an editor for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville. The site is not related to the newspaper. The site states that an unmoderated forum will be provided in the future in addition to the current moderated format.

1998-01-01

342

Cartwheel Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A peculiar galaxy in the constellation of Sculptor that derives its name from its wheel-like appearance. The Cartwheel has a ring-shaped `rim', 150 000 light-years in diameter, that contains billions of recently formed stars and which is dominated by massive clusters of bright blue stars and HII regions. The nucleus, or `hub' of the galaxy contains a predominantly older population of stars and is...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

343

Andromeda Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Andromeda galaxy is the closest SPIRAL GALAXY to the MILKY WAY, just visible to the naked eye on a dark night as a faint smudge of light in the constellation Andromeda. The earliest records of the Andromeda nebula, as it is still often referred to, date back to AD 964, to the `Book of the Fixed Stars' published by the Persian astronomer AL-SÛFI. The first European to officially note the Andro...

Walterbos, R.; Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

344

Teenage Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The early growth stages of galaxies are still poorly understood. The aim of the MASSIV survey is to better understand the key processes that govern the evolution of galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1-2, a particularly turbulent period similar to the teenage years. This paper presents this ambitious survey, together with the main results obtained so far from this ESO Large Programme with SINFONI at the VLT.

Contini, T.; Epinat, B.; Vergani, D.; Queyrel, J.; Tasca, L.; Amram, P.; Garilli, B.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Fèvre, O.; Moultaka, J.; Paioro, L.; Tresse, L.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Perez-Montero, E.; Perret, V.; Bournaud, F.; Divoy, C.

2012-03-01

345

A 12-month survey of the gastro-intestinal helminths of antelopes, gazelles and giraffids kept at two zoos in Belgium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faecal egg count patterns and clinical signs associated with gastro-intestinal (GI) nematodes of 107 zoo ruminants were monitored at fortnightly intervals for 1 year. The ruminants in this study were kept under different husbandry conditions at two sites of the Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, the Antwerp Zoo and the Animal Park Planckendael. Artiodactylids involved were Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx),

Els Goossens; Pierre Dorny; Joop Boomker; Francis Vercammen; Jozef Vercruysse

2005-01-01

346

PREFACE: IV Nanotechnology International Forum (RUSNANOTECH 2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Logo The RUSNANOTECH 2011 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from 26-28 October 2011, in Moscow, Russia. It was the fourth forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into four sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Nanomaterials Nanotechnology and Green Energy Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma (United business and science & technology section on 'RUSNANOTECH 2011') The scientific program of the forum included more than 50 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them were world-known specialists such as Professor S Bader (Argonne National Laboratory, USA), Professor O Farokzhad (Harvard Medical School, USA), Professor K Chien (Massachusetts General Hospital, USA), Professor L Liz-Marzan (University of Vigo), A Luque (Polytechnic University of Madrid) and many others. The poster session consisted of over 120 presentations, 90 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 47 submissions. Section editors of the proceedings: Nanoelectronics and nanophotonics Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Anatoly Dvurechenskii (Institute of Semiconductor Physics, RAS). Nanomaterials Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Mikhail Alfimov (Photochemistry Center, RAS), Professor Igor Suzdalev (Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Vyacheslav Osiko (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Aleksey Khokhlov (Physical department of Moscow State University). Nanotechnology and green energy Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Eduard Son (Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS). Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Konstantin Skryabin (Bioengineering Center, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Rem Petrov (RAS), Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Sergey Deev (Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry).

Dvurechenskii, Anatoly; Alfimov, Mikhail; Suzdalev, Igor; Osiko, Vyacheslav; Khokhlov, Aleksey; Son, Eduard; Skryabin, Konstantin; Petrov, Rem; Deev, Sergey

2012-02-01

347

Semantic tagging of and semantic enhancements to systematics papers: ZooKeys working examples  

PubMed Central

Abstract The concept of semantic tagging and its potential for semantic enhancements to taxonomic papers is outlined and illustrated by four exemplar papers published in the present issue of ZooKeys. The four papers were created in different ways: (i) written in Microsoft Word and submitted as non-tagged manuscript (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.504); (ii) generated from Scratchpads and submitted as XML-tagged manuscripts (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.505 and doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.506); (iii) generated from an author’s database (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.485) and submitted as XML-tagged manuscript. XML tagging and semantic enhancements were implemented during the editorial process of ZooKeys using the Pensoft Mark Up Tool (PMT), specially designed for this purpose. The XML schema used was TaxPub, an extension to the Document Type Definitions (DTD) of the US National Library of Medicine Journal Archiving and Interchange Tag Suite (NLM). The following innovative methods of tagging, layout, publishing and disseminating the content were tested and implemented within the ZooKeys editorial workflow: (1) highly automated, fine-grained XML tagging based on TaxPub; (2) final XML output of the paper validated against the NLM DTD for archiving in PubMedCentral; (3) bibliographic metadata embedded in the PDF through XMP (Extensible Metadata Platform); (4) PDF uploaded after publication to the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL); (5) taxon treatments supplied through XML to Plazi; (6) semantically enhanced HTML version of the paper encompassing numerous internal and external links and linkouts, such as: (i) vizualisation of main tag elements within the text (e.g., taxon names, taxon treatments, localities, etc.); (ii) internal cross-linking between paper sections, citations, references, tables, and figures; (iii) mapping of localities listed in the whole paper or within separate taxon treatments; (v) taxon names autotagged, dynamically mapped and linked through the Pensoft Taxon Profile (PTP) to large international database services and indexers such as Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Barcode of Life (BOLD), Encyclopedia of Life (EOL), ZooBank, Wikipedia, Wikispecies, Wikimedia, and others; (vi) GenBank accession numbers autotagged and linked to NCBI; (vii) external links of taxon names to references in PubMed, Google Scholar, Biodiversity Heritage Library and other sources. With the launching of the working example, ZooKeys becomes the first taxonomic journal to provide a complete XML-based editorial, publication and dissemination workflow implemented as a routine and cost-efficient practice. It is anticipated that XML-based workflow will also soon be implemented in botany through PhytoKeys, a forthcoming partner journal of ZooKeys. The semantic markup and enhancements are expected to greatly extend and accelerate the way taxonomic information is published, disseminated and used.

Penev, Lyubomir; Agosti, Donat; Georgiev, Teodor; Catapano, Terry; Miller, Jeremy; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Roberts, David; Smith, Vincent S.; Brake, Irina; Ryrcroft, Simon; Scott, Ben; Johnson, Norman F.; Morris, Robert A.; Sautter, Guido; Chavan, Vishwas; Robertson, Tim; Remsen, David; Stoev, Pavel; Parr, Cynthia; Knapp, Sandra; Kress, W. John; Thompson, Chris F.; Erwin, Terry

2010-01-01

348

Semantic tagging of and semantic enhancements to systematics papers: ZooKeys working examples.  

PubMed

The concept of semantic tagging and its potential for semantic enhancements to taxonomic papers is outlined and illustrated by four exemplar papers published in the present issue of ZooKeys. The four papers were created in different ways: (i) written in Microsoft Word and submitted as non-tagged manuscript (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.504); (ii) generated from Scratchpads and submitted as XML-tagged manuscripts (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.505 and doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.506); (iii) generated from an author's database (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.485) and submitted as XML-tagged manuscript. XML tagging and semantic enhancements were implemented during the editorial process of ZooKeys using the Pensoft Mark Up Tool (PMT), specially designed for this purpose. The XML schema used was TaxPub, an extension to the Document Type Definitions (DTD) of the US National Library of Medicine Journal Archiving and Interchange Tag Suite (NLM). The following innovative methods of tagging, layout, publishing and disseminating the content were tested and implemented within the ZooKeys editorial workflow: (1) highly automated, fine-grained XML tagging based on TaxPub; (2) final XML output of the paper validated against the NLM DTD for archiving in PubMedCentral; (3) bibliographic metadata embedded in the PDF through XMP (Extensible Metadata Platform); (4) PDF uploaded after publication to the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL); (5) taxon treatments supplied through XML to Plazi; (6) semantically enhanced HTML version of the paper encompassing numerous internal and external links and linkouts, such as: (i) vizualisation of main tag elements within the text (e.g., taxon names, taxon treatments, localities, etc.); (ii) internal cross-linking between paper sections, citations, references, tables, and figures; (iii) mapping of localities listed in the whole paper or within separate taxon treatments; (v) taxon names autotagged, dynamically mapped and linked through the Pensoft Taxon Profile (PTP) to large international database services and indexers such as Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Barcode of Life (BOLD), Encyclopedia of Life (EOL), ZooBank, Wikipedia, Wikispecies, Wikimedia, and others; (vi) GenBank accession numbers autotagged and linked to NCBI; (vii) external links of taxon names to references in PubMed, Google Scholar, Biodiversity Heritage Library and other sources. With the launching of the working example, ZooKeys becomes the first taxonomic journal to provide a complete XML-based editorial, publication and dissemination workflow implemented as a routine and cost-efficient practice. It is anticipated that XML-based workflow will also soon be implemented in botany through PhytoKeys, a forthcoming partner journal of ZooKeys. The semantic markup and enhancements are expected to greatly extend and accelerate the way taxonomic information is published, disseminated and used. PMID:21594113

Penev, Lyubomir; Agosti, Donat; Georgiev, Teodor; Catapano, Terry; Miller, Jeremy; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Roberts, David; Smith, Vincent S; Brake, Irina; Ryrcroft, Simon; Scott, Ben; Johnson, Norman F; Morris, Robert A; Sautter, Guido; Chavan, Vishwas; Robertson, Tim; Remsen, David; Stoev, Pavel; Parr, Cynthia; Knapp, Sandra; Kress, W John; Thompson, Chris F; Erwin, Terry

2010-01-01

349

The Big Bang-steady state controversy: Cosmology in public and scientific forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

A highly visible debate emerged in the 1950s and 1960s over two rival cosmologies, the big bang and the steady state. Cosmologists operated in three distinct forums of discourse---a specialists' forum in cosmology, a general science forum, and a diverse popular science forum. Each forum had its own implicit standards and conventions of argument which collectively shaped the development of

Craig Sean McConnell

2000-01-01

350

Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A\\/Tiger\\/Thailand\\/CU-T3\\/04 and A\\/Tiger\\/Thailand\\/CU-T7\\/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8

Alongkorn Amonsin; Sunchai Payungporn; Apiradee Theamboonlers; Roongroje Thanawongnuwech; Sanipa Suradhat; Nuananong Pariyothorn; Rachod Tantilertcharoen; Sudarat Damrongwantanapokin; Chantanee Buranathai; Arunee Chaisingh; Thaweesak Songserm; Yong Poovorawan

2006-01-01

351

Zoo-heleoplankton structure in three artificial ponds of North-eastern Argentina.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare the abundance and species richness of zoo-heleoplankton bigger than 53 microm in an annual cycle under similar climate conditions in three artificial ponds, in order to observe the changes during an annual cycle. Samples were taken monthly from June 1993 to July 1994 in Corrientes, Argentina. The first pond (A) was covered an 80% by Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.), the second one (B) with bloom of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kurtzing) and the last one (C) with organic matter deposited in the bottom. The water was more acidic at pond A, and the water at pond B contained more dissolved oxygen concentration than the water at the other two ponds. The zoo-heleoplankton densities varied between 20-1728 ind.l(-1) at pond A, 42-4082 ind.l(-1) at pond B and 148-2447 ind.l(-1) at pond C. The maximum zoo-heleoplankton abundance was found in the pond with cyanobacteria bloom during Autumn 1994 and the minimum abundance was found in the one with a predominance of E. crassipes. The rank of species richness was pond A > pond B > pond C. Rotifera was the most abundant group in pond A whereas the larval stages of Copepoda were abundant in the other two ponds. Anuraeopsis navicula Rousselt 1910 was the dominant population in the pond with macrophytes prevalence. Brachionus calyciflorus Pallas 1776 and larval stage of Copepoda had variable proportions in the pond with cyanobacteria bloom. Thermocyclops decipiens (Kiefer 1929) was present during the annual cycle only in the pond with organic matter deposited in the bottom. The succession of taxa was observed in the pond with coverage of aquatic macrophytes and with cyanobacteria bloom. Differences in species richness and low similarity in zoo-heleoplankton between ponds were determined by differences in the quality of the water in relation to the presence of macrophytes, cyanobacteria, organic matter deposited in the bottom and fish predation. Multiple regression analysis (stepwise) revealed that water transparency, dissolved oxygen and conductivity were the environmental variables that explained more than 42% of variability in the abundance of the dominant species. PMID:19419034

Frutos, S M; Carnevali, R

2008-09-01

352

SpArcFiRe: Scalable Automated Detection of Spiral Galaxy Arm Segments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ~644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as "galaxies." We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral "arm," leading us to prefer the term "arm segment." We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B.

2014-08-01

353

Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

2011-01-01

354

Measuring Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How big and how old is the universe? This culminating telescope investigation for high school students has them first taking images of galaxies near and far; then measuring and calculating their distances; then predicting how they might expect galaxies to be moving based on various models of gravity; and then comparing their results with the galaxy velocity measurements in a NASA database. From this data, students explore the concept of an expanding universe and can actually determine an estimate for the age of our universe. This activity is part of a DVD that is a professional development resource for educators. Many new astronomy learners, students and adults alike, are unfamiliar with the universe beyond the solar system. Instructions for obtaining the DVD and registering for the professional development workshop are contained on the website.

355

World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE) is an international interdisciplinary coalition of individuals and institutions concerned with the world soundscape as an ecologically balanced entity. WFAE encourages the study of the relationship between living organisms and their sonic environment (soundscape), it is WFAE's main task to draw attention to unhealthy imbalances in this relationship, to improve the acoustic quality of a place wherever possible and to protect and maintain acoustically balanced soundscapes where they still exist. WFAE has recently established four on-line services and we invite anyone interested in acoustic ecology and communication to participate.

356

78 FR 13072 - Seventh Annual Drug Information Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum-2013...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum--2013; Public Conference AGENCY...entitled ``Seventh Annual DIA/FDA Statistics Forum--2013.'' The purpose of...I. Background This annual FDA/DIA statistics forum will establish a unique,...

2013-02-26

357

Is painting by elephants in zoos as enriching as we are led to believe?  

PubMed Central

The relationship between the activity of painting and performance of stereotyped and other stress-related behaviour was investigated in four captive Asian elephants at Melbourne Zoo, Australia. The activity involved the elephant being instructed to paint on a canvas by its keeper in front of an audience. Painting by elephants in zoos is commonly believed to be a form of enrichment, but this assumption had not been based on any systematic research. If an activity is enriching we would expect stress-related behaviour to be reduced but we found no evidence of the elephants anticipating the painting activity and no effect on the performance of stereotyped or other stress-related behaviour either before or after the painting session. This indicates that the activity does not fulfil one of the main aims of enrichment. However, if an elephant was not selected to paint on a given day this was associated with higher levels of non-interactive behaviour, a possible indicator of stress. Behavioural observations associated with ear, eye and trunk positions during the painting session showed that the elephant’s attentiveness to the painting activity or to the keeper giving instruction varied between individuals. Apart from positive reinforcement from the keeper, the results indicated that elephants gain little enrichment from the activity of painting. Hence, the benefits of this activity appear to be limited to the aesthetic appeal of these paintings to the people viewing them.

Kaplan, Gisela; Rogers, Lesley J.

2014-01-01

358

Prevalence and molecular typing of Giardia spp. in captive mammals at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia.  

PubMed

A total of 131 faecal samples from 57 mammalian species housed at the zoo of Zagreb, Croatia, were tested for the presence of Giardia spp. cysts using epifluorescence microscopy. The overall prevalence (29%) was high, yet all animals were asymptomatic at the time of sampling. Positive samples were characterized by PCR and sequence analysis of both conserved and variable loci, for the identification of Giardia species and G. duodenalis assemblages and genotypes. Assemblages A and C were identified in Artiodactyla, assemblage B in Primates, Rodentia and Hyracoidea, and assemblages A, B, C and D, as well as Giardia microti, in Carnivora. Genotyping at the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, at the triose phosphate isomerase, glutamate dehydrogenase and beta-giardin genes revealed extensive polymorphisms, particularly among assemblage B isolates. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences showed that isolates from captive mammals housed at the zoo are genetically different from isolates of human and domestic animal origin. This is the first survey in a zoological garden to include a molecular characterization of the parasite, and provides novel sequence data of G. duodenalis from many previously uncharacterized hosts. PMID:20970259

Beck, Relja; Sprong, Hein; Bata, Ingeborg; Lucinger, Snjezana; Pozio, Edoardo; Cacciò, Simone M

2011-01-10

359

Status of wild birds in Bulgarian zoos with regard to orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus type 1 infections.  

PubMed

Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV) are pathogens of major economic and social importance, and the diseases they cause are often devastating, particularly in domestic poultry. Both viruses are naturally found in a wide variety of wild birds, particularly aquatic species, where asymptomatic infection typically occurs. Wild birds are therefore considered to be a natural reservoir for both viruses. Wild birds kept in captivity are in an environment that promotes transmission of infection with both influenza and Newcastle disease viruses. This report describes a survey for the detection of antibodies against Newcastle disease and avian influenza A viruses using the hemagglutination inhibition test in samples from 88 wild birds from 38 species in four Bulgarian zoos. Samples with positive results against NDV were also tested against avian paramyxovirus type 3 (APMV-3). Real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR was also performed to detect viral RNA of NDV and AIV among 127 wild birds from 57 species from the same zoos. In 13 samples from seven avian species (ten birds from the family Phasianidae, two from the family Numidae, and one from the family Columbidae), antibodies against APMV-1 were detected. Seven birds, whose sera were APMV-1 positive, had been vaccinated. The other six birds (five Phasianidae representatives and one of the Columbidae family) had no immunization history. No antibodies against both H5 and H7 AIV and against APMV-3 were detected, and no RNA of NDV and AIV were detected. PMID:20521660

Dimitrov, Kiril M; Manvell, Ruth J; Goujgoulova, Gabriela V

2010-03-01

360

Kiosks, Clubs and Neighborhoods: The Language Games of Online Forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Wittgenstein’s language-game paradigm, we analyze the discursive practices of three online discussion forums devoted to topics of professional management interest, and present the different language games enacted by their participants. We characterize the differences among the three forums as kiosk, club, and neighborhood: distinctive games that vary in their complexity in terms of linguistic style, roles, and interaction patterns.

Anne-Laure Fayard; Gerardine DeSanctis

2008-01-01

361

Enacting Democracy: Using Forum Theatre to Confront Bullying  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a curriculum project designed to create opportunities for transformative educational experiences in relation to democratic and social justice ideals. The project used an empowering interactive art form, Forum Theatre, to explore the topic of bullying. Through the development of Forum Theatre scenes by eighth grade students…

Gourd, Karen M.; Gourd, Tina Y.

2011-01-01

362

Analysing Interactions in a Teacher Network Forum: A Sociometric Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the sociometric analysis of the interactions in a forum of a social network created for the professional development of Portuguese-speaking teachers. The main goal of the forum, which was titled Stricto Sensu, was to discuss the educational value of programmes that joined the distance learning model in Brazil. The empirical…

Lisboa, Eliana Santana; Coutinho, Clara Pereira

2013-01-01

363

Homeless and Special Education Administrative Collaboration: Recommendations. Policy Forum Proceedings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) and the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) worked together to collect information regarding the need for a policy forum on the topic of administrative collaboration between school personnel who support homeless education under the McKinney-Vento…

Bowman, Diana; Burdette, Paula; Julianelle, Patricia

2008-01-01

364

Paperwork in Special Education: Survey Findings. inForum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2002, Project Forum conducted a survey on special education forms and a policy forum on the issue of paperwork in special education. Some recommendations that resulted from those activities were included in the 2004 reauthorization of IDEA. With a new reauthorization pending, the topic has again aroused interest. This document presents the…

Ahearn, Eileen

2011-01-01

365

Measuring Critical Thinking Skills in Engineering Mathematics using online forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of critical thinking skills is vital in the teaching and learning of Engineering Mathematics. Forty students of the subject were exposed to two ill structured problem solving sessions over the Blackboard discussion forums. They also attempted the CCTST (California Critical Thinking Skills Test) test to measure their general critical thinking skills prior to and after the forum sessions.

Seibu Mary Jacob; Betsy Lee; Gillian Rosemary Lueckenhausen

2009-01-01

366

The Forum State of the Field Survey 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In October/November 2009, the Forum on Education Abroad conducted its third State of the Field Survey. This survey provides an annual or biannual assessment of key education abroad issues and topics of interest to Forum members and the field of education abroad at large. Previous State of the Field surveys were conducted in 2006 and 2008. The 2009…

Blessing, Charlotte; Rayner, Elise; Kreutzer, Kim

2010-01-01

367

Ultra-Low Power Signal Processing [DSP Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

This IEEE Signal Processing Magazine forum discusses the latest advances and challenges in ultra-low power (ULP) signal processing (SP). The forum members bring their expert insights to issues such as design requirements and future applications of ULP SP systems.

Gene Frantz; Jorg Henkel; Jan Rabaey; Todd Schneider; Marilyn Wolf; Umit Batur

2010-01-01

368

Teachers Leading the Way. Voices From the National Teacher Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet for teachers reports what participants in the U.S. Department of Education's 1996 National Teacher Forum had to say about teacher leadership. Forum participants were 120 exemplary public and private school teachers nationwide. The report also includes thoughts of teachers who used e-mail to share their ideas on teacher leadership.…

Paulu, Nancy, Ed.; Winters, Kirk, Ed.

369

Acceptability of an Asynchronous Learning Forum on Mobile Devices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile learning has recently become noteworthy because mobile devices have become popular. To construct an asynchronous learning forum on mobile devices is important because an asynchronous learning forum is always an essential part of networked asynchronous distance learning. However, the input interface in handheld learning devices, which is…

Chang, Chih-Kai

2010-01-01

370

(Integrated Energy Systems Forum monthly meetings). Final report  

SciTech Connect

During the life of the IES program, including the time it was administered by NBS, a total of 288 documents were designated as numbered IES documents, reproduced and made available to IES Forum participants. The documents constituted an important part of the technical information exchange function of the IES Forum. Included were reprints of articles from journals and magazines; papers presented at IES Forum meetings; papers prepared for other meetings and conferences; reports on topics of interest; Congressional testimony; and other papers and publications of interest. Current documents were placed on the literature table at each meeting to be taken by meeting participants; they also were provided by mail upon request. In addition, a variety of magazines, newsletters and other miscellaneous literature was provided to the IES Forum by their publishers. The Conference of Mayors Research and Education Foundation was successful in its purpose of maintaining the IES Forum as an important means of exchanging technical information during the one-year grant period. At this time, the future of the IES Forum is uncertain. The IES Advisory Council is exploring the possibility of obtaining outside funding to continue the group; but there is a general feeling that the IES Forum may no longer be necessary, since the technologies promoted by the IES Forum are now generally accepted and other organizations have instituted meetings and conferences which serve a technical information exchange function.

Gatton, D.

1983-10-07

371

Smaller Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dr. Halton Arp from Mt. Wilson and Las Campanas Observatory has spent a few months with the ESO Scientific Group in Geneva. He is weil known for his unconventional ideas about the origin of the redshift of quasars; however, surprisingly, he has chosen to write on a "harmless" subject: dwarf galaxies.

Arp, H.

1980-09-01

372

Galaxy collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theories of how galaxies, the fundamental constituents of large-scale structure, form and evolve have undergone a dramatic paradigm shift in the last few decades. Earlier views were of rapid, early collapse and formation of basic structures, followed by slow evolution of the stellar populations and steady buildup of the chemical elements. Current theories emphasize hierarchical buildup via recurrent collisions and

Curtis Struck

1999-01-01

373

PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into eight sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Catalysis and Chemical Industry Nanobiotechnology Nanodiagnostics Nanoelectronics Nanomaterials Nanophotonics Nanotechnolgy In The Energy Industry Nanotechnology in Medicine The scientific program of the forum included 115 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them in the "Nanomaterials" section was the lecture by Dr Konstantin Novoselov, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2010. The poster session consisted of over 500 presentations, 300 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 57 submissions. The scientific program committee: Prof Zhores Alferov, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nobel Prize winner, Russia, Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Sergey Deev, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesHead of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, M M Shemyakin and Yu A Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Deputy Chairman of the Program CommitteeProf Alexander Aseev, AcademicianVice-president of Russian Academy of Sciences Director, A V Rzhanov-Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Sergey Bagaev, AcademicianDirector, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexander Gintsburg, Ademician, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDirector Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Grigoryev, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesVice-president, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, RussiaProf Michael Kovalchuk, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center, RussiaProf Valery Lunin, AcademicianDean, Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valentin Parmon, Academician, DirectorBoreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Rem Petrov, AcademicianAdvisor, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Konstantin Skryabin, AcademicianDirector, Bioinzheneriya Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vsevolod Tkachuk, Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical SciencesDean, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Vladimir Fortov, AcademicianDirector, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Alexey Khokhlov, AcademicianVice Principal, Head of Innovation, Information and International Scientific Affairs Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, RussiaProf Valery Bukhtiyarov, RAS Corresponding MemberDirector, Physicochemical Research Methods Dept., Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Anatoly Dvurechensky, RAS Corresponding MemberDeputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of S

Kazaryan, Konstantin

2011-03-01

374

"Galaxy," Defined  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A growing number of low luminosity and low surface brightness astronomical objects challenge traditional notions of both galaxies and star clusters. To address this challenge, we propose a definition of galaxy that does not depend on a cold dark matter model of the universe: a galaxy is a gravitationally bound collection of stars whose properties cannot be explained by a combination of baryons and Newton's laws of gravity. After exploring several possible observational diagnostics of this definition, we critically examine the classification of ultra-faint dwarfs, globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and tidal dwarfs. While kinematic studies provide an effective diagnostic of the definition in many regimes, they can be less useful for compact or very faint systems. To explore the utility of using the [Fe/H] spread as a complementary diagnostic, we use published spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of 16 Milky Way dwarfs and 24 globular clusters to uniformly calculate their [Fe/H] spreads and associated uncertainties. Our principal results are (1) no known, old star cluster less luminous than MV = -10 has a significant (gsim0.1 dex) spread in its iron abundance; (2) known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies can be unambiguously classified with a combination of kinematic and [Fe/H] observations; (3) the observed [Fe/H] spreads in massive (gsim 106 M ?) globular clusters do not necessarily imply that they are the stripped nuclei of dwarfs, nor a need for dark matter; and (4) if ultra-compact dwarf galaxies reside in dark matter halos akin to those of ultra-faint dwarfs of the same half-light radii, then they will show no clear dynamical signature of dark matter. We suggest several measurements that may assist the future classification of massive globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and ultra-faint galaxies. Our galaxy definition is designed to be independent of the details of current observations and models, while our proposed diagnostics can be refined or replaced as our understanding of the universe evolves.

Willman, B.; Strader, J.

2012-09-01

375

Understanding geographic origins and history of admixture among chimpanzees in European zoos, with implications for future breeding programmes  

PubMed Central

Despite ample focus on this endangered species, conservation planning for chimpanzees residing outside Africa has proven a challenge because of the lack of ancestry information. Here, we analysed the largest number of chimpanzee samples to date, examining microsatellites in >100 chimpanzees from the range of the species in Africa, and 20% of the European zoo population. We applied the knowledge about subspecies differentiation throughout equatorial Africa to assign origin to chimpanzees in the largest conservation management programme globally. A total of 63% of the genotyped chimpanzees from the European zoos could be assigned to one of the recognized subspecies. The majority being of West African origin (40%) will help consolidate the current breeding programme for this subspecies and the identification of individuals belonging to the two other subspecies so far found in European zoos can form the basis for breeding programmes for these. Individuals of various degree of mixed ancestry made up 37% of the genotyped European zoo population and thus highlight the need for appropriate management programmes guided by genetic analysis to preserve maximum genetic diversity and reduce hybridization among subspecies.

Hvilsom, C; Frandsen, P; B?rsting, C; Carlsen, F; Salle, B; Simonsen, B T; Siegismund, H R

2013-01-01

376

Upper Secondary Students’ Situational Interest: A case study of the role of a zoo visit in a biology class  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper comprises a presentation of the findings of a case study that investigated how situational factors triggered 12th grade students’ interest during a field trip to a zoo. The purpose was to identify sources of interest and to investigate the attributes that make them interesting. Students’ interest was investigated by a descriptive interpretive approach, based on data from classroom

Niels Bonderup Dohn

2011-01-01

377

A new non-species dependent ELISA for detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. in zoo animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Lyme borreliosis is regarded as one of the most important zoonotic diseases, in Europe very few research reports have documented examinations on free-ranging wild animal populations and no study on zoo animals has been published. One of the problems regarding the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis in wild animals is often the lack of species specific secondary antibodies for serological

Katrin Stöbel; Arno Schönberg; Christian Staak

2002-01-01

378

Isolation of a Mycobacterium microti-like organism from a rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) in a Canadian zoo  

PubMed Central

A Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organism was isolated from a zoo resident rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) imported into Canada from South Africa. The strain was identified biochemically as Mycobacterium microti. The spoligotype pattern obtained for this isolate was found to be rare. This represents the first report of isolation and spoligotyping of M. microti in North America.

Lutze-Wallace, Cyril; Turcotte, Claude; Glover, Gordon; Cousins, Debby; Bell, John; Berlie-Surujballi, Gloria; Barbeau, Yvon; Randall, Geoff

2006-01-01

379

Galaxy Evolution with LSST  

Microsoft Academic Search

LSST will be a unique tool to study the universe of galaxies. The database will provide photometry for 1010 galaxies, from the Local Group to thousands of z 6 galaxies. It will provide structural measurements and 6-band photometry for about 109 galaxies, largely at z<1.5. The key goal of the LSST Galaxies Working Group is to measure the multivariate properties

Jennifer M. Lotz; H. C. Ferguson; L. Armus; L. F. Barrientos; J. G. Bartlett; M. Blanton; K. D. Borne; C. R. Bridge; M. Dickinson; H. Francke; G. Galaz; E. Gawiser; K. Gilmore; R. H. Lupton; J. A. Newman; N. D. Padilla; B. E. Robertson; R. Roskar; A. Stanford; R. H. Wechsler

2010-01-01

380

Working in the Future. The Thinkahead Project Forum #3 (San Francisco, California, September 21, 1989). FIERI Forum Transcripts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains an edited transcript of a forum held as part of a research project called Thinkahead, which was designed to serve as a catalyst for developing educational models that will prepare people to think more critically and creatively in the world of the future. The forum participants, all business people concerned about the ways in…

Whitman Inst., San Francisco, CA.

381

Arthropod-borne pathogens circulating in free-roaming domestic cats in a zoo environment in Brazil.  

PubMed

Recently, tick and flea-borne pathogens have been detected in wild carnivores maintained in captivity in Brazilian zoos. Since free-roaming cats are frequently found in Brazilian zoos, they could act as reservoirs for arthropod-borne pathogens, which could be transmitted to endangered wild carnivores maintained in captivity in these institutions. On the other hand, stray cats in zoos may play a role as sentinels to pathogens that circulate among wild animals in captivity. The present work aimed to detect the presence of Anaplasmataceae agents, hemoplasmas, Bartonella species, piroplasmas, and Hepatozoon sp. DNA in blood samples of 37 free-roaming cats in a Brazilian zoo. Three (8%) cats were positive for Anaplasma spp. closed related to Anaplasma phagocytophilum; 12 (32%) cats were positive for hemoplasmas [two (5%) for Mycoplasma haemofelis, five (13.5%) for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, and five (13.5%) for Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis]; 11 (30%) were positive for Bartonella spp., six (16%) were positive Babesia vogeli and one (3%) for Theileria sp. Coinfection with multiple arthropod-borne agentes was observed in sampled cats. None of sampled cats were positive for Ehrlichia spp., Cytauxzoon spp., or Hepatozoon spp. in PCR. This is the first molecular detection of Babesia vogeli and Theileria sp. in domestic cats in Brazil. The control of the population of free-roaming cats in these conservation institutions is much needed aiming to prevent the potential transmission to endangered wild animals maintained in captivity, such as wild neotropical wild felids, as well as to human beings visiting zoos. PMID:24889035

André, Marcos Rogério; Baccarim Denardi, Nathani Cristina; Marques de Sousa, Keyla Carstens; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Henrique, Paloma Canedo; Grosse Rossi Ontivero, Claudia Regina; Lima Gonzalez, Irys Hany; Cabral Nery, Carolina Vaz; Fernandes Chagas, Carolina Romeiro; Monticelli, Cauê; Alexandre de Santis, Ana Cláudia Gabriela; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

2014-09-01

382

RADIO DETECTION OF GREEN PEAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MAGNETIC FIELDS IN YOUNG GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Green Peas are a new class of young, emission line galaxies that were discovered by citizen volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their low stellar mass, low metallicity, and very high star formation rates make Green Peas the nearby (z {approx} 0.2) analogs of the Lyman break galaxies which account for the bulk of the star formation in the early universe (z {approx} 2-5). They thus provide accessible laboratories in the nearby universe for understanding star formation, supernova feedback, particle acceleration, and magnetic field amplification in early galaxies. We report the first direct radio detection of Green Peas with low frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations and our stacking detection with archival Very Large Array FIRST data. We show that the radio emission implies that these extremely young galaxies already have magnetic fields ({approx}> 30 {mu}G) even larger than that of the Milky Way. This is at odds with the present understanding of magnetic field growth based on amplification of seed fields by dynamo action over a galaxy's lifetime. Our observations strongly favor models with pregalactic magnetic fields at {mu}G levels.

Chakraborti, Sayan; Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Cardamone, Carolin, E-mail: sayan@tifr.res.in [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Bldg. 26-331, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-02-10

383

Third Annual HEDS-UP Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HEDS-UP (Human Exploration and Development of Space-University Partners) program has been instituted to build new relationships between university faculty and students and NASA in support of the Human Exploration and Development of Space. The program provides a mechanism whereby university students can explore problems of interest to NASA through student design projects, led by a university professor or mentor, and aided by the HEDSUP staff. HEDS-UP advises on the type of project that is of interest and provides contacts to NASA and industry professionals who may serve as mentors to the student project. Students become acquainted with objectives, strategies, development issues, and technologic characteristics of space exploration programs. In doing so, they are preparing themselves for future engineering challenges and may well find that the program is on their critical path to professional advancement. Many of the ideas are novel and are of interest to NASA. Industry finds in HEDS-UP a mechanism to meet many bright and enthusiastic students who are about to enter the work force. The universities become more involved with space exploration and the students are encouraged to include an outreach element in their work, to bring their efforts and their excitement to others in their universities or in their communities. The climax of the HEDS-UP program each year is the HEDS-UP Forum, held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. Here, the university teams bring their projects - written reports, oral reports, models, prototypes, and experiment demonstrations - to show to one another and to NASA and industry participants. NASA, industry, and academic professionals present discussions of problems of current interest to space exploration. All meet informally around the posters that each of the teams brings to the Forum. This year the HEDS-UP Forum was held May 4-5 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. Thirteen university teams from twelve universities participated. Eleven teams were undergraduate teams; two were composed of graduate students. Each team contributed a 20-page written report, and these reports are reproduced in this volume. The specially invited NASA presenters included Mr. John Connolly, Dr. David McKay and Dr. Donald Henninger of the NASA Johnson Space Center, Dr. Paul Spudis and Dr. Steve Clifford of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, and Dr. Pascal Lee of the NASA Ames Research Center.

Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

2000-01-01

384

Chernobyl Forum: Forum Sharpens Focus on Human Consequences of Chernobyl Accident.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a concrete sarcophagus was built to enclose the remnants of the destroyed reactor. Now, nearly seventeen years later, engineers are faced with a new problem: the sarcophagus is literally falling apart. This site discusses events and topics of the February 2003 international forum on Chernobyl. Several documents are included on the site, including retrospectives and health analyses.

2003-01-01

385

Galaxy formation  

PubMed Central

It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ? 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

Peebles, P. J. E.

1998-01-01

386

Acid rain: an intergovernmental policy forum  

SciTech Connect

The various presentations made at the New York State Senate's Acid Rain Policy Forum underscored the uncertainty and intricacy of the complex issue of acid rain. Statements by the panelists illustrated strong divergence of opinion over the many questions surrounding the acid rain problem, such as: what causes acid rain; where does it come from; is it getting worse; what are its impacts; and what are the most appropriate policy options for addressing the issue. If there was one point of consensus, it was that enough evidence exists to support the conclusion that some form of action is appropriate. As one panelist noted, the quick answers are all in, and it will be five or more years before answers to some of the remaining questions are known. Therefore, policymakers will have to make their choices on the basis of incomplete knowledge.

Not Available

1984-05-01

387

Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

1994-01-01

388

Galaxy collisions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theories of how galaxies, the fundamental constituents of large-scale structure, form and evolve have undergone a dramatic paradigm shift in the last few decades. Earlier views were of rapid, early collapse and formation of basic structures, followed by slow evolution of the stellar populations and steady buildup of the chemical elements. Current theories emphasize hierarchical buildup via recurrent collisions and mergers, separated by long periods of relaxation and secular restructuring. Thus, collisions between galaxies are now seen as a primary process in their evolution. This article begins with a brief history of how this once peripheral subject found its way to center stage. The author then tours parts of the vast array of collisional forms that have been discovered to date. Many examples are provided to illustrate how detailed numerical models and multiwaveband observations have allowed the general chronological sequence of collisional morphologies to be deciphered, and how these forms are produced by the processes of tidal kinematics, hypersonic gas dynamics, collective dynamical friction and violent relaxation. Galaxy collisions may trigger the formation of a large fraction of all the stars ever formed, and play a key role in fueling active galactic nuclei. Current understanding of the processes involved is reviewed. The last decade has seen exciting new discoveries about how collisions are orchestrated by their environment, how collisional processes depend on environment, and how these environments depend on redshift or cosmological time. These discoveries and prospects for the future are summarized in the final sections.

Struck, C.

389

Can Anonymous Posters on Medical Forums be Reidentified?  

PubMed Central

Background Participants in medical forums often reveal personal health information about themselves in their online postings. To feel comfortable revealing sensitive personal health information, some participants may hide their identity by posting anonymously. They can do this by using fake identities, nicknames, or pseudonyms that cannot readily be traced back to them. However, individual writing styles have unique features and it may be possible to determine the true identity of an anonymous user through author attribution analysis. Although there has been previous work on the authorship attribution problem, there has been a dearth of research on automated authorship attribution on medical forums. The focus of the paper is to demonstrate that character-based author attribution works better than word-based methods in medical forums. Objective The goal was to build a system that accurately attributes authorship of messages posted on medical forums. The Authorship Attributor system uses text analysis techniques to crawl medical forums and automatically correlate messages written by the same authors. Authorship Attributor processes unstructured texts regardless of the document type, context, and content. Methods The messages were labeled by nicknames of the forum participants. We evaluated the system’s performance through its accuracy on 6000 messages gathered from 2 medical forums on an in vitro fertilization (IVF) support website. Results Given 2 lists of candidate authors (30 and 50 candidates, respectively), we obtained an F score accuracy in detecting authors of 75% to 80% on messages containing 100 to 150 words on average, and 97.9% on longer messages containing at least 300 words. Conclusions Authorship can be successfully detected in short free-form messages posted on medical forums. This raises a concern about the meaningfulness of anonymous posting on such medical forums. Authorship attribution tools can be used to warn consumers wishing to post anonymously about the likelihood of their identity being determined.

Bobicev, Victoria; El Emam, Khaled; Jafer, Yasser; Dewar, Brian; Jonker, Elizabeth; Matwin, Stan

2013-01-01

390

Zoo Labs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These five laboratory activities are designed for observation of primates and humans in a zoological environment and include studies of locomotion, communication, mother-infant interaction, general behavior, and dominance/submissive behavior. Students are directed to make observations and interpretations.

Brooks, Alison

2007-04-08

391

Leptospira and Brucella antibodies in collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) in Brazilian zoos.  

PubMed

The presence of Leptospira spp. and Brucella spp. antibodies was investigated in serum samples from 28 collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) kept in seven Brazilian zoos. Sera were tested against 19 Leptospira serovars using microscopic agglutination. Samples reacted to the following serovars: two (7.14%) to Patoc, three (10.71%) to Tarrasovi, three (10.71%) to both Patoc and Tarrasovi, two (7.14%) to Wolffi, and one (3.57%) to Australis. Two (7.14%) samples reacted to the buffered Brucella antigen test, but no confirmatory reaction occurred using the 2-mercaptoethanol slow slide agglutination test. No sample was reactive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test for rugose species of Brucella. The presence of anti-leptospira agglutinins in captive T. tetradactyla serum indicates that this species may be susceptible to infection by these bacteria. PMID:23272339

Sales, Indiara dos Santos; Folly, Márcio Manhães; Garcia, Luize Néli Nunes; Ramos, Tatiane Mendes Varela; da Silva, Mariana Cristina; Pereira, Martha Maria

2012-12-01

392

Persistent Giardia spp. and Trichuris spp. infection in maras (Dolichotis patagonum) at a zoo in Greece.  

PubMed

The mara (Dolichotis patagonum) is a species classified as "Near Threatened" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. In the wild, it inhabits only Argentina, but it is also kept in zoos around the world. In order to investigate the endoparasites of the maras kept in the Attica Zoological Park, Greece, four fecal examinations were performed in a period of 4 yr (2008-2011) by standard parasitologic methods. Cysts of the protozoan parasite Giardia spp. and eggs of the nematode Trichuris spp. were found in all four examinations. The possible routes of infection of the maras and the importance of these parasites to other animals and to humans are discussed. PMID:23805557

Tahas, Stamatios Alan; Diakou, Anastasia

2013-06-01

393

A comparative approach to the study of Keeper-Animal Relationships in the zoo.  

PubMed

Research on intensively farmed animals over the past 25 years has shown that human-animal interactions, by affecting the animal's fear of humans, can markedly limit the productivity and welfare of farm animals. This article begins to explore some of the factors that need to be considered to investigate Keeper-Animal Relationships (KARs) in the zoo. In the mid-1990s, a large body of multi-institutional data on zookeepers and animals was collected from 46 Zoos. Using standardized questionnaires, 82 keepers rated how they behaved towards animals, their husbandry routine, how the animal responds to them and to other people, and provided information about themselves. These data include 219 individuals of four endangered species: black rhinoceros, cheetah, maned wolf, and great hornbill. At each zoo, keepers were also videotaped calling to their animals in order to directly observe animal responses to keeper behaviors. Principle Components Analysis reduced eight animal variables to three components and ten keeper variables to five components. Scores for animals and for keepers were calculated on these components and compared, according to five predictions based on models of human-animal interactions in the literature. Animal responses to keepers varied along three dimensions: Affinity to Keeper, Fear of People, and Sociable/Curious. Animal scores of Fear of People were significantly and positively correlated with independent measures of poor welfare from two later studies: fecal corticoid concentrations for 12 black rhinos and "tense-fearful" scores for 12 cheetahs. (1) Significant species differences were found for Affinity to Keeper and Fear of People, and the interaction of these two dimensions of animal response to keepers appears to be species-specific. (2) The quality of KAR is influenced by whether the zookeeper goes in the enclosure with the animal or not, the frequency and time of feeding, and keeper visibility to the animal. Among keepers who go in with their animals, a significant negative correlation between Frequency of Feeding/Early Feedtime and average Affinity to Keeper of their animals, and a positive correlation between Keeper Experience and their animals' Fear of People, indicates that certain zoo keeping styles or habits among experienced keepers might be aversive and increase fear among animals. (3) Keepers who locomote or make unexpected noises when calling their animals elicit increased aggression or apprehension from maned wolves and cheetahs. (4) Wild-born black rhino and parent-reared maned wolf have significantly less affinity to keepers than their captive-born or hand-reared counterparts, but neither differs in Fear of People. (5) Keeper-animal relationships are likely to be reciprocal as evidenced by a negative correlation of Job Satisfaction with animal Fear of People. Future research directions are discussed with respect to assessment of keeper attitudes and behaviors, animal fear, positive measures of welfare, and positive reinforcement training. PMID:19885915

Carlstead, Kathy

2009-11-01

394

Survey of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) for potential pathogens at three Michigan zoos.  

PubMed

Blood samples collected from 31 free-roaming peafowl from three zoos in Michigan were tested serologically. Antibody titers were present against avian adenovirus and Bordetella avium in 19.3% and 61.3% of the samples, respectively. Serum plate agglutination tests were positive for Mycoplasma meleagridis and Mycoplasma synoviae in 3.2% and 38.7% of the samples, respectively. All birds were seronegative for avian influenza, Newcastle disease virus, West Nile virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella typhimurium, and Giardia sp. No parasites were seen in blood smears. Cloacal swabs were cultured for anaerobic, aerobic, and microaerophilic bacteria. Clostridium perfringens type A and Escherichia coli were cultured most frequently from 64.5% and 29% of the samples, respectively, whereas Salmonella sp. and Campylobacter sp. were not isolated. Fecal samples contained moderate numbers of ascarid and Capillaria sp. ova and coccidian oocysts. Female biting lice (Goniodes gigas) were identified on three birds. PMID:15077714

Hollamby, Simon; Sikarskie, James G; Stuht, John

2003-12-01

395

Virologic and serologic studies of zoo birds for Marek's disease virus infection.  

PubMed Central

One hundred and eleven zoo birds representing 49 species in 14 orders were examined for Marek's disease (MD) herpesvirus (MDHV) infection. MDHV was isolated from 10 birds, all belonging to genus Gallus. The precipitating antibodies against MDHV were demonstrated only in the Gallus birds, when 51 selected birds including 34 Galliformes and 17 other birds representing 12 species from nine orders were examined. The 10 MDHV isolates all induced morphologically similar plaques in cell cultures closely resembling those of HN strain, a low pathogenic isolate of MDHV. Six of the 10 isolates, when inoculated into an experimental line of chickens highly susceptible to MD, caused only a minimal degree of histologic lesions without causing clinical MD, gross MD lesions, or deaths from MD. Natural hosts of MD are probably Galliformes, primarily affecting Gallus and less often other genera of Galliformes. Images

Cho, B R; Kenzy, S G

1975-01-01

396

Solving leadership problems by going to the zoo: the pull of diverse experiences.  

PubMed

Being confronted with a diversity of thinking can break up the old models in our head and open new pathways to innovation. In health care, it is extremely important to be exposed to very different situations that can potentially create very different answers for us; hence the trip to the zoo, to a factory known for quality outcomes, or other venues that will open new vistas in our mind. Anytime we try to do something that worked in the last 5 years, we are flirting with disaster. Health care is constantly changing and if we attempt to cover the present with the templates of the past, we will fail. Immersing people in situations where they can share openly with very diverse people and ideas will create the culture consistent with behaviors that eagerly engage in seeking diverse answers to the issues of the future. PMID:20672547

Kerfoot, Karlene M

2010-01-01

397

The captive husbandry and reproduction of the pink-eared turtle (Emydura victoriae) at Perth Zoo.  

PubMed

In 1997, Perth Zoo acquired six pink-eared turtles (Emydura victoriae) from the wild for display in the reptile facility. There is very little documented information on pink-eared turtles in captivity. This article looks at the reproductive biology, ecology, behavior, diet, and captive husbandry of the species. Eight clutches of eggs were documented over a 2-year period with an average clutch size of 10 eggs. Egg size was recorded with three clutches incubated to hatching. Ten hatchlings were maintained for a growth and development study. Measurements of weight, carapace length, width, height, and plastron length were recorded weekly for about 12 months, and then monthly for approximately 2 years. The data were analyzed and showed positive growth curves in all animals. Sexual dimorphism was observed after 20 weeks and sexual maturity in males observed after 2 years. PMID:21319211

Gaikhorst, G S; Clarke, B R; McPharlin, M; Larkin, B; McLaughlin, J; Mayes, J

2011-01-01

398

[Breeding management of black rhinos (Diceros bicornis michaeli) in Magdeburg Zoo].  

PubMed

Objective: The African black rhino is an endangered species. In Germany there are only five zoos where this species is kept and breeding has not been successful in all of them. In Magdeburg Zoo the last birth occurred in December 2005, and during the following years, no matings could be observed. During the construction of a new enclosure to enable a more natural mating behaviour, the reproduction status of the rhino cows was evaluated and a hormonal treatment was performed. Material and methods: Since 2009, faecal samples from two rhino cows (Diceros bicornis michaeli; "Mana", 30 years old, and "Maleika", 17 years old) were collected periodically, and the pregnanediol-glucuronide (PdG) and oestradiol concentrations were determined using enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Following evaluation of the results, both cows were trea- ted for 12 days with Regumate® Equine, a synthetic progesterone, during the period of PdG-dominance. Results: "Mana" accepted the bull 11 days after completion of the hormonal treatment, and in December 2011 gave birth to a healthy calf. "Maleika" had her first ever oestrus 13 days after completion of the medication and also accepted the bull. Thereafter, she had two regular oestrus cycles with normal mating behaviour. Her first calf was born in July 2012. Conclusion and clinical relevance: The causal treatment of both cows, following a long period of infertility, with synthetic progesterone led to their pregnancy and the birth of healthy calves. The commercial product Regumate® Equine is appropriate to stimulate the sexual cycle in temporarily infertile black rhinos. Attention should be paid to the timing of the medication and the required dose. PMID:24920088

Schwarz, C; Grothmann, P; Gottschalk, J; Eulenberger, K; Einspanier, A

2014-06-12

399

AsteroidZoo: A New Zooniverse project to detect asteroids and improve asteroid detection algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new citizen science project: AsteroidZoo. A collaboration between Planetary Resources, Inc., the Zooniverse Team, and the Catalina Sky Survey, we will bring the science of asteroid identification to the citizen scientist. Volunteer astronomers have proved to be a critical asset in identification and characterization of asteroids, especially potentially hazardous objects. These contributions, to date, have required that the volunteer possess a moderate telescope and the ability and willingness to be responsive to observing requests. Our new project will use data collected by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), currently the most productive asteroid survey, to be used by anyone with sufficient interest and an internet connection. As previous work by the Zooniverse has demonstrated, the capability of the citizen scientist is superb at classification of objects. Even the best automated searches require human intervention to identify new objects. These searches are optimized to reduce false positive rates and to prevent a single operator from being overloaded with requests. With access to the large number of people in Zooniverse, we will be able to avoid that problem and instead work to produce a complete detection list. Each frame from CSS will be searched in detail, generating a large number of new detections. We will be able to evaluate the completeness of the CSS data set and potentially provide improvements to the automated pipeline. The data corpus produced by AsteroidZoo will be used as a training environment for machine learning challenges in the future. Our goals include a more complete asteroid detection algorithm and a minimum computation program that skims the cream of the data suitable for implemention on small spacecraft. Our goal is to have the site become live in the Fall 2013.

Beasley, M.; Lewicki, C. A.; Smith, A.; Lintott, C.; Christensen, E.

2013-12-01

400

Prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens in a population of zoo animals.  

PubMed

Faecal prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens, including Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, as well as Arcobacter, were examined in 317 faecal specimens from 44 animal species in Belfast Zoological Gardens, during July-September 2006. Thermophilic campylobacters including Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter lari, were the most frequently isolated pathogens, where members of this genus were isolated from 11 animal species (11 of 44; 25%). Yersinia spp. were isolated from seven animal species (seven of 44; 15.9%) and included, Yersinia enterocolitica (five of seven isolates; 71.4%) and one isolate each of Yersinia frederiksenii and Yersinia kristensenii. Only one isolate of Salmonella was obtained throughout the entire study, which was an isolate of Salmonella dublin (O 1,9,12: H g, p), originating from tiger faeces after enrichment. None of the animal species found in public contact areas of the zoo were positive for any gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Also, water from the lake in the centre of the grounds, was examined for the same bacterial pathogens and was found to contain C. jejuni. This study is the first report on the isolation of a number of important bacterial pathogens from a variety of novel host species, C. jejuni from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), C. lari from a maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Y. kristensenii from a vicugna (Vicugna vicugna) and Y. enterocolitica from a maned wolf and red panda (Ailurus fulgens). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the faeces of animals in public contact areas of the zoo were not positive for the bacterial gastrointestinal pathogens examined. This is reassuring for the public health of visitors, particularly children, who enjoy this educational and recreational resource. PMID:18331520

Stirling, J; Griffith, M; Blair, I; Cormican, M; Dooley, J S G; Goldsmith, C E; Glover, S G; Loughrey, A; Lowery, C J; Matsuda, M; McClurg, R; McCorry, K; McDowell, D; McMahon, A; Cherie Millar, B; Nagano, Y; Rao, J R; Rooney, P J; Smyth, M; Snelling, W J; Xu, J; Moore, J E

2008-04-01

401

Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1995-12-31

402

LLW Forum meeting report, July 20--22, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representative, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. This report details activities of the meeting held July 20-22, 1994.

NONE

1994-12-31

403

A Public Forum– Challenging the Culture of Disease: The Crystal Meth-HIV Connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following a 2003 community forum on unsafe sexual practices among gay men, a follow up community forum was held on February 8, 2004 to address the insufficiently studied linkage between unsafe sexual practices, HIV transmission and crystal methamphetamine abuse. The forum was moderated by award-winning playwright and actor, Harvey Fierstein. The forum begins with an introduction by one of the

Harvey Fierstein; Dan Carlson; Bruce Kellerhouse; Peter Staley; Trevor P; Steven Tierney; Steven Lee

2006-01-01

404

77 FR 36606 - Pipeline Safety: Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development Forum, Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development Forum, Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline...Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development (R&D) Forum. The R&D Forums are...pipeline safety and with protecting the environment. The forum allows public,...

2012-06-19

405

Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

2009-01-01

406

Galaxy NGC 55  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the 'local group' of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

2003-01-01

407

Space Technology and Applications International Forum {minus} 1998. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings represent papers presented at the Space Technology and Applications International Forum {minus} 1998. This Forum consisted of six hosted conferences covering a broad spectrum of space science and technology. The technology spanned from basic research, such as thermophysics in microgravity and breakthrough physics for propulsion, to the most recent advances in space power and propulsion, space exploration and commercialization, and next generation launch systems. The Forum provided opportunity for professional interaction among academia, industry, and government. Program managers and developers of space technologies in the United States and abroad got together to exchange ideas. There was an emphasis on international participation and collaboration. The theme for the 1998 Forum was ``Progress in expanding the space frontier.`` There were four plenary sessions on ``View of the future.`` There were 340 presentations altogether; 255 papers are included in these proceedings, out of which 31 have been abstracted for the Energy, Science and Technology database.(AIP)

El-Genk, M.S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States)

1998-01-01

408

Surgeons find themselves on trial in forum featuring CMPA lawyers  

PubMed Central

During a recent forum, Ontario surgeons learned that the courtroom requires a much different form of behaviour than the operating room. These lessons hit home during a mock trial featuring CMPA lawyers.

Silversides, A

1999-01-01

409

78 FR 11236 - Positive Train Control Public Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ntsb.gov. NTSB Forum Coordinator: Jennifer Cheek_jennifer.cheek@ntsb.gov. Dated: February 12, 2013. Candi R. Bing, Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2013-03604 Filed 2-14-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

2013-02-15

410

Hubble's deepest view ever of the Universe unveils earliest galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hubble sees galaxies galore hi-res Size hi-res: 446 kb Credits: NASA, ESA, and S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team Hubble sees galaxies galore Galaxies, galaxies everywhere - as far as the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope can see. This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is the deepest visible-light image of the cosmos. Called the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, this galaxy-studded view represents a ‘deep’ core sample of the universe, cutting across billions of light-years. Hubble reveals galactic drama hi-res Size hi-res: 879 kb Credits: NASA, ESA, and S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team Hubble reveals galactic drama A galactic brawl. A close encounter with a spiral galaxy. Blue wisps of galaxies. These close-up snapshots of galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field reveal the drama of galactic life. Here three galaxies just below centre are enmeshed in battle, their shapes distorted by the brutal encounter. Hubble reveals galactic drama hi-res Size hi-res: 886 kb Credits: NASA, ESA, and S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team Hubble reveals galactic drama A galactic brawl. A close encounter with a spiral galaxy. Blue wisps of galaxies. These close-up snapshots of galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field reveal the drama of galactic life. Here three galaxies just below centre are enmeshed in battle, their shapes distorted by the brutal encounter. Hubble reveals galactic drama hi-res Size hi-res: 892 kb Credits: NASA, ESA, and S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team Hubble reveals galactic drama A galactic brawl. A close encounter with a spiral galaxy. Blue wisps of galaxies. These close-up snapshots of galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field reveal the drama of galactic life. The galaxies in this panel were plucked from a harvest of nearly 10,000 galaxies in the Ultra Deep Field, the deepest visible-light image of the cosmos. This historic new view is actually made up by two separate images taken by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Both images reveal some galaxies that are too faint to be seen by ground-based telescopes, or even in Hubble's previous faraway looks, called the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs), taken in 1995 and 1998. The HUDF field contains an estimated 10,000 galaxies in a patch of sky just one-tenth the diameter of the full Moon. Besides the rich harvest of classic spiral and elliptical galaxies, there is a zoo of oddball galaxies littering the field. Some look like toothpicks; others like links on a bracelet. A few appear to be interacting. Their strange shapes are a far cry from the majestic spiral and elliptical galaxies we see today. These oddball galaxies chronicle a period when the Universe was more chaotic. Order and structure were just beginning to emerge. The combination of ACS and NICMOS images will be used to search for galaxies that existed between 400 and 800 million years after the Big Bang (in cosmological terms this corresponds to a 'redshift' range of 7 to 12). Astronomers around the world will use these data to understand whether in this very early stages the Universe appears to be the same as it did when the cosmos was between 1000 and 2000 million years old. Hubble's ACS allows astronomers to see galaxies two to four times fainter than Hubble could view previously, but the NICMOS sees even farther than the ACS. The NICMOS reveals the farthest galaxies ever seen because the expanding Universe has stretched their light into the near-infrared portion of the spectrum. The ACS uncovered galaxies that existed 800 million years after the Big Bang (at a redshift of 7). But the NICMOS might have spotted galaxies that lived just 400 million years after the birth of the cosmos (at a redshift of 12). Just like the previous HDFs, the new data are expected to galvanise the astronomical community and lead to dozens of research papers that will offer new insights into the birth and evolution of galaxies. This will hold the record as the deepest-ever view of the Universe until ESA together with NASA launches the James Webb Space Telescope in

2004-03-01

411

CARICOF - The Caribbean Regional Climate Outlook Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regional Climate Outlook Forums (RCOFs) are viewed as a critical building block in the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The GFCS seeks to extend RCOFs to all vulnerable regions of the world such as the Caribbean, of which the entire population is exposed to water- and heat-related natural hazards. An RCOF is initially intended to identify gaps in information and technical capability; facilitate research cooperation and data exchange within and between regions, and improve coordination within the climate forecasting community. A focus is given on variations in climate conditions on a seasonal timescale. In this view, the relevance of a Caribbean RCOF (CARICOF) is the following: while the seasonality of the climate in the Caribbean has been well documented, major gaps in knowledge exist in terms of the drivers in the shifts of amplitude and phase of seasons (as evidenced from the worst region-wide drought period in recent history during 2009-2010). To address those gaps, CARICOF has brought together National Weather Services (NWSs) from 18 territories under the coordination of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), to produce region-wide, consensus, seasonal climate outlooks since March 2012. These outlooks include tercile rainfall forecasts, sea and air surface temperature forecasts as well as the likely evolution of the drivers of seasonal climate variability in the region, being amongst others the El Niño Southern Oscillation or tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea temperatures. Forecasts for both the national-scale forecasts made by the NWSs and CIMH's regional-scale forecast amalgamate output from several forecasting tools. These currently include: (1) statistical models such as Canonical Correlation Analysis run with the Climate Predictability Tool, providing tercile rainfall forecasts at weather station scale; (2) a global outlooks published by the WMO appointed Global Producing Centres (GPCs). Indications are that the current seasonal forecasting system used by CARICOF has produced reliable outlooks than previously available. Nevertheless, through its forum platform, areas for further development are continuously being defined, which are then implemented through efficient information exchanges between and hands-on training of forecasters. Finally, the disaster research and emergency management communities have shown that effective early warnings of impending hazards need to be complemented by information on the risks actually posed by the hazards and pathways for action. CARICOF is to address this issue by designing the outputs of the seasonal climate outlooks such that they can then effectively feed into an early warning information system of seasonal climate variability related hazards to its constituent countries' and territories major socio-economic sectors.

Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

2013-04-01

412

Archives of SOUTH-EAST-EUROPE-FORUM@JISCMAIL.AC.UK  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This electronic discussion list, created by the South East European Research Unit at the University of Glasgow, aims to be an interdisciplinary forum for academics and researchers interested in the socio-cultural and geopolitical issues of southeastern Europe. The forum will emphasize discussion of the major transitional processes occurring in the Balkans, promote the exchange of scholarly information, and foster understanding of the region.

1998-01-01

413

LLW Forum meeting report, May 7--9, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Chicago, Illinois, on may 7--9, 1997. Twenty-three Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 20 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Upgrading an existing disposal facility; Revisions to DOE Order 5820 re DOE waste management; Conference of radiation control program directors: Recent and upcoming activities; National Conference of State Legislatures` (NCSL) low-level radioactive waste working group: Recent and upcoming activities; Executive session; LLW forum business session; Public involvement and risk communication: Success at West Valley, New York; DOE low-level waste management program; impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency`s convention on waste; Panel discussion: The environmental justice concept--Past, present and future; New technologies for processing and disposal of LLRW; High-level and low-level radioactive waste: A dialogue on parallels and intersections; Draft agreement re uniform application of manifesting procedures; Regulatory issues focus; LLW forum October 1997 agenda planning; Resolutions; LLW forum regulatory issues discussion group meets; and Attendance.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-12-31

414

Galaxy Formation Simulations and Lyman Alpha Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations based on a cold dark matter model is a useful tool to study galaxy formation. I will review basic models of star formation and supernova feedback used in simulations, and describe how galaxy properties are computed using a population synthesis model. Evolution of luminosity and mass functions of galaxies from z=10 to z=3 will be discussed. We compute Ly-? luminosity function of simulated galaxies based on star formation rates. By comparing our results with observed Ly-? luminosity functions, we examine the stellar masses of Ly-? emitters and escape fraction of Ly-? photons from young galaxies.

Nagamine, Ken

2007-05-01

415

A comparative map of the porcine and human genomes demonstrates ZOO-FISH and gene mapping-based chromosomal homologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

ZOO-FISH with chromosome-specific DNA libraries (CSLs) from individual flow-sorted human chromosomes was applied on porcine\\u000a metaphase chromosomes to establish segment homology between the pig and human karyotypes. Forty-seven porcine chromosomal\\u000a segments corresponding to all human chromosomes except the Y were delineated, resulting in a nearly complete coverage of the\\u000a porcine karyotype. The syntenic segments detected were further confirmed by the

L. Frönicke; B. P. Chowdhary; H. Scherthan; I. Gustavsson

1996-01-01

416

PROVIDING ENRICHMENT IN HIGHLY CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENTS: BLACK-FOOTED FERRET (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) ENRICHMENT PROGRAM AT THE PHOENIX ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The black-footed ferret was believed to have been extinct until 1981, when it was rediscovered in Wyoming. In 1987, several institutions led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service teamed up to save the species. The Phoenix Zoo has played a significant part in the recovery program since 1991. Enrichment options are being synchronized with recommendations from the U.S. Fish

Hilda Tresz; Phoenix Zoo

2007-01-01

417

Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.  

PubMed

Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception option in zoo animals, even in endangered species. Ongoing use of gamete and embryo freezing may salvage vanishing species. PMID:24437091

Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

2013-12-01

418

Serological response to vaccination against avian influenza in zoo-birds using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five hundred and forty birds in three zoos were vaccinated twice against avian influenza with a 6-week interval using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine. Serological response was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition test 4–6 weeks following the second vaccine administration. 84% of the birds seroconverted, and 76% developed a titre ?32. The geometric mean titre after vaccination was 137. A significant species

Mads F. Bertelsen; Joan Klausen; Elisabeth Holm; Carsten Grøndahl; Poul H. Jørgensen

2007-01-01

419

Student cognitive growth and attitudinal changes through conducting authentic research in the Young Scientist Program at Zoo Atlanta  

Microsoft Academic Search

This purpose of this study was to determine if authentic research conducted by students in the Young Scientist Program: (a) enhanced scientific research skills, (b) increased cognitive growth in the areas of animal behavior and characteristics, and (c) affected attitudes toward scientific research, science, and zoo-related issues. During the nine-week program, 18 students from Liberty High School completed program-related activities

La Tanya Danielle Sharpe

2003-01-01

420

Merging Galaxies, Cosmic Collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exciting Hubble Space Telescope images of more than a dozen very distant colliding galaxies indicate that, at least in some cases, big massive galaxies form through collisions between smaller ones, in a generation after generation never-ending story. The Hubble image shows the paired galaxies very close together with streams of stars being pulled out of the galaxies. The colliding 'parent' galaxies lose their shape and smoother galaxies are formed. The whole merging process can take less than a billion years. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged 81 galaxies in the galaxy cluster 8 billion light-years away. Astronomers say the collisions have never been observed before at this frequency. Many of the collisions involve very massive galaxies, and the end result will be even more massive galaxies.

1999-01-01

421

ICPD+5: The Hague International Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week's In the News covers an important international conference on population and development. The nine resources discussed provide background information, breaking news, social commentary, and primary materials. This week, official delegates representing governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from over 180 nations are convening in The Hague, Netherlands, on the fifth anniversary of the United Nations International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The 1994 ICPD, held in Cairo, Egypt, has been lauded as one of the most successful global congresses ever, culminating with the unanimous endorsement of a comprehensive 20-year Programme of Action. Recognizing that individual health, rights, and well-being provide the foundation for sustainable development, the ICPD Programme of Action emphasizes the need for universal access to affordable reproductive health services, underscores the promotion of women's rights issues, and highlights the impact of the world's expanding population on the environment. This week's international forum, dubbed ICPD+5, will review and appraise the progress made worldwide since the implementation of the Cairo agenda. With world population expected to exceed six billion in 1999, the UN plans to hold several special sessions on population and development throughout the year, based on the findings unearthed at this week's ICPD+5.

Osmond, Andrew.

1999-01-01

422

Introductory Astronomy: Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial begins with a description of Hubble's discovery that other galaxies exist besides the Milky Way and how these galaxies are classified. Hubble's classification categorizes galaxies as either spiral, elliptical, or irregular. Under these topics there is a link that gives information about the structure, components, classification system, diameter, and the average number of stars for each galaxy type. The next section talks about the different ways that galaxies can interact, collide, or merge. The tutorial ends with a short quiz.

Miller, Kristen; Miller, Scott

2005-06-07

423

Ecological ethics in captivity: balancing values and responsibilities in zoo and aquarium research under rapid global change.  

PubMed

Ethical obligations to animals in conservation research and management are manifold and often conflicting. Animal welfare concerns often clash with the ethical imperative to understand and conserve a population or ecosystem through research and management intervention. The accelerating pace and impact of global environmental change, especially climate change, complicates our understanding of these obligations. One example is the blurring of the distinction between ex situ (zoo- and aquarium-based) conservation and in situ (field-based) approaches as zoos and aquariums become more active in field conservation work and as researchers and managers consider more intensive interventions in wild populations and ecosystems to meet key conservation goals. These shifts, in turn, have consequences for our traditional understanding of the ethics of wildlife research and management, including our relative weighting of animal welfare and conservation commitments across rapidly evolving ex situ and in situ contexts. Although this changing landscape in many ways supports the increased use of captive wildlife in conservation-relevant research, it raises significant ethical concerns about human intervention in populations and ecosystems, including the proper role of zoos and aquariums as centers for animal research and conservation in the coming decades. Working through these concerns requires a pragmatic approach to ethical analysis, one that is able to make trade-offs among the many goods at stake (e.g., animal welfare, species viability, and ecological integrity) as we strive to protect species from further decline and extinction in this century. PMID:23904531

Minteer, Ben A; Collins, James P

2013-01-01

424

A new non-species dependent ELISA for detection of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. in zoo animals.  

PubMed

Although Lyme borreliosis is regarded as one of the most important zoonotic diseases, in Europe very few research reports have documented examinations on free-ranging wild animal populations and no study on zoo animals has been published. One of the problems regarding the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis in wild animals is often the lack of species specific secondary antibodies for serological tests. For our study on exposure of zoo animals to Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi s. l. and the occurrence of Lyme borreliosis in various German zoos, a non-species dependent ELISA was developed. Specific IgG antibodies against B. burgdorferi s. l. were detected by peroxidase labeled protein A or protein G conjugates. For this purpose, both conjugates were tested for their binding affinities to 160 different wild animal species representing 25 families and 7 orders. With 2 exceptions, all tested species reacted with either protein A or protein G, and 47 species reacted with both conjugates. In combination with an easy method for the long-term preservation of antigen-coated microtiter plates, the ELISA developed for this study could essentially facilitate serological examinations regarding Lyme borreliosis in wild animal sera. In summary, the results indicate commercially available protein A and protein G conjugates as useful alternatives to species specific secondary antibodies in various diagnostic assays on sera of a wide range of wild mammals. Therefore, this should be considered more often as versatile diagnostic tools in wildlife studies. PMID:12141767

Stöbel, Katrin; Schönberg, Arno; Staak, Christian

2002-06-01

425

Video observation of hand hygiene practices at a petting zoo and the impact of hand hygiene interventions.  

PubMed

Petting zoos are popular attractions, but can also be associated with zoonotic disease outbreaks. Hand hygiene is critical to reducing disease risks; however, compliance can be poor. Video observation of petting zoo visitors was used to assess animal and environmental contact and hand hygiene compliance. Compliance was also compared over five hand hygiene intervention periods. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression were used for analysis. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 58% (340/583). Two interventions had a significant positive association with hand hygiene compliance [improved signage with offering hand sanitizer, odds ratio (OR) 3·38, P<0·001; verbal hand hygiene reminders, OR 1·73, P=0·037]. There is clearly a need to improve hand hygiene compliance at this and other animal exhibits. This preliminary study was the first to demonstrate a positive impact of a hand hygiene intervention at a petting zoo. The findings suggest that active, rather than passive, interventions are more effective for increasing compliance. PMID:21371366

Anderson, M E C; Weese, J S

2012-01-01

426

Zoos in the twenty-first century: Can't we find a better way to love nature?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a new millennium approaches, many forms of life on the planet and the environments in which they have evolved are increasingly threatened by human activities Wildlife is being marginalized, and native habitats are disappearing at an unprecedented rate. Equally disturbing is the impending demise of traditional human societies---peoples who have evolved outside of the confines and conditions of modern Western influence. The loss of these human and animal societies has occurred so rapidly that implications are largely unknown. Research on how modern Americans relate to animals, particularly wildlife, revealed a clear and disturbing incongruity best exemplified in the current paradigm of zoo exhibition and education. Although zoos purport to educate visitors about the ecology of natural environments and the universal plight of wildlife, research shows that people, particularly children, learn less about ecological principles in zoos with live animals than they do in non-living natural history exhibits. While designers employ a variety of visual techniques in natural history exhibition, environmental sound as an educational exhibit component is largely nonexistent. Many animal species communicate through sound, especially species in underwater environments. As the audio equivalent of a landscape, the soundscape is as important as any other habitat feature to the well-being of wildlife populations. Using recorded sounds of natural environments, an exhibition soundscape was designed and produced for Oceanario de Lisboa in Lisbon, Portugal---the centerpiece of the 1998 World Exposition in Lisbon, Portugal. With programmed sound serving as a major component of natural history exhibition, a conceptual design of a novel zoo for the twenty-first century was described. The "NewZew" concept is based on a growing awareness that the best way to save species is to salvage, preserve, and restore their natural habitats---activities that are largely antithetical to current zoo practice. In introducing visitors to the lifeways of traditional societies and employing recent and emerging technologies, the NewZew educates its visitors about the wonders of life on earth without displaying live animals.

Dewey-Platt, Lauren Kay

427

Friday Forum: Reading from the Primary Literature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Friday forum is an integral part of my course. I choose papers before the term begins based on my own interest, the interests of my students (e.g. senior thesis topics), and the types of projects we plan to complete in the course that term (e.g. term-long or multi-week research problem ). The number of papers is based on enrollment so that two students are responsible for one paper. I integrate the papers into my syllabus so the students know when each paper must be read and discussed. At the beginning of the term, I have the students rank order their choice of paper. Their decision is typically based on interest and timing with respect to the term. I then assign them a paper based on their ranking. This works well in that they typically get their first or second choice , and the students feel like they have a say in what they are going to present. At the beginning of the term I hand out the first paper we are going to read. Everyone in the course reads the paper, and must submit three questions about the paper to me via e-mail by 4:00 PM the day before we discuss the paper. After the deadline, I compile the questions, identified by name, and send to everyone in the course as soon as possible. This typically ensures that the students read the paper, and that we have plenty of ammunition for the discussion. On the day of Friday forum (typically Friday), the two students responsible for the paper give a 10-15 minute presentation on the paper emphasizing the main point(s) of the paper, along with any background information they think is necessary to fully understand the paper. Sometime before their presentation (usually the day before), I schedule a one-hour meeting with the presenters to give them the chance to ask me any questions they have before putting together their presentation. I believe this is an essential part of the process in order to clear up any fundamental questions. After the presentation, we sit around one large table (four lab tables put together) for the discussion. I think the round table format, with everyone facing each other, helps promote discussion. Its up to the student presenters how they want to lead the discussion, but typically they focus on themes that emerged from the question s submitted by the rest of the students. This has the added benefit of drawing the rest of the class into the discussion. The hardest part for me to control as an instructor is to try and keep my mouth shut, and allow the students to explore ideas on their own.

Davidson, Cameron

428

Working Together Through NASA's Astrophysics Forum: Collaborations Across the Spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums are teams of scientists and educators that work closely with NASA SMD and its education and public outreach (EPO) community to organize individual SMD-funded EPO activities into a coordinated effort. One Forum exists for each of SMD's four science divisions: Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science. Through the Forums, NASA SMD and the members of its EPO community work together to interconnect a wide spectrum of SMD-funded EPO activities, resources, and expertise and to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the resulting ensemble of efforts. The Forums also support members of the broader science and education communities by identifying opportunities and strategies for scientists and educators to participate in and make use of SMD EPO activities and resources according to their needs. This article highlights examples of this work within NASA Astrophysics EPO, where the Forum and community members are extending the impact of existing EPO resources through collaborative online professional development activities for classroom educators, activities to engage girls in STEM in library settings, resources to support the Astronomy 101 instructional community, and practical tips for scientists interested in EPO.

Smith, D. A.; Sharma, M.; Watkins, M.; Lawton, B.; Eisenhamer, B.; McCallister, D.; Bartolone, L.; Nichols, M.; Withnell, H.; Schultz, G.; Fraknoi, A.; Manning, J. G.; Blair, W.; Bianchi, L.

2012-08-01

429

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico.  

PubMed

Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico, using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus); 4 of 4 cougars (Puma concolor); 10 of 13 jaguars (Panthera onca); 5 of 5 leopards (Panthera pardus); 7 of 7 lions (Panthera leo); 2 of 3 tigers (Panthera tigris); 2 of 3 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis); 2 of 2 Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae); lof 2 Jaguarundi (Herpailurus jagouaroundi); but not in 0 of 2 oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus). Such high seroprevalence in wild felids is of public health significance because of the potential of oocyst shedding. Four of 6 New World primates (2 of 2 Geoffroy's spider monkeys [Ateles geoffroyi], 1 of 3 Patas monkeys [Erythrocebus patas], and 1 of 1 white-headed capuchin [Cebus capucinus]) had high MAT titers of 3,200, suggesting recently acquired infection; these animals are highly susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. However, none of these animals were ill. Seropositivity to T. gondii was found for the first time in a number of species. PMID:24063119

Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Gayosso-Dominguez, Edgar Arturo; Villena, Isabelle; Dubey, J P

2013-09-01

430

A survey of husbandry practices for lorisid primates in North American zoos and related facilities.  

PubMed

Zoos and related facilities in North America currently manage five species in the primate family Lorisidae: the greater (Nycticebus coucang), Bengal (N. bengalensis) and pygmy (N. pygmaeus) slow lorises, red slender loris (Loris tardigradus), and potto (Perodicticus potto). We used an online survey to describe institutional housing and husbandry practices for these species and assess the extent to which practices are consistent with established guidelines. Our results show that most captive lorisids are housed solitarily or in pairs. Most individuals occupy a single exhibit space in a building dedicated to nocturnal animals. Facilities are commonly meeting recommendations for abiotic exhibit design and are providing animals with an enriched environment. However, pottos and slender lorises currently occupy exhibit spaces smaller than the recommended minimum, and the impact of cleaning protocols on olfactory communication should be critically evaluated. Few facilities are taking advantage of the benefits of positive reinforcement training for promoting animal welfare. Research is greatly needed on the effects of exhibit lighting on behavior, health, and reproduction; and to determine how best to manage the social needs of lorisids with naturally dispersed social structures. Although captive populations of slender lorises, pottos, and slow lorises are declining, we suggest that improved husbandry knowledge has the potential to positively influence population sustainability and to enhance future efforts to manage the growing pygmy loris population. PMID:23161761

Fuller, Grace; Kuhar, Christopher W; Dennis, Patricia M; Lukas, Kristen E

2013-01-01

431

Concurrent Capillaria and Heterakis Infections in Zoo Rock Partridges, Alectoris graeca  

PubMed Central

Two adult rock partridges raised in a city zoo were examined parasitologically and pathologically. Two distinctive eggs resembling those of Capillaria and Heterakis were detected in the feces. At necropsy, a markedly-dilated duodenum with severe catarrhal exudates, containing adult worms of Capillaria sp. and Heterakis sp. in the cecum, was observed. Male Capillaria had the cloacal aperture extended almost terminally with a small bursal lobe and an unsheathed spicule with transverse folds without spines. Female Capillaria had a vulva that was slightly prominent and slightly posterior to the union of the esophagus and intestine. The esophagus of the adult Capillaria was more than a half as long as the body in the male, but was much shorter in the female. Based on these morphological features, the capillarid nematode was identified as Capillaria obsignata. The male adult worms of Heterakis was identifiable by 2 dissimilar spicules, a unique morphological feature where the right spicule was considerably longer than the left, which is also a characteristic feature of Heterakis gallinarum. This is the first report of concurrent infections with C. obsignata and H. gallinarium in rock partridges.

Park, Sang-Ik

2010-01-01

432

Socio-ecological factors correlate with levels of stereotypic behavior in zoo-housed primates.  

PubMed

Stereotypic behavior often indicates poor welfare. It may develop when the animal's ability to carry out appropriate behavioral responses is limited, despite a high motivation to express them. Behavioral motivations vary across species. Consequently, under similar captive conditions, the sustained inability of animals to express certain behaviors is likely to affect some species more than others. We used a phylogenetic comparative approach to evaluate the socio-ecological factors affecting the manifestation of stereotypic behavior in 24 species of zoo-housed primates. We examined the relationship between two stereotypic behaviors: hair-pulling and pacing, and the species' natural socio-ecological factors and captivity conditions. The degree of stereotypic behaviors was unaffected by phylogenetic relatedness between species. Stereotypic hair-pulling behavior levels were positively correlated with natural group size. Stereotypic pacing levels were positively correlated with the animals' natural day journey length. These findings suggest large-group and wide-ranging primate species are more prone to suffer in captivity. Our findings facilitate the detection of species that are more susceptible to behaving stereotypically in captivity. We suggest that providing appropriate social stimuli, and increasing the complexity of the captive environment rather than enlarging it, are both attainable and expected to improve the animals' welfare. PMID:23694743

Pomerantz, Ori; Meiri, Shai; Terkel, Joseph

2013-09-01

433

[Hantaviruses in Germany: threat for zoo, pet, companion and farm animals?].  

PubMed

Hantaviruses are so-called "emerging" and "re-emerging" viruses because of the new and sudden nature of their appearance. Human infections can lead to two distinct disease patterns, the Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome and the Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome. All known human pathogenic hantaviruses are transmitted through rodent hosts. There are three rodent-associated hantaviruses in Germany. The bank vole-associated Puumala virus (PUUV) is responsible for most of the human hantavirus infections. The Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) associated with the striped field mouse is causing hantavirus disease in the North and Northeast of Germany. The human pathogenicity of Tula virus (TULV) is still controversially discussed--the virus has been mainly associated with the common vole as the reservoir, but was molecularly detected also in the field and the water vole. More recently, two shrew-borne hantaviruses were described in Germany, i. e. Seewis virus in the common shrew and Asikkala virus in the pygmy shrew. Systematic studies about hantavirus infections of zoo, pet, companion and farm animals are still lacking. Hence, the aim of this review article is to summarise the current knowledge on this topic and raise the attention of veterinarians to potentially overlooked clinical disease patterns. PMID:24511827

Ulrich, Rainer G; Imholt, Christian; Krüger, Detlev H; Krautkrämer, Ellen; Scheibe, Thomas; Essbauer, Sandra S; Pfeffer, Martin

2013-01-01

434

Applying the analytic theory of colliding ring galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analytic theory of the waves in colliding ring galaxies was presented some years ago, but the observations were not of sufficient quality then to make quantitative comparisons. Well-resolved observations of a few systems are now available to make such comparisons, and structure imaged in several dozen systems, derived from the recent compilation of Madore, Nelson and Petrillo and the Galaxy Zoo project, can further constrain the theory. Systems with two rings are especially useful for deriving such constraints. After examining the implications of recent observations of ring sizes and structure, I extend the analytic theory, investigate limiting cases and present several levels of approximation. The theory is especially simple in the case of nearly flat rotation curves. I present observational comparisons for a few systems, including Arp 10, the Cartwheel and AM 2136-492. The fit is quite good over a large range of cases. For the Cartwheel there are discrepancies, but the areas of disagreement are suggestive of additional factors, such as multiple collisions. A specific prediction of the theory in the case of nearly flat rotation curves is that the ratio of the outward velocities of successive rings approximately equals the ratio of ring sizes. Ring velocities are also shown to scale simply with local circular velocities in this limit.

Struck, Curtis

2010-04-01

435

LLW Forum meeting report, January 24--26 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held January 24-26, 1990.

NONE

1990-12-31

436

Effectiveness of a Weekly Faculty Conversation Forum About Teaching  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of holding weekly 60-90 minute conversation forums for faculty members to discuss, explore, and reflect on various teaching topics in a relaxed, informal, interactive format. Methods Weekly, 60-90 minute sessions were held for faculty members of the University of Illinois College of Pharmacy. A 15-item retrospective pretest-posttest questionnaire was developed and administered at the end of the first year of implementation to evaluate the participants’ perceived knowledge, abilities, and confidence gains relative to becoming effective educators. Results Eleven faculty members completed the questionnaire. All respondents tended to agree (6/11) or agreed (5/11) that their confidence as educators improved after attending the conversation forums. In addition,7 respondents tended to agree and 4 agreed that their ability to self-assess their teaching had improved. Conclusions An ongoing weekly conversations forum provides faculty members opportunities to explore and learn about facets of teaching in a safe, informal environment.

Popovich, Nicholas G.; Peverly, Susan L.; Jackson, Terrence R.

2006-01-01

437

Narrating dementia: self and community in an online forum.  

PubMed

In this article, I examine how individuals diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease use illness narratives to construct community. The ability to narrate is a fundamental component of the self. Using 354 posts by 32 members of an Internet forum, I argue that people with Alzheimer's, whose ability to narrate, and thus create a self, was compromised, nonetheless managed to tell stories of redemption out of which a salvaged self emerged. Narratives are essential for the construction of self, but as I show in this article, they are also essential for the construction of community. Forum members shared stories, gave advice, offered encouragement, and commiserated about their symptoms in ways that generated solidarity. Internet forums provide a venue for people with illnesses who are unable to leave the home to construct community. PMID:23907588

Rodriquez, Jason

2013-09-01

438

LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed..

NONE

1994-12-31

439

Galaxy NGC 300  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer in a single orbit exposure of 27 minutes on October 10, 2003. NGC 300 lies 7 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is one of a group of galaxies in the constellation Sculptor. NGC 300 is often used as a prototype of a spiral galaxy because in optical images it displays flowing spiral arms and a bright central region of older (and thus redder) stars. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer image taken in ultraviolet light shows us that NGC 300 is an efficient star-forming galaxy. The bright blue regions in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer image reveal new stars forming all the way into the nucleus of NGC 300.

2003-01-01

440

Clusters of Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

1981-09-01

441

Star Formation in Galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

1987-01-01

442

Diverse Galaxies Lithograph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the diversity of galaxies in the universe. A huge elliptical galaxy, designated ESO 325-G004, dominates the image. In addition to many elliptical and spiral galaxies, the image contains a few small irregular galaxies, and red, yellow, and blue foreground stars. The accompanying classroom activity is a current support tool designed for use as an introductory inquiry activity. It can be incorporated into a unit that has a scientific inquiry and/or a galaxy classification theme. During the classroom activity, In Search of ...Galaxy Types, students use the lithograph images and text to generate questions about the diverse collection of galaxies on the front of the lithograph. They conduct research to answer their questions, identify patterns, and/or compare and contrast galaxy characteristics, depending on the teacherâs objectives. Students will organize their material and present a report, providing supporting evidence from their research.

2007-09-01

443

Experimenting with galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study to demonstrate how the dynamics of galaxies may be investigated through the creation of galaxies within a computer model is presented. The numerical technique for simulating galaxies is shown to be both highly efficient and highly robust. Consideration is given to the anatomy of a galaxy, the gravitational N-body problem, numerical approaches to the N-body problem, use of the Poisson equation, and the symplectic integrator.

Miller, Richard H.

1992-01-01

444

Secular Evolution of Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; 1. Secular evolution in disk galaxies John Kormendy; 2. Galaxy morphology Ronald J. Buta; 3. Dynamics of secular evolution James Binney; 4. Bars and secular evolution in disk galaxies: theoretical input E. Athanassoula; 5. Stellar populations Reynier F. Peletier; 6. Star formation rate indicators Daniela Calzetti; 7. The evolving interstellar medium Jacqueline van Gorkom; 8. Evolution of star formation and gas Nick Z. Scoville; 9. Cosmological evolution of galaxies Isaac Shlosman.

Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Knapen, Johan H.

2013-10-01

445

Dynamics of interacting galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dynamics of interacting galaxies as observed in the present epoch is reviewed. Topics discussed include numerical methods for modeling galactic interactions, the signatures of interacting galaxies due to tidal forces, and events that add mass to a galaxy. The review also covers major mergers between systems of comparable mass, forms of activity triggered or induced by galactic interactions, and galaxies' return to normality and related cosmological issues. Finally, some questions that yet have to be answered are examined.

Barnes, Joshua E.; Hernquist, Lars

1992-01-01

446

Forum on Education American Physical Society: Spring 2011 Newsletter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Spring 2011 Newsletter from the Forum on Education for the American Physical Society. Features of the newsletter include "Forum on Engaging the Public" by Dan Dahlberg and Philip W. Hammer, "NanoJapan: Connecting U.S. Undergraduates with the Best of Nanoscience Resarch in Japan" by Cheryl Matherly and Junichiro Kono, and "Using Clickers in a University Physics Course to Improve Student Achievement" by Judith C. Stull, David M. Majerich, Andria C. Smythe, Susan Jansen Varnum, Joseph P. Ducette and Tiffany Gilles.

Society, American P.

2011-09-28

447

LLW Forum meeting report, January 31--February 3, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held January 31-February 3, 1995.

NONE

1995-12-31

448

[Marijuana, health, disease, and freedom: analysis of an Internet forum].  

PubMed

This paper takes a Health Education perspective to analyze a debate forum on the Brazilian Internet site entitled "Universo On-Line", in which the following questions were addressed: "Do you believe that marijuana is harmful to one's health?" "In your opinion, should marijuana use be decriminalized?" By applying qualitative discourse analysis techniques to responses from the forum, we were able to identify six main types of discourse, reflecting the opinions of six "collective subjects" concerning drugs, health, disease, and freedom and existing as social representations in the current Brazilian collective imagination. Research on these social representations allows one to establish criteria for intervention in the field of Health Education. PMID:10578087

Lefèvre, F; Simioni, A M

1999-11-01

449

Proposal to Help Convene Three Policy Forums on Crime Issues for State Policy Makers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Governors' Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices, in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice, convened a series of three executive policy forums to help address Governors' concerns about juvenile crime. The forums, 'Combating...

2001-01-01

450

Part 4: NASA Future Forum Examines Nationâ??s Goals in Space  

NASA Video Gallery

Closing remarks wrap up the Dec. 9 NASA Future Forum held at The Museum of Flight in Seattle. (Part 4 of 4) Since 2008, the agencyâ??s ongoing series of Future Forums have provided NASA leadership,...

451

78 FR 39283 - Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9829-9] Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for...Protection Agency's Forum on Environmental Measurements (FEM) is implementing a policy requiring...practicable, prior to beginning any work involving the generation or use of...

2013-07-01

452

76 FR 12337 - Request for Applicants for Appointment to the United States-Brazil CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for Appointment to the United States- Brazil CEO Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...2007, the Governments of the United States and Brazil established the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2011-03-07

453

78 FR 32239 - Request for Applicants for Appointment to the United States-Brazil CEO Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicants for Appointment to the United States- Brazil CEO Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...2007, the Governments of the United States and Brazil established the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum. This notice announces membership...

2013-05-29

454

Wrangling Galaxy's reference data  

PubMed Central

Summary: The Galaxy platform has developed into a fully featured collaborative workbench, with goals of inherently capturing provenance to enable reproducible data analysis, and of making it straightforward to run one’s own server. However, many Galaxy platform tools rely on the presence of reference data, such as alignment indexes, to function efficiently. Until now, the building of this cache of data for Galaxy has been an error-prone manual process lacking reproducibility and provenance. The Galaxy Data Manager framework is an enhancement that changes the management of Galaxy’s built-in data cache from a manual procedure to an automated graphical user interface (GUI) driven process, which contains the same openness, reproducibility and provenance that is afforded to Galaxy’s analysis tools. Data Manager tools allow the Galaxy administrator to download, create and install additional datasets for any type of reference data in real time. Availability and implementation: The Galaxy Data Manager framework is implemented in Python and has been integrated as part of the core Galaxy platform. Individual Data Manager tools can be defined locally or installed from a ToolShed, allowing the Galaxy community to define additional Data Manager tools as needed, with full versioning and dependency support. Contact: dan@bx.psu.edu. or anton@bx.psu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online.

Blankenberg, Daniel; Johnson, James E.; Taylor, James; Nekrutenko, Anton

2014-01-01

455

Galaxy Trading Cards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of nine cards focuses on the three types of galaxies: spiral, elliptical, and irregular. Each card displays a color image of a galaxy on one side and describes the galaxy's type, its location within a constellation, and interesting facts on the other side. The Hubble Space Telescope card includes interesting facts, as well as suggestions for using the cards.

1999-01-01

456

Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sagittarius DWARF GALAXY is the closest member of the Milky Way's entourage of satellite galaxies. Discovered by chance in 1994, its presence had previously been overlooked because it is largely hidden by the most crowded regions of our own Galaxy with which it is merging....

Ibata, R.; Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

457

Content analysis of online discussion forums: A comparative analysis of protocols  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discussion forum is a significant component of online courses. Instructors and students rely on these asynchronous forums\\u000a to engage one another in ways that potentially promote critical thinking, meaningful problem sovving, and knowledge construction.\\u000a In spite of the importance of these forums, predominantly used methods for assessing the content and outcomes of these forums\\u000a has often been limited to

Rose M. Marra; Joi L. Moore; Aimee K. Klimczak

2004-01-01

458

Problem presentation and responses on an online forum for young people who self-harm  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we investigate the nature of problem presentation and responses on an online forum for young people who self-harm. Previous studies have raised concerns about the peer encouragement of self-harming behaviours in online forums, and this analysis considers the nature of peer interaction on a specific forum, ‘ SharpTalk’. This was a research forum which explored the potential

Janet Smithson; Siobhan Sharkey; Elaine Hewis; Ray Jones; Tobit Emmens; Tamsin Ford; Christabel Owens

2011-01-01

459

Lacustrine sediments and Holocene climates in the southern Sahara: the example of paleolakes in the Grand Erg of Bilma (Zoo Baba and Dibella, eastern Niger)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two endoreic depressions of the central Erg of Bilma/eastern Republic of Niger are described here. Special interest is given to widespread lacustrine sediments (diatomites) in the depressions, indicating paleolakes with an extension of some 10 km 2. The minimum depth of the lakes has been found to be 25 m (Zoo Baba) and 36 m (Dibella). At Dibella there is evidence of two lacustrine phases of Early Holocene (9785-7890 years B.P.) and of Mid-Holocene age (about 6500 years B.P.). At Zoo Baba only one lacustrine phase of Mid-Holocene age (about 6000-5370 years B.P.) can be proven for Zoo Baba. The difference between the Early- and Mid-Holocene diatomites Di I and Di II is based not only on radiocarbon data but also on geomorphological characteristics. Despite the small distance of only 70 km between the two depressions, the reconstruction of pluvial water chemistry particularly by analyzing the diatoms shows great differences. The Mid-Holocene Zoo Baba lake was a freshwater lake; the Early- and Mid-Holocene Dibella lakes obviously contained brackish water with great fluctuations of salinity. An explanation may be given by the varying groundwater influence during the pluvial periods. It is supposed that Zoo Baba has been touched by the large Kaouar/Bilma aquifer while Dibella has been influenced by a smaller local aquifer. Any groundwater supply from Paleo-Chad can be excluded. Both the rising of groundwater table and of lake levels must have been induced by a largely increased annual precipitation rate (today 20-40 mm only), combined with a very effective reduction in evaporation rate. Based on lacrustine sediments, paleosoils and geomorphological features (fossil landslides of Zoo Baba), the Early Holocene annual precipitation rate is estimated at least at 300-400 mm, the Mid-Holocene rate at 200-300 mm. The special character of precipitations cannot be reconstructed.

Grunert, J.; Baumhauer, R.; Völkel, J.

460

Content Analysis of Online Discussion Forums: A Comparative Analysis of Protocols  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The discussion forum is a significant component of online courses. Instructors and students rely on these asynchronous forums to engage one another in ways that potentially promote critical thinking, meaningful problem solving, and knowledge construction. In spite of the importance of these forums, predominantly used methods for assessing the…

Marra, Rose M.; Moore, Joi L.; Klimczak, Aimee K.

2004-01-01