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1

Galaxy Zoo User Behaviors 2: How Forums, Favorites, and having Fun relates to User Classifications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this poster we examine how the rate at which Galaxy Zoo users classify galaxies varies as a function of other interactions they have within the Galaxy Zoo interface. The Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott 2008) asks users to look at images of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to classify them based on their appearance. As of the submission of this abstract, nearly 240,000 individuals had registered to participate through two different interfaces - Galaxy Zoo 1 (GZ1) and Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) - and had contributed over 10,000,000 classification to the GZ2 project alone. To support the efforts of these users and to add some fun to what they are doing, we have provided them discussion forums, the ability to favorite items, and a variety of ways to explore their favorites, including the ability to create World Wide Telescope sky tours (see related poster, Luebbert et al.). We find that there are correlations between how users interact with these additional features and their rate of classifications, including a weak anti-correlation between extreme forum usage and classification number. In addition to forum-classification relationships, we look at trends in favoriting galaxies (including what types of objects get favorited), and trends as a function of generating WWT sky tours. This work has been funded through NASA ROSES NNX09AD34G.

Gay, Pamela L.; Bracey, G.; Raddick, M. J.; CS390/490 Class, SIUE; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

2

Galaxy Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Galaxy Zoo is an ongoing research project to classify millions of galaxies. The website has a short tutorial to teach the user how to classify the galaxies. Once they have passed a trial proving their ability, they are allowed to create an account and save their classifications to Galaxy Zoo's database. The images being classified come from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey).

2009-06-26

3

Galaxy Zoo User Behaviors 2: How Forums, Favorites, and having Fun relates to User Classifications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this poster we examine how the rate at which Galaxy Zoo users classify galaxies varies as a function of other interactions they have within the Galaxy Zoo interface. The Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott 2008) asks users to look at images of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and to classify them based on their appearance. As of the

Pamela L. Gay; G. Bracey; M. J. Raddick

2010-01-01

4

A Zoo of Galaxies  

E-print Network

We live in a universe filled with galaxies with an amazing variety of sizes and shapes. One of the biggest challenges for astronomers working in this field is to understand how all these types relate to each other in the background of an expanding universe. Modern astronomical surveys (like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) have revolutionised this field of astronomy, by providing vast numbers of galaxies to study. The sheer size of the these databases made traditional visual classification of the types galaxies impossible and in 2007 inspired the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org); starting the largest ever scientific collaboration by asking members of the public to help classify galaxies by type and shape. Galaxy Zoo has since shown itself, in a series of now more than 30 scientific papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this Invited Discourse I spoke a little about the historical background of our understanding of what galaxies are, of galaxy classification, about our mode...

Masters, Karen L

2013-01-01

5

Galaxy Zoo: passive red spirals  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red (or passive) spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on disc-dominated spirals, we construct a sample of truly passive discs (i.e. they are not dust reddened spirals, nor are they dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set

Karen L. Masters; Moein Mosleh; A. Kathy Romer; Robert C. Nichol; Steven P. Bamford; Kevin Schawinski; Chris J. Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Heather C. Campbell; Ben Crowcroft; Isabelle Doyle; Edward M. Edmondson; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

2010-01-01

6

Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands

Karen L. Masters; Robert Nichol; Steven Bamford; Moein Mosleh; Chris J. Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; William C. Keel; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2010-01-01

7

Galaxy Zoo: bars in disc galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present first results from Galaxy Zoo 2, the second phase of the highly successful Galaxy Zoo project (). Using a volume-limited sample of 13 665 disc galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.06 and Mr < -19.38), we study the fraction of galaxies with bars as a function of global galaxy properties like colour, luminosity and bulge prominence. Overall, 29.4 ± 0.5 per cent of galaxies in our sample have a bar, in excellent agreement with previous visually classified samples of galaxies (although this overall fraction is lower than that measured by automated bar-finding methods). We see a clear increase in the bar fraction with redder (g-r) colours, decreased luminosity and in galaxies with more prominent bulges, to the extent that over half of the red, bulge-dominated disc galaxies in our sample possess a bar. We see evidence for a colour bimodality for our sample of disc galaxies, with a 'red sequence' that is both bulge and bar dominated, and a 'blue cloud' which has little, or no, evidence for a (classical) bulge or bar. These results are consistent with similar trends for barred galaxies seen recently both locally and at higher redshift, and with early studies using the RC3. We discuss these results in the context of internal (secular) galaxy evolution scenarios and the possible links to the formation of bars and bulges in disc galaxies. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx

Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Hoyle, Ben; Lintott, Chris; Bamford, Steven P.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy; Keel, William C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Smith, Arfon M.; Thomas, Daniel

2011-03-01

8

An Interpretive Study of Meanings Citizen Scientists Make When Participating in Galaxy Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the Web 2.0 world lurches forward, so do intellectual opportunities for students and the general public to meaningfully engage in the scientific enterprise. In an effort to assess the intrinsic motivation afforded by participation in Galaxy Zoo, we have inductively analyzed more than 1,000 contributions in the Galaxy Zoo Forum and coded posts thematically. We find that participants overwhelmingly

T. S. Mankowski; S. J. Slater; T. F. Slater

2011-01-01

9

Polar Ring Galaxies in the Galaxy Zoo  

E-print Network

We report observations of 16 candidate polar ring galaxies (PRGs) identified by the Galaxy Zoo project in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Deep images of five galaxies are available in the SDSS Stripe82 database, while to reach similar depth we observed the remaining galaxies with the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We derive integrated magnitudes and u-r colours for the host and ring components and show continuum-subtracted H\\alpha+[NII] images for seven objects. We present a basic morphological and environmental analysis of the galaxies and discuss their properties in comparison with other types of early-type galaxies. Follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow a kinematic confirmation of the nature of these systems and a more detailed analysis of their stellar populations.

Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah

2012-01-01

10

Galaxy Zoo: chiral correlation function of galaxy spins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the spiral sense of rotation of galaxy arms for a sizeable number of galaxies. We measure the correlation function of spin chirality (the sense in which galaxies appear to be spinning) of face-on spiral galaxies in angular, real and projected spaces. Our results indicate a hint

Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2009-01-01

11

Galaxy Zoo: dust in spiral galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination dependence of optical colours for 24276 well-resolved Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified via the Galaxy Zoo project. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4mag for the ugri passbands (estimating 0.3mag of extinction in z band). We split the sample into `bulgy' (early-type) and `discy' (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or fDeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of `bulgy' spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of `discy' spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disc ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with discy spirals at Mr ~ -21.5mag having the most reddening - more than twice as much as both the lowest luminosity and most massive, bulge-dominated spirals. An increase in dust content is well known for more luminous galaxies, but the decrease of the trend for the most luminous has not been observed before and may be related to their lower levels of recent star formation. We compare our results with the latest dust attenuation models of Tuffs et al. We find that the model reproduces the observed trends reasonably well but overpredicts the amount of u-band attenuation in edge-on galaxies. This could be an inadequacy in the Milky Way extinction law (when applied to external galaxies), but more likely indicates the need for a wider range of dust-star geometries. We end by discussing the effects of dust on large galaxy surveys and emphasize that these effects will become important as we push to higher precision measurements of galaxy properties and their clustering. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 160000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Keel, William C.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-05-01

12

Galaxy Zoo: passive red spirals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red (or passive) spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on disc-dominated spirals, we construct a sample of truly passive discs (i.e. they are not dust reddened spirals, nor are they dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spiral galaxies and red early types, making up ~6 per cent of late-type spirals. We use optical images and spectra from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. We find red spirals preferentially in intermediate density regimes. However, there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment suggesting that environment alone is not sufficient to determine whether a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a very small fraction of all spirals at low masses (M* < 1010 Msolar), but are a significant fraction of the spiral population at large stellar masses showing that massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that as expected, red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than the main spiral population. While the presence of spiral arms suggests that a major star formation could not have ceased a long ago (not more than a few Gyr), we show that these are also not recent post-starburst objects (having had no significant star formation in the last Gyr), so star formation must have ceased gradually. Intriguingly, red spirals are roughly four times as likely than the normal spiral population to host optically identified Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission region (LINER; at a given stellar mass and even accounting for low-luminosity lines hidden by star formation), with most of the difference coming from the objects with LINER-like emission. We also find a curiously large optical bar fraction in the red spirals (70 +/- 5 verses 27 +/- 5 per cent in blue spirals) suggesting that the cessation of star formation and bar instabilities in spirals are strongly correlated. We conclude by discussing the possible origins of these red spirals. We suggest that they may represent the very oldest spiral galaxies which have already used up their reserves of gas - probably aided by strangulation or starvation, and perhaps also by the effect of bar instabilities moving material around in the disc. We provide an online table listing our full sample of red spirals along with the normal/blue spirals used for comparison. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 160000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

Masters, Karen L.; Mosleh, Moein; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Bamford, Steven P.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C.; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-06-01

13

Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

Schorn, R.A.

1988-01-01

14

Citizen Science Case Study: Galaxy Zoo / Zooniverse Nathan R. Prestopnik  

E-print Network

Citizen Science Case Study: Galaxy Zoo / Zooniverse Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract Galaxy Zoo and other "Zooniverse" websites are citizen science projects designed or other assets online. Galaxy Zoo is specifically designed to have individuals from around the world

Crowston, Kevin

15

Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers' motivations for participating. This paper analyzes results from an online survey of nearly 11000 volunteers in Galaxy Zoo, an astronomy citizen…

Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Cardamone, Carie; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2013-01-01

16

An Interpretive Study of Meanings Citizen Scientists Make When Participating in Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the Web 2.0 world lurches forward, so do intellectual opportunities for students and the general public to meaningfully engage in the scientific enterprise. In an effort to assess the intrinsic motivation afforded by participation in Galaxy Zoo, we have inductively analyzed more than 1,000 contributions in the Galaxy Zoo Forum and coded posts thematically. We find that participants overwhelmingly want to meaningfully contribute to a larger scientific enterprise as well as have seemingly unique access to high quality, professional astronomical data. While other citizen science projects work through large data sets, Galaxy Zoo is unique in its motivations and retention abilities. Many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses, while not compromising the scientific value of the project. From the data emerged several trends of motivation, the primary being the sense of community created within the project that promotes professional-amateur collaboration; fulfilling a dream of being an astronomer, physicist, or astronaut; tapping into a potential well of interest created during the space race era; the spiritual aspect generated when the imagination interacts with Galaxy Zoo; and, uniting them all, the aesthetic appeal of the galaxy images. In addition, a very powerful tool also emerged as a method of retention unique to Galaxy Zoo. This tool, known as variable ratio reinforcement in behavioral psychology, uses the most appealing images as positive reinforcement to maintain classification rates over time.

Mankowski, T. S.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

2011-09-01

17

The "Valencian-GALAXY-zoo"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a sample of the most massive galaxies (M^{*}>10^{11}{M}_{?}) found at z=0 in a fully cosmological simulation performed with MASCLET (Mesh Adaptative Scheme for CosmologicaL structurE evoluTion). te{quilis04} The Upper (lower) pannel shows the merger (quiet) galaxies depending on elipticity (?) and velocity vs velocity-dispersion (v/?). We use the ssp MILES models to make our galaxies bright and study some observables of our fully cosmological synthetic galaxies.

Navarro-González, J.; Ricciardelli, E.; Quilis, V.; Vazdekis, A.

2013-05-01

18

Galaxy Zoo: An Experiment in Public Science Participation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An interesting question in modern astrophysics research is the relationship between a galaxy's morphology (appearance) and its formation and evolutionary history. Research into this question is complicated by the fact that to get a study sample, researchers must first assign a shape to a large number of galaxies. Classifying a galaxy by shape is nearly impossible for a computer, but easy for a human - however, looking at one million galaxies, one at a time, would take an enormous amount of time. To create such a research sample, we turned to citizen science. We created a web site called Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org) that invites the public to classify the galaxies. New members see a short tutorial and take a short skill test where they classify galaxies of known types. Once they pass the test, they begin to work with the entire sample. The site's interface shows the user an image of a single galaxy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The user clicks a button to classify it. Each classification is stored in a database, associated with the galaxy that it describes. The site has become enormously popular with amateur astronomers, teachers, and others interested in astronomy. So far, more than 110,000 users have joined. We have started a forum where users share images of their favorite galaxies, ask science questions of each other and the "zookeepers," and share classification advice. In a separate poster, we will share science results from the site's first six months of operation. In this poster, we will describe the site as an experiment in public science outreach. We will share user feedback, discuss our plans to study the user community more systematically, and share advice on how to work with citizen science projects to the mutual benefit of both professional and citizen scientists.

Raddick, Jordan; Lintott, C. J.; Schawinski, K.; Thomas, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Andreescu, D.; Bamford, S.; Land, K. R.; Murray, P.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A. S.; Vandenberg, J.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2007-12-01

19

Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars  

E-print Network

Observations have shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy. In a parallel effort, simulations have shown that this connection is consistent with the theory of bar-driven secular evolution. But observational evidence of bar-driven secular evolution has been sparse. In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to look for evidence of this secular evolution. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 +/- 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. We characterize bars by the bar likelihood, the likelihood a bar is present in a given galaxy, and the bar length. These two bar properties show interesting correlations with the specific star formation rate and the inner central structure of galaxies. Comparing these observations to state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution, which include live halos and ...

Cheung, Edmond; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Bosma, A; Bell, Eric F; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Lintott, Chris; Melvin, Thomas; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Willett, Kyle W

2013-01-01

20

Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists  

E-print Network

Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers' motivations for participating. This paper analyzes results from an online survey of nearly 11,000 volunteers in Galaxy Zoo, an astronomy citizen science project. Results show that volunteers' primary motivation is a desire to contribute to scientific research. We encourage other citizen science projects to study the motivations of their volunteers, to see whether and how these results may be generalized to inform the field of citizen science.

Raddick, M Jordan; Gay, Pamela L; Lintott, Chris J; Cardamone, Carie; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

2013-01-01

21

Galaxy Zoo: chiral correlation function of galaxy spins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the spiral sense of rotation of galaxy arms for a sizeable number of galaxies. We measure the correlation function of spin chirality (the sense in which galaxies appear to be spinning) of face-on spiral galaxies in angular, real and projected spaces. Our results indicate a hint of positive correlation at separations less than ~0.5 Mpc at a statistical significance of 2?-3?. This is the first experimental evidence for chiral correlation of spins. Within the tidal torque theory, it indicates that the inertia tensors of nearby galaxies are correlated. This is complementary to the studies of nearby spin axis correlations that probe the correlations of the tidal field. Theoretical interpretation is made difficult by the small distances at which the correlations are detected, implying that substructure might play a significant role, and our necessary selection of face-on spiral galaxies, rather than a general volume-limited sample. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their individual contributions are acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx. E-mail: anze@berkeley.edu

Slosar, Anže; Land, Kate; Bamford, Steven; Lintott, Chris; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alex; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2009-01-01

22

Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution through Bars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1). .

Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, Eric F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Lintott, Chris; Melvin, Thomas; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

2013-12-01

23

Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed Galaxy Zoo, a citizen science project in which volunteers classify images of galaxies by shape. The site has been hugely successful in reaching large numbers of people - more than 125,000 people have signed up. As a result, each galaxy has been classified more than 30 times, resulting in high-quality science results. We are studying the motivations of these volunteers to determine what about our site made it so captivating. We have some ideas - people enjoy helping science, looking at beautiful galaxy images, and the "game" nature of the interface. But we want to study the motivations systematically, to learn who thinks what, and how this affects what they do. We have designed a methodology in which we begin with interviews, asking open-ended questions of volunteers about their motivation. Then, we design a survey to collect motivation data for a larger sample. Lastly, for volunteers who agreed to give us their site username, we examine how they classified galaxies to look for correlations between motivation and behavior. In this poster, we describe our methodology and present preliminary results of our research.

Raddick, Jordan; Lintott, C.; Bamford, S.; Land, K.; Locksmith, D.; Murray, P.; Nichol, B.; Schawinski, K.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A.; Thomas, D.; Vandenberg, J.; Andreescu, D.

2008-05-01

24

Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk, I use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR), and inner galactic structure, i.e., the prominence of the bulge as parameterized by Sérsic index and central surface stellar mass density. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 ± 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. I find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anti-correlated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. I find that the trends of bar likelihood with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR, i.e., in star-forming galaxies, bulges are more prominent in galaxies more likely to host bars, while in quiescent disk galaxies, bars are less frequent where there are prominent bulges. Our observations of bar length reveal a complex picture. In star-forming disks, longer bars are found where the bulges are more prominent, while in quiescent disks there is a maximum in the average bar length as a function of bulge prominence. I interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution which include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. I suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks; a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. I interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution, and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies, but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, L.; Masters, K.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Zoo, Galaxy

2014-01-01

25

The intrinsic shape of galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By modelling the axis ratio distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 galaxies, we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026} in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of 0.267 ± 0.009, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of 0.215 ± 0.013. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of 0.584 ± 0.006, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlopers present in samples with morphological information from photometric profiles. These interlopers are removed when selecting ellipticals using Galaxy Zoo data. We find that the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and their dust extinction vary with absolute magnitude, colour and physical size. We find that bright elliptical galaxies are more spherical than faint ones, a trend that is also present with galaxy size, and that there is no dependence of elliptical galaxy shape with colour. For spiral galaxies, we find that the reddest ones have higher dust extinction as expected, due to the fact that this reddening is mainly due to dust. We also find that the thickness of discs increases with luminosity and size, and that brighter, smaller and redder galaxies have less round discs.

Rodríguez, Silvio; Padilla, Nelson D.

2013-09-01

26

Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers have made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this article, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and…

Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-01-01

27

Galaxy Zoo: reproducing galaxy morphologies via machine learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present morphological classifications obtained using machine learning for objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 that have been classified by Galaxy Zoo into three classes, namely early types, spirals and point sources/artefacts. An artificial neural network is trained on a subset of objects classified by the human eye, and we test whether the machine-learning algorithm can reproduce the human classifications for the rest of the sample. We find that the success of the neural network in matching the human classifications depends crucially on the set of input parameters chosen for the machine-learning algorithm. The colours and parameters associated with profile fitting are reasonable in separating the objects into three classes. However, these results are considerably improved when adding adaptive shape parameters as well as concentration and texture. The adaptive moments, concentration and texture parameters alone cannot distinguish between early type galaxies and the point sources/artefacts. Using a set of 12 parameters, the neural network is able to reproduce the human classifications to better than 90 per cent for all three morphological classes. We find that using a training set that is incomplete in magnitude does not degrade our results given our particular choice of the input parameters to the network. We conclude that it is promising to use machine-learning algorithms to perform morphological classification for the next generation of wide-field imaging surveys and that the Galaxy Zoo catalogue provides an invaluable training set for such purposes. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx. E-mail: mbanerji@ast.cam.ac.uk ‡ Einstein Fellow.

Banerji, Manda; Lahav, Ofer; Lintott, Chris J.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven P.; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alex; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-07-01

28

Galaxy Zoo: Chiral correlation function of galaxy spins  

E-print Network

Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the spiral sense of rotation of galaxy arms for a sizeable number of galaxies. We measure the correlation function of spin chirality (the sense in which galaxies appear to be spinning) of face-on spiral galaxies in angular, real and projected spaces. Our results indicate a hint of positive correlation at separations less than ~0.5 Mpc at a statistical significance of 2-3 sigma. This is the first experimental evidence for chiral correlation of spins. Within tidal torque theory it indicates that the inertia tensors of nearby galaxies are correlated. This is complementary to the studies of nearby spin axis correlations that probe the correlations of the tidal field. Theoretical interpretation is made difficult by the small distances at which the correlations are detected, implying that substructure might play a significant role, and our necessary selection of face-on spiral galaxies, rather than a general volume-limited sample.

Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2008-09-04

29

Galaxy Zoo: `Hanny's Voorwerp', a quasar light echo?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the discovery of an unusual object near the spiral galaxy IC2497, discovered by visual inspection of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. The object, known as Hanny's Voorwerp, is bright in the SDSS g band due to unusually strong [OIII]4959, 5007 emission lines. We present the results of the first targeted

Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; William Keel; Hanny van Arkel; Nicola Bennert; Edward Edmondson; Daniel Thomas; Daniel J. B. Smith; Peter D. Herbert; Matt J. Jarvis; Shanil Virani; Dan Andreescu; Steven P. Bamford; Kate Land; Phil Murray; Robert C. Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Anze Slosar; Alex Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

2009-01-01

30

Galaxy Zoo: Quantifying Morphological Indicators of Galaxy Interaction  

E-print Network

We use Galaxy Zoo 2 visual classifications to study the morphological signatures of interaction between similar-mass galaxy pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that many observable features correlate with projected pair separation; not only obvious indicators of merging, disturbance and tidal tails, but also more regular features, such as spiral arms and bars. These trends are robustly quantified, using a control sample to account for observational biases, producing measurements of the strength and separation scale of various morphological responses to pair interaction. For example, we find that the presence of spiral features is enhanced at scales 10^9.5 M_\\odot and mass ratio < 4, to be between 0.4 - 2.7 per cent.

Casteels, Kevin R V; Skibba, Ramin A; Masters, Karen L; Lintott, Chris J; Keel, William C; Schawinski, Kevin; Nichol, Robert C; Smith, Arfon M

2012-01-01

31

Galaxy Zoo: Bulgeless Galaxies With Growing Black Holes  

E-print Network

The growth of supermassive black holes appears to be driven by both galaxy mergers and `secular' processes that occur in their absence. In order to quantify the effects of secular evolution on black hole growth, we require a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxies that have formed without significant mergers, a population that heretofore has been difficult to locate. Here we present an initial sample of 13 AGN in massive (M_* \\gtrsim 1e10 M_sun) bulgeless galaxies -- which lack the classical bulges believed inevitably to result from mergers -- selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using visual classifications from Galaxy Zoo. Parametric morphological fitting confirms the host galaxies lack classical bulges; any contributions from pseudobulges are very small (typically < 5%). This is the largest such sample yet assembled. We compute black hole masses for the two broad-line objects in the sample (4.2e6 and 1.2e7 M_sun) and place lower limits on black hole masses for the remaining sample (typi...

Simmons, B D; Schawinski, K; Moran, E C; Han, A; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L; Urry, C M; Willett, K W; Bamford, S P; Nichol, R C

2012-01-01

32

Galaxy Zoo: disentangling the environmental dependence of morphology and colour  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyse the environmental dependence of galaxy morphology and colour with two-point clustering statistics, using data from the Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present two-point correlation functions of spiral and early-type galaxies, and we quantify the correlation between morphology and environment with marked correlation functions. These

Ramin A. Skibba; Steven P. Bamford; Robert C. Nichol; Chris J. Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2009-01-01

33

The Intrinsic Shape of Galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo  

E-print Network

By modelling the axis ratio distribution of SDSS DR8 galaxies we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of $E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026}$ in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of $ 0.267 \\pm 0.009 $, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of $0.215 \\pm 0.013$. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of $0.584 \\pm 0.006$, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlo...

Rodríguez, Silvio

2013-01-01

34

Galaxy Zoo 2: Statistics of Morphological Sub-Populations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, large galaxy surveys have been mapped in color-magnitude space, and fit to Schechter luminosity functions, enabling detailed, quantitative descriptions of their distributions. A similar approach is implemented, for many of the morphological classification groups available in the Galaxy Zoo 2 data release. We investigate photometry of elliptical galaxies, spiral galaxies, barred galaxies, and their sub-populations. Several of those populations are found to have qualitatively different distributions from the full sample, and we experiment with methods of fitting and distinguishing between them. Such methods include peak comparison, ridgeline function fitting, and statistical bootstrapping.

Pace, Zachary; Willett, K.; Fortson, L.

2014-01-01

35

Galaxy Zoo: disentangling the environmental dependence of morphology and colour  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse the environmental dependence of galaxy morphology and colour with two-point clustering statistics, using data from the Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present two-point correlation functions of spiral and early-type galaxies, and we quantify the correlation between morphology and environment with marked correlation functions. These yield clear and precise environmental trends across a wide range of scales, analogous to similar measurements with galaxy colours, indicating that the Galaxy Zoo classifications themselves are very precise. We measure morphology marked correlation functions at fixed colour and find that they are relatively weak, with the only residual correlation being that of red galaxies at small scales, indicating a morphology gradient within haloes for red galaxies. At fixed morphology, we find that the environmental dependence of colour remains strong, and these correlations remain for fixed morphology and luminosity. An implication of this is that much of the morphology-density relation is due to the relation between colour and density. Our results also have implications for galaxy evolution: the morphological transformation of galaxies is usually accompanied by a colour transformation, but not necessarily vice versa. A spiral galaxy may move on to the red sequence of the colour-magnitude diagram without quickly becoming an early type. We analyse the significant population of red spiral galaxies, and present evidence that they tend to be located in moderately dense environments and are often satellite galaxies in the outskirts of haloes. Finally, we combine our results to argue that central and satellite galaxies tend to follow different evolutionary paths. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: skibba@mpia.de

Skibba, Ramin A.; Bamford, Steven P.; Nichol, Robert C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2009-10-01

36

Galaxy Zoo: the fraction of merging galaxies in the SDSS and their morphologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the largest, most homogeneous catalogue of merging galaxies in the nearby Universe obtained through the Galaxy Zoo project - an interface on the World Wide Web enabling large-scale morphological classification of galaxies through visual inspection of images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method converts a set of visually inspected classifications for each galaxy into a

D. W. Darg; S. Kaviraj; C. J. Lintott; K. Schawinski; M. Sarzi; S. Bamford; J. Silk; R. Proctor; D. Andreescu; P. Murray; R. C. Nichol; M. J. Raddick; A. Slosar; A. S. Szalay; D. Thomas; J. Vandenberg

2010-01-01

37

Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of morphology and colour on environment  

E-print Network

We analyse the relationships between galaxy morphology, colour, environment and stellar mass using data for over 100,000 objects from Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled. We conclusively show that colour and morphology fractions are very different functions of environment. Both are sensitive to stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass, while colour is also highly sensitive to environment, morphology displays much weaker environmental trends. Only a small part of both relations can be attributed to variation in the stellar mass function with environment. Galaxies with high stellar masses are mostly red, in all environments and irrespective of their morphology. Low stellar-mass galaxies are mostly blue in low-density environments, but mostly red in high-density environments, again irrespective of their morphology. The colour-density relation is primarily driven by variations in colour fractions at fixed morphology, in particular the fraction of spiral galaxies that have red colours, and especially at low stellar masses. We demonstrate that our red spirals primarily include galaxies with true spiral morphology. We clearly show there is an environmental dependence for colour beyond that for morphology. Before using the Galaxy Zoo morphologies to produce the above results, we first quantify a luminosity-, size- and redshift-dependent classification bias that affects this dataset, and probably most other studies of galaxy population morphology. A correction for this bias is derived and applied to produce a sample of galaxies with reliable morphological type likelihoods, on which we base our analysis.

Steven P. Bamford; Robert C. Nichol; Ivan K. Baldry; Kate Land; Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Mehri Torki; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; Christopher J. Miller; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Jan Vandenberg

2008-05-16

38

Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting

Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan Vandenberg

2008-01-01

39

Galaxy Zoo: Disentangling the Environmental Dependence of Morphology and Colour  

E-print Network

We analyze the environmental dependence of galaxy morphology and colour with two-point clustering statistics, using data from the Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present two-point correlation functions of spiral and early-type galaxies, and we quantify the correlation between morphology and environment with marked correlation functions. These yield clear and precise environmental trends across a wide range of scales, analogous to similar measurements with galaxy colours, indicating that the Galaxy Zoo classifications themselves are very precise. We measure morphology marked correlation functions at fixed colour and find that they are relatively weak, with the only residual correlation being that of red galaxies at small scales, indicating a morphology gradient within haloes for red galaxies. At fixed morphology, we find that the environmental dependence of colour remains strong, and these correlations remain for fixed morphology \\textit{and} luminosity. An implication of this is that much of the morphology--density relation is due to the relation between colour and density. Our results also have implications for galaxy evolution: the morphological transformation of galaxies is usually accompanied by a colour transformation, but not necessarily vice versa. A spiral galaxy may move onto the red sequence of the colour-magnitude diagram without quickly becoming an early-type. We analyze the significant population of red spiral galaxies, and present evidence that they tend to be located in moderately dense environments and are often satellite galaxies in the outskirts of haloes. Finally, we combine our results to argue that central and satellite galaxies tend to follow different evolutionary paths.

Ramin A. Skibba; Steven P. Bamford; Robert C. Nichol; Chris J. Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2008-11-24

40

Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

2014-03-01

41

Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of morphology and colour on environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse the relationships between galaxy morphology, colour, environment and stellar mass using data for over 105 objects from Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled. We conclusively show that colour and morphology fractions are very different functions of environment. Both colour and morphology are sensitive to stellar mass. However, at fixed stellar mass, while colour is also highly sensitive to environment, morphology displays much weaker environmental trends. Only a small part of both the morphology-density and colour-density relations can be attributed to the variation in the stellar-mass function with environment. Galaxies with high stellar masses are mostly red in all environments and irrespective of their morphology. Low stellar-mass galaxies are mostly blue in low-density environments, but mostly red in high-density environments, again irrespective of their morphology. While galaxies with early-type morphology do always have higher red fractions, this is subdominant compared to the dependence of red fraction on stellar mass and environment. The colour-density relation is primarily driven by variations in colour fractions at fixed morphology, in particular the fraction of spiral galaxies that have red colours, and especially at low stellar masses. We demonstrate that our red spirals primarily include galaxies with true spiral morphology, and that they constitute an additional population to the S0 galaxies considered by previous studies. We clearly show there is an environmental dependence for colour beyond that for morphology. The environmental transformation of galaxies from blue to red must occur on significantly shorter time-scales than the transformation from spiral to early-type. We also present many of our results as functions of the distance to the nearest galaxy group. This confirms that the environmental trends we present are not specific to the manner in which environment is quantified, but nevertheless provides plain evidence for an environmental process at work in groups. However, the properties of group members show little dependence on the total mass of the group they inhabit, at least for group masses . Before using the Galaxy Zoo morphologies to produce the above results, we first quantify a luminosity-, size- and redshift-dependent classification bias that affects this data set, and probably most other studies of galaxy population morphology. A correction for this bias is derived and applied to produce a sample of galaxies with reliable morphological-type likelihoods, on which we base our analysis. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100, 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: steven.bamford@nottingham.ac.uk

Bamford, Steven P.; Nichol, Robert C.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Land, Kate; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thomas, Daniel; Torki, Mehri; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M.; Miller, Christopher J.; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Vandenberg, Jan

2009-03-01

42

Galaxy Zoo Green Peas: discovery of a class of compact extremely star-forming galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate a class of rapidly growing emission line galaxies, known as `Green Peas', first noted by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project because of their peculiar bright green colour and small size, unresolved in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. Their appearance is due to very strong optical emission lines, namely [OIII] lambda5007Å, with an unusually large equivalent width of

Carolin N. Cardamone; Kevin Schawinski; Marc Sarzi; Steven P. Bamford; Nicola Bennert; C. M. Urry; Chris Lintott; William C. Keel; John Parejko; Robert C. Nichol; Daniel Thomas; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Anze Slosar; Alex Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

2009-01-01

43

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 12251232 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14127.x Galaxy Zoo: chiral correlation function of galaxy spins  

E-print Network

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 1225­1232 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14127.x Galaxy Zoo 12 ABSTRACT Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo

Thomas, Daniel

44

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 389, 11791189 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13689.x Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies  

E-print Network

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 389, 1179­1189 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13689.x Galaxy Zoo. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified

Thomas, Daniel

45

Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one\\u000amust first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive\\u000asystems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project,\\u000aGalaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one\\u000amillion galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This\\u000aachievement was made possible by inviting

Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anÿze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

2008-01-01

46

A Galaxy Zoo - WorldWide Telescope Mashup: Expanding User Defined Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new way of exploring your favorite Galaxy Zoo galaxies within the context of the sky using Microsoft Research's WorldWide Telescope. Galaxy Zoo has a fantastic community that is eager to learn and contribute to science through morphological classifications of galaxies. WorldWide Telescope is an interactive observatory that allows users to explore the sky. WorldWide Telescope uses images

Jarod Luebbert; M. Sands; J. Fay; A. Smith; P. L. Gay

2010-01-01

47

Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS Barred Disks and Bar Fractions  

E-print Network

The formation of bars in disk galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. Here we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS. From within a sample of 876 disk galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a sub-sample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5< z < 2 (f_bar = 10.7 +6.3 -3.5% after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 bil...

Simmons, B D; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Willett, Kyle W; Keel, William C; Smethurst, R J; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Bell, Eric F; Casteels, Kevin R V; Conselice, Christopher J; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; McIntosh, Daniel H; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N A; Grutzbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Haussler, Boris; Jek, Kian J; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

2014-01-01

48

Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS barred discs and bar fractions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of bars in disc galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in discs decreases from the local Universe to z ˜ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature discs should be extremely rare. Here, we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disc galaxies at z ˜ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. From within a sample of 876 disc galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a subsample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5 ? z ? 2 ( f_{bar} = 10.7^{+6.3}_{-3.5} per cent after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disc galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

Simmons, B. D.; Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Willett, Kyle W.; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, R. J.; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Bell, Eric F.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N. A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Häußler, Boris; Jek, Kian J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

2014-12-01

49

Galaxy Zoo: The Environmental Dependence of Bars and Bulges in Disc Galaxies  

E-print Network

We present an analysis of the environmental dependence of bars and bulges in disc galaxies, using a volume-limited catalogue of 15810 galaxies at zZoo 2 project. We find that the likelihood of having a bar, or bulge, in disc galaxies increases when the galaxies have redder (optical) colours and larger stellar masses, and observe a transition in the bar and bulge likelihoods, such that massive disc galaxies are more likely to host bars and bulges. We use galaxy clustering methods to demonstrate statistically significant environmental correlations of barred, and bulge-dominated, galaxies, from projected separations of 150 kpc/h to 3 Mpc/h. These environmental correlations appear to be independent of each other: i.e., bulge-dominated disc galaxies exhibit a significant bar-environment correlation, and barred disc galaxies show a bulge-environment correlation. We demonstrate that approximately half (50 +/- 20%) of the bar-environm...

Skibba, Ramin A; Nichol, Robert C; Zehavi, Idit; Hoyle, Ben; Edmondson, Edward M; Bamford, Steven P; Cardamone, Carolin N; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Williams, Michael J

2011-01-01

50

Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 4 × 107 individual classifications made by ~105 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provide a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structural parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour-magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk (CJL); kevins@astro.ox.ac.uk (KS)

Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Land, Kate; Bamford, Steven; Thomas, Daniel; Raddick, M. Jordan; Nichol, Robert C.; Szalay, Alex; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Vandenberg, Jan

2008-09-01

51

Galaxy Zoo: `Hanny's Voorwerp', a quasar light echo?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the discovery of an unusual object near the spiral galaxy IC2497, discovered by visual inspection of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. The object, known as Hanny's Voorwerp, is bright in the SDSS g band due to unusually strong [OIII]4959, 5007 emission lines. We present the results of the first targeted observations of the object in the optical, ultraviolet and X-ray, which show that the object contains highly ionized gas. Although the line ratios are similar to extended emission-line regions near luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the source of this ionization is not apparent. The emission-line properties, and lack of X-ray emission from IC2497, suggest either a highly obscured AGN with a novel geometry arranged to allow photoionization of the object but not the galaxy's own circumnuclear gas, or, as we argue, the first detection of a quasar light echo. In this case, either the luminosity of the central source has decreased dramatically or else the obscuration in the system has increased within 105yr. This object may thus represent the first direct probe of quasar history on these time-scales. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Keel, William; van Arkel, Hanny; Bennert, Nicola; Edmondson, Edward; Thomas, Daniel; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Herbert, Peter D.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Virani, Shanil; Andreescu, Dan; Bamford, Steven P.; Land, Kate; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alex; Vandenberg, Jan

2009-10-01

52

Galaxy Zoo: a sample of blue early-type galaxies at low redshift  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the discovery of a population of nearby, blue early-type galaxies with high star formation rates (0.5 < SFR < 50Msolaryr-1). They are identified by their visual morphology as provided by Galaxy Zoo for Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and their u - r colour. We select a volume-limited sample in the redshift range 0.02 < z

Kevin Schawinski; Chris Lintott; Daniel Thomas; Marc Sarzi; Dan Andreescu; Steven P. Bamford; Sugata Kaviraj; Sadegh Khochfar; Kate Land; Phil Murray; Robert C. Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Anze Slosar; Alex Szalay; Jan Vandenberg; Sukyoung K. Yi

2009-01-01

53

Galaxy Zoo: a correlation between the coherence of galaxy spin chirality and star formation efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the finding of a correlation between the past star formation activity of galaxies and the degree to which the rotation axes of neighbouring galaxies are aligned. This is obtained by cross-correlating star formation histories, derived using the multiple optimized parameter estimation and data compression (MOPED) algorithm, and the spatial coherence of spin direction (chirality), as determined by the Galaxy Zoo project, for a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. Our findings suggest that spiral galaxies, which formed the majority of their stars early (z > 2), tend to display coherent rotation over scales of ~10Mpch-1. The correlation is weaker for galaxies with significant recent star formation. We find evidence for this alignment at more than the 5? level, but no correlation with other galaxy stellar properties. This finding can be explained within the context of hierarchical tidal-torque theory if the SDSS galaxies harbouring the majority of the old stellar population were formed in the past, in the same filament and at about the same time. Galaxies with significant recent star formation instead are in the field, thus influenced by the general tidal field that will align them in random directions, or have had a recent merger that would promote star formation but change the spin direction. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their individual contributions are acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx. E-mail: raulj@astro.princeton.edu

Jimenez, Raul; Slosar, Anže; Verde, Licia; Bamford, Steven; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Nichol, Robert; Andreescu, Dan; Land, Kate; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Szalay, Alex; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2010-05-01

54

A Galaxy Zoo - WorldWide Telescope Mashup: Expanding User Defined Exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new way of exploring your favorite Galaxy Zoo galaxies within the context of the sky using Microsoft Research's WorldWide Telescope. Galaxy Zoo has a fantastic community that is eager to learn and contribute to science through morphological classifications of galaxies. WorldWide Telescope is an interactive observatory that allows users to explore the sky. WorldWide Telescope uses images from the world's best telescopes, including the galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. WorldWide Telescope provides a fantastic sense of size and distance that is hard to experience in Galaxy Zoo. Creating tours from favorite galaxies directly from Galaxy Zoo aims to solve this dilemma.The incorporation of Galaxy Zoo and WorldWide telescope provides a great resource for users to learn more about the galaxies they are classifying. Users can now explore the areas around certain galaxies and view information about that location from within WorldWide Telescope. Not only does this encourage self-motivated research but after tours are created they can be shared with anyone. We hope this will help spread citizen science to different audiences via email, Facebook, and Twitter.Without the WorldWide Telescope team at Microsoft Research this project would not have been possible. Please go start exploring at http://wwt.galaxyzoo.org. This project was funded through the Microsoft Research Academic Program.

Luebbert, Jarod; Sands, M.; Fay, J.; Smith, A.; Gay, P. L.; Galaxy Zoo Team

2010-01-01

55

Galaxy Zoo: the large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

We re-examine the evidence for a violation of large-scale statistical isotropy in the distribution of projected spin vectors of spiral galaxies. We have a sample of ~37000 spiral galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with their line of sight spin direction confidently classified by members of the public through the online project Galaxy Zoo. After establishing and correcting for

Kate Land; Anze Slosar; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Steven Bamford; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2008-01-01

56

Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-print Network

In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 40,000,000 individual classifications made by ~100,000 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provides a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structual parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour--magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology.

Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

2008-04-29

57

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000000 (0000) Printed 25 February 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies  

E-print Network

.2) Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies with prominent dust lanes Sugata Kaviraj1,000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http

Bureau, Martin

58

Lecture 6: Creating the Galactic Zoo: Galaxy Interactions and the Hubble Sequence  

E-print Network

Lecture 6: Creating the Galactic Zoo: Galaxy Interactions and the Hubble Sequence Risa H. Wechsler in 10000 (Compare to one part in 100 billion at the centers of galaxies today). · These fluctuations grow. · Gas particles can cool when they collide. Dark matter particles do not interact with each other

Wechsler, Risa H.

59

Galaxy Zoo 1: data release of morphological classifications for nearly 900 000 galaxies  

SciTech Connect

Morphology is a powerful indicator of a galaxy's dynamical and merger history. It is strongly correlated with many physical parameters, including mass, star formation history and the distribution of mass. The Galaxy Zoo project collected simple morphological classifications of nearly 900,000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, contributed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers. This large number of classifications allows us to exclude classifier error, and measure the influence of subtle biases inherent in morphological classification. This paper presents the data collected by the project, alongside measures of classification accuracy and bias. The data are now publicly available and full catalogues can be downloaded in electronic format from http://data.galaxyzoo.org.

Linott, C.; Slosar, A.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S.; Slosar, A.; Land, K.; Thomas, D.; Edmondson, E.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.C.; Raddick, M.J.; Szalay, A.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Vandenberg, J.

2011-01-01

60

Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: Atomic Gas and the Regulation of Star Formation in Barred Disc Galaxies  

E-print Network

We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' HI content from the ALFALFA blind HI survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas rich disc galaxies than gas poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation, and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangu...

Masters, Karen L; Haynes, Martha P; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

2012-01-01

61

VizieR Online Data Catalog: Morphological types from Galaxy Zoo 2 (Willett+, 2013)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Morphological classifications of galaxies from Galaxy Zoo 2. Each galaxy has several objIDs (from SDSS) and positions that can be used for cross-matching. Morphological classifications include six parameters for each of 37 categories: unweighted and weighted versions of both the total number of votes and the vote fraction for that response, the vote fraction after being debiased, and flags for systems identified as being in clean samples. (5 data files).

Willett, K. W.; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Masters, K. L.; Simmons, B. D.; Casteels, K. R. V.; Edmondson, E. M.; Fortson, L. F.; Kaviraj, S.; Keel, W. C.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Raddick, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R. J.; Skibba, R. A.; Smith, A. M.; Thomas, D.

2013-09-01

62

Galaxy Zoo Green Peas: discovery of a class of compact extremely star-forming galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate a class of rapidly growing emission line galaxies, known as `Green Peas', first noted by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project because of their peculiar bright green colour and small size, unresolved in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. Their appearance is due to very strong optical emission lines, namely [OIII] ?5007Å, with an unusually large equivalent width of up to ~1000Å. We discuss a well-defined sample of 251 colour-selected objects, most of which are strongly star forming, although there are some active galactic nuclei interlopers including eight newly discovered narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The star-forming Peas are low-mass galaxies (M ~ 108.5-1010Msolar) with high star formation rates (~10Msolaryr-1), low metallicities (log[O/H] + 12 ~ 8.7) and low reddening [E(B - V) <= 0.25] and they reside in low-density environments. They have some of the highest specific star formation rates (up to ~10-8yr-1) seen in the local Universe, yielding doubling times for their stellar mass of hundreds of Myr. The few star-forming Peas with Hubble Space Telescope imaging appear to have several clumps of bright star-forming regions and low surface density features that may indicate recent or ongoing mergers. The Peas are similar in size, mass, luminosity and metallicity to luminous blue compact galaxies. They are also similar to high-redshift ultraviolet-luminous galaxies, e.g. Lyman-break galaxies and Ly? emitters, and therefore provide a local laboratory with which to study the extreme star formation processes that occur in high-redshift galaxies. Studying starbursting galaxies as a function of redshift is essential to understanding the build up of stellar mass in the Universe. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: ccardamone@astro.yale.edu

Cardamone, Carolin; Schawinski, Kevin; Sarzi, Marc; Bamford, Steven P.; Bennert, Nicola; Urry, C. M.; Lintott, Chris; Keel, William C.; Parejko, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alex; Vandenberg, Jan

2009-11-01

63

Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304 122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304 122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with mr > 17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original GZ2 project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relative strengths of galactic bulges and spiral arms. This paper presents the full public data release for the project, including measures of accuracy and bias. The majority (?90 per cent) of GZ2 classifications agree with those made by professional astronomers, especially for morphological T-types, strong bars and arm curvature. Both the raw and reduced data products can be obtained in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org.

Willett, Kyle W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Bamford, Steven P.; Masters, Karen L.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, Arfon M.; Thomas, Daniel

2013-11-01

64

Galaxy Zoo: a sample of blue early-type galaxies at low redshift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the discovery of a population of nearby, blue early-type galaxies with high star formation rates (0.5 < SFR < 50Msolaryr-1). They are identified by their visual morphology as provided by Galaxy Zoo for Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and their u - r colour. We select a volume-limited sample in the redshift range 0.02 < z < 0.05, corresponding to luminosities of approximately L* and above and with u - r colours significantly bluer than the red sequence. We confirm the early-type morphology of the objects in this sample and investigate their environmental dependence and star formation properties. Blue early-type galaxies tend to live in lower density environments than `normal' red sequence early-types and make up 5.7 +/- 0.4 per cent of the low-redshift early-type galaxy population. We find that such blue early-type galaxies are virtually absent at high velocity dispersions above 200kms-1. Our analysis uses emission line diagnostic diagrams and we find that ~25 per cent of them are actively star forming, while another ~25 per cent host both star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Another ~12 per cent are AGN. The remaining 38 per cent show no strong emission lines. When present and uncontaminated by an AGN contribution, the star formation is generally intense. We consider star formation rates derived from H?, u band and infrared luminosities, and radial colour profiles, and conclude that the star formation is spatially extended. Of those objects that are not currently undergoing star formation must have ceased doing so recently in order to account for their blue optical colours. The gas-phase metallicity of the actively star-forming blue early-types galaxies is supersolar in all cases. We discuss the place of these objects in the context of galaxy formation. A catalogue of all 204 blue early-type galaxies in our sample, including star formation rates, emission line classification is provided. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 160000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx. E-mail: kevins@astro.ox.ac.uk

Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris; Thomas, Daniel; Sarzi, Marc; Andreescu, Dan; Bamford, Steven P.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Khochfar, Sadegh; Land, Kate; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alex; Vandenberg, Jan; Yi, Sukyoung K.

2009-06-01

65

Galaxy Zoo: the fraction of merging galaxies in the SDSS and their morphologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the largest, most homogeneous catalogue of merging galaxies in the nearby Universe obtained through the Galaxy Zoo project - an interface on the World Wide Web enabling large-scale morphological classification of galaxies through visual inspection of images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method converts a set of visually inspected classifications for each galaxy into a single parameter (the `weighted-merger-vote fraction,' fm) which describes our confidence that the system is part of an ongoing merger. We describe how fm is used to create a catalogue of 3003 visually selected pairs of merging galaxies from the SDSS in the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.1. We use our merger sample and values of fm applied to the SDSS Main Galaxy Spectral sample to estimate that the fraction of volume-limited (Mr < -20.55) major mergers (1/3 < M*1/M*2 < 3) in the nearby Universe is 1-3 × C per cent, where C ~ 1.5 is a correction factor for spectroscopic incompleteness. Having visually classified the morphologies of the constituent galaxies in our mergers, we find that the spiral-to-elliptical ratio of galaxies in mergers is higher by a factor of ~2 relative to the global population. In a companion paper, we examine the internal properties of these merging galaxies and conclude that this high spiral-to-elliptical ratio in mergers is due to a longer time-scale over which mergers with spirals are detectable compared to mergers with ellipticals.

Darg, D. W.; Kaviraj, S.; Lintott, C. J.; Schawinski, K.; Sarzi, M.; Bamford, S.; Silk, J.; Proctor, R.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Nichol, R. C.; Raddick, M. J.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A. S.; Thomas, D.; Vandenberg, J.

2010-01-01

66

Galaxy Zoo: A Catalog of Overlapping Galaxy Pairs for Dust Studies  

E-print Network

Analysis of galaxies with overlapping images offers a direct way to probe the distribution of dust extinction and its effects on the background light. We present a catalog of 1990 such galaxy pairs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by volunteers of the Galaxy Zoo project. We highlight subsamples which are particularly useful for retrieving such properties of the dust distribution as UV extinction, the extent perpendicular to the disk plane, and extinction in the inner parts of disks. The sample spans wide ranges of morphology and surface brightness, opening up the possibility of using this technique to address systematic changes in dust extinction or distribution with galaxy type. This sample will form the basis for forthcoming work on the ranges of dust distributions in local disk galaxies, both for their astrophysical implications and as the low-redshift part of a study of the evolution of dust properties. Separate lists and figures show deep overlaps, where the inner regions of the foregrou...

Keel, William C; Holwerda, Benne W; Mezzoprete, Massimo; Lintott, Chris J; Schawinski, Kevin; Gay, Pamela; Masters, Karen L

2012-01-01

67

Commons at the Intersection of Peer Production, Citizen Science, and Big Data: Galaxy Zoo  

E-print Network

The knowledge commons research framework is applied to a case of commons governance grounded in research in modern astronomy. The case, Galaxy Zoo, is a leading example of at least three different contemporary phenomena. In the first place Galaxy Zoo is a global citizen science project, in which volunteer non-scientists have been recruited to participate in large-scale data analysis via the Internet. In the second place Galaxy Zoo is a highly successful example of peer production, sometimes known colloquially as crowdsourcing, by which data are gathered, supplied, and/or analyzed by very large numbers of anonymous and pseudonymous contributors to an enterprise that is centrally coordinated or managed. In the third place Galaxy Zoo is a highly visible example of data-intensive science, sometimes referred to as e-science or Big Data science, by which scientific researchers develop methods to grapple with the massive volumes of digital data now available to them via modern sensing and imaging technologies. This ...

Madison, Michael J

2014-01-01

68

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 388, 16861692 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13490.x Galaxy Zoo: the large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan  

E-print Network

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 388, 1686­1692 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13490.x Galaxy Zoo Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find effect. Key words: galaxies: spiral ­ large-scale structure of Universe. 1 INTRODUCTION Galaxy Zoo (GZ)1

Thomas, Daniel

69

Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304,122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-print Network

We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304,122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with m_r>17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original Galaxy Zoo project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types, or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges, and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relat...

Willett, Kyle W; Bamford, Steven P; Masters, Karen L; Simmons, Brooke D; Casteels, Kevin R V; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy F; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Thomas, Daniel

2013-01-01

70

Managing the Big Data Avalanche in Astronomy - Data Mining the Galaxy Zoo Classification Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will summarize a variety of data mining experiments that have been applied to the Galaxy Zoo database of galaxy classifications, which were provided by the volunteer citizen scientists. The goal of these exercises is to learn new and improved classification rules for diverse populations of galaxies, which can then be applied to much larger sky surveys of the future, such as the LSST (Large Synoptic Sky Survey), which is proposed to obtain detailed photometric data for approximately 20 billion galaxies. The massive Big Data that astronomy projects will generate in the future demand greater application of data mining and data science algorithms, as well as greater training of astronomy students in the skills of data mining and data science. The project described here has involved several graduate and undergraduate research assistants at George Mason University.

Borne, Kirk D.

2014-01-01

71

Galaxy Zoo: the large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We re-examine the evidence for a violation of large-scale statistical isotropy in the distribution of projected spin vectors of spiral galaxies. We have a sample of ~37000 spiral galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with their line of sight spin direction confidently classified by members of the public through the online project Galaxy Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find the winding sense of the galaxies to be consistent with statistical isotropy. In particular, we find no significant dipole signal, and thus no evidence for overall preferred handedness of the Universe. We compare this result to those of other authors and conclude that these may also be affected and explained by a bias effect. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project: http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx. E-mail: krl@astro.ox.ac.uk (KL); anze@berkeley.edu (AS)

Land, Kate; Slosar, Anže; Lintott, Chris; Andreescu, Dan; Bamford, Steven; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert; Raddick, M. Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alex; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

2008-08-01

72

Galaxy Zoo: The large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-print Network

We re-examine the evidence for a violation of large-scale statistical isotropy in the distribution of projected spin vectors of spiral galaxies. We have a sample of $\\sim 37,000$ spiral galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with their line of sight spin direction confidently classified by members of the public through the online project Galaxy Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find the winding sense of the galaxies to be consistent with statistical isotropy. In particular we find no significant dipole signal, and thus no evidence for overall preferred handedness of the Universe. We compare this result to those of other authors and conclude that these may also be affected and explained by a bias effect.

Kate Land; Anze Slosar; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Steven Bamford; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2008-03-22

73

Selection of Dual AGN Candidate Using Wise & Galaxy Zoo: A Chandra Pilot Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the vast majority of galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy interactions trigger nuclear gas accretion, a direct consequence of the hierarchical model of galaxy formation would be the existence of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The existence, frequency, and characteristics of such binary AGNs have important astrophysical implications on the SMBH mass function, the interplay between SMBHs and the host galaxy, and the M-? relation. Despite decades of searching, and strong theoretical reasons that they should exist, observationally confirmed cases of binary AGNs are extremely rare, and most have been discovered serendipitously. Using extremely red mid-IR colors from the all-sky WISE survey and Galaxy Zoo close interaction identifications, we identified a sample of 90 strongly interacting galaxies with mid-IR signatures of powerful AGNs. Although these galaxies are optically quiescent, all galaxies in the sample for which archival Chandra observations are available, contain double X-ray nuclear sources suggestive of dual AGNs. We present these archival X-ray observations. This study suggests that the WISE survey may open up a promising pre-selection strategy for finding dual AGNs that is complementary to optical studies and will enable larger systematic investigations of dual AGN candidates.

Koju, Raj K.

2014-01-01

74

Using SDSS & GalaxyZoo Databases to Ask Research-able Questions in Learning Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using Galaxy Zoo1 at: http://zoo1.galaxyzoo.org/ accessing SDSS and a multi-phase backwards faded scaffolding approach, we first ask students to classify 30 galaxies and consider proposed conclusion: "most galaxies are elliptical” based on the evidence collected. Here, student attention is isolated from generating a question or even a data collection protocol, but focused on the issue of "does the evidence match the conclusion?” The next phase focuses on generating conclusions from evidence, whereas the previous phase was focused on evaluating conclusions. Students explain their reasoning provide evidence in response to "What conclusions and generalizations can you make from the following data collected by a student in terms of do spiral galaxies generally spin clockwise or anticlockwise given that one observes 36 spirals spinning clockwise, 21 spirals spinning anticlockwise, and 16 appearing to be edge-on or unclear.” Next, students are asked to consider what evidence needs to be collected in order to complete a scientific inquiry related to a given question. Students propose what evidence is needed in order to pursue, "What fraction of galaxies observed appear to be in the process of merging with other galaxies?” Note students are explicitly asked not to actually gather data as it detracts from developing an understanding of how data collection needs to be tightly aligned with the question. And, in practice, students can intellectually engage with a data collection plan that is simply too ominous to actually collect. By this point, students have extended experience with inquiry in this domain. Students are now ready to wrestle with creating a fruitful question. Students are tasked to design an answerable research question, propose a plan to pursue evidence, collect data using the present astronomical data base and create an evidence-based conclusion about the nature and or frequency of galaxies.

Slater, Timothy F.

2010-01-01

75

Galaxy Zoo: building the low-mass end of the red sequence with local post-starburst galaxies  

E-print Network

We present a study of local post-starburst galaxies (PSGs) using the photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the results from the Galaxy Zoo project. We find that the majority of our local PSG population have neither early- nor late- type morphologies but occupy a well-defined space within the colour-stellar mass diagram, most notably, the low-mass end of the "green valley" below the transition mass thought to be the mass division between low-mass star-forming galaxies and high-mass passively-evolving bulge-dominated galaxies. Our analysis suggests that it is likely that a local PSG will quickly transform into "red", low-mass early-type galaxies as the stellar morphologies of the "green" PSGs largely resemble that of the early-type galaxies within the same mass range. We propose that the current population of PSGs represents a population of galaxies which is rapidly transitioning between the star-forming and the passively-evolving phases. Subsequently, these PSG...

Wong, O Ivy; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L; Nichol, R C; Lintott, C; Keel, W C; Darg, D; Bamford, S P; Andreescu, D; Murray, P; Raddick, M J; Szalay, A; Thomas, D; VandenBerg, J

2011-01-01

76

Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?  

E-print Network

We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, E; Bamford, Steven P; Bell, Eric F; Bosma, A; Cardamone, Carolin N; Casteels, Kevin R V; Faber, S M; Fang, Jerome J; Fortson, Lucy F; Kocevski, Dale D; Koo, David C; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W

2014-01-01

77

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

2012-07-10

78

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

79

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

E-print Network

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10$^{11}$ $M_\\odot$ that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured ($N_H \\lesssim 1.1 \\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint ($< 40$ counts per nucleus; $f_{2-10 keV} \\lesssim 1.2 \\times 10^{-13}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H; Urry, C Megan; Darg, Dan W; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W; Cardamone, Carolin N; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Simmons, Brooke D; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

80

Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10(sup 11) solar mass that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) less than or approximately 1.1 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (less than 40 counts per nucleus; f(sub 2-10 keV) less than or approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -13) ergs per second per square centimeter) to separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H.; Schwainski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

2012-01-01

81

Galaxy Zoo: a correlation between the coherence of galaxy spin chirality and star formation efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the finding of a correlation between the past star formation activity of galaxies and the degree to which the rotation axes of neighbouring galaxies are aligned. This is obtained by cross-correlating star formation histories, derived using the multiple optimized parameter estimation and data compression (MOPED) algorithm, and the spatial coherence of spin direction (chirality), as determined by

Raul Jimenez; Anze Slosar; Licia Verde; Steven Bamford; Chris Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Robert Nichol; Dan Andreescu; Kate Land; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

2010-01-01

82

Moon Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the Moon Zoo website is "to provide detailed crater counts for as much of the Moon's surface as possible." On the website, interested parties can help out with this effort by examining images of the moon's surface and providing feedback to be used by the team of researchers in charge of the Moon Zoo project. First-time visitors should click on the "How To Take Part" for a tutorial that will help determine which project they might be best suited for. Visitors who wish to take part in the project will need to register on the website, and that process only takes a few minutes. Moving on, the website has an online forum where users can trade information as well as a blog.

83

The Green Valley is a Red Herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies  

E-print Network

We use SDSS+\\textit{GALEX}+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disk to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant disks, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of co...

Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Sarzi, Marc; Ramin,; Skibba,; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W; Wong, O Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K

2014-01-01

84

The green valley is a red herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use SDSS+GALEX+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disc to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant discs, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of cosmic gas supply and gas reservoirs. We conclude that late-type galaxies are consistent with a scenario where the cosmic supply of gas is shut off, perhaps at a critical halo mass, followed by a slow exhaustion of the remaining gas over several Gyr, driven by secular and/or environmental processes. In contrast, early-type galaxies require a scenario where the gas supply and gas reservoir are destroyed virtually instantaneously, with rapid quenching accompanied by a morphological transformation from disc to spheroid. This gas reservoir destruction could be the consequence of a major merger, which in most cases transforms galaxies from disc to elliptical morphology, and mergers could play a role in inducing black hole accretion and possibly active galactic nuclei feedback.

Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Simmons, Brooke D.; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Sarzi, Marc; Skibba, Ramin; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W.; Wong, O. Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K.

2014-05-01

85

The Galaxy Zoo survey for giant AGN-ionized clouds: past and present black-hole accretion events  

E-print Network

Some active galactic nuclei (AGN) are surrounded by extended emission-line regions (EELRs), which trace both the illumination pattern of escaping radiation and its history over the light-travel time from the AGN to the gas. From a new set of such EELRs, we present evidence that the AGN in many Seyfert galaxies undergo luminous episodes 20,000-200,000 years in duration. Motivated by the discovery of the spectacular nebula known as Hanny's Voorwerp, ionized by a powerful AGN which has apparently faded dramatically within ~ 100,000 years, Galaxy Zoo volunteers have carried out both targeted and serendipitous searches for similar emission-line clouds around low-redshift galaxies.We present the resulting list of candidates and describe spectroscopy identifying 19 galaxies with AGN-ionized regions at projected radii > 10 kpc. This search recovered known EELRs and identified additional previously unknown cases, one with detected emission to r = 37 kpc. At least 14/19 are in interacting or merging systems; tidal tail...

Keel, William C; Bennert, Vardha N; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J; Lynn, Stuart; Pancoast, Anna; Harris, Chelsea; Nierenberg, A M; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Proctor, Richard

2011-01-01

86

GALAXY ZOO: THE FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT CO-EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE HOST GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and visual classifications of morphology from the Galaxy Zoo project to study black hole growth in the nearby universe (z < 0.05) and to break down the active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxy population by color, stellar mass, and morphology. We find that the black hole growth at luminosities L[O{sub III}]>10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} in early- and late-type galaxies is fundamentally different. AGN host galaxies as a population have a broad range of stellar masses (10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub sun}), reside in the green valley of the color-mass diagram and their central black holes have median masses around 10{sup 6.5} M{sub sun}. However, by comparing early- and late-type AGN host galaxies to their non-active counterparts, we find several key differences: in early-type galaxies, it is preferentially the galaxies with the least massive black holes that are growing, while in late-type galaxies, it is preferentially the most massive black holes that are growing. The duty cycle of AGNs in early-type galaxies is strongly peaked in the green valley below the low-mass end (10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of the red sequence at stellar masses where there is a steady supply of blue cloud progenitors. The duty cycle of AGNs in late-type galaxies on the other hand peaks in massive (10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) green and red late-types which generally do not have a corresponding blue cloud population of similar mass. At high-Eddington ratios (L/L{sub Edd}>0.1), the only population with a substantial fraction of AGNs are the low-mass green valley early-type galaxies. Finally, the Milky Way likely resides in the 'sweet spot' on the color-mass diagram where the AGN duty cycle of late-type galaxies is highest. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the role of AGNs in the evolution of galaxies.

Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Virani, Shanil; Coppi, Paolo; Cardamone, Carolin N. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bamford, Steven P. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Treister, Ezequiel [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lintott, Chris J.; Kaviraj, Sugata [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Sarzi, Marc [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Blvd., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Hampshire Terrace, Portsmouth, PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); Ross, Nicholas P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Andreescu, Dan [LinkLab, 4506 Graystone Avenue, Bronx, NY 10471 (United States); Murray, Phil [Fingerprint Digital Media, 9 Victoria Close, Newtownards, Co. Down, Northern Ireland, BT23 7GY (United Kingdom); Raddick, M. Jordan; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Slosar, Anze, E-mail: kevin.schawinski@yale.ed [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-03-01

87

The Galaxy Zoo survey for giant AGN-ionized clouds: past and present black hole accretion events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some active galactic nuclei (AGN) are surrounded by extended emission-line regions (EELRs), which trace both the illumination pattern of escaping radiation and its history over the light travel time from the AGN to the gas. From a new set of such EELRs, we present evidence that the AGN in many Seyfert galaxies undergo luminous episodes 0.2-2 ? years in duration. Motivated by the discovery of the spectacular nebula known as Hanny's Voorwerp, ionized by a powerful AGN which has apparently faded dramatically within ? years, Galaxy Zoo volunteers have carried out both targeted and serendipitous searches for similar emission-line clouds around low-redshift galaxies. We present the resulting list of candidates and describe spectroscopy identifying 19 galaxies with AGN-ionized regions at projected radii ? kpc. This search recovered known EELRs (such as Mrk 78, Mrk 266 and NGC 5252) and identified additional previously unknown cases, one with detected emission to ? kpc. One new Sy 2 was identified. At least 14/19 are in interacting or merging systems, suggesting that tidal tails are a prime source of distant gas out of the galaxy plane to be ionized by an AGN. We see a mix of one- and two-sided structures, with observed cone angles from 23? to 112?. We consider the energy balance in the ionized clouds, with lower and upper bounds on ionizing luminosity from recombination and ionization-parameter arguments, and estimate the luminosity of the core from the far-infrared data. The implied ratio of ionizing radiation seen by the clouds to that emitted by the nucleus, on the assumption of a non-variable nuclear source, ranges from 0.02 to ?; 7/19 exceed unity. Small values fit well with a heavily obscured AGN in which only a small fraction of the ionizing output escapes to be traced by surrounding gas. However, large values may require that the AGN has faded over tens of thousands of years, giving us several examples of systems in which such dramatic long-period variation has occurred; this is the only current technique for addressing these time-scales in AGN history. The relative numbers of faded and non-faded objects we infer, and the projected extents of the ionized regions, give our estimate (0.2-2 ? years) for the length of individual bright phases.

Keel, William C.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Bennert, Vardha N.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J.; Lynn, Stuart; Pancoast, Anna; Harris, Chelsea; Nierenberg, A. M.; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Proctor, Richard

2012-02-01

88

Logic Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hacker has let loose the wacky animals of Logic Zoo! Use your critical thinking skills to help him put them back in their proper places. Each area of the zoo is separated into four pens, and animals with things in common share the same pen.

2008-01-01

89

Galaxy Zoo: an independent look at the evolution of the bar fraction over the last eight billion years from HST-COSMOS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measure the redshift evolution of the bar fraction in a sample of 2380 visually selected disc galaxies found in Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The visual classifications used both to identify the disc sample and to indicate the presence of stellar bars were provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. We find that the overall bar fraction decreases by a factor of 2, from 22 ± 5 per cent at z = 0.4 (tlb = 4.2 Gyr) to 11 ± 2 per cent at z = 1.0 (tlb = 7.8 Gyr), consistent with previous analysis. We show that this decrease, of the strong bar fraction in a volume limited sample of massive disc galaxies [stellar mass limit of log (M?/M?) ? 10.0], cannot be due to redshift-dependent biases hiding either bars or disc galaxies at higher redshifts. Splitting our sample into three bins of mass we find that the decrease in bar fraction is most prominent in the highest mass bin, while the lower mass discs in our sample show a more modest evolution. We also include a sample of 98 red disc galaxies. These galaxies have a high bar fraction (45 ± 5 per cent), and are missing from other COSMOS samples which used SED fitting or colours to identify high-redshift discs. Our results are consistent with a picture in which the evolution of massive disc galaxies begins to be affected by slow (secular) internal process at z ˜ 1. We discuss possible connections of the decrease in bar fraction to the redshift, including the growth of stable disc galaxies, mass evolution of the gas content in disc galaxies, as well as the mass-dependent effects of tidal interactions.

Melvin, Thomas; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Chris; Nichol, Robert C.; Simmons, Brooke; Bamford, Steven P.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, Arfon M.; Willett, Kyle W.

2014-03-01

90

Zoo Calendar  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use the Zoo Calendar (page 1 of PDF) to involve learners in interdisciplinary, whole language, and writing activities about ecological concepts. Each 30-45 minute activity emphasizes the concept of biodiversity and demonstrates that science is all around us. These activities can be conducted before or after a visit to a zoo (or not at all), in a large or small group setting, and as a month long or shorter (or longer) unit.

Baltimore, The M.

2012-06-26

91

Galaxy Zoo: An independent look at the evolution of the bar fraction over the last eight billion years from HST-COSMOS  

E-print Network

We measure the redshift evolution of the bar fraction in a sample of 2380 visually selected disc galaxies found in Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The visual classifications used to identify both the disc sample and to indicate the presence of stellar bars were provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. We find that the overall bar fraction decreases by a factor of two, from 22+/-5% at z=0.4 (tlb = 4.2 Gyr) to 11+/-2% at z=1.0 (tlb = 7.8 Gyr), consistent with previous analysis. We show that this decrease, of the strong bar fraction in a volume limited sample of massive disc galaxies [stellar mass limit of log(Mstar/Msun) > 10.0], cannot be due to redshift dependent biases hiding either bars or disc galaxies at higher redshifts. Splitting our sample into three bins of mass we find that the decrease in bar fraction is most prominent in the highest mass bin, while the lower mass discs in our sample show a more modest evolution. We also include a...

Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Nichol, Robert C; Simmons, Brooke; Bamford, Steven P; Casteels, Kevin R V; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Willett, Kyle W

2014-01-01

92

Minnesota Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Minnesota Zoo website provides students and others with basic information about a large variety of animals from Minnesota and around the world. Examples of the numerous animals featured include the: Clouded Leopard, Red Panda, Bactrian Camel, Fishing Cat, Komodo Monitor, and Great Horned Owl. Animal profiles contain a small, clear photograph of each species; a concise description, and brief information about diet, habitat, breeding, range, and more. The profile provides the class, order, family, genus, and species names for each animal as well. In addition, the site features information about farm animals including the American Cream Draft Horse, Dutch Belted Dairy Cow, Jersey Diary Cow, and Holstein Dairy Cow. Site visitors can also link to information about the conservation efforts of the Minnesota Zoo, and to a Kidsâ Corner which features a few simple educational games for younger children.

93

Our Zoo to You  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes, and Madagascar hissing cockroaches.

Mayo, Lois; Abuloum, Amjad; Mancuso, Brian; Brooks, David W.; Wickless, Mimi; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.

2003-09-01

94

Group 10 - Zoos  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

BACKGROUND People have different opinions about zoos. Some feel it is animal cruelty. Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. TASK - Investigate how zoos began and what purposes they serve today. Explain to the class both sides of the issue of whether animals in zoos is cruelty or not. Give your opinions on zoos and what value they may have today. RESOURCES Crocodile Hunter Zoo Born Free.org PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) Endangered Species San Diego Zoo World Wildlife Fund The Nature Conservancy All groups may also search on The Student Research Center and The National Science Digital Library ...

Mecham, Mrs.

2006-11-30

95

2.10 A&GApril2011Vol.52 oon Zoo is an online lunar citizen  

E-print Network

2.10 A&G·April2011·Vol.52 M oon Zoo is an online lunar citizen science project designed to address. These projects are inspired by the highly successful Galaxy Zoo project, which harnesses the power of internet). Launched in May 2010, Moon Zoo sets reg istered users the task of identifying, classifying and measuring

Crawford, Ian

96

Zoo Praxis and Theories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Zoo projects that encourage reflective learning and are legitimate undertakings for untrained undergraduates are hard to develop. The two themes of the author's primate studies course lead students to observe and evaluate the social behavior of nonhuman primates. Students use a rigorous methodology focused on the use of space, and their findings are forwarded to zoo administrators. This results in improvements in zoo housing and makes the exercise intrinsically meaningful.

Burton, Frances

2004-07-01

97

Lively Zoo Lessons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents ideas for getting the most out of an elementary school trip to the zoo. The article offers before, during, and after lesson plans which touch on biology (the life cycle), geography (continents and regions of the world), conservation (endangered species), ecology (natural communities), and career guidance (zoo jobs). (SM)

Swengel, Ann

1992-01-01

98

Who's in the Zoo?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To make the concept of biomes fresh for high school students and help them achieve more conceptual depth, the author Amy Slack created the "Who's in the Zoo?" project. Working in groups, students design a zoo that represents five of Earth's biomes and the

Slack, Amy

2010-03-01

99

The Electronic Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Electronic Zoo: A List of Animal-Related Computer Resources (Internet/Bitnet Mailing Lists, Gophers, World Wide Web Sites, Mail Servers, Usenet Newsgroups, FTP Archives, Commercial Online Services, and Bulletin Board Systems.)

Boschert, Ken.

1997-01-01

100

Interaction Design for Digital Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a consumer-oriented design of Interaction System applied in a digital zoo. In order to introduce a new experience of visiting zoos, a series of interaction interfaces and applications is designed based on the web surfing. The applications can be located anywhere has Internet connection, used by visitors both in and out of the zoo. In the meantime,

Keni Ren; Johannes Karlsson; Haibo Li

2011-01-01

101

Zoo Interchange Reconstruction Project Update  

E-print Network

Zoo Interchange Reconstruction Project Update Medical College of Wisconsin March 7, 2013 Bob Gutierrez - WisDOT Ryan Luck - WisDOT #12;Today's presentation · Overview of Zoo IC project · Milwaukee Plank Road ­ Glenview Avenue #12;Why rebuild the Zoo Interchange · Safety ­ averages nearly three

102

San Diego Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Zoological Society of San Diego brings to the web the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Wild Animal Park, and the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species. Each unit of the zoo has a main page, from which the user can meet the animals and find out about the humans who watch over them. The photographs of new arrivals at the zoo should be a big draw, and there is informative text underlying the visuals. The "Guest Book" is a game in which users attempt to match animals with their "signatures": the tracks they leave. Use the table of contents to find your way to the animals you're most interested in.

1998-01-01

103

ChimpanZoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"A collective effort between the Jane Goodall Institute, zoological facilities, and universities," ChimpanZoo is a research and education program that aims to "apply uniform research methods to learn more about chimpanzees and their psychological and behavioral responses to a captive environment." The program involves participating zoos, researchers, and volunteers collecting and submitting chimpanzee behavior data to the program. The site contains a great deal of information on chimpanzee behavior for a variety of different educational levels, high school and beyond. Topics include general chimpanzee behavior, biology, evolution, and results determined from the Chimpanzoo database.

104

Compromised survivorship in zoo elephants.  

PubMed

We analyzed data from over 4500 elephants to show that animals in European zoos have about half the median life span of conspecifics in protected populations in range countries. This discrepancy is clearest in Asian elephants; unlike African elephants in zoos, this species' infant mortality is very high (for example, twice that seen in Burmese timber camps), and its adult survivorship in zoos has not improved significantly in recent years. One risk factor for Asian zoo elephants is being moved between institutions, with early removal from the mother tending to have additional adverse effects. Another risk factor is being born into a zoo rather than being imported from the wild, with poor adult survivorship in zoo-born Asians apparently being conferred prenatally or in early infancy. We suggest stress and/or obesity as likely causes of zoo elephants' compromised survivorship. PMID:19074339

Clubb, Ros; Rowcliffe, Marcus; Lee, Phyllis; Mar, Khyne U; Moss, Cynthia; Mason, Georgia J

2008-12-12

105

Microbe Zoo Water World  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is maintained by the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology. A Microbe Zoo and the Microbe of the Month are included. The site provides some background material on many different types of Microbes, in ponds, around the deep sea vents, and various other locations. Two water regions are represented on the site, although mention is made of several others.

2004-01-28

106

Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo (BAMZ) online provides: visitor information, news about exhibits, education programs, memberships and activities for children and adults, including behind the scenes exploration of their facility. It is also a resource for information about Bermuda's biodiversity, conservation work, and research projects. Located in Flats Village.

107

Zoo and Aquarium Libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the world of special science libraries, zoo and aquarium libraries have an especially narrow focus and purpose. Nevertheless, they play an important part in the functioning of their parent institutions, which currently emphasize their roles in education, conservation, and research. This paper summarizes the results of a survey which found that despite a wide range in the sizes of

Dorothy Barr

2005-01-01

108

Chinese Zoo Lion Fraud  

E-print Network

, in some kooky, backhanded way, the logic behind the People's Park Zoo's decision to claim that a Tibetan mastiff was an African lion. Sure, Tibetan mastiffs are large and have shaggy, mane-like fur around their heads but still there was a dead giveaway...

Hacker, Randi

2013-09-26

109

The modern zoo: How do people perceive zoo animals?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the recent growth in scientific attention focusing upon human-animal relationships, very little research has been conducted in relation to the human experience of, and relationship with, zoo animals. In order to assess how the general public perceive zoo animals, a street survey questionnaire was used (Study 1, n = 200). In addition, a second study was carried out within

Louise S. Reade; Natalie K. Waran

1996-01-01

110

ZooScope. Teacher's Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum provides background information and activities for teaching inquiry-based science in the classroom and at the Oregon Zoo. The ZooScope program was created to provide students with hands-on and minds-on activities that are crucial to taking theoretical learning into the real world. The hope is that as students begin asking about the…

Henrie, Charis

111

SAN DIEGO ZOO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A BROCHURE GEARED TO HELP TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN THE SAN DIEGO AREA TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES OF THE SAN DIEGO ZOO IS PRESENTED. THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF THE ZOO EMPLOYS TWO FULL-TIME TEACHERS AND A DRIVER-GUIDE. THE PROGRAM OFFERED IS BRIEFLY DESCRIBED--(1) IN "PRESCHOOL AND FIRST GRADE," INTRODUCTIONS ARE MADE TO…

San Diego County Dept. of Education, CA.

112

Visitor Behavior at Melbourne Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The potential educational impact of the Melbourne Zoo (Australia) for recreational visitors was examined in this study using time as the major dependent variable. Specific goals included: (1) assessment of the potential cognitive and affective educational impact of zoos on recreational visitors; (2) determination of the temporal and spatial…

Churchman, David

113

The neutron star zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

Harding, Alice K.

2013-12-01

114

Oxyspiruriasis in zoo birds.  

PubMed

Oxyspiruriasis caused by the bird eyeworm, Oxyspirura mansoni, a thelaziid nematode, in three species of pheasants, 3 Chrysolophus pictus (golden pheasant), 7 Lophura nycthemera (silver pheasant) and 9 Phasianus colchicus (common pheasant) in Zoo Negara Malaysia are reported. Birds with the disease were treated with a solution of 0.5% iodine or 0.5% lysol. Antistress powder for 4 days in water and non-strep vitamin powder in water was also provided. Control measures included removal of the cockroach intermediate host, Pycnoscelus surinamensis (Surinam cockroach) from the vicinity of the birds. The golden pheasant is a new host for O. mansoni in peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22735854

Vellayan, S; Jeffery, J; Oothuman, P; Zahedi, M; Krishnasamy, M; Paramaswaran, S; Rohela, M; Abdul-Aziz, N M

2012-06-01

115

The Neutron Star Zoo  

E-print Network

Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

Harding, Alice K

2013-01-01

116

Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in Zoo Animals in Selected Zoos in the Midwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplas- mosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of

Silvia de Camps; J. P. Dubey; W. J. A. Saville

2008-01-01

117

4-H Zoo Snooze March 29, 2013  

E-print Network

4-H Zoo Snooze March 29, 2013 Come spend the night at the OKC Zoo and learn about animal camouflage hike through the zoo. The hike will be followed by some social time and activities. In the morning we is yours to spend at the zoo. Make plans today, it's sure to be a "Wild" time! Registration is first come

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

118

World Zoo Conservation Strategy: a blueprint for zoo development  

Microsoft Academic Search

People need a sense of purpose, the setting of clear targets, the encouragement and support of others in striving for and\\u000a achieving tasks that have been set. This is particularly true for zoo personnel, a profession which is often under critical\\u000a attack, especially from those who have a philosophical difficulty in accepting the idea of animals in captivity. The zoo

Roger Wheater

1995-01-01

119

San Diego Zoo: Kid Territory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This San Diego Zoo website is absolutely packed with fun and informative stuff for kids, and features not only the residents of the zoo, but also the people who work there. Read All About It offers a look at how the San Diego Zoo began, why we give scientific names to animals, why animal enrichment is important, and much more. Science in Action offers simple experiments to do at home or in the classroom, like exploring what life would be like without an opposable thumb (with tape, not via amputation). The website also provides interesting essays on zoo-related careers, as well as cool multimedia games, animal-themed recipes, and loads of other great features.

120

Pioneer Middle School Virtual Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Zoo showcases middle-school students' research and reports on the animal kingdom and animal classification. A broad outline of animal taxonomy organizes the student reports into the overarching animal kingdoms: Animalia, Plantea, Fungi, Protista, and Monera.

121

Wildlife Crediting Forum Report on Forum Deliberations  

E-print Network

Wildlife Crediting Forum Report on Forum Deliberations January 2010 ­ May 2011 Northwest Power.parametrix.com #12;Wildlife Crediting Forum Report on Forum Deliberations January 2010 ­ May 2011 Northwest Power Crediting Forum Report on Forum Deliberations January 2010 ­ May 2011 Northwest Power and Conservation

122

Zoos as heritage tourism attractions: A neglected area of research?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoos are a form of museum. The main difference between zoos and other forms of museum is that zoos exhibit living objects. These objects are examples of natural heritage. Unlike other museums, the focus of much research in the past decade, zoos appear under?researched. Zoos, however, are significant tourist attractions. There are over 10,000 zoos worldwide, many in major world

Peter Mason

1999-01-01

123

What Do We Learn at the Zoo?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The zoo's role in public education is analyzed. Despite good intentions, zoos may be creating animal stereotypes that are not only incorrect but that actually work against the interests of wildlife preservation. (BL)

Sommer, Robert

1972-01-01

124

Zoo Biology 29 : 114 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 29 : 1­14 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS First Captive Breeding of the Imperial Parrot and low population density have frustrated a detailed understanding of its ecology and reproduction. Zoo (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/zoo.20374 Received 17 November 2010; Accepted 19 November 2010 Grant sponsor

125

Zoo Biology 29 : 397404 (2010) BRIEF REPORT  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 29 : 397­404 (2010) BRIEF REPORT The Influence of Feeding, Enrichment, and Seasonal general behavior and activity patterns of Walruses in zoos or aquariums, less is known about how online 31 August 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/zoo.20272 Received

Champagne, Frances A.

126

San Diego Zoo: Panda Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is provided by the San Diego Zoo. Visitors may view real time footage of pandas at the zoo with Panda Cam, have their questions answered at the Panda Facts page, or read up on each panda with Panda Profiles. And of course, no one should miss the features devoted to panda Hua Mei, who seems to have spent nearly every minute of her life in front of a camera since her birth at the San Diego Zoo in 1999. Visitors can watch video clips of Hua Mei from her birth onward, or view a slide show that chronicles her progress from a tiny unrecognizable lump to a "curious and precocious cub." The Web site has been recently updated to include a short piece about Hua Mei's third birthday, celebrated in August 2002.

2002-01-01

127

Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5galaxies from quiescent galaxies. Our method indicates that the inner stellar mass is the most correlated parameter of quenching, implying that the process that quenches galaxies must also buildup their inner structure. Second, we explore the relationship between galactic bars and their host galaxies with Galaxy Zoo 2 at z˜0. The correlations of bar properties and galaxy properties are consistent with simulations of bar formation and evolution, indicating that bars affect their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate whether bars can drive supermassive black hole growth with data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble at 0.2galaxies to a matched sample of inactive, control galaxies shows that there is no statistically significant excess of bars in active hosts. Our result shows that bars are not the primary fueling mechanism of supermassive black hole growth.

Cheung, Edmond

128

Biodiversity and the lexicon zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecologists and natural resource managers struggle to define and relate biodiversity, biocomplexity, ecological integrity, ecosystem services, and related concepts; to describe effects of disturbance dynamics on biodiversity; and to understand how biodiversity relates to resilience, resistance, and stability of ecosystems and sustainability of resource conditions. Further diversifying this “lexicon zoo” are the ecological roles of rare species and refugia, and

Bruce G. Marcot

2007-01-01

129

Bring the Zoo to You!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hands-on, minds-on zoo project provides a fun and safe opportunity for students to experience the world of animals and nature right in their own classroom. Students have the chance to work individually or in small groups to explore, observe, and discover answers to their questions about the natural world. In addition, it provides numerous…

Wilcox, Dawn Renee; Sterling, Donna R.

2008-01-01

130

Bronx Zoo Fuel Cell Project  

SciTech Connect

A 200 kW Fuel Cell has been installed in the Lion House, Bronx Zoo, NY. The Fuel Cell is a 200 kW phosphoric acid type manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and will provide thermal energy at 725,000 Btu/hr.

Hoang Pham

2007-09-30

131

Forum Commentary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social class has been underresearched in the field of applied linguistics. The central goal of this forum was to stimulate more conversation about social class as it impacts language learning and teaching. In this article, I comment on 3 salient themes that have emerged in the 5 articles: (1) agency and structure in language learning and teaching,…

Kanno, Yasuko

2014-01-01

132

Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Topic in Depth presents the science and research of galaxies. First, the University of Cambridge offers clear, logical descriptions and images of the Milky Way, spiral and elliptical galaxies, clusters, and dark matter of the Universe (1). Users can also find educational tutorials on many other cosmology topics. Next, the Space Telescope Science Institute's "Galaxies Galore, Games and More is a learning module designed to allow elementary students to use their observational skills, recognize patterns, and learn how galaxies are classified" (2). Through the fun, interactive materials, students can learn about spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies. The third website, developed by NASA, introduces students to Seyfert Galaxies, quasars, and blazars (3). Visitors can find cool facts about the topic, quizzes, an advanced-level article on galaxies and pulsars, and additional resources. Next, Professor Bill Keel at Leiden University and the University of Alabama supplies graduate level virtual lectures on the topic of extragalactic astronomy (4). While the website is only updated to the most recent class he taught (Spring of 2003), the wealth of high-quality information offered on topics such as star formation, environmental effects on galaxies, and galaxy interactions and mergers makes it worth the visit. The fifth website, produced by the Jodrell Bank Observatory, is "an electronic publication dedicated to the observations and theory of active galaxies" (5). The newsletter promotes new papers, conferences, dissertations, employment opportunities, and more. Sixth, the Science Museum of Virginia educates users about the differences among galaxies through a series of images and clear text (6). Visitors can view images collected by the Hubble telescope and can test their skills at classifying galaxies. The seventh website, produced by National Academy of Engineering member Edward Barlow, presents concepts of general relativity and the new developments and tools used to study galaxies and other cosmological phenomena (7). The complex materials offer great examples of how models are used to help scientists understand facets of the universe. Lastly, Wikipedia offers concise explanations of the characteristics of galaxies, their history, and etymology (8). Throughout the text, visitors can find links to more information on the concepts discussed.

133

Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]?5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

2012-02-01

134

The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

2002

135

Molecular Expressions: The Silicon Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although most of us will never examine a computer chip under a microscope, computer engineers are showing their creative side by hiding silicon artwork in a chip's layout. The Silicon Zoo has a collection of highly-magnified images that showcase the designer's talent, and each image is accompanied by an interesting, and often humorous, explanation. The silicon doodles have many different themes, ranging from cartoon characters to King Arthur's sword. Two Java tutorials are also on the Web site: the first describes how engineers create their "creatures," while the second explains how computer chips are searched to find them. There are many interesting sections of The Silicon Zoo, so be sure to explore! This site is also reviewed in the March 15, 2002 NSDL Math, Engineering, and Technology Report.

2002-01-01

136

How Zoos Are Meeting the Challenges Facing Biodiversity: Bristol Zoo Gardens as a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As ideas about effective conservation of biodiversity develop, zoos are adapting their roles to meet the new challenges. This article considers these changes, using the work of Bristol and other UK zoos as a case study. The significance of zoos in both global and local conservation of biodiversity, their role in promoting public engagement and…

Garrett, Simon

2010-01-01

137

The HI absorption 'Zoo'  

E-print Network

We present an analysis of the HI absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S_1.4 GHz > 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). HI absorption is detected in 32 galaxies, showing a broad variety of widths, shapes and kinematical properties. We characterize the HI spectra of the individual detections using the busy function (Westmeier et al. 2014). With the goal of identifying different morphological structures of HI, we study the kinematical and radio source properties of the detections as function of their width. Narrow lines (FWHM = 500 km/s). These detections are good candidates for being HI outflows. The detection rate of HI outflows is 5 percent in the total radio AGN sample. This fraction represents a lower limit, however it could suggests that, if outflows are a characteristic phenomenon of all radio sources, they would have a short depletion timescale compared to the lifetime of the AGN. Blueshifted and broad/asymmetric lines are more often present among young...

Gereb, K; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A

2014-01-01

138

Development Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An electronic venue for "dialogue and knowledge sharing" among international development community members, the World Bank's Development Forum includes ongoing Development Dialogues, or discussion groups, geared to share "high-value information" on key development issues. Each dialogue is open to the public but varies in content, format, and duration. Currently, dialogues on violence against women, rural communications in Africa, foreign direct investment, and social capital are active, with archives maintained at the Join the Discussion page. Complete registration is available online. Note: the World Bank invites the public to join the following upcoming dialogues by February 1, 1999: Knowledge and Information for Development (IKD), Gender and Law (GENDER-LAW), Les Consequences de la Maternite Precoce sur l'Education des Filles en Afrique (EDUC-FILLES), and Attacking Poverty (WDR2001), the first public forum on the World Development Report for 2000/02.

1998-01-01

139

Zoo and Wildlife Libraries: An International Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conservation and well-being of exotic animals is core to the mission of zoos, aquariums and many small nonprofit wildlife groups. Increasingly, these organizations are committed to scientific research, both basic and applied. To ascertain the current state of the libraries that support their efforts, librarians at the San Diego Zoo conducted…

Coates, Linda L.; Tierney, Kaitlyn Rose

2010-01-01

140

[Medical treatment of dystocia in zoo animals].  

PubMed

Kasuistics of Zoo animals with dystocia (Anoa, Giraffe, Snow goat, Scimitar horned Antelope, Bactrian camel, Tiger, Diana monkey) treated with special pharmaceuticals (glukokortikoids, cienbuterol, denaverine, carbetocin) and distance injections by blow darts are introduced. These procedures are described as very effective and save methods of obstetrics especially in Zoo animals. PMID:11155524

Eulenberger, K

2000-12-01

141

Zoos, Aquariums, and Expanding Students' Data Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoo and aquarium educators are increasingly providing educationally rigorous programs that connect their animal collections with curriculum standards in mathematics as well as science. Partnering with zoos and aquariums is a powerful way for teachers to provide students with more opportunities to observe, collect, and analyze scientific data. This…

Mokros, Jan; Wright, Tracey

2009-01-01

142

San Francisco's New Zoo's Connections for Conservation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides information on a redevelopment project at the San Francisco Zoo known as the New Zoo. The explicit goal of the project is to inspire a sense of caring and appreciation for wildlife that is the foundation of a conservation ethic. (DDR)

Routman, Emily

2001-01-01

143

DVD Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The DVD Forum, an association of companies that contributes to the development of the technology, has information for both users of DVD products and those interested in their evolution. There are a few frequently asked questions lists on the site, which mainly explain the basics of DVDs, contrast them with CDs, and describe the differences between various DVD formats. Some technical specifications are also provided on the site for people in industry. For instance, the "Guideline of Transmission and Control for DVD-Video/Audio through IEEE1394 Bus" can be freely downloaded, as well as general recommendations for DVD video, audio, and production.

1998-01-01

144

parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --A new species of zoo  

E-print Network

], Vincennes Zoo or simply the zoo. LOCAtION The Zoological Park of Paris is an urban zoo located in the Bois of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy. The Museum manages two other animal parks: the Ménagerie (zoo IN THE WORLD TO HAVE BEEN ENTIRELY REBUILT A MOSAIC OF DIFFERENT LANDSCAPES, STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN NATURE

145

Zoo: A tool for traffic analysis and characterization User manual  

E-print Network

Zoo: A tool for traffic analysis and characterization User manual Nicolas LARRIEU, Philippe Introduction This paper introduces the Zoo tool that has been designed in the French Metropolis project, explaining why Zoo speaks French; we will soon teach Zoo how to speak English. More technically speaking

Owezarski, Philippe

146

parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --une nouvelle espce de zoo  

E-print Network

parczoologiquedeparis.fr -- 1 -- une nouvelle espèce de zoo PARC ZOOLOGIQUE DE PARIS Dossier de presse #12;-- 2 -- parczoologiquedeparis.fr SOmmAIRE NOm Parc Zoologique de Paris ou le zoo de Vincennes ou tout simplement le zoo. SItUAtION le Parc Zoologique de Paris est un zoo urbain, il est situé au

147

Moon Zoo: Educating side-by-side with Doing Science (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon Zoo citizen science project (http://www.moonzoo.org) engages individuals - primarily members of the public - in identifying geological (and sometimes technological) features on the lunar surface. Using a flash-based interface that runs in a web browser, users can mark craters, linear features, and even left-behind lunar landers on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images. These science tools are embedded in an environment designed to encourage learning and collaboration. On the main Moon Zoo site users can explore educational content, including video tutorials, articles, glossary terms, and flash interactive activities. Additionally, there is a blog and a forum to encourage collaboration and social learning, and a twitter feed for general communications. Through this suite of software Moon Zoo users can contribute to science while learning about the Moon and geology. The Moon Zoo educational content is designed with one purpose in mind: To make sure that a curious user can find information quickly, easily, and on (or within 1-click of) the Moon Zoo site. The Internet is filled with many excellent lunar educational products, and many high-quality digital products exist in offline archives. Finding desired resources, however, can sometimes be a challenge even for professional educators. In order to make finding content easier, we developed a glossary list and a basic concept map for our website that addresses geology, lunar exploration, observing, and the moon in history and culture, and then we populated these terms and concepts with already available materials. We also do things in a way that encourages both doing science tasks and learning at the same time! Specifically, we use pop-out audio and video players that allow users to listen, learn, and classify the lunar surface all at once. To try and understand our users better we are conducting both learning and motivations studies while also monitoring site usage. Our learning assessments use an assessment tool designed by Sebastien Cormier and Ed Prather. At the time of this writing, data collection is still in progress. We are asking users with a variety of different experience levels within Moon Zoo to answer concept questions to assess if we can measure a higher conceptual knowledge in people who have spent more time in Moon Zoo and see change over time in individual users. We are also doing interview-based grounded theory investigations into what motivates people to come to Moon Zoo and to continue using the site. Preliminary results of the investigations will be presented, along with user behaviors, and other website statistics-based research. This work is funded through NASA ROSES grant NNX09AD34G and NSF grant DRL-0917608.

Gay, P. L.; Moon Zoo Team

2010-12-01

148

Dermatophytosis in zoo macropods: a questionnaire study.  

PubMed

Limited published data are available on dermatophytosis in zoo macropods, despite anecdotal reports of disease occurrence and recurrent mob outbreaks. The aim of this questionnaire study was to analyze data from Australian and international zoos to evaluate estimated disease prevalence in zoos housing macropods, affected macropod species, causative organisms, predisposing factors, clinical presentations, diagnostics, treatments, and disease risk management. Two questionnaires (initial detailed and subsequent brief) were distributed via email to zoo veterinarians, with an estimated response rate of 23%. The overall estimated disease prevalence from responding zoos was 28%, with 73% of responding Australian zoos and 14% of responding non-Australian zoos reporting disease. The first cases of confirmed and suspected dermatophytosis in several macropod species and in association with Trichophyton verrucosum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. nodulare are reported, with young red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) appearing predisposed. Diagnosis was most commonly based on fungal culture or presumptively on typical clinical signs of minimally/nonpruritic alopecia, crusting, and scaling distributed most frequently on the tail, pinnae, and hind limbs. Both disease resolution without treatment and resolution after an average of 1 to 2 mo of treatment were reported. PMID:24063082

Boulton, Katie Alyce; Vogelnest, Linda Jean; Vogelnest, Larry

2013-09-01

149

Educational PedagogyForum  

E-print Network

Innovative Instructor The Center for Educational Resources c e r Pedagogy PedagogyForum Forum What categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful strategies for teaching excellence Technology Forum Information about emerging technologies, who is using them, and why you should know Best Practice

Gray, Jeffrey J.

150

Moon Zoo: a Citizen Science Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Moon Zoo is a citizen science project that utilises internet crowd-sourcing techniques. Moon Zoo users are asked to review images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)[1] spacecraft and perform tasks such as measuring impact crater sizes and identifying morphologically interesting features. The tasks are designed to address issues in lunar science and to aid future exploration of the Moon. In addition to its potential in delivering high quality science outputs, Moon Zoo is also an important educator resource, providing information about the geology of the Moon and geophysical processes in the inner solar system.

Bugiolacchi, R.; Crawford, I. A.; Joy, K. H.

2013-09-01

151

The effect of use of visitor facilities in zoos on duration and intensity of zoo visits  

E-print Network

THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS QN DURATION AND INTENSII'Y OF ZOO VISITS A I'hesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May I979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS ON DURATION AND INTENSITY OF ZOO VISITS A Thesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Shughart, Melinda Joy

2012-06-07

152

Efficiently Sorting Zoo-Mesh Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the SXMPVO algorithm for performing a visibility ordering zoo-meshed polyhedra. The algorithm runs in practice in linear time and the visibility ordering which it produces is exact.

Cook, R; Max, N; Silva, C; Williams, P

2001-03-26

153

Quantitative analysis of spirality in elliptical galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use an automated galaxy morphology analysis method to quantitatively measure the spirality of galaxies classified manually as elliptical. The data set used for the analysis consists of 60,518 galaxy images with redshift obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and classified manually by Galaxy Zoo, as well as the RC3 and NA10 catalogues. We measure the spirality of the galaxies by using the Ganalyzer method, which transforms the galaxy image to its radial intensity plot to detect galaxy spirality that is in many cases difficult to notice by manual observation of the raw galaxy image. Experimental results using manually classified elliptical and S0 galaxies with redshift <0.3 suggest that galaxies classified manually as elliptical and S0 exhibit a nonzero signal for the spirality. These results suggest that the human eye observing the raw galaxy image might not always be the most effective way of detecting spirality and curves in the arms of galaxies.

Dojcsak, Levente; Shamir, Lior

2014-04-01

154

Zoo theater's influence on affect and cognition: a case study from the Central Park Zoo in New York.  

PubMed

Zoo theater is used by zoos as a means to influence visitor feelings and knowledge gain about wildlife and environmental themes. This study examined whether and to what extent zoo theater fulfilled these aims by investigating its impact on affect and cognition. The study consisted of an in-depth case study at the Central Park Zoo in New York, a location that has one of the most diverse zoo theater programs in the United States. Using a multimethod approach the study explored many facets of the Central Park Zoo's extensive zoo theater program. These included performances at a main stage, at exhibits, and in the children's zoo. The study found that the extent of zoo theater's influence on affect and cognition is dependent on a combination of a variety of characteristics that include the length of a performance, audience participation, the level of structure of a performance, the presence of song and dance elements, and the scale of the productions. PMID:19821505

Penn, Laura

2009-09-01

155

Zoo veneers: Animals and ethnic crafts at the san Diego zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author critically examines the juxtaposition of ethnic craft souvenirs with animals at the San Diego Zoo. The deployment of symbolic representations of animals and people at zoos are considered in the specific historical context of San Diego. While animals and people were displayed for tourists at expositions and world's fairs staged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, today visitors

Matthew Morbello

1996-01-01

156

Programmatic Evaluation in Association of Zoos and Aquariums--Accredited Zoos and Aquariums: A Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluation of educational programs in zoos and aquariums is a growing area of interest for researchers and professionals. In this review, the authors examine the literature that focuses on these settings. They then discuss evaluations that have been conducted in institutions accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in relation to…

Khalil, Kathayoon; Ardoin, Nicole

2011-01-01

157

American Venous Forum  

MedlinePLUS

... venous disorders Find a vein doctor American Venous Forum 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100 Milwaukee, WI ... 3349 E: info@veinforum.org © 2014 American Venous Forum. Contact Us | Legal/Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | ...

158

Football Forum Key Themes Alumni Forum  

E-print Network

Football Forum Key Themes Alumni Forum October 15, 2007; 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm Harris Alumni Center higher revenue generation potential Adding football provides opportunity to change conference affiliation & Community support important, and has high potential considering corporate dollars in community Football

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

159

The Virtual Astronomical Observatory Users Forum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the online forum astrobabel.com, which has the goal of being a gathering place for the collective community intelligence about astronomical computing. The audience for this forum is anyone engaged in the analysis of astronomical or planetary data, whether that data be observational or theoretical. It is a free, community driven site where discussions are formulated primarily around the "question and answer" format. Current topics on the forum range from “Is there a photometry package in Python?” to “Where are the support forums for astronomy software packages?” and “Why is my SDSS SkyQuery query missing galaxies?” The poster will detail the full scope of discussions in the forum, and provide some basic guidelines for ensuring high quality forum posts. We will highlight the ways astronomers can discover and participate in discussions. Further, we view this as an excellent opportunity to gather feedback and feature requests from AAS221 attendees. Acknowledgement: The Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is managed by the VAO, LLC, a non-profit company established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. The VAO is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Muench, August A.; Emery Bunn, S.; Astronomical Observatory, Virtual

2013-01-01

160

Representing the Zoo World and the Trac World  

E-print Network

Representing the Zoo World and the TraÃ?c World in the Language of the Causal Calculator Varol Akman of that language. The Zoo World and the TraÃ?c World have been proposed by Erik Sandewall in his Logic Modelling ] . The two test domains discussed in this paper, the Zoo World and the TraÃ?c World, have been proposed

Lifschitz, Vladimir

161

At the Zoo: Kindergartners Reinvent a Dramatic Play Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a South Dakota early childhood program, children and adults in the kindergarten classroom collaborated to build a "classroom zoo" in support of the children's pretend play. Creation of the zoo incorporated information about animals and zoos that the children and their families and teachers located in secondary sources such as nonfiction books…

Bowne, Mary; Brokmeier, Sue

2008-01-01

162

The Risk of Delivering Disturbing Messages to Zoo Family Audiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the roles of the modern zoo is to provide environmental education. Zoo visitation comprises primarily family groups seeking to spend time together. There is potential for tension between message and audience expectation as zoos seek to raise awareness of the effects of irresponsible human behavior on the environment. This may unsettle…

Esson, Maggie; Moss, Andrew

2013-01-01

163

Zoo Biology 27:470487 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 27:470­487 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE Mutual Benefits of Research Collaborations Between Zoos and Academic Institutions Eduardo J. Fernandez,� and William Timberlake� Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana Zoos focus on welfare, conservation

Timberlake, William D.

164

Assessment of Change in Conservation Attitudes through Zoo Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in fall 2010 and subjects were students' ages 14-18 who either participated in a formal conservation education class led by zoo educators or in a field trip in which they were engaged in free-choice learning. Two research questions were: 1) Does a trip to the zoo affect conservation attitudes and…

Randall, Teresa

2011-01-01

165

Zoo Biology 0:113 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 0:1­13 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE Urinary Corticosteroid Excretion Patterns in the Okapi and Naida Loskutoff3 1 Dallas Zoo, Dallas, Texas 2 Department of Psychology and Nebraska Behavioral Biology's Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska Stress is known to alter a variety of biological processes, including

French, Jeffrey A.

166

Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl  

E-print Network

Highlights Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl Bicycle Safety Daily Activities! First, we will drive to Jacksonville zoo to see animals! Then, we're going to the beach to swim and see Zoo and Beach are now SOLD OUT. If you want to go, see Nate to sign up in case other students can't go

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

167

Math in a Zoo Math in the Wild Gary Flewelling  

E-print Network

199 Math in a Zoo Math in the Wild Gary Flewelling Independent Consultant flew these two games and the significance of these differences. I do this by comparing a trip to a zoo. These two learning games differ in ways similar to the ways that a trip to a zoo differs from a trip

Spagnolo, Filippo

168

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum/96-0810R2 Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum/96-0810R2 ************************************************************************ Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text

Jain, Raj

169

Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

Klasson, KT

2003-04-07

170

World Urban Forum III  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are forums on many topics, ranging from animal husbandry to the latest trends in fashion technology, but there is only one forum sponsored by the United Nations that draws such a tremendously diverse mix of practitioners, politicians, and pundits: the World Urban Forum. In its third edition, the Forum and its participants have descended upon Vancouver, and this website brings together materials they are working on during their time at this third meeting. Visitors can learn about the governing bodies that oversee the Forum’s operations, read speeches and statements from those speaking at the event, and also learn about a related event, the World Youth Forum. Visitors with specific interests in various aspects of urbanism will want to look over their “Programmes” area, which contains specific information about the Forum’s initiatives, including land tenure, housing policies, and urban economic development.

2006-01-01

171

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum/96-0180 Title: Scope For ATM Forum's Performance Benchmarking Work Item  

E-print Network

******************************************************************* ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum Forum's Performance Benchmarking Work Item ******************************************************************* Abstract: This contribution discusses the scope of the ATM Forum's test working group. It also presents

Jain, Raj

172

A horizon scan for species conservation by zoos and aquariums.  

PubMed

We conducted the first horizon scan for zoos and aquariums to identify the 10 most important emerging issues for species conservation. This involved input from more than 100 experts from both the wider conservation community and the world zoo and aquarium community. Some of the issues are globally important: diseases, zoonoses, and biosecurity issues; new (communication) technologies; global water shortage and food insecurity; developing economies and markets for wildlife consumption; changes in wildlife population dynamics; and political instability and conflicts. Other issues are more specific to zoos and aquariums: need for extractive reserves; space shortage in zoos and aquariums; need for metapopulation management; and demand for caring of more species in zoos and aquariums. We also identified some broad approaches to these issues. Addressing the emerging issues identified in our horizon scan will further increase the contribution of the world zoo and aquarium community to global biodiversity conservation. Zoo Biol. 33:375-380, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:25065560

Gusset, Markus; Fa, John E; Sutherland, William J

2014-09-01

173

Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.  

PubMed

In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation. PMID:19598253

Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

2010-01-01

174

Visitor interest in zoo animals and the implications for collection planning and zoo education programmes.  

PubMed

As zoos have sought to further their conservation missions, they have become powerful providers of environmental education. Outside of "formal" education initiatives, such as those designed for school and other organized groups, or structured public talks programmes, much of the learning potential that the zoo has to offer is around the viewing of animals and the response of visitors to them. In this, zoo learning is a very personal construct, develops from the previous knowledge, and experiences and motivations of each individual. In this article, we make the assertion that learning potential, although difficult to quantify, is very much related to the attractiveness of animal species and the interest that visitors show in them. Using standard behaviorist measures of attraction and interest (the proportion of visitors that stop and for how long), we analyzed the relative interest in 40 zoo species held in a modern UK zoo and the variables that are significant in predicting that popularity. Further to this, the suggestion is made that the zoo collection planning process could use such information to make more informed decisions about which species should be housed for their educational value. Taxonomic grouping was found to be the most significant predictor of visitor interest--that is, visitors were far more interested in mammals than any other group--although body size (length), increasing animal activity and whether the species was the primary or "flagship" species in an exhibit or not, were all found to have a significant bearing on visitor interest. PMID:20333734

Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

2010-01-01

175

Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

Ward, Kristin

176

Zoo/Aquarium Libraries: A Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the unique features of zoo/aquarium libraries--their history, users, staff, collections and services, access, location, budget, networking and cooperation--and discusses problems they have in common with other special libraries. Increased cooperation and communication as major goals for the future are noted. (8 references)…

Kenyon, Kay A.

1984-01-01

177

Zoo Animal Feeding: A Natural History Viewpoint  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to formulate animal feeding programs, zoos traditionally borrow knowledge and techniques, developed for domesticated animals, from livestock industry. Although livestock industry provides some of the basic components of feeding it is aimed at economic gain from animals, and the number of species it covers is extremely small. Moreover, wild animals are forced to make considerable adjustments to captivity

Ken Kawata

2008-01-01

178

LLW Forum meeting report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01

179

World Economic Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

World Economic Forum is a nonprofit organization dedicated to "economic growth and social progress." The forum is located in Geneva, Switzerland, and its members include those in business, politics, and the academic world. The World Economic Forum Website contains a variety of information about the Forum as well as information about global economics. Latest news is highlighted, with reports from several recent economic summits including photographs and Webcasts. A menu at the top left corner of the site directs users to the rest of the site, including resources about regional networks, reports and publications, and centers and projects.

180

Forum: A Multiple-Conclusion  

E-print Network

Forum: A Multiple] provides some primitives for concurrency but lacks abstraction mechanisms. In this paper we present Forum. To illustrate the new expressive strengths of Forum, we specify in it a sequent calculus proof system

Miller, Dale

181

BIOSPECIMEN BEST PRACTICES FORUM  

Cancer.gov

BIOSPECIMEN BEST BIOSPECIMEN BEST PRACTICES FORUM PRACTICES FORUM Overview of Ethical, Legal, and Policy Overview of Ethical, Legal, and Policy Best Practices Best Practices June 18, 2007 June 18, 2007 Karen Smith Thiel, Ph.D., J.D. Karen Smith Thiel,

182

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-0882 Title: Rate Based Schemes: Mistakes to Avoid  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-0882 ************************************************************************ Title: Rate ************************************************************************ Distribution: ATM Forum Technical Working Group Members (Traffic Management

Jain, Raj

183

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-0988 Title: Simulation Results: The EPRCA+ Scheme  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-0988 ************************************************************************ Title of this contribution at ATM Forum is sponsored by NIST

Jain, Raj

184

Ecological status of soils in Moscow Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quantitative assessment of the status of soils in Moscow Zoo was performed using traditional and original methods based on the differentiated system of indices. The studies were conducted in animal open-air cages and on plots available for visitors. The dynamics of the temperature and water-air regimes in the root-inhabited layer, the density, the acidity, and the salinity of the soils were studied. The level of the biological activity was assessed according to the intensity of the organic matter decomposition and the substrate-induced respiration. In the background of the rather satisfactory status of the soils, negative factors were found: a periodic excess or deficit of moisture and, for the most part, low biological activity (low respiration and decomposition of the lignin-cellulose test material). Recommendations for the improvement of the status of the soil cover in Moscow Zoo are proposed.

Yurkova, N. E.; Yurkov, A. M.; Smagin, A. V.

2009-03-01

185

LES REPRSENTATIONS DE L'EXEMPLE DES ZOOS  

E-print Network

LES REPR�SENTATIONS DE LA NATURE: L'EXEMPLE DES ZOOS Eric Baratay Elisabeth Hardouin-Fugier P artout, les zoos attirent les foules. En 1995, six cent millions de personnes auraient visité les 1100.-même et sur les autres. Le succès vient aussi du fait que les zoos permettent une rencontre particu- lière

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

Managing Soil Science Experiments Using ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionOver the past three years, in collaboration with severaldomain scientists, we have studied the needs of awide range of experimental disciplines, developed solutionsto some of the basic problems in experiment management,and have made significant progress towards implementinga simple Desktop Experiment Management Environment(DEME) called Zoo. Our work has proceeded in a tight loopbetween developing generic experiment management technologythat is implemented in

Yannis E. Ioannidis; Miron Livny; Anastassia Ailamaki; Arvind Ranganathan; Andrew Therber; Maria Yuin; Martha Anderson; John Norman

1997-01-01

187

Cool Cosmos: The Infrared Zoo Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As students tour this online Infrared Zoo, they gather new information about the animals they would not get from a visible light picture. Infrared light shows us the heat radiated by the world around us. By viewing animals with a thermal infrared camera, we can actually see the differences between warm and cold-blooded animals. Infrared also allows us to study how well feathers, fur and blubber insulate animals.

Ipac/caltech, Nasa

2009-09-01

188

Pneumocystis carinii infections in zoo animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Pneumocystis carinii was found to be present in the lungs of twenty-three zoo animals in the Netherlands. The following species were represented: red kangaroo, common tree shrew, Senegal-Galago, Demidoff's-Galago, brown howler monkey, woolly monkey, long-haired spider monkey, white-eared marmoset, chimpanzee, three-toed sloth, palm squirrel, red panda, fennec fox, tree hyrax and large-toothed hyrax.

F. G. Poelma

1975-01-01

189

[Malignant catarrhal fever in zoo ruminants].  

PubMed

An outbreak of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in Indian gauer (Bos gaurus gaurus) and Javan banteng (Bos javanicus javanicus) occurred in the year 1964 and killed almost all animals of the groups of these species kept at the Munich zoo at that time. In the consecutive years at highly irregular intervals cases of the head-and-eye-form of MCF occurred sporadically at the zoo in European and American bison (Bison bonasus, B. bison' bison, B. bison athabascae), elk (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus), Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and again in gaur and banteng. The clinical and pathomorphological observations, including those of prophylactic and tentative treatment are reported. The subspecies of caprinae and alcelaphinae potentionally latently infected with viral agents of MCF kept at the zoo over the reported period are listed. Some details concerning housing, taking care of the animals etc. of the latently infected carriers of the family caprinae and the susceptible species of bovidae and cervidae are also given as far as they are of epidemiological interest. The results of the retrospective analysis and the results of testing paraffin-embedded tissue samples for the presence of ovine herpesvirus-2 (OHV-2)-specific DNA and alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AHV-1)-specific DNA from 1964 up to 1997 are discussed. The negative results for OHV-2-specific DNA suggest that MCF at Munich zoo until 1979 could have been "wildebeest-associated", also because until 1974 blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus taurinus) and until 1983 white-tailed gnu (Connochaetes gnou) were kept. However, positive results for OHV-2-specific DNA in the tissues collected from 1985 onwards, strongly suggest the "sheep-associated" MCF. PMID:9810608

Hänichen, T; Reid, H W; Wiesner, H; Hermanns, W

1998-09-01

190

13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN FOREGROUND. - Connecting Railway, Schuylkill River Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, north of Girard Avenue Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

191

Exploiting the "Doddington Zoo" Effect in Biometric Fusion Arun Ross, Ajita Rattani, Massimo Tistarelli  

E-print Network

Exploiting the "Doddington Zoo" Effect in Biometric Fusion Arun Ross, Ajita Rattani, Massimo classification, known as "Doddington's Zoo", assigns users into several categories labeled as Sheep, Lambs, Goats

Ross, Arun Abraham

192

College of Engineering Research Forum  

E-print Network

College of Engineering Research Forum December 3, 2010 Understanding the Ionosphere from GPS Troposphere CoE Research Forum 2010 #12;Motivation December 3, 2010 3 CoE Research Forum 2010 Space, particularly during stormy periods. Objective December 3, 2010 4 CoE Research Forum 2010 * Proprietary

Su, Xiao

193

Sea Slug Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Australian Museum and maintained by Dr. Bill Rudman, the recently redesigned Sea Slug Forum is an excellent resource for information on nudibranchs and related sea slugs such as bubble-shells, sea hares, and side-gilled slugs. One of the chief features of the site is a lengthy species list that links to lovely photos, brief descriptions, distribution information, and related messages from the site's Forum. The site also offers a sizable collection of short pieces and archived forum messages on a variety of general topics, arranged alphabetically. Users can send their own questions and review messages sent to the site along with Dr. Rudman's replies by date or via a keyword search engine. Additional resources include suggested reading, related annotated links, and information on forum participants.

194

Forum on Organizing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The forum contributors draw on their personal experiences and insights to put forth ideas about how contingent faculty might improve their working conditions through various kinds of alliances. (Contains 1 note.)

Heller, Janet Ruth; Jenkins, Trish; Mechenbier, Mahli Xuan; Moeller, Marie

2011-01-01

195

Visitors or visits? An examination of zoo visitor numbers using the case study of Australia.  

PubMed

Usually cited in reference to the potential reach of zoo education, one of the popular figures for global zoo visitation is that 600 million people visit zoos annually. However, this number needs clarification on two fronts. First, there are many zoo visitors who are not included in the calculation because they visited a zoo that was not included in the count. Second, it does not take into consideration the people visit either the same or different zoos more than once annually. Using data collected from several sources, including zoo visitors themselves, this article focuses on one country--Australia--that contributes 15.6 million to the visitation total, and contends that the correct number of unique annual zoo visitors to Australian zoos is likely to be between 8 and 10 million. However, rather than suggesting an overemphasis on the potential of zoos for educating visitors, having regular repeat visitors represents a distinct advantage for zoos, allowing for progressive education opportunities. PMID:22674839

Smith, Liam

2013-01-01

196

The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

2000-01-01

197

Managing soil science experiments using Zoo (http:\\/\\/www.cs.wisc.edu\\/~ZOO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the needs of a wide range of experimental disciplines, developed solutions to some of the basic problems in experiment management and made significant progress towards implementing a simple desktop experiment management environment (DEME) called Zoo. Our work has proceeded in a tight loop between developing generic experiment management technology that is implemented in a generic tool, installing

Yannis IoannidisS; Miron Livny; Anastassia Ailamaki; Arvind Ranganathan; Andrew Therber; Y. Yuin; Martha Anderson; John Norman

1997-01-01

198

The Role of the Zoo in Environmental Education Today.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses issues related to the role of the zoo in environmental education. Suggests that zoos must learn to interpret their collections (through better enclosure, design, graphics, labels, and guides) to influence attitudes of visitors toward the natural world and to become aware of the community's educational needs. (JN)

Hatley, Jan

1984-01-01

199

Cover | Passenger Pigeons | 1of 4 CINCINNATI ZOO & BOTANICAL GARDEN  

E-print Network

Cover | Passenger Pigeons | 1of 4 CINCINNATI ZOO & BOTANICAL GARDEN It has been 100 years since the last passenger pigeon died. A new exhibit celebrates the species. pullfor caption Martha, the last passenger pigeon, died on September 1, 1914, at the Cincinnati Zoo. #12;COuRTEsy sIEGEL FAmILy Imagine

Liu, X. Shirley

200

Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

2014-01-01

201

Programs for Invasive Research in North American Zoos and Aquariums  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoo-based research in North America is an emerging field, which has progressed from an ad hoc approach in a small number of zoos to a coordinated, integrated network of scientists with recognized research programs in approxi- mately one half of the accredited institutions in North America. The disciplines most active in these programs— veterinary medicine and pathology, nutrition, reproductive biology,

Karen L. Goodrowe

202

Factors Influencing Zoo Visitors' Conservation Attitudes and Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Predicts that Zoo Atlanta visitors who had interactive experience with the zoo's elephant demonstration and bio-fact program would be more likely to actively support elephant conservation than those who simply viewed the animals in their exhibit and read graphics. Uses survey instruments including 25 closed-ended questions, petitions, and…

Swanagan, Jeffrey S.

2000-01-01

203

Conservation and Education: Prominent Themes in Zoo Mission Statements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors examine the mission statements of 136 zoos in the United States that the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) has accredited, and report on the predominant themes of education and conservation in the statements. To explore the relation between these two themes, the authors present a literature review of the roles…

Patrick, Patricia G.; Matthews, Catherine E.; Ayers, David Franklin; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

2007-01-01

204

The "Science" Behind a Successful Field Trip to the Zoo  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field trip to the local zoo is often a staple in many elementary school curricula. Many zoos offer free entry to local teachers and their students. Teachers take students on field trips to enrich the curriculum, make connections to what students are learning in school, and provide students with meaningful learning experiences (Kisiel 2007).…

Scott, Catherine Marie; Matthews, Catherine E.

2011-01-01

205

Zoo School for Preschoolers: Laying the Foundation for Environmental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The traditional approach to education in zoo settings operated under the premise that meaningful learning and improved attitudes toward environmental education would occur by simply exposing children to wild animals. This study was a preliminary evaluation of an innovative environmental education program at a medium-sized Florida zoo. The study…

Pringle, Rose; Hakverdi, Meral; Cronin-Jones, Linda; Johnson, Courtney

206

People's Perceptions of AnimalsThe Influence of Zoo Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven semantic differential scales were developed to assess the effects of contextual setting on peoples' perceptions of animals. The scales were given to subjects viewing slides of eight species of animals in either the wild, naturalistic zoo, or caged zoo environments. A control group, which saw no slides, also rated the animals. The ratings on the semantic differential scales were

Ted Finlay; Lawrence R. James; Terry L. Maple

1988-01-01

207

Extraordinary Animals and Expository Writing: Zoo in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A zoo outreach program led to placing animals in classrooms where those animals became foci for numerous learning activities such as writing, observing, and care. Systematic debriefings suggested uniqueness to learning outcomes connected to zoo animals. Subsequent analysis of student writing indicated that students responded to situational…

Trainin, Guy; Wilson, Kathleen; Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David

2005-01-01

208

Free-Choice Learning at a Metropolitan Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on an inquiry into the use of zoos as a source of informal or free choice learning. The study was contextualized within the zoo's environmental enrichment program - an animal husbandry principle that seeks to develop species-typical behavior for captive animals by using naturalistic enclosures or artificial items that stimulate…

Coll, Richard K.; Tofield, Sara; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

209

Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Indicates that the zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning but that visitors' prime purpose is for entertainment. Concludes that science learning at the zoo is limited for general visitors, but is enhanced for school children by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricular…

Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

2003-01-01

210

Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals in selected zoos in the midwestern United States.  

PubMed

Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of the midwestern United States was determined by using the modified agglutination test (MAT). A titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of T. gondii exposure. Among wild felids, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 6 (27.3%) of 22 cheetahs (Acynonyx jubatus jubatus), 2 of 4 African lynx (Caracal caracal), 1 of 7 clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), 1 of 5 Pallas cats (Otocolobus manul), 12 (54.5%) of 22 African lions (Panthera leo), 1 of 1 jaguar (Panthera onca), 1 of 1 Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), 1 of 1 Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), 5 (27.8%) of 18 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), 1 of 4 fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), 3 of 6 pumas (Puma concolor), 2 of 2 Texas pumas (Puma concolor stanleyana), and 5 (35.7%) of 14 snow leopards (Uncia uncia). Antibodies were found in 10 of 34 feral domestic cats (Felis domesticus) trapped in 3 zoos. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were not found in any of the 78 fecal samples from wild and domestic cats. Among the macropods, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 Dama wallabies (Macropus eugenii), 1 of 1 western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus), 1 of 2 wallaroos (Macropus robustus), 6 of 8 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), 21 (61.8%) of 34 red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), and 1 of 1 dusky pademelon (Thylogale brunii). Among prosimians, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 blue-eyed black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons), 1 of 21 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 2 of 9 red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra), and 2 of 4 black- and white-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata). Among the avian species tested, 2 of 3 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were seropositive. Among 7 possible risk factors, sex, freezing meat temperature (above -13 C vs. below -13 C), washing vegetables thoroughly, frequency of feral cat sightings on zoo grounds (occasionally vs. frequently), frequency of feral cat control programs, capability of feral cats to enter hay/grain barn, and type of animal exhibit, exhibiting animals in open enclosures was the only factor identified as a significant risk (OR 3.22, P = 0.00). PMID:18605803

de Camps, Silvia; Dubey, J P; Saville, W J A

2008-06-01

211

Current husbandry of red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) in zoos.  

PubMed

The endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is held in zoos worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine how red pandas are kept and managed in captivity and to compare it with the management guidelines. Sixty-nine zoos, mainly from Europe but also from North America and Australia/New Zealand, responded to our survey. The results revealed that in general zoos follow the management guidelines for most of the investigated issues. The average enclosure is almost four times larger than the minimum size recommended by the management guidelines, although seven zoos have smaller enclosures. About half the zoos do not follow the guidelines concerning visitor access and number of nest boxes. Other issues that may compromise animal welfare include proximity of neighboring carnivore species and placement of nest boxes. PMID:21182101

Eriksson, P; Zidar, J; White, D; Westander, J; Andersson, M

2010-01-01

212

Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 34(3): 274277, 2003 Copyright 2003 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians  

E-print Network

274 Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 34(3): 274�277, 2003 Copyright 2003 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians PARASITOLOGIC ANALYSES OF THE SIFAKA (PROPITHECUS VERREAUXI VERREAUXI,4,6,11 and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) of Gabon.9 Wild Old World and New World primates harbor a wide range of pro

Muehlenbein, Michael

213

Learning on Zoo Field Trips: The Interaction of the Agendas and Practices of Students, Teachers, and Zoo Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the findings of a case study that investigated the interaction of the agendas and practices of students, teachers, and zoo educators during a class field trip to a zoo. The study reports on findings of the analysis of two case classes of students and their perceptions of their learning experiences during the field trip. The…

Davidson, Susan Kay; Passmore, Cynthia; Anderson, David

2010-01-01

214

“Somethin' Tells Me It's All Happening at the Zoo”: Discourse, Power, and Conservationism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines how certain Western institutional discourses reproduce particular human relationships with nature. The analysis focuses upon the institutional setting of the zoo, examining long-standing multi-voiced debates about zoos and exploring the contemporary zoo's conservation discourses and cultural, lexical, and spatial elements of gaze and power. The author contextualizes zoo discourses within Western ideological environmental dialectics, including those of

Tema Milstein

2009-01-01

215

Call of the Dwindling Wild Returns Zoo Bongos to Home By MARC LACEY  

E-print Network

Call of the Dwindling Wild Returns Zoo Bongos to Home By MARC LACEY Published: February 10, 2004 dozen bongos were shipped from the wilds of Kenya to the staid confines of various American zoos Kingdom in Florida, from the Cape May County Zoo in New Jersey and from zoos in Los Angeles, St. Louis

216

How does the zoo environment affect the behaviour of captive primates?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important for us to be able to understand the behaviour of primates in zoos for at least three reasons: firstly as a means towards ensuring their welfare, secondly to use that understanding to ensure a positive zoo experience for zoo visitors, and thirdly so that results of basic research undertaken on zoo primates can be properly evaluated. Often,

Geoffrey R. Hosey

2005-01-01

217

Zoo Biology 21:14 (2002) 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 21:1­4 (2002) © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. DOI 10.1002/zoo.10023 COMMENTARY Opportunities Lost: Zoos and the Marsupial That Tried To Be a Wolf Chris Wemmer* Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Front Royal, Virginia In the archives of the National Zoo there is a story

218

Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants  

SciTech Connect

The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

Gibson, P.W.

1980-01-01

219

Stanford University: Computer Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Stanford Computer Forum is sponsored by the Industrial Affiliates Program for the Computer Science Department and CS/EE Computer Systems Laboratory. The Forum brings together students, faculty, and industry leaders through events and programs, and offers members "facilitated interaction with faculty, students, and colleagues at other member companies." The website announces upcoming meetings, symposia and job fairs. The Events Archive includes a few short video clips on previous workshops on emerging technologies and future research. The Forum also posts information on the members and their research interests, which fall within the following research areas: BioCompuation, Database, Graphics, Hardware & Architecture, Knowledge Management, Mobile Computing, Networks, Operating Systems & Apps., Robotics, and Security.

220

Blood-feeding ecology of mosquitoes in zoos.  

PubMed

To determine if the unique host assemblages in zoos influence blood-feeding by mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), a sampling programme was conducted in Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos, South Carolina, U.S.A., from April 2009 to October 2010. A total of 4355 female mosquitoes of 14 species were collected, of which 106 individuals of nine species were blood-fed. The most common taxa were Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes triseriatus (Say), Anopheles punctipennis (Say), Culex erraticus (Dyar & Knab), Culex pipiens complex (L.) and Culex restuans (Theobald). Molecular analyses (cytochrome b) of bloodmeals revealed that mosquitoes fed on captive animals, humans and wildlife, and took mixed bloodmeals. Host species included one amphibian, 16 birds, 10 mammals (including humans) and two reptiles. Minimum dispersal distances after feeding on captive hosts ranged from 15.5 m to 327.0 m. Mosquito-host associations generally conformed to previous accounts, indicating that mosquito behaviour inside zoos reflects that outside zoos. However, novel variation in host use, including new, exotic host records, warrants further investigation. Zoos, thus, can be used as experiment environments in which to study mosquito behaviour, and the findings extrapolated to non-zoo areas, while providing medical and veterinary benefits to zoo animals, employees and patrons. PMID:22390304

Tuten, H C; Bridges, W C; Paul, K S; Adler, P H

2012-12-01

221

VoiceXML Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The market for voice-operated applications has steadily grown for several years, and wireless and mobile devices are an added incentive to develop a standard for voice processing. An established standard is VoiceXML, which dates back to 1999. The VoiceXML Forum has introductory tutorials about the standard, and the full specifications can be downloaded (including a draft of version 2.0, published in early 2003). A more recent initiative is the Speech Application Language Tags (SALT) specification. Similar documents and resources can be found at the SALT Forum homepage, as well as links to Webcasts and other items for developers.

222

Space support forum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a report of the discussions held by the Space Support Forum on the subject of education as an investment in the future. The Space Support Forum is a gathering of representatives of various space-related organizations that interact or overlap with the mission of the Space Foundation. They reported that an international science assessment in 17 countries ranked the United States either near or at the bottom in biology, chemistry, and physics. The U.S. Department of Education has laid out 6 National Education Goals to turn this status around and is helping hundreds of communities to work towards these goals, referred to as America 2000.

Posvar, Wesley W.; Laidlaw, Donald A.; Brown, Robert; King, Douglas; Graham, Daniel O.; Strine, Linda; Hopkins, Mark; Mcnair, Carl

1992-01-01

223

Alaska Science Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alaska Science Forum Web site is provided by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The forum consists of articles written about various science subjects by scientists from the Geophysical Institute. Categories include the aurora, earthquakes, fun science facts, historic Alaska, mountains, rocks and geology, volcanoes, weather, and more. One of the latest articles, by Ned Rozell, is titled: Bogs, Permafrost and the Global Carbon Equation. Each of the articles is listed along with the author's name and a direct link to the online publication, most of which are fairly short and geared towards nonscientists making reading easy and interesting. [JAB

224

Sustainable Rangelands Issue Forum  

E-print Network

Sustainable Rangelands Issue Forum Co-Hosted by: Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative Public Lands of Conservation Districts Soil and Water Conservation Society Ecological Society of America Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable #12;Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable John Tanaka, Director Kristie Maczko, Deputy Director http://Sustainable

Wyoming, University of

225

Forestry: Forum summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A synopsis of a forum addressing the use of LANDSAT data in forestry is given. Broad inventory studies, clear-cut monitoring, and insect and disease detection were among the subject areas discussed. Concerns regarding the vailability of data, cloud cover, resolution and classification accuracy, and product format were expressed by foresters.

Whitmore, R.

1981-01-01

226

Residential Energy Conservation Forum  

SciTech Connect

A public forum for homeowners on how to reduce energy usage in the home. Representatives from Long Island Power Authority, Renewable Energy Long Island, and BNL explored alternative energy solutions for the home, analyzing energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and environmental-friendliness. Some of the technologies discussed include solar panels, Energy Star-certified products, and modern wood-burning stoves.

2008-06-26

227

2012 National Leadership Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two key themes emerged from the 2012 National Leadership Forum: Taking Business to School, which was hosted by the Career and Technical Education Foundation at the end of May. The first was that employers are looking for a workforce that is technologically savvy while having leadership and employability skills. The second is that the business…

Magnuson, Peter

2012-01-01

228

Dinner Forum SUMMARY REPORT  

E-print Network

urgently concerned about risk ­ risk management ranks remarkably high on the supply chain agenda as well for the CSCO is to claw back control of elements within the supply chain, rather than risk expanding it everFT CSCO Dinner Forum SUMMARY REPORT The Evolving Role of the Chief Supply Chain Officer 23 April

229

International Forum Speaks  

E-print Network

An International Forum Speaks the Unspoken: Masculinities, Bodies and Body Image The University education among adolescent youth; To foster a more nuanced and complicated understanding of body image: Masculinities, Bodies and Body Image Keynote Speakers: Dr. Michael A. Messner is a Professor of Sociology

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

230

Forum Series: The \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

the National Research Council (NRC) in 2007. In the present issue of the journal, we initiate the latest series of Forum articles which will focus on the promises and conundrums associated with the 'Vision', starting with an article by two members of the National Academies of Science (NAS) committee that developed it over the course of almost three years (Andersen

Michael P. Holsapple; Cynthia A. Afshari; Lois D. Lehman-McKeeman

2008-01-01

231

Exploring the 4d Superconformal Zoo  

E-print Network

We discuss a new constraint for determining the superconformal U(1)_R symmetry of 4d N=1 SCFTs: It is the unique one which locally maximizes a(R) = 3Tr R^3-Tr R. This constraint comes close to proving the conjectured "a-theorem" for N=1 SCFTs. Using this "a-maximization", exact results can now be obtained for previously inaccessible 4d N=1 SCFTs. We apply this method to a rich class of examples: 4d N=1 SQCD with added matter chiral superfields in the adjoint representation. We classify a zoo of SCFTs, finding that Arnold's ADE singularity classification arises in classifying these theories via all possible relevant Landau-Ginzburg superpotentials. We verify that all RG flows are indeed compatible with the "a-theorem" conjecture, a_{IR}

Ken Intriligator; Brian Wecht

2004-02-11

232

American Zoo and Aquarium Association Multi-Institutional Research Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the results of a literature review of the level of conservation-related knowledge, attitudes, affect, and behavior among visitors to zoos and aquariums. Includes some details of the pilot project related to the literature review. (DDR)

Dierking, Lynn D.

2001-01-01

233

Wild Jobs with Wildlife: Jobs in Zoos and Aquariums.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides job descriptions and information for keepers and other animal caretakers at zoos and aquariums. Includes information about skills and training needed, working conditions, employment outlook, and earnings. Includes a list of resources for further information. (JOW)

Crosby, Olivia

2001-01-01

234

20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 87.25. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

235

Lighting retrofits at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Zoo occupies approximately 52 acres in the City`s Highland Park. Thirty structures serve as animal holding facilities, public display buildings, classrooms, food service facilities, offices, warehouses, a veterinary hospital, and gift shops. The cost of energy for heating, cooling, lighting, pumping, food service, etc. is approximately $280,000 a year. Of this, about 79 percent, or $220,000, is spent for electricity. About 20 percent ($44,000) of that electricity cost is spent directly on lighting. In mid-1992 a series of retrofits to the lighting systems in the Zoo`s buildings was begun. These were completed in mid-1994. These improvements cost $127,690, and they are expected to reduce electricity costs by $24,500 a year. The most interesting projects were carried out in the Tropical Forest Building, the Aqua Zoo, and the Niches of the World Building.

Sadowski, E.C. [Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary, PA (United States)

1995-09-01

236

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/97-0609 Title: Patent Declaration  

E-print Network

****************************************************************** ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/97-0609 ****************************************************************** Title: Patent the algorithms covered by the patents which have been discussed in the ATM Forum Traffic Management Technical

Jain, Raj

237

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-1173 Title: Transient Performance of EPRCA and EPRCA++  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/94-1173 ************************************************************************ Title of this contribution at the ATM Forum is sponsored by NIST

Jain, Raj

238

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-972 Title: Parameter Values for Satellite Links.  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-972 ************************************************************************ Title of this contribution at the ATM Forum is sponsored by NIST

Jain, Raj

239

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum/99-0045 Title: Throughput Fairness Index: An Explanation  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM_Forum/99-0045 ************************************************************************ Title of this contribution at the ATM Forum is sponsored by NASA

Jain, Raj

240

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-0177 Title: Tutorial paper on ATM congestion control  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-0177 ************************************************************************ Title ************************************************************************ Abstract: Congestion control mechanisms for ATM networks as selected by the ATM Forum traffic management

Jain, Raj

241

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-467 Title: Simulation Results for ERICA Switch Algorithm  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-467 ************************************************************************ Title of this contribution at the ATM Forum is sponsored by NIST

Jain, Raj

242

Wild and zoo animal interactive management and habitat conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review considers interactive management of wild and zoo populations as a stratesy to support habitat preservation, help\\u000a sustain key endangered species, and hasten the evolution of zoos and aquaria as proactive conservation organizations. Interactive\\u000a management supports key species' subpopulations in an integrated fashion, using their study in nature as a way to understand\\u000a wildlife habitats, ecological processes and conservation

William Conway

1995-01-01

243

Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on an inquiry into the use of zoos as a source of informal or free choice learning. The study was contexualised within the zoo's environmental enrichment programme (an animal husbandry principle that seeks to develop species-typical behaviour for captive animals by using naturalistic enclosures or artificial items that stimulate animal interest). Visitor perceptions and actual use of the zoo were investigated using structured interviews based on an interview protocol that elicited their perspectives of the nature and character of zoo settings including the use of photographs of selected exhibits to induce stimulated recall. These data were triangulated with unobtrusive observation at the same exhibits (Bitgood et al., 1988). The visitors spent little time at a given exhibit, and rated the more naturalistic or enriched exhibits more favourably, but older visitors seemed less concerned with naturalness of exhibits. The zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning for both general visitors and school groups. Both general visitors and school groups reported that the prime purpose of their visit was for entertainment. It appears learning of science at the zoo is limited for general visitors, however, the learning of science for school children is enhanced by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricula links.

Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

2003-01-01

244

Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 39(4): 542547, 2008 Copyright 2008 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians  

E-print Network

Association of Zoo Veterinarians DETERMINATION OF A SEDATIVE PROTOCOL FOR USE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS is becoming an increasing challenge to the veterinarian.7 Electro- encephalogram (EEG) evaluation is desirable

Yandell, Brian S.

245

The global reach of zoos and aquariums in visitor numbers and conservation expenditures.  

PubMed

A survey conducted by the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums, in collaboration with national and regional zoo and aquarium associations, showed that annually more than 700 million people visit zoos and aquariums worldwide and are thus potentially exposed to environmental education. Furthermore, the world zoo and aquarium community reportedly spends about US$ 350 million on wildlife conservation each year. Therefore, the world zoo and aquarium community has the potential to play an important role in both environmental education and wildlife conservation. Systematic reviews are encouraged to provide further evidence for the effectiveness of zoos and aquariums as centers of education and conservation. PMID:21136509

Gusset, Markus; Dick, Gerald

2011-01-01

246

A Cosmic Zoo in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomers often turn their telescopes to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the closest galaxies to our own Milky Way, in their quest to understand the Universe. In this spectacular new image from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, a celestial menagerie of different objects and phenomena in part of the LMC is on display, ranging from vast globular clusters to the remains left by brilliant supernovae explosions. This fascinating observation provides data for a wide variety of research projects unravelling the life and death of stars and the evolution of galaxies. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is only about 160 000 light-years from our own Milky Way - very close on a cosmic scale. This proximity makes it a very important target as it can be studied in far more detail than more distant systems. The LMC lies in the constellation of Dorado (the Swordfish), deep in the southern sky and well placed for observations from ESO's observatories in Chile. It is one of the galaxies forming the Local Group surrounding the Milky Way [1]. Though enormous on a human scale, the LMC is less than one tenth the mass of our home galaxy and spans just 14 000 light-years compared to about 100 000 light-years for the Milky Way. Astronomers refer to it as an irregular dwarf galaxy [2]. Its irregularity, combined with its prominent central bar of stars suggests to astronomers that tidal interactions with the Milky Way and fellow Local Group galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, could have distorted its shape from a classic barred spiral into its modern, more chaotic form. This image is a mosaic of four pictures from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image covers a region of sky more than four times as large as the full Moon. The huge field of view of this camera makes it possible to see a very wide range of objects in the LMC in a single picture, although only a small part of the entire galaxy can be included. Dozens of clusters of young stars can be seen as well as traces of glowing gas clouds. Huge numbers of faint stars fill the image from edge to edge and in the background, more galaxies, far beyond the LMC, are visible. Globular clusters are collections of hundreds of thousands to millions of stars bound by gravity into a roughly spherical shape just a few light-years across. Many clusters orbit the Milky Way and most are ancient, over ten billion years old, and composed mainly of old red stars. The LMC also has globular clusters and one is visible as the fuzzy white oval cluster of stars in the upper right part of the image. This is NGC 1978, an unusually massive globular cluster. Unlike most other globular clusters, NGC 1978 is believed to be just 3.5 billion years old. The presence of this kind of object in the LMC leads astronomers to think that the LMC has a more recent history of active star formation than our own Milky Way. As well as being a vigorous region of star birth, the LMC has also seen many spectacular stellar deaths in the form of brilliant supernova explosions. At the top right of the image, the remnant of one such supernova, a strangely shaped wispy cloud called DEM L 190, often also referred to as N 49, can be seen. This giant cloud of glowing gas is the brightest supernova remnant in the LMC, and is about 30 light-years across. At the centre, where the star once burned, now lies a magnetar, a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. It was only in 1979 that satellites orbiting Earth detected a powerful gamma-ray burst from this object, drawing attention to the extreme properties of this new class of stellar exotica created by supernova explosions. This part of the Large Magellanic Cloud is so packed with star clusters and other objects that astronomers can spend entire careers exploring it. With so much activity, it is easy to see why astronomers are so keen to study the strange creatures in this heavenly zoo. Notes [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Group [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_mor

2010-06-01

247

Inquiry Learning Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Inquiry Learning Forum (ILF) is an online community of K-12 math and science teachers interested in inquiry-based teaching and learning. Materials at the ILF web site include discussions on what inquiry is and why it is useful,and how it connects to local and national educational standards. The ILF library is a collection of lesson ideas and web links suggested by teachers, including inquiry-based lesson plans, activities, and unit ideas, as well as links to online resources from other web sites. Teachers can create their own personal portals with links to ILF and external resources, personal profiles, and a personal journal. There are also discussion forums for teachers; a collaborative group space for sharing ideas; virtual visits to classrooms; and information on professional development activities.

248

The PRIVACY Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Begun in 1992, the PRIVACY Forum is a moderated digest of "the discussion and analysis of issues relating to the general topic of privacy (both personal and collective) in the 'information age'." It is sponsored by the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), internetMCI and Cisco Systems, but they do not influence its content. The digest mailing itself is a once- or twice-weekly publication, and submissions are generally, though not always, signed by the author. The archive includes all of the Privacy Forum's digests as well as various reports, legislative acts, fact sheets and other materials that are topically related. The archive is keyword searchable but results contain no descriptive information--only the volume and number of the issue.

1992-01-01

249

Critical Dance Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Terpsichorean pursuits sometimes get short shrift on arts sites, but this site celebrates all aspects of dance and ballet. CriticalDance is an international non-profit entity established to support all of the dance arts, and their site includes forums, photo galleries, external links, and articles culled from their magazine. First-time visitors may want to start by looking through the online "Ballet-Dance" magazine, where they can read both the current issue, and issues dating back to July 2003. Here they will be delighted to find pieces on British choreography, reviews of recent performances, and information about upcoming dance performances and conferences. Moving on, visitors should also browse through the photo galleries and take a dip into the online forums where they can feel free to ask questions about all aspects of dance.

250

Young physicists' forum  

SciTech Connect

The Young Physicists' Forum was an opportunity for the younger members of the particle-physics community to gather at Snowmass 2001 and to study and debate major issues that face the field over the next twenty years. Discussions were organized around three major topics: outreach and education, the impact of globalization, and building a robust and balanced field. We report on the results of these discussions, as presented on July 17, 2001.

T. Adams et al.

2001-11-02

251

Notre Dame Euthanasia Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Euthanasia and palliative care are issues requiring community empathy, concern and careful consideration, as was demonstrated at a recent forum held at The University of Notre Dame Australia's Fremantle Campus.\\u000aOrganised by the Notre Dame Centre for Faith, Ethics and Society and attracting over 100 community members, key speakers, LJ Goody Bioethics Centre Director, Rev Dr Joseph Parkinson, Francis Burt

Andrea Barnard

2010-01-01

252

Dark web forums portal: Searching and analyzing jihadist forums  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the advent of Web 2.0, the Web is acting as a platform which enables end-user content generation. As a major type of social media in Web 2.0, Web forums facilitate intensive interactions among participants. International Jihadist groups often use Web forums to promote violence and distribute propaganda materials. These Dark Web forums are heterogeneous and widely distributed. Therefore, how

Yulei Zhang; Shuo Zeng; Li Fan; Yan Dang; Catherine A. Larson; Hsinchun Chen

2009-01-01

253

Page 1 of 1 Fish Tagging Forum  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 1 AGENDA Fish Tagging Forum Northwest Power and Conservation Council Meeting:30 Opening Remarks Forum Manager, Forum Chair, and Participants will share their perspectives and expectations related to the Fish Tagging Forum. BREAK 10:45 to 11:15 Forum Ground Rules, Participation

254

PedagogyForum What this is  

E-print Network

Pedagogy PedagogyForum Forum Innovative Instructor The What this is The Innovative Instructor Cheryl Wagner · (410) 516-7181 Forum categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful them, and why you should know Best Practice Forum "How To"workshops on using technologies and applying

Gray, Jeffrey J.

255

Best Practice BestPracticeForum  

E-print Network

Best Practice BestPracticeForum Forum Center for Educational Resources c e r Innovative Instructor@jhu.edu Forum categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful strategies for teaching excellence Practice Forum "How To"workshops on using technologies and applying innovative instructional methods

Gray, Jeffrey J.

256

Best Practice BestPracticeForum  

E-print Network

Best Practice BestPracticeForum Forum Center for Educational Resources c e r Innovative Instructor-7181 Forum categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful strategies for teaching excellence Practice Forum "How To"workshops on using technologies and applying innovative instructional methods Making

Gray, Jeffrey J.

257

Best Practice BestPracticeForum  

E-print Network

Best Practice BestPracticeForum Forum Center for Educational Resources c e r Innovative Instructor-7181 Forum categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful strategies for teaching excellence Practice Forum "How To"workshops on using technologies and applying innovative instructional methods

Gray, Jeffrey J.

258

Best Practice BestPracticeForum  

E-print Network

Best Practice BestPracticeForum Forum Center for Educational Resources c e r Innovative Instructor@jhu.edu Forum categories Pedagogy Forum Hopkins professors share successful strategies for teaching excellence Practice Forum "How To"workshops on using technologies and applying innovative instructional methods To the

Gray, Jeffrey J.

259

Agricultural Outlook Forum '98: USDA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Department of Agriculture organized Agricultural Outlook Forum '98 to provide "up-to-date assessment of farm and commodity prospects and major economic developments in agriculture." The topics covered in the forum include agricultural and trade prospects, new frontiers for agriculture, food safety, economic opportunities for small farms, risk management, trade barriers, biotechnology, marketing organic food products, conservation, international marketing, price indexes and transportation. Selected speeches from the forum are now available for downloading.

260

Automatic morphological classification of galaxy images  

PubMed Central

We describe an image analysis supervised learning algorithm that can automatically classify galaxy images. The algorithm is first trained using a manually classified images of elliptical, spiral, and edge-on galaxies. A large set of image features is extracted from each image, and the most informative features are selected using Fisher scores. Test images can then be classified using a simple Weighted Nearest Neighbor rule such that the Fisher scores are used as the feature weights. Experimental results show that galaxy images from Galaxy Zoo can be classified automatically to spiral, elliptical and edge-on galaxies with accuracy of ~90% compared to classifications carried out by the author. Full compilable source code of the algorithm is available for free download, and its general-purpose nature makes it suitable for other uses that involve automatic image analysis of celestial objects. PMID:20161594

Shamir, Lior

2009-01-01

261

Cosmic Collisions: Galaxy Mergers and Evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the years evidence has mounted for a significant mode of galaxy evolution via mergers. This process links gas-rich, spiral galaxies; starbursting galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); post-starburst galaxies; and gas-poor, elliptical galaxies, as objects representing different phases of major galaxy mergers. The post-starburst phase is particularly interesting because nearly every galaxy that evolves from star-forming to quiescent must pass through it. In essence, this phase is a sort of galaxy evolution “bottleneck” that indicates that a galaxy is actively evolving through important physical transitions. In this talk I will present the results from the ‘Galaxy Zoo Quench’ project - using post-starburst galaxies to place observational constraints on the role of mergers and AGN activity in quenching star formation. `Quench’ is the first fully collaborative research project with Zooniverse citizen scientists online; engaging the public in all phases of research, from classification to data analysis and discussion to writing the article and submission to a refereed journal.

Trouille, Laura; Willett, Kyle; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Christopher; Whyte, Laura; Lynn, Stuart; Tremonti, Christina A.

2014-08-01

262

Glanders outbreak at Tehran Zoo, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives In December 2010 four, lions and one tiger died at the Tehran zoo. Out of all samples, Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of Glanders) was isolated just from ulcer sample of the tiger which was imported to Iran from Russia. Materials and Methods One nasal swab from a tiger and fifteen blood samples with anticoagulant belonging to one tiger and fourteen lions (four dead lions and eleven live lions) were collected and were inoculated directly onto the selective media. The isolate was identified by morphological and biochemical and API BBL tests and PCR using specific primers (Bma- IS407-flip). The standard (Razi Type Culture Collection RTCC: 2375) and tiger isolates were inoculated into 2 guinea pigs. All residue solipeds and carnivores were checked by Malleination test and Complement Fixation (CF) Test respectively. Results One isolate of B. mallei was isolated from tiger's nasal swab. Both of B.mallei strains were recovered from inoculated animals. All of solipeds were negative by malleination test, however, 11 lions including 4 dead and 7 live lions out of 14 lions were positive in CF test for Glanders and all were put down by the authorities. Conclusion Active surveillance of Glanders is essential for solipeds, especially it's more important while being used to feed valuable carnivores like lions and tigers. Therefore, a reliable test like malleination must be carried out twice (first before transferring and one month after quarantine). Both test results should be negative for use for feeding. PMID:22783454

Khaki, P; Mosavari, N; Khajeh, Nasiri S; Emam, M; Ahouran, M; Hashemi, S; Taheri, Mohammad M; Jahanpeyma, D; Nikkhah, S

2012-01-01

263

working as a veterinarian in a farming community training animals at a zoo  

E-print Network

Picture Yourself working as a veterinarian in a farming community training animals at a zoo working-Veterinary Club and assist in community activities involving animals, such as volunteering at the zoo, attending

Holland, Kim N.

264

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Winter 2000 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 16, No. 4 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Alaska Natives, page 4 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE � An examination of victimization of Alaska Natives

Pantaleone, Jim

265

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Fall 1999 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 16, No. 3 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see DWI Alaska 338 95.5 % Other (14 states) 16 4.5 Missing data 46 Table 2. Characteristics of DWI Arrestees

Pantaleone, Jim

266

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Fall 1998 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 15, No. 3 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Inmate in 1997 (page 2). An examination of probation revocation and ethnicity in Alaska (page 3). Current

Pantaleone, Jim

267

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Winter 2001 UNIVERSITY OFALASKAANCHORAGE Vol. 17, No. 4 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Circle in Alaska (page 2). � Justice Center paralegal students participate in service learning project (page 4

Pantaleone, Jim

268

SYNERGIA Forum Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management  

E-print Network

2nd SYNERGIA Forum «Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management: Recycling and Energy.00 Delegates' Arrival Registration 09.30 Welcome by *Dimitris Tasios Forum Chairman & President and Discussion Chair: Dimitris Tasios, Forum Chairman & President, Scientific Committee Emeritus Professor

Columbia University

269

SUMMARY OF CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING FORUM  

E-print Network

SUMMARY OF CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING FORUM DAVIS, CA, DECEMBER 16-17, 2013 Geoff Morrison ......................................................................................................................................................3 Key Forum Insights of the California Climate Policy Modeling (CCPM) forum, including: Louise Bedsworth (California Governor's Office

California at Davis, University of

270

Mobile Manufacturers Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Mobile Manufacturer's Forum, an international association of several leading "radio communications equipment manufacturers." Its purpose is to inform the general public about health policies and standards regarding radio frequency (RF) energy emitted by mobile phones and base stations. There are several documents and press releases that can be accessed on the Web site. One in particular, called the Health Policy Update, outlines the research findings of government agencies and independent organizations. These include recommendations for safe design and use, and assessments of health risks associated with cellular phones and other RF devices. An overview of mobile phone technology is also presented.

1998-01-01

271

The Role of Zoos and Aquariums in Education for a Sustainable Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Zoos and aquariums today consider education to be a central role. The vision of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (2005, p. 35) is that "Zoos and aquariums with their unique resource of live animals, their expertise, and their links to field conservation will be recognized as leaders and mentors in formal and informal education for…

Packer, Jan; Ballantyne, Roy

2010-01-01

272

The Influence of an Interactive Educational Approach on Visitors' Learning in a Swiss Zoo  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new but costly approach to providing visitors of zoos with information on conservation is the presentation of small exhibits by zoo professionals or volunteers. At these "touch tables" visitors can find out about the biology, ecology, and conservation of animals kept in the zoo. We studied the effect of a touch table on visitors' learning in a…

Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Kamer, Tobias

2005-01-01

273

The changing face of zoos: centres for conservation or a panacea in an age of extinction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoos and wildlife parks are generally perceived as centres for conservation, a vital component in the fight against species extinction, but how, and how effectively, do such institutions achieve this aim? A review of several of the world's most prominent zoos (San Diego, Bronx, Great Plains, London, and Melbourne Zoos) reveals a common set of conservation oriented goals such as

Jo Banks

274

Family leisure, family photography and zoos: exploring the emotional geographies of families  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we explore the significance of the zoo as a place for family leisure and the emotional work of sustaining a positive family life. Zoos are understood as culturally laden places, widely identified as locations for family-friendly leisure and as stages for practicing family and then capturing and memorializing this behavior in and through family photographs. Zoo family

Bonnie C. Hallman; S. Mary P. Benbow; P. Benbow

2007-01-01

275

The international transportation of zoo animals: conserving biological diversity and protecting animal welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Issues pertaining to the long distance transportation of animals are examined according to the aspirations of the world's zoo community. Guidance comes from the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA), the civil society organisation that provides 'leadership and support for zoos, aquariums and partner organisations of the world in animal care and welfare, conservation of biodiversity, environmental education

Peter Linhart; David B. Adams; Thomas Voracek

276

ModelingVisitor-Exhibit Interaction at Dynamic Zoo and Aquarium Exhibits for  

E-print Network

ModelingVisitor-Exhibit Interaction at Dynamic Zoo and Aquarium Exhibits for Developing Real of Technology b Sonification Lab, Georgia Institute of Technology Abstract. Zoos and aquaria are dynamic, vision impairment Introduction Over 140 million people visit zoos and aquaria each year ensuring

277

Zoo Biology 21:243251 (2002) 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 21:243­251 (2002) © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Notes on the Long-term Transport are discussed. Zoo Biol 21:243­251, 2002. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: physiology; stress; elasmobranch; Accepted December 17, 2001. DOI: 10.1002/zoo.10019 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www

Kajiura, Stephen

278

Zoo Biology 17:481497 (1998) 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.  

E-print Network

Zoo Biology 17:481­497 (1998) © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc. An Improved Method for Estimating Inbreeding is discussed. Zoo Biol 17:481­497, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: endangered species; fitness; lethal. For example, in a classic study, Ralls et al. [1988] exam- ined 40 mammalian zoo pedigrees and found decreased

Kalinowski, Steven T

279

What Free-Ranging Animals Do at the Zoo: A Study of the Behavior and Habitat  

E-print Network

What Free-Ranging Animals Do at the Zoo: A Study of the Behavior and Habitat Use of Opossums (Didelphis virginiana) on the Grounds of the St. Louis Zoo Luke J. Harmon,1n Karen Bauman,2 Matt McCloud,2. Louis, Missouri 2 St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis, Missouri Studies of urban wildlife are important because

Harmon, Luke

280

The Development of Spontaneous Gestures in Zoo-living Gorillas and Sign-taught Gorillas  

E-print Network

The Development of Spontaneous Gestures in Zoo-living Gorillas and Sign-taught Gorillas: From, and in the ges- tures developed by zoo-living gorillas at different ages. There is a progression in all. Introduction Research in recent decades has shown that zoo-living apes create gestures other than the obviously

281

Monkeying Around: Examining the Effects of a Community Zoo on the Science Achievement of Third Graders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the efficacy of a model of integrated science and literacy instruction situated at a community zoo. Three intact cohorts of third grade urban students received instruction via different treatments: inquiry-based instruction at a zoo; inquiry-based instruction at school; and activity-based instruction at a zoo. All three…

Kenny, Heather A.

2010-01-01

282

The Internet Topology Zoo Simon Knight, Hung X. Nguyen, Nickolas Falkner, Rhys Bowden, Matthew Roughan  

E-print Network

1 The Internet Topology Zoo Simon Knight, Hung X. Nguyen, Nickolas Falkner, Rhys Bowden, Matthew,nickolas.falkner,rhys.bowden,matthew.roughan}@adelaide.edu.au www.topology-zoo.org Abstract--The study of network topology has attracted a great deal of attention questions about network structure. The Internet Topology Zoo is a store of network data created from

Roughan, Matthew

283

GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo In het mooie Zuid-Limburg ligt een prachtig dierenpark;  

E-print Network

GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo In het mooie Zuid-Limburg ligt een prachtig dierenpark; GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo. In 2005 opende GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo haar deuren. Het is het eerste dierenpark dat volledig in de 21e eeuw

Franssen, Michael

284

Forum Entreprises 25 novembre 2011  

E-print Network

Forum Entreprises 25 novembre 2011 Le département de mathématiques et le master professionnel « Statistiques, Informatique et Techniques Numériques » organisent un forum pour présenter les débouchés

Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

285

London International Youth Science Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

Auty, Geoff

2010-01-01

286

(Tribology conferences and forums)  

SciTech Connect

The principal meeting attended during this trip was the Japan International Tribology Conference Nagoya 1990. The conference encompassed a wide range of topics, including the tribology of ceramics, the tribology in high-performance automobiles, and many aspects of lubrication technology. Associated forums were also held on the tribology of advanced ceramics, on solid lubrication, and on automotive lubricants. Presentations made during the latter forum discussed anticipated trends in engine development and anticipated improvements in lubricants required for the next generation of engines. In addition to meetings, site visits were made to five industrial organizations to discuss ceramic tribology. Nippon Steel Corporation and Toshiba Corporation are both very active in the ceramic area, Nippon Steel from their interest in research on new materials and Toshiba from both an interest in new materials and in support of their work in electronic devices. Two engine manufacturers were also visited, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. These companies were somewhat reserved in their discussion of progress in the utilization of ceramics in automobile engines.

Yust, C.S.

1990-11-30

287

Science in the 19th-century zoo.  

PubMed

The 19th century saw the advent of the modern zoological garden. The newly founded zoos not only claimed to educate and entertain their audiences, but also to serve science by providing direct access to exotic animals. However, reality did not live up to the promise of such rhetoric. The vast majority of biologists preferred to use dead bodies as the material for their morphological research. Nevertheless, there was still a strong interaction between the zoo and science. In the debate on Darwinism, the apes in the cage played a vital role. PMID:15749152

Hochadel, Oliver

2005-03-01

288

Activities of the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This reports a history and future prospects of the activities by the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan. For growths of academic fields, active communications among students and young scientists are indispensable. Several academic communities in geoinformation fields are established by youths and play important roles of building networks over schools and institutes. The networks are expected to be innovative cooperation after the youths achieve their professions. Although academic communities are getting fixed growth particularly in Japan, youths had gotten little opportunities to make contacts with youths themselves. To promote gotten youth activities among geoinformation fields, in 1998, we started a series of programs that named the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan involving students and young scientists within the annual conferences, Geoinformation Forum Japan. The programs have provided opportunities to do presentation their studies by posters, some events, and motivations to create networks among students and young scientists. From 2009, some members of our activities set additional conference in west area of Japan. Thus our activities are spread within Japan. As a result of these achievements, the number of youth dedicating to the programs keeps growing. From 2009, it's getting international gradually, however, almost all the participants are still Japanese. To keep and expand the network, we are planning to make some nodes with some Asian youth organizations in the field of geoinformation. This paper is concluded with proposals and future prospects on the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan.

Oba, A.; Miyazaki, H.

2012-07-01

289

Wonder how your MSU degree can move you toward a career in a zoo or aquarium? Want to  

E-print Network

Wonder how your MSU degree can move you toward a career in a zoo or aquarium? Want to apply your at Binder Park Zoo in Bat- tle Creek collaborate with MSU Department of Zoology to offer an intensive field per week with zoo professionals. Their mission guides the work efforts of the whole Binder Park Zoo

290

The C. elegans Zonula Occludens Ortholog ZOO-1 Cooperates with the Cadherin-Catenin Complex to Recruit Actin during  

E-print Network

The C. elegans Zonula Occludens Ortholog ZOO-1 Cooperates with the Cadherin-Catenin Complex embryo, we have characterized the sole C. elegans ZO family member, ZOO-1. ZOO-1 localizes proteins HMR- 1/E-cadherin and VAB-9/claudin, but surprisingly, not HMP-1/-catenin or HMP-2/-catenin. zoo-1

Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

291

Musical Instrument Makers Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With links to over 400 pages on acoustic guitar building, violin, dulcimer, flute, recorder, and bagpipe making, brass instrument building and repair, drum making and much, much more this is the site to visit to better understand how musical instruments are made and maintained. The Forum itself hosts a long list of topics which include discussions related to everything from splitting spruce billets to how to alter a violin to better fit a musician's hand to how to use bird's eye maple in guitar building. And as if all of that were not enough the site also provides links to appropriate books, magazines and hosts a tools store section with links to wood turning tools, hand tools and everything else that's needed to keep your fiddle, guitar or flute in tip top shape.

2006-10-17

292

OECD: Global Forums  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the early 21st century, there are a multitude of evolving policy questions that are inherently transnational in scope and breadth, and thus require an ongoing dialogue across various political and organizational boundaries. It is not surprising that one of the international organizations involved in creating a meaningful dialogue and exchange of ideas is the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Its Global Forum program is an excellent way to learn about some of these complex policy questions and programs they are emerging, as the organization addressed such issues as governance, international investment, the knowledge economy, and sustainable development. Within each thematic section, users can view working papers, statistics, and other relevant documents related to each theme. For persons with an interest in these topics, this site will be of great use, and one that is worth returning to several times.

293

Global Policy Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United Nations has a number of policy initiatives occurring in all parts of the globe, and some might ask the question: Who evaluates the effectiveness of such programs? The United Nations does some of this work themselves, but the Global Policy Forum is also intimately concerned with monitoring their programs, along with "promoting accountability of global decisions." Visitors who know what types of material they are looking for will want to search through the headings which include such themes as globalization, international justice, and UN reform. Each one of these sections contains a brief essay on their work, along with a smattering of reports, tables, and charts that highlight their analyses, past and present.

294

Regional Technical Forum 2013 Annual Report  

E-print Network

Regional Technical Forum 2013 Annual Report #12;PAGE 3 > Regional Technical FoRum > 2013 ANNUAL REPORT I'm pleased to present the Regional Technical Forum's 2013 Annual Report, detailing its progress to identify and measure cost-effective energy efficiency in the Pacific Northwest. The forum develops unbiased

295

Regional Technical Forum AND 2012 PROGRESS UPDATE  

E-print Network

Regional Technical Forum AND 2012 PROGRESS UPDATE 2011 Annual Report #12;PAGE 2 > REGIONAL TECHNICAL FORUM > 2011 ANNUAL REPORT In this second annual report, the Regional Technical Forum documents Chair A Brief RTF History The Regional Technical Forum (RTF) was chartered by the Northwest Power

296

Wales Squirrel Forum Terms of Reference  

E-print Network

1 Wales Squirrel Forum Terms of Reference The Wales Squirrel Forum aims to enable effective red squirrel conservation and grey squirrel management in Wales. In doing so, the Forum also aims to co Squirrel Forum · Encourage the conservation and sustainable management of red squirrel populations in Wales

297

Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum  

E-print Network

Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum Performance Benchmarking Specifications af-test-00 May, 1996 #12;af-test-0022.000 Introduction to ATM Forum Test Specifications Page ii ATM Forum Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum Performance Benchmarking Specifications Version 1.0 May, 1996

Jain, Raj

298

Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum  

E-print Network

Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum Performance Benchmarking Testing Specifications May07/17/96 10:21 AMJune, 1996 96-0810R1 #12;96-0810R1af-test-0022.000Introduction to ATM Forum Performance Test ing Specifications Page iiii ATM Forum Technical Committee Introduction to ATM Forum Performance

Jain, Raj

299

Page 1 of 1 Fish Tagging Forum  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 1 AGENDA Fish Tagging Forum Northwest Power and Conservation Council Meeting Forum Manager and Forum Chair will report back to the group on their first briefing on progress questions. LUNCH 1:15 to 3:45 Continued Discussion of Forum Process The State agencies and Nez Perce

300

Beyond Borders: Zoo as Training Location for Wildlife Biologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of institutions such as zoos in global conservation efforts is critical. In addition to serving as informal learning centers for the general public, these institutions are well-positioned to provide training and professional development for the next generation of conservation scientists. And while many organizations traditionally have…

Melber, Leah M.; Bergren, Rachel; Santymire, Rachel

2011-01-01

301

A quantitative microbiological risk assessment for campylobacter in petting zoos.  

PubMed

The significance of petting zoos for transmission of Campylobacter to humans and the effect of interventions were estimated. A stochastic QMRA model simulating a child or adult visiting a Dutch petting zoo was built. The model describes the transmission of Campylobacter in animal feces from the various animal species, fences, and the playground to ingestion by visitors through touching these so-called carriers and subsequently touching their lips. Extensive field and laboratory research was done to fulfill data needs. Fecal contamination on all carriers was measured by swabbing in 10 petting zoos, using Escherichia coli as an indicator. Carrier-hand and hand-lip touching frequencies were estimated by, in total, 13 days of observations of visitors by two observers at two petting zoos. The transmission from carrier to hand and from hand to lip by touching was measured using preapplied cow feces to which E. coli WG5 was added as an indicator. Via a Beta-Poisson dose-response function, the number of Campylobacter cases for the whole of the Netherlands (16 million population) in a year was estimated at 187 and 52 for children and adults, respectively, so 239 in total. This is significantly lower than previous QMRA results on chicken fillet and drinking water consumption. Scenarios of 90% reduction of the contamination (meant to mimic cleaning) of all fences and just goat fences reduces the number of cases by 82% and 75%, respectively. The model can easily be adapted for other fecally transmitted pathogens. PMID:24724585

Evers, Eric G; Berk, Petra A; Horneman, Mijke L; van Leusden, Frans M; de Jonge, Rob

2014-09-01

302

Proceedingsof the Zoo0 IEEE InternationalConferenceon Robotics& Automation  

E-print Network

fields of robotics, the quality of achievement of q biped robot relies on a tight cooperation betweenProceedingsof the Zoo0 IEEE InternationalConferenceon Robotics& Automation San Francisco,CA April 2000 The Anthropomorphic Biped Robot BIP2000 B. Espiau INRIA 655 Avenue de 1'Europe 38330 Montbonnot

303

It's a Zoo out There!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The People Learning Urban Science (PLUS) program creates partnerships and coordinates efforts involving a local zoo, university, and school district, seeking to instill within students a sense of the natural environment. Even though the majority of students live among concrete and metal structures, their eyes and ears can be trained to make…

Gillan, Amy Larrison; Hebert, Terri

2014-01-01

304

Screw the Zoo! Observer Physics Simplifies Nuclear and Particle Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article I present a new set of principles governing fundamental particles, then introduce the new set of primary particles according to the principles and show how they map to the current particle zoo that is based on quark theory. Then I give some examples of particle interactions using modified Feynman diagrams to show how the upgraded notation works.

Douglass A. White

305

School visits to zoos and museums: a missed educational opportunity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies in exhibitions have begun to consider the cognitive content of the ‘dialogue’ between visitor and exhibit designer. Such studies have focused on the leisure visitor and not on organised school visits. The study reported here compares the conversational content of primary school and family visitors at the London Zoo and the Natural History Museum, London. The data show

Sue Dale Tunnicliffe; A. M. Lucas; Jonathan Osborne

1997-01-01

306

The slashdot zoo: mining a social network with negative edges  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyse the corpus of user relationships of the Slash- dot technology news site. The data was collected from the Slashdot Zoo feature where users of the website can tag other users as friends and foes, providing positive and negative en- dorsements. We adapt social network analysis techniques to the problem of negative edge weights. In particular, we con- sider

Jérôme Kunegis; Andreas Lommatzsch; Christian Bauckhage

2009-01-01

307

Lighting retrofits at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary  

SciTech Connect

Energy bills for the Pittsburgh Zoo typically total $280,000 a year, of which about $220,000 are spent on electricity. Until recently, lighting accounted for 20 percent of this electricity use. This translated into an annual cost of $44,000. Recent advances in lighting technology have made it possible to perform lighting retrofits in Zoo facilities that reduce energy costs while also providing improved light quality and better lit and more natural looking exhibits and animal holding areas. Through an investment of $127,690 in these projects from mid-1992 through mid-1994, the Zoo expects to realize an annual savings in electricity costs of $24,500 and further savings from a reduction in maintenance and plant replacement costs. Retrofits to the lighting systems in the Tropical Forest Building, the Aquarium, and the Niches of the World Building were the most interesting and are described in detail. Providing a sufficient amount of ultraviolet light to maintain the health of reptiles was a particular challenge in the Niches of the World Building. Lack of separate meters and additions to the Zoo have made the determination of the actual performance of these retrofit projects impossible. A similar retrofit project at the Pittsburgh Aviary (now the National Aviary) in 1989 through 1990 provides savings figures that should be comparable to those expected at the Zoo, however. This project cost $100,000 and saved $21,008 in electricity costs during the first year of operation. Maintenance costs were reduced by approximately $5000 a year.

Sadowski, E.C.

1995-06-01

308

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center will host the day-long 2014 NCI SBIR Investor Forum on November 13, 2014 at Agilent Technologies, 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, CA 95051.

309

Cover Crops Soil Health Forum  

E-print Network

blinking light, onto Silk Farm Road. 4. Entrance to Center and Sanctuary is on the left. See sign. Cover Crops & Soil Health Forum February 18, 2014 NH Audubon Center 84 Silk Farm Road Concord, NH 03301

New Hampshire, University of

310

Forum on orthophotography: Summary Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Forum on Orthophotography was held on May 15, 1990, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The forum was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Governors' Association, and the National Association of Counties. The purpose of the forum was to expand the understanding and use of orthophoto products among the user community, as well as among those currently considering, or as yet unfamiliar with, the use of these products. It was also intended to provide a forum for assessing requirements for, and interest in, orthophoto products and for the identification and discussion of issues and future needs concerning orthophoto use and coordination. The 1-day forum was organized into three major sessions that focussed on technical aspects, user applications, and management issues. The first session presented a brief background and overview of the technical characteristics of standard and digital orthophotos. The second session included formal presentations by Federal, State, and county government agencies on their current and planned applications of orthophoto products, with particular emphasis on their use within geographic information systems. In the third session, private industry addressed their community's interest, capabilities, and potential role. This session also included a proposal by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service for a national cooperative program for the production of l:12,000-scale orthophotoquad products. In addition to the formal presentations, the forum provided a time for open discussion in which attendees had an opportunity to exchange information and make statements about their needs or other items pertinent to the production and dissemination of orthophoto products. Several agency orthophoto product exhibits and interactive demonstrations were also available throughout the day. This report includes a forum agenda and summaries of the various presentations given by the program participants. The appendixes to the report include a list of forum cosponsoring agencies and cooperating organizations, a summary listing of forum registrants by organizational affiliation, and the forum registration list. Also included in the appendkes is the Higher Resolution Orthophoto Products Survey that was sent to each participant following the forum to assist in the identification of near- and longer-term applications, and the determination of requirements, for higher-resolution orthophoto products.

1990-01-01

311

Ocular oxyspirurosis of primates in zoos: intermediate host, worm morphology, and probable origin of the infection in the Moscow zoo.  

PubMed

Over the last century, only two cases of ocular oxyspirurosis were recorded in primates, both in zoos, and two species were described: in Berlin, Germany, Oxyspirura (O.) conjunctivalis from the lemurid Microcebus murinus, later also found in the lorisid Loris gracilis; in Jacksonville, Florida, O. (O.) youngi from the cercopithecid monkey Erythrocebus patas. In the present case from the Moscow zoo, oxyspirurosis was recorded in several species of Old World lemuriforms and lorisiforms, and some South American monkeys. i) The intermediate host was discovered to be a cockroach, as for O. (O.) mansoni, a parasite of poultry. The complete sequence identity between ITS-1 rDNA from adult nematodes of the primate and that of the larval worms from the vector, Nauphoete cinerea, confirmed their conspecificity. ii) Parasites from Moscow zoo recovered from Nycticebus c. coucang were compared morphologically to those from other zoos. The length and shape of the gubernaculum, used previously as a distinct character, were found to be variable. However, the vulvar bosses arrangement, the distal extremity of left spicule and the position of papillae of the first postcloacal pair showed that the worms in the different samples were not exactly identical and that each set seemed characteristic of a particular zoo. iii) The presence of longitudinal cuticular crests in the infective stage as well as in adult worms was recorded. Together with several other morphological and biological characters (long tail and oesophagus, cockroach vector), this confirmed that Oxyspirura is not closely related to Thelazia, another ocular parasite genus. iv) The disease in the Moscow zoo is thought to have started with Nycticebus pygmaeus imported fromVietnam, thus the suggestion was that Asiatic lorisids were at the origin of the Moscow set of cases. The natural host(s) for the Berlin and Jacksonville cases remain unknown but they are unlikely to be the species found infected in zoos. Consequently the notion of type hosts is artificial and the three agents of oxyspirurosis are provisionally placed in the taxon O. (O.) conjunctivalis. PMID:18225417

Ivanova, E; Spiridonov, S; Bain, O

2007-12-01

312

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/96-1268 Title: MIMO Frame Latency Metric -Revised Definition  

E-print Network

****************************************************************** ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/96-1268 ****************************************************************** Title: MIMO Frame-292-3989, Fax: 614-292-2911, Email: Jain@cse.wustl.edu The presentation of this contribution at ATM Forum

Jain, Raj

313

Radio Galaxies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

Downes, Ann

1986-01-01

314

ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-0179 Title: Simulation Results for the Sample Switch Algorithm  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number: ATM Forum/95-0179 ************************************************************************ Title@ACM.Org The presentation of this contribution at the ATM Forum is sponsored by NIST

Jain, Raj

315

The green highway forum  

SciTech Connect

In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

NONE

2006-07-01

316

Closed sets of correlations: answers from the zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the conditions under which a set of multipartite nonlocal correlations can describe the distributions achievable by distant parties conducting experiments in a consistent universe. Several questions are posed, such as: are all such sets ‘nested’, i.e., contained into one another? Are they discrete or do they form a continuum? How many of them are supraquantum? Are there non-trivial polytopes among them? We answer some of these questions or relate them to established conjectures in complexity theory by introducing a ‘zoo’ of physically consistent sets, which can be characterized efficiently via either linear or semidefinite programming. As a bonus, we use the zoo to derive, for the first time, concrete impossibility results in nonlocality distillation. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

Lang, Ben; Vértesi, Tamás; Navascués, Miguel

2014-10-01

317

Closed sets of correlations: answers from the zoo  

E-print Network

We investigate the conditions under which a set of multipartite nonlocal correlations can describe the distributions achievable by distant parties conducting experiments in a consistent universe. Several questions are posed, such as: are all such sets "nested", i.e., contained into one another? Are they discrete or do they form a continuum? How many of them are supraquantum? Are there non-trivial polytopes among them? We answer some of these questions or relate them with established conjectures in complexity theory by introducing a "zoo" of physically consistent sets which can be characterized efficiently via either linear or semidefinite programming. As a bonus, we use the zoo to derive, for the first time, concrete impossibility results in nonlocality distillation.

Ben Lang; Tamas Vertesi; Miguel Navascues

2014-02-12

318

Paris, le 24 janvier 2013 MNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES  

E-print Network

Paris, le 24 janvier 2013 M�NAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES Après l'épisode neigeux, la Ménagerie rouvre ses portes au public et sonne la fin de la récréation pour les Orangs-outans ! Le zoo a du zoo de Twycross (Angleterre). Infos pratiques Accès par le Jardin des Plantes, 57 rue Cuvier. Ouvert

319

Paris, mai 2014 LA MNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES  

E-print Network

Paris, mai 2014 LA M�NAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES Exposition : les coulisses en bande dessinée Ouverte en 1794, la Ménagerie, zoo historique au coeur de Paris, fête ses 220 ans cette année ! � exposer le travail qu'elle a réalisé lors de son immersion au sein du zoo du Jardin des Plantes pour la

320

Naturally acquired picornavirus infections in primates at the Dhaka zoo.  

PubMed

The conditions in densely populated Bangladesh favor picornavirus transmission, resulting in a high rate of infection in the human population. Data suggest that nonhuman primates (NHP) may play a role in the maintenance and transmission of diverse picornaviruses in Bangladesh. At the Dhaka Zoo, multiple NHP species are caged in close proximity. Their proximity to other species and to humans, both zoo workers and visitors, provides the potential for cross-species transmission. To investigate possible interspecies and intraspecies transmission of picornaviruses among NHP, we collected fecal specimens from nine NHP taxa at the Dhaka Zoo at three time points, August 2007, January 2008, and June 2008. Specimens were screened using real-time PCR for the genera Enterovirus, Parechovirus, and Sapelovirus, and positive samples were typed by VP1 sequencing. Fifty-two picornaviruses comprising 10 distinct serotypes were detected in 83 fecal samples. Four of these serotypes, simian virus 19 (SV19), baboon enterovirus (BaEV), enterovirus 112 (EV112), and EV115, have been solely associated with infection in NHP. EV112, EV115, and SV19 accounted for 88% of all picornaviruses detected. Over 80% of samples from cages housing rhesus macaques, olive baboons, or hamadryas baboons were positive for a picornavirus, while no picornaviruses were detected in samples from capped langurs or vervet monkeys. In contrast to our findings among synanthropic NHP in Bangladesh where 100% of the picornaviruses detected were of human serotypes, in the zoo population, only 15% of picornaviruses detected in NHP were of human origin. Specific serotypes tended to persist over time, suggesting either persistent infection of individuals or cycles of reinfection. PMID:23097447

Oberste, M Steven; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Maher, Kaija; Nix, W Allan; Engel, Gregory A; Begum, Sajeda; Hasan, Kamrul M; Oh, Gunwha; Pallansch, Mark A; Jones-Engel, Lisa

2013-01-01

321

Motivation of Citizen Scientists Participating in Moon Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Moon Zoo is an online citizen science project with the aim of providing detailed crater counts for as much of the Moon's surface as possible. In addition to focusing on craters, volunteers are encouraged to remain vigilant for sightings of atypical features which may lead to new discoveries. Volunteers accomplish these tasks by exploring images captured by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) which has a resolution of 50cm per pixel. To be successful, Moon Zoo needs to attract and retain a large population of citizen scientists. In this study, we examine the factors motivating Moon Zoo participants who invest many hours exploring these images. In this, the first of a two-phased study, we conducted a qualitative analysis using semi-structured interviews as a means of data collection. A stratified sample of participants was used in an attempt to uncover the driving forces behind decisions to participate from a wide-range of participants. Inquiring and probing questions were asked about factors which led volunteers to Moon Zoo as well as reasons which kept them committed to exploring the Moon's surface through this online portal. Responses were then categorized using a grounded theory approach, and frequency distributions are calculated where appropriate. Aggregate results from these interviews are presented here including the demographics of the sample and motivators as per the content analysis. The information gathered from this phase will be used to guide the development of an online survey to further explore volunteers’ motivation based on the presented classification schemes. The survey will then be used to guide future research and development in the area of citizen science in the field of astronomy. These findings will also be useful in charting new boundaries for future research.

Brown, Shanique; Gay, P. L.; Daus, C. S.

2011-01-01

322

Lighting retrofits at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pittsburgh Zoo occupies approximately 52 acres in the City`s Highland Park. Thirty structures serve as animal holding facilities, public display buildings, classrooms, food service facilities, offices, warehouses, a veterinary hospital, and gift shops. The cost of energy for heating, cooling, lighting, pumping, food service, etc. is approximately $280,000 a year. Of this, about 79 percent, or $220,000, is spent

Sadowski

1995-01-01

323

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.03 (96-0810R6) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

********************************************************************************* ATM Forum) ********************************************************************************* Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

324

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.05 (96-0810R8) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

********************************************************************************* ATM Forum) ********************************************************************************* Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

325

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.01 (96-0810R4) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number) ************************************************************************ Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

326

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.02 (96-0810R5) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number) ************************************************************************ Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

327

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.00 (96-0810R3) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number) ************************************************************************ Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

328

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.010 (96-0810R4) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

************************************************************************ ATM Forum Document Number) ************************************************************************ Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

329

ATM Forum Document Number: BTD-TEST-TM-PERF.00.04 (96-0810R7) Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification -Baseline Text  

E-print Network

********************************************************************************* ATM Forum) ********************************************************************************* Title: ATM Forum Performance Testing Specification - Baseline Text far by the ATM Forum Testing Working Group

Jain, Raj

330

Cell-Forum: Collaborative multi-user virtual world applications  

E-print Network

Cell-Forum: Collaborative multi-user virtual world applications Author: S.M. Wolff Project: Cell-Forum ................................................................................... - 6 - 1.3 Cell-Forum Project............................................................ - 19 - 3.1 Cell Forum construction toes

Emmerich, Michael

331

A survey of diabetes prevalence in zoo-housed primates.  

PubMed

In humans, type II diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas is capable of producing insulin but cells do not appropriately respond to insulin with an uptake of glucose. While multiple factors are associated with type II diabetes in humans, a high calorie diet and limited exercise are significant risk factors for the development of this disease. Zoo primates, with relatively high caloric density diets and sedentary lifestyles, may experience similar conditions that could predispose them to the development of diabetes. We surveyed all Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) facilities with primates in their collections to determine the prevalence of diabetes, diagnosis and treatment methods, and treatment outcomes. Nearly 30% of responding institutions reported at least one diabetic primate in their current collection. Although the majority of reported cases were in Old World Monkeys (51%), all major taxonomic groups were represented. Females represented nearly 80% of the diagnosed cases. A wide variety of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment techniques were reported. It is clear from these results diabetes should be considered prominently in decisions relating to diet, weight and activity levels in zoo-housed primates, as well as discussions surrounding animal health and welfare. PMID:22847472

Kuhar, C W; Fuller, G A; Dennis, P M

2013-01-01

332

Intestinal parasites in various animals at a zoo in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal parasites from different groups of mammals housed in a zoological garden in Malaysia. A total of 197 faecal samples were collected randomly from various primates (99), hoofed mammals (70) and feline (28). It was discovered that 89.3% of feline, 54.5% of primates and 45.7% of hoofed mammals were infected with intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasites found in primates were Balantidium coli (19.2%), Cryptosporidium spp. (14.1%), hookworm (10.1%), Trichuris spp. (5.1%), Ascaris (4.0%) and Blastocystis spp. (2.0%). For hoofed mammals, hookworm had the highest prevalence (34.3%) followed by Trichuris spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. (5.7%). Meanwhile, for feline, Toxocara cati was the most prevalent (64.3%), followed by Cryptosporidium spp. (14.3%), Spirometra spp. (7.1%), and hookworm (3.6%). Animals that were infected were all asymptomatic with low parasite load. Routine monitoring of the presence of parasites in animals kept in the zoo is imperative in assisting zoo management in the formulation and implementation of preventive and control measures against the spread of infectious parasitic diseases among animals within the zoo or to humans. PMID:18723289

Lim, Y A L; Ngui, R; Shukri, J; Rohela, M; Mat Naim, H R

2008-10-20

333

Endoparasite Infections in Pet and Zoo Birds in Italy  

PubMed Central

Faecal samples were individually collected from pet (n = 63) and zoo (n = 83) birds representing 14 orders and 63 species. All the samples were examined by faecal flotation technique. In a subgroup of samples (n = 75), molecular assays were also used to detect Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts. Overall, 35.6% of the birds harboured parasites (42.2% of zoo birds and 27% of pet birds), including Strongyles-Capillarids (8.9%), Ascaridia (6.8%), Strongyles (5.5%), G. duodenalis Assemblage A (5.3%), Coccidia (4.1%), Cryptosporidium (4%), Porrocaecum (2.7%), Porrocaecum-Capillarids (2%), and Syngamus-Capillarids (0.7%). The zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A and Cryptosporidium were exclusively found in Psittaciformes, with prevalences of 10.3% and 7.7% within this bird group. Zoo birds were more likely to harbor mixed infections (OR?=?14.81) and symptomatic birds to be parasitized (OR?=?4.72). Clinicians should be aware of the public health implications posed by zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblages and Cryptosporidium species in captive birds. PMID:22536128

Papini, Roberto; Girivetto, Martine; Marangi, Marianna; Mancianti, Francesca; Giangaspero, Annunziata

2012-01-01

334

IT Open Forum April 17, 2014 / ENG 285/287  

E-print Network

IT Open Forum April 17, 2014 / ENG 285/287 #12;2 IT Open Forum, April 17, 2014 Open Forum Q Gen Update ­ John Briar IT Open Forum, April 17, 2014 #12;4 WORKSTATION REFRESH UPDATE Mike Cook IT Open Forum, April 17, 2014 #12;5 IT Open Forum, April 17, 2014 #12;6 Workstation Refresh--Key Dates

Su, Xiao

335

A PERSONALIZED FORUM ENVIRONMENT Anna Stavrianou  

E-print Network

A PERSONALIZED FORUM ENVIRONMENT Anna Stavrianou Laboratoire ERIC, Université Lumière Lyon 2 Department, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, USA magdalini.eirinaki@sjsu.edu Keywords: forum. In this position paper, we discuss the requirements and challenges of Forum Rec- ommender Systems. Such systems aim

Eirinaki, Magdalini

336

Teachers' Online Discussion Forums in Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia has special online discussion forums for teachers as part of its internet website. The study surveys those teachers' online forums and reports the number of participants, number of threads and responses, topics with the highest and lowest posts and the forums role in teachers' professional development and…

Al-Jarf, Reima

2006-01-01

337

The North West People in Research Forum  

E-print Network

The North West People in Research Forum Involving and engaging patients and the public REVISED WITH STAKEHOLDERS: 20/8/10 The NW People in Research Forum: involving and engaging patients and the public Page 2 of 9 1. Introduction This document sets out a plan for a new "North West People in Research Forum

Diggle, Peter J.

338

FORUM RESTAURANT 8am to 11am  

E-print Network

FORUM RESTAURANT Available 8am to 11am Monday ­ Friday Croque Monsieur$8 Double smoked leg ham MEREWETHER BUILDING DARLINGTON ROAD TERRACES DARLINGTON CENTRE AND FORUM RESTAURANT 174 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2008 forum.restaurant@sydney.edu.au 9351 4664 #12;

Viglas, Anastasios

339

Fish Tagging Forum March 22, 2012  

E-print Network

1 Fish Tagging Forum March 22, 2012 Portland, OR Draft Meeting Notes Background The Northwest Power and Conservation Council convened the Fish Tagging Forum (FTF) to address regional fish tagging issues (see July 13 of the Forum's overall Evaluation Framework. The subcommittee reviewed the management questions and indicators

340

Page 1 of 1 Fish Tagging Forum  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 1 AGENDA Fish Tagging Forum Northwest Power and Conservation Council Meeting Date: Monday Question and Indicator Network Diagram, the Forum will explore the value of genetic marking by identifying, the Forum will explore the value of CWT by identifying the theoretical consequences of not investing

341

NOVEMBER 2011 UCL Students' Climate Forum  

E-print Network

NOVEMBER 2011 CONtaCt UCL Students' Climate Forum UCL Laws Bentham House, Endsleigh Gardens London WC1H 0EG Email: uclcop17@gmail.com Blog: http://uclcop17forum.blogspot.com/ twitter: https Deal-Breakers With COP17 commencing on 28 November 2011, UCL Students' Climate Forum takes

Saunders, Mark

342

Executive Forum on Solutions to Transmission Investment  

E-print Network

Executive Forum on Solutions to Transmission Investment Summary of Participant Ideas Power Systems;Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Executive Forum on Solutions to Transmission Investment Grid Forum Held on April 21, 2006 Chicago, IL May 2, 2006 #12;Table of Contents I. Overview

343

Page 1 of 9 Fish Tagging Forum  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 9 Fish Tagging Forum Northwest Power and Conservation Council Wednesday August 29, 2012. These new definitions are: o Required: required by a forum to be done o Funds: entity that funds the work out the action that collects the information. o Interest-Uses: forum that uses the information

344

G20 YOUTH FORUM 2013 PARTICIPATION STATISTICS  

E-print Network

#12;CONTENTS: G20 YOUTH FORUM 2013 PARTICIPATION STATISTICS PARTICIPATING UNIVERSITIES PREVIOUS' DEBATE G20 YOUTH SUMMIT OBSERVERS' PROGRAM PARTICIPATION FEE #12;G20 YOUTH FORUM 2013 (Saint Petersburg, April 17-21) The G20 Youth Forum will be the largest international event organized for young leaders

Takada, Shoji

345

Community Forums: A Boost for the Humanities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest in the humanities is being revitalized at community and junior colleges through community forums and town meetings. The idea of melding the community forum with the humanities was at the heart of a national humanities demonstration program, in which 11 community colleges participated by developing model community forum programs based upon…

Eisenberg, Diane U.

346

Contact: Tina Rolen, Knoxville Zoo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (865) 637-5331 ext. 377 June 30, 2011  

E-print Network

Contact: Tina Rolen, Knoxville Zoo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (865) 637-5331 ext. 377 June 30, 2011, a science educator at the Knoxville Zoo, recently returned after 18 days of assisting scientists surveying

347

Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers\\/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after listening to students' conversations during a field trip to the zoo. In order to

Patricia Patrick; Cathy Mathews; Sue Dale Tunnicliffe

2011-01-01

348

Giraffe Killing at Copenhagen Zoo Sparks Global Outrage1 A healthy male giraffe was euthanized because its genes didn't add to the diversity of the zoo population.2  

E-print Network

Giraffe Killing at Copenhagen Zoo Sparks Global Outrage1 A healthy male giraffe was euthanized because its genes didn't add to the diversity of the zoo population.2 by Roff Smith for National-month-old male giraffe5 named Marius was killed with a slaughterhouse bolt gun at the Copenhagen Zoo

South Bohemia, University of

349

North South Forum Boniface Kiteme  

E-print Network

Objectives: 1. transport linkage between Kenya, South Sudan and Ethiopia; 2. dynamic promotion of regionalNorth ­ South Forum Boniface Kiteme CETRAD/NCCR North-South, East Africa Bern, 13 November 2012 for the South #12;Overview and Introduction: Kenyan Scene Why and what type of tertiary education Present

Richner, Heinz

350

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The 2010 Investor Forum connected the strongest and most promising NCI SBIR funded companies with life science investors and strategic partners. The event was a rare opportunity for attendees to get a first look at some of the best emerging companies focused on innovative cancer-related technologies, and to establish new collaborations that will expedite the commercialization of these products.

351

"Fall" Forum Our College is....  

E-print Network

Welcome Everyone #12;"Fall" Forum #12;Our College is.... ....helping animals be responsible #12;Collaboration · Across College & Campus · Shared Facilities · Combined Programs · SAU;Challenges to the Veterinary Profession: · New Veterinary Schools · Tuition/Debt/Loans #12;Vaughn

352

Math Forum: Elementary Problems Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The well known Math Forum (formerly from Swarthmore College, discussed in the October 20, 1995 issue of The Scout Report), has meta-pages specifically for elementary school math teachers. One of the highlights of the Problems and Activities section is Ruth Carver's elementary problem of the week, with an interactive problem and solution archive back to the fall of 1995.

1995-01-01

353

Environments and morphologies of red sequence galaxies with residual star formation in massive clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ˜ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray-selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX near-ultraviolet (NUV) photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by the blue NUV - R colour), regardless of the cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low-density, high-cluster-radius environments. The morphology of these UV-bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light profiles and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV-bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure infalling into the cluster, or high-mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Stott, John P.; Jones, D. Heath

2014-01-01

354

Zoos through the Lens of the IUCN Red List: A Global Metapopulation Approach to Support Conservation Breeding Programs  

PubMed Central

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

Conde, Dalia A.; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K.; Jones, Owen R.

2013-01-01

355

Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs.  

PubMed

Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K; Jones, Owen R

2013-01-01

356

School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences An investigation into factors affecting elephant welfare in UK zoos  

E-print Network

welfare in UK zoos A DEFRA-commissioned study to assess the `Welfare, Housing and Husbandry of Elephants in UK Zoos` identified areas for improvement relating to the continued maintenance of elephants in UK Zoos. A UK Government Directive established the Elephant Welfare Group (EWG) to i) tackle welfare

Evans, Paul

357

An Hourly Variation in Zoo Visitor Interest: Measurement and Significance for Animal Welfare Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A methodological difficulty facing welfare research on nonhuman animals in the zoo is the large number of uncontrolled variables due to variation within and between study sites. Zoo visitors act as uncontrolled variables, with number, density, size, and behavior constantly changing. This is worrisome because previous research linked visitor variables to animal behavioral changes indicative of stress. There are implica-

Gareth Davey

2006-01-01

358

Serologic survey of trichinellosis in wild mammals kept in a Mexico City Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

A serologic survey of Trichinella infection was carried out to determine the prevalence of this parasitosis among wild mammals kept in captivity at the Chapultepec Zoo. This was prompted by the necropsy finding of a heavy Trichinella infection in a Canadian polar bear (Ursus maritimus) that had been kept at the Zoo for more than 11 years. The parasites recovered

L. Yépez-Mulia; C. Arriaga; M. A. Peña; F. Gual; G. Ortega-Pierres

1996-01-01

359

The educational claims of zoos: where do we go from here?  

PubMed

Zoos exude a certain self-confidence regarding their roles as education providers. Indeed, the education outputs of zoos are, at face value, pretty impressive, with most investing in learning opportunities for leisure visitors, education groups and in some cases, as part of their in situ programs. However, these outputs are not necessarily reliable indicators of the educational achievements of zoos. Quantity does not necessarily equate to quality, just as outputs do not necessarily lead to outcomes. Zoo-accreditation organizations such as the AZA and EAZA offer us clear insight into the strategic vision underpinning the education goals for zoo visitors; a heightened appreciation of the value of biodiversity and a connectedness with the natural world. Unsurprisingly, most zoos have educational goals that ally neatly with the vision of their respective accreditation body. Consequently, we are left with fairly narrow, top-down educational goals. This does not necessarily sit well with what we know about the unpredictability of "free choice" learning in environments such as zoos and aquariums, or what is known about public science communication. Research that seeks to explore the impacts of zoo visits often focuses on evaluating performance based on educational goals and the findings are used as a means of providing evidence of institutional achievement. However, any visitor outcome that falls outside of this narrow range could well be missed by the research. In this article, we propose that research that takes unpredictable and unexpected outcomes into account is necessary and overdue. PMID:22674295

Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

2013-01-01

360

Human Interest and Humane Governance in Iraq: Humanitarian War and the Baghdad Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article argues that the story of the Baghdad zoo in the Iraq war and the ‘human interest’ it attracted are important for the analysis of warfare and humanitarian intervention. The activities at the zoo are notable precisely because they provide a specific site through which to analyse the increasing entanglements between war and humanitarianism, and practices associated with civil–military

Alison Howell; Andrew W. Neal

2012-01-01

361

From a Zoo to a Zoology: Descriptive Complexity for Graph Polynomials  

E-print Network

From a Zoo to a Zoology: Descriptive Complexity for Graph Polynomials J.A. Makowsky Department) and the echidna (tachyglossus aculeatus). Zoology is the science 1 It was T. Zaslavsky who suggested the titel "From a zoo to a zoology" for this research program. #12;of comparing and classifying animals

Makowsky, Johann A. "Janos"

362

Competing Natural and Historical Heritage: The Penguin Pool at London Zoo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zoos are complex social representations of the natural world. They are not just about animals but equally about cultural attitudes towards animals. This nature–culture duality poses formidable challenges when it comes to appreciating historical zoo architecture today. Many old animal enclosures are artistic highpoints, but modern standards of animal welfare as well as contemporary visitors’ expectations often make them ill?suited,

Andrew Shapland; David Van Reybrouck

2008-01-01

363

77 FR 43167 - Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Number USCG-2012-0588] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY AGENCY: Coast...as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0588 Safety Zone; Electronic Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY. (a)...

2012-07-24

364

The international transportation of zoo animals: conserving biological diversity and protecting animal welfare.  

PubMed

Issues pertaining to the long distance transportation of animals are examined according to the aspirations of the world's zoo community. Guidance comes from the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA), the civil society organisation that provides 'leadership and support for zoos, aquariums and partner organisations of the world in animal care and welfare, conservation of biodiversity, environmental education and global sustainability'. The authors describe why it is necessary to transport zoo animals over long distances and how animal welfare can be protected during the process. Transportation of animals among zoos is essential for the cooperative breeding programmes undertaken for the ex situ conservation of wildlife with the help of WAZA studbooks. The challenge is to satisfy the entwined ethical imperatives of safeguarding animal welfare and protecting biodiversity. PMID:20405412

Linhart, Peter; Adams, David B; Voracek, Thomas

2008-01-01

365

DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the deepest images to date of the universe, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST), reveals thousands of faint galaxies at the detection limit of present day telescopes. Peering across a large volume of the observable cosmos, Hubble resolves thousands of galaxies from five to twelve billion light-years away. The light from these remote objects has taken billions of years to cross the expanding universe, making these distant galaxies fossil evidence' of events that happened when the universe was one-third its present age. A fraction of the galaxies in this image belong to a cluster located nine billion light-years away. Though the field of view (at the cluster's distance) is only two million light-years across, it contains a multitude of fragmentary objects. (By comparison, the two million light-years between our Milky Way galaxy and its nearest large companion galaxy, in the constellation Andromeda, is essentially empty space!) Very few of the cluster's members are recognizable as normal spiral galaxies (like our Milky Way), although some elongated members might be edge-on disks. Among this zoo of odd galaxies are ``tadpole-like'' objects, disturbed and apparently merging systems dubbed 'train-wrecks,' and a multitude of faint, tiny shards and fragments, dwarf galaxies or possibly an unknown population of objects. However, the cluster also contains red galaxies that resemble mature examples of today's elliptical galaxies. Their red color comes from older stars that must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2. The picture was taken in intervals between May 11 and June 15, 1994 and required an 18-hour long exposure, over 32 orbits of HST, to reveal objects down to 29th magnitude. [bottom right] A close up view of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C324 used to locate the cluster. The galaxy is nine billion light-years away as measured by its spectral redshift (z=1.2), and located in the constellation Serpens. Based on the colors and the statistical distribution of the galaxies in 3C 324's vicinity, astronomers conclude a remote cluster is at the same distance as a radio galaxy. [center right] This pair of elliptical galaxies, seen together with a few fainter companions, is remarkably similar in shape, light distribution, and color to their present day descendants. This Hubble image provides evidence that ellipticals formed remarkably early in the universe. [top right] Some of the objects in this compact tangled group resemble today's spiral galaxies. However, they have irregular shapes and appear disrupted and asymmetric. This might be due to a high frequency of galaxy collisions and close encounters in the early universe. Credit: Mark Dickinson (STScI) and NASA

2002-01-01

366

The Animal Welfare Act and the zoo: A positive approach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Interpretations of the Animal Welfare Act and other regulations governing use of research animals in the United States are changing. Recent amendments to the Act have resulted in the inclusion of more species under the umbrella of regulation. The role of the zoo and wildlife veterinarian should be that of leading his or her institution into a positive endorsement of these regulations and their application. Recent additions to the Code of Federal Regulations spell out the roles of the veterinarian and the Animal Care and Use Committee at an institution.

Olsen, G.H.

1989-01-01

367

Pittsburgh Zoo Tragedy: Why Did African Wild Dogs Attack Boy? "I very much doubt that this was a predatory attack," expert says..  

E-print Network

Pittsburgh Zoo Tragedy: Why Did African Wild Dogs Attack Boy? "I very much doubt fallen into an enclosure at the Pittsburgh Zoo, zoo officials confirmed at a press conference Monday. One of the dogs was shot after it wouldn't leave the boy's body. The others have been quarantined. "The zoo feels

South Bohemia, University of

368

Comparing galaxy populations in compact and loose groups of galaxies. II. Brightest group galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: The properties of the brightest galaxies (BCGs) are studied in both compact and loose groups of galaxies in order to better understand the physical mechanisms influencing galaxy evolution in different environments. Methods: Samples of BCGs are selected in compact and loose groups of galaxies previously identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The following physical properties of the BCGs in compact groups and in sub-samples of loose groups are compared, defined by their mass and total luminosity: absolute magnitude, colour, size, surface brightness, stellar mass, concentration and morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo. The fraction of BCGs classified as red and/or early-type as a function of galaxy luminosity is studied. The fraction of the group's total luminosity contained in the BCG and the difference in luminosity between the BCG and the second-ranked galaxy, are also analysed. Results: Some properties of BCGs in compact and loose groups are comparable. However, BCGs in compact groups are systematically more concentrated and have larger surface brightness than their counterparts in both, high- and low-mass loose groups. The fractions of red and early-type BCGs in compact groups are consistent with those of high-mass loose groups. Comparing BCGs in sub-samples of compact and loose groups selected for their similar luminosities, BCGs in compact groups are found to be, on average, brighter, more massive, larger, redder and more frequently classified as elliptical. In compact groups, the BCG contains a larger fraction of the system's total luminosity and differs more in absolute magnitude from the second-ranked galaxy. Using a simple model, which dry-merges the BCG in loose groups with a random choice among the 2nd, 3rd and 4th-ranked galaxies in the group, and allowing for some star loss in the process, we show that the absolute magnitude distributions of BCGs in compact and loose groups of similar luminosities can be made more alike. Conclusions: BCGs in compact and loose groups are found to be different. Some mechanisms responsible for transforming late-type galaxies into early types, such as mergers, may be more effective within compact groups due to their high densities and small velocity dispersion, which would lead their BCGs along somewhat different evolutionary paths.

Martínez, Héctor J.; Coenda, Valeria; Muriel, Hernán

2013-09-01

369

Interpretive signs designed to trigger naturalist intelligence at two American zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation of interpretive graphics was conducted in 2005 at two mid-sized AZA-accredited zoos, Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida and Knoxville Zoo, Knoxville, Tennessee. The Lowry Park Zoo study investigated signs at a red-tailed hawk and sandhill crane exhibit. Combination signs and wordless signs were more effective helping visitors see animals, increasing holding time, and number of engagements than treatments of no signs, or signs with words only. A second study, at Knoxville Zoo, tested combination and wordless signs in a children's zoo, investigating 31 signs at a 3.5-acre exhibit. Comparisons of visitors seeing the animals/using interactive exhibit elements, holding time, and engagement activities, showed wordless signs were more effective than combination signs. Differences in gender ratio, age, group size, and other demographics were not significant. Visit motivation differed between zoos, with visitors from Lowry Park Zoo more often articulating reason for a visit as wanting to see animals. Visitors at Knoxville Zoo most often said they wanted to spend time with family and friends. Differences in potential for naturalist intelligence were probably related to local practices rather than to innate differences in naturalist intelligence. The number of communities in Florida that regulate pet ownership and provide lawn service could account for the lower number of people who have pets and plants. At both institutions, behaviors supported educational theories. The importance of signs as advanced organizers was shown where signs were removed at the bird exhibit at Lowry Park Zoo, with fewer visitors seeing the animals. Social interaction was noted at both zoos, with intra- and inter-group conversations observed. If naturalist intelligence is necessary to see animals, visitors run a continuum. Some are unable to see animals with signs and assistance from other visitors; others see animals with little difficulty. The importance of honing naturalist intelligence was best stated by a Lowry Park Zoo visitor who commented. "No one has ever shown me how to see animals." The potential for honing naturalist intelligence is the key finding of the study and should be considered as zoos work to connect their visitors with the creatures in their collections.

Bryant, Martha

370

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program hosted the 2012 NCI SBIR Investor Forum on April 18, 2012 in Santa Clara, CA. This year’s meeting brought together nearly 200 SBIR-funded companies, investors, venture capitalists, strategic partners, and business leaders from the biotech and pharmaceutical industries, and featured presentations from 18 top NCI SBIR-funded companies with innovative cancer-related technologies on the brink of commercialization.

371

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum  

Cancer.gov

The event held November 5, 2009 was attended by over 150 leading investors and top pharmaceutical and medical device companies, all strategic partners in the effort to develop and commercialize novel technologies and products to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer. The Forum showcased the top 14 SBIR companies focused on innovative research in cancer-related technologies, selected by strength of research, impact on cancer, product development and market potential.

372

Virtual Forum: Archaeology and Decolonization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this forum, patiently achieved through months of cyber-work, participants Nayanjot Lahiri (India), Nick Shepherd (South\\u000a Africa), Joe Watkins (USA) and Larry Zimmerman (USA), plus the two editors of Arqueología Suramericana, Alejandro Haber (Argentina) and Cristóbal Gnecco (Colombia), discuss the topic of archaeology and decolonization. Nayanjot\\u000a Lahiri teaches archaeology in her capacity as Professor at the Department of History, University

Alejandro Haber; Cristóbal Gnecco

2007-01-01

373

2nd World Water Forum.  

PubMed

The world is facing a water crisis. About one billion people lack access to safe water and three billion to appropriate sanitation. There will probably be two billion extra people on the planet by 2025; so while today's shortages are for fresh water and sanitation, tomorrow's are predicted to be for growing crops. Already, 10% of world food production is drawing down underground water faster than the recharge rates. Water also threatens to cause conflicts between regions--a state of affairs that is expected to worsen as this century progresses. To raise public awareness of these issues and pressurize politicians to act, the World Water Commission (WWC) held a Forum in March 2000 in The Hague. The Forum collected together a huge range of people from governments, non-government organizations (NGOs), workers for the environment and development, private sector water providers, trades unions and scientific institutes. They all discussed a document (World Water Vision: A Water Secure World, referred to as the Vision) drawn up by the WWC as a basis for action. The Forum culminated in a meeting of ministers from over 140 governments. PMID:11037279

Barnaby, W

2000-01-01

374

Influences on visitor behavior at a modern immersive zoo exhibit.  

PubMed

Zoos serve as centers for both research and education. The challenge is to convey messages about their conservation projects while meeting visitor expectations, which often include recreation and entertainment. One way this can be achieved is through the design of immersive exhibits that draw visitors in and engage them with interactive educational elements. Regenstein African Journey (RAJ) opened at Lincoln Park Zoo in 2003 and was designed to take visitors on a simulated safari through Africa. Because visitor experience was a major design goal, we conducted a timing and tracking study to evaluate use of the building and educational components. For a 9-week period in 2003, we tracked 338 visitors to RAJ and recorded continuous data as they moved through the building. Data were collected on handheld computers that provided precise timing data. The median visit was 11.08 min, 41% of which was spent looking at animals and 9% of which was spent engaged with interpretive elements. We found significant differences in the way visitors used signage: those in groups without children spent more of their visit engaged with signage than those with children and visitors who spent more of their visit interacting socially spent less time engaged with signage. By understanding how visitors use the educational opportunities presented to them, we can better meet their expectations and more effectively achieve the goal of conservation education. PMID:19821504

Ross, Stephen R; Gillespie, Katie L

2009-09-01

375

Student perspectives on their school trips to zoos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation aimed to explore students' perspectives on their school trips to informal education sites. In particular, what did students think they learned, what did they want to do, what was fun or boring, and how did their trip relate to classroom activities? The two case studies presented here explore these ideas with 11-12-year olds in New Zealand and their class trips to zoos, in contrasting situations: one is a class in which the teacher thoughtfully and explicitly linked the trip to classroom learning both before and after the trip; the other classroom teacher did not. These differences impacted how students thought about their learning and how they valued the trip. Despite the differences, students had similarities in some of their perspectives, particularly in their focus on social interactions with peers and their desire to see the animals at the zoos. This study concludes with recommendations for informal and classroom educators, especially to find out what students are interested in, give them choices, and connect trips to classroom activities.

Davidson, Susan Kay

376

Unraveling the complexity of the zoo community: identifying the variables related to conservation performance in zoological parks.  

PubMed

Zoological parks make up a highly heterogeneous community. Ranging from small collections at shopping malls to highly developed bioparks, their contribution to conservation is expected to vary enormously. Although several studies have focused on assessing such contribution, the parameters used frequently do not apply when considering more modest zoos. The goals of this study are to determine, within the wide range of zoos, which type tend to fulfill the conservation mission of modern zoos and to identify the variables associated to their conservation performance. We used the requirements demanded by the European Community Zoos Directive 1999/22/EC, relating to the keeping of wild animals in zoological parks, to assess conservation performance in 72% of officially registered Spanish zoos. Sampled zoos were classified into groups according to their common characteristics, and then the variables related to how they met each of the Directive's requirements in the groups were assessed. We found that private zoological parks with large zoological collections, located within metropolitan areas, and members of a zoo association tended to fulfill the requirements. Being a member of a zoo association was the variable that better explained fulfillment of the requirements among the evaluated zoos. Data revealed that zoos not meeting any requirement were few, although those meeting all of them were not frequent. The requirement related to adequate record keeping showed the lowest level of fulfillment. We discuss the implications of our results and propose measures of change in order to promote the contribution of zoos to biodiversity conservation. PMID:21480369

Fàbregas, María C; Guillén-Salazar, Federico; Garcés-Narro, Carlos

2012-01-01

377

Molecular characterization of Blastocystis isolates from zoo animals and their animal-keepers.  

PubMed

Blastocystis is an enteric protist and one of the most frequently reported parasitic infections in humans and a variety of animal hosts. It has also been reported in numerous parasite surveys of animals in zoological gardens and in particular in non-human primate species. PCR-based methods capable of the direct detection of Blastocystis in faeces were used to detect Blastocystis from various hosts, including non-human primates, Australian native fauna, elephants and giraffes, as well as their keepers from a Western Australian zoo. Additional faecal samples were also collected from elephants and giraffes from four other zoos in Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Antwerp (Belgium), Melbourne and Werribee (Australia). Information regarding the general health and lifestyle of the human volunteers were obtained by questionnaire. Overall, 42% and 63% of animals and zoo-keepers sampled from the Western Australian zoo were positive for Blastocystis, respectively. The occurrence of Blastocystis in elephants and giraffes from other cities was similar. This is the first report of Blastocystis found in the elephant, giraffe, quokka, southern hairy nosed wombat and western grey kangaroo. Three novel and what appear to be highly host-specific subtypes (STs) of Blastocystis in the elephant, giraffe and quokka are also described. These findings indicate that further exploration of the genetic diversity of Blastocystis is crucial. Most zoo-keepers at the Perth Zoo were harbouring Blastocystis. Four of these zoo-keeper isolates were identical to the isolates from the southern hairy nosed wombat and five primate species. PMID:20089360

Parkar, Unaiza; Traub, Rebecca J; Vitali, Simone; Elliot, Aileen; Levecke, Bruno; Robertson, Ian; Geurden, Thomas; Steele, Jan; Drake, Bev; Thompson, R C Andrew

2010-04-19

378

The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum.  

PubMed

The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, 9-12 September 2013The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum was attended by a little over 100 participants from pharma, contract research, instrument vendors and academia. The Forum was divided into six broad themes, which included collaborative partnerships between CROs and pharmaceutical companies, technology developments, problem solving, the bioanalytical toolbox, biomarker analysis and regulations in bioanalysis. PMID:24423590

Houghton, Richard

2014-01-01

379

Analyzing Internet Forums: A Practical Guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within Internet forums, members of certain (online) communities discuss matters of concern to the respective groups, with comparatively few social restraints. For radical, extremist, and other ideologically \\

Peter Holtz; Nicole Kronberger; Wolfgang Wagner

2012-01-01

380

Warning signs for suicide in Internet forums.  

PubMed

The presence of 10 warning signs for suicide proposed by the American Association of Suicidology was compared in 215 postings on a suicide forum and 94 postings on a self-injury forum. The suicide forum postings received a higher score on the 10 signs than the self-injury forum postings, and significant differences were found for 6 of the 10 signs: suicidal ideation, purposelessness, trapped, hopelessness, withdrawal, and, in the reverse direction, recklessness. Overall, the findings support the usefulness of the warning signs in identifying suicidal individuals. PMID:23045860

McSwain, Stephanie; Lester, David; Gunn, John F

2012-08-01

381

[Keeping of bears and big cats in the zoo and circus].  

PubMed

The exhibition of bears and big cats in zoo and circus causes regular criticism, justified and unjustified, by people engaged in the prevention of cruelty to animals. Main points of critique are holding conditions, feeding and health status of the animals. The official veterinarian involved in the supervision often needs the cooperation of a specialised zoo veterinarian. In most cases the clinical examination of bears and big cats requires an immobilisation. This article will enter into some of the most common holding problems and diseases of big carnivores in zoo and circus. PMID:11963361

Rietschel, W

2002-03-01

382

78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum On Thursday...convene a forum titled, ``Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation.'' The forum will...into three topic areas: Lithium ion battery design, development, and use;...

2013-03-28

383

10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16 Section 903.16 Energy ...Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a) One or more public comment forums shall be held for major rate...

2011-01-01

384

10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16 Section 903.16 Energy ...Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a) One or more public comment forums shall be held for major rate...

2013-01-01

385

10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16 Section 903.16 Energy ...Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a) One or more public comment forums shall be held for major rate...

2010-01-01

386

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 24  

E-print Network

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 24 Volume XXVI committees along with completing posttenure reviews. Academic technology W SENATE FORUM #12; Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 25 supports our work in all areas. Our

de Lijser, Peter

387

75 FR 39209 - U.S.-China Environmental Industries Forum  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...S.-China Environmental Industries Forum AGENCY: International Trade Administration...S.-China Environmental Industries Forum conference agenda, the development of...S.-China Environmental Industries Forum was created by the JCCT Environment...

2010-07-08

388

10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Public information forums. 903.15 Section 903.15 Energy...Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums. (a) One or more public information forums shall be held for major rate...

2012-01-01

389

10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Public information forums. 903.15 Section 903.15 Energy...Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums. (a) One or more public information forums shall be held for major rate...

2011-01-01

390

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 1  

E-print Network

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 1 Volume XXVI a Location Chris Renne Understanding the Accessible Technology Initiative xtine burrough SENATE FORUM The Senate Forum is a publication of the Academic Senate at California State University, Fullerton

de Lijser, Peter

391

10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16 Section 903.16 Energy ...Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a) One or more public comment forums shall be held for major rate...

2012-01-01

392

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 2  

E-print Network

Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 2 Volume XXVI for students, faculty, staff, and community members. The Academic Senate Executive Committee T SENATE FORUM #12; Senate Forum, Winter 2011, Vol. XXVI (2) Page 3 worked

de Lijser, Peter

393

10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Public information forums. 903.15 Section 903.15 Energy...Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums. (a) One or more public information forums shall be held for major rate...

2013-01-01

394

10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Public information forums. 903.15 Section 903.15 Energy...Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums. (a) One or more public information forums shall be held for major rate...

2010-01-01

395

Scholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum-NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships  

E-print Network

sports journalists, while promoting quality sports journalism education at the collegiate levelScholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum- NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships Scholarship source: NCAA and the Freedom Forum Address: Sports Journalism Scholarship Committee Freedom Forum Scholarships

Karonis, Nicholas T.

396

Galaxy Crash  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides an interactive java applet which allows the user to model galaxy collisions. With this applet the user can study how galaxies collide and merge gravitationally and how the effects of the collision depend on the properties of the galaxies. The user can also recreate collisions between real interacting galaxies observed in the sky. This website also provides background information on galaxies like: interaction dynamics, starbursts, AGN, elliptical galaxies, and minor galactic mergers. There are also lab questions that teachers can use along with the applet and links to helpful resources.

Mihos, Christopher

2007-03-20

397

Online groups and patient forums.  

PubMed

Online mental health support forums are becoming increasingly popular and there is evidence that they are useful: particularly for providing anonymous support and filling information gaps. However, there are also very real concerns about negative outcomes for users. One online mental health service, Big White Wall, manages these risks and supports its members through the provision of 24 hour professional moderation. Comparison of Big White Wall's member population with the population of one London borough shows a diverse user group, but members are more likely to be female, and aged 25 to 34, or unemployed. PMID:25273668

Dosani, Sabina; Harding, Claire; Wilson, Simon

2014-11-01

398

Columbia News Video Forum Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Over the past few years, more and more universities and colleges have created video archives of important and timely conferences, proceedings, scholarly lectures, and have placed them online. Columbia University has created this fine archive that highlights many of these types of events, with many of them featuring the scholars in residence at the school. The video forum archive features thematically bundled commentaries (usually lasting close to one hour) on a variety of topics, such as globalization (featuring Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz), and the 21st century American city, which features Bernard Tschumi and Kenneth Jackson, the noted urban historian.

399

An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning  

E-print Network

Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline...

Shi, Hao

2010-01-01

400

Brookfield Zoo: In Search of The Ways of Knowing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In Search of Ways of Knowing is an online Adventure Trail from the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois. The Adventure Trails each offer an "interactive journey to explore conservation efforts worldwide." Visitors to this Web site -- geared toward kids but fun for anyone -- will find a lively, virtual journey to the village of Epulu in central Africa's Ituri forest. With a choose-your-own-adventure-style educational game format, players hide from a rampaging elephant, snack on beetle grubs, and identify animal sounds in the dark of night. Players also learn about the people and wildlife of the area (with help from your Forest Factbook and the four local kids you meet on the way). Moral of the story: have respect for other ways of knowing. Great graphics and diverse story options make this fun Web site worth a repeat visit.

401

The Expanding Zoo of Calabi-Yau Threefolds  

E-print Network

This is a short review of recent constructions of new Calabi-Yau threefolds with small Hodge numbers and/or non-trivial fundamental group, which are of particular interest for model-building in the context of heterotic string theory. The two main tools are topological transitions and taking quotients by actions of discrete groups. Both of these techniques can produce new manifolds from existing ones, and they have been used to bring many new specimens to the previously sparse corner of the Calabi-Yau zoo where both Hodge numbers are small. Two new manifolds are also obtained here from hyperconifold transitions, including the first example with fundamental group S3, the smallest non-Abelian group.

Rhys Davies

2011-03-16

402

WISE Zoo: Discovering Disks In The WISE Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new WISE Zoo project will scour the data archive from NASA's WISE mission to fill in our knowledge of the distribution of protoplanetary and debris disks among stars of various populations. Using the power of citizen science to perform a robust, well-calibrated search, we stand to increase the pool of known debris disks by ~375, mostly by finding new disk candidates around B6-A6 dwarfs, A-F subgiants, and G-K giants. This new sample will trace the evolution of planetary systems around intermediate-mass stars from their youth through retirement and provide a crucial list of future targets for disk and exoplanet imaging with JWST.

Thaller, Michelle; Kuchner, Marc; Padgett, Deborah; McElwain, Mike; Grady, Carol; Debes, John; Kenyon, Scott; Currie, Thayne; Whyte, Laura; Padget, Ed; Lintott, Chris; Bans, Alissa; Smith, Arfon; Rebull, Luisa; Schawinski, Kevin

2014-01-01

403

Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in South Carolina Zoos  

PubMed Central

Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

Nelder, Mark P.; Swanson, Dustin A.; Adler, Peter H.; Grogan, William L.

2010-01-01

404

Effects of porcine zona pellucida immunocontraceptives in zoo felids.  

PubMed

Methods of contraception are necessary for management of zoo felids; however, the most commonly used contraceptive (melengestrol acetate implant) is associated with serious adverse reactions with long-term use. Porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccines are promising as contraceptives, but their safety in zoo felids has not been tested. pZP vaccine was administered to 27 female felids representing 10 species, including African lion (Panthera leo), Asian leopard (P. pardus), jaguar (P. onca), tiger (P. tigris), snow leopard (P. uncia), cougar (Felis concolor), Siberian lynx (F. lynx), Canada lynx (F. canadensis), serval (F. serval), and bobcat (F. rufus), in 15 facilities. Over 6 wk, each animal received three i.m. injections of 65 microg pZP with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or carbopol as the adjuvant. Behavioral signs of estrus were seen in 14 of the vaccinated felids. An unacceptably high incidence of adverse reactions was seen including injection site swelling, lameness, limb swelling, or abscessation (or all) in five felids after injection with FCA as the initial adjuvant. Adverse behavioral signs, including increased irritability and aggression, were seen in four felids. Six of the felids were assayed for antibodies against pZP during the 12 mo after vaccination; all showed antibody production. Antibody levels appeared to peak 1-4 mo after vaccination began, although elevated antibody levels persisted in two animals for > 12 mo after the first injection. All vaccinated felids were ovariohysterectomized 3-13 mo after vaccination. Folliculogenesis was present in all treated animals, and there was no histopathologic evidence of inflammatory damage to ovaries. Contraceptive efficacy was not specifically evaluated in this study; however, two of the three felids housed with an intact male became pregnant during the study, one of which gave birth to healthy cubs. PMID:15526881

Harrenstien, Lisa A; Munson, Linda; Chassy, Lisa M; Liu, Irwin K M; Kirkpatrick, Jay F

2004-09-01

405

REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE ZOOLOGIA Revta bras. Zoo!., 5 ( 4 ) : 49 1 -5 08 30.XI.1988  

E-print Network

REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE ZOOLOGIA Revta bras. Zoo!., 5 ( 4 ) : 49 1 - 5 08 30.XI.1988 OSTEOLOGIA DO, Instituto de Bioci�ncias, UFRGS . Pesquisadora do CNPq. #12;Revta bras. Zool. A craniometria foi realizada

Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

406

Why Are They Doing That? Animal Investigations at the Local Zoo.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities that link classroom science to real world scientific ventures. Uses field trips to zoos or wildlife centers for in-depth learning experiences that help students observe, investigate, and explore issues in animal science. (SAH)

Melber, Leah M.

2001-01-01

407

Low pathogenic influenza A virus activity at avian interfaces in Ohio zoos, 2006-2009.  

PubMed

This investigation to examine influenza A virus activity in avian species at four Ohio zoos was initiated to better understand the ecology of avian-origin influenza A (AIV) virus in wild aquatic birds and the possibility of spill-over of such viruses into captive zoo birds, both native and foreign species. Virus isolation efforts resulted in the recovery of three low pathogenic (LP) AIV isolates (one H7N3 and two H3N6) from oral-pharyngeal or cloacal swabs collected from over 1000 zoo birds representing 94 species. In addition, 21 LPAIV isolates possessing H3N6, H4N6, or H7N3 subtype combinations were recovered from 627 (3.3%) environmental fecal samples collected from outdoor habitats accessible to zoo and wild birds. Analysis of oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected from free-ranging mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) live-trapped at one zoo in 2007 resulted in the recovery of 164 LPAIV isolates (48% of samples) representing five HA and six NA subtypes and at least nine HA-NA combinations. The high frequency of isolate recovery is undoubtedly due to the capture and holding of wild ducks in a common pen before relocation. Serologic analyses using an agar gel immune diffusion assay detected antibodies to the influenza A virus type-specific antigen in 147 of 1237 (11.9%) zoo bird sera and in 14 of 154 (9%) wild mallard sera. Additional analyses of a limited number of zoo bird sera demonstrated HA- and NA-inhibition activity to 15 HA and nine NA subtypes. The spectrum of HA antibodies indicate antibody diversity of AIV infecting zoo birds; however, the contribution of heterologous cross-reactions and steric interference was not ruled out. This proactive investigation documented that antigenically diverse LPAIVs were active in all three components of the avian zoologic-wild bird interfaces at Ohio zoos (zoo birds, the environment, and wild birds). The resulting baseline data provides insight and justification for preventive medicine strategies for zoo birds. PMID:24283133

Nolting, Jacqueline M; Dennis, Patricia; Long, Lindsey; Holtvoigt, Lauren; Brown, Deniele; King, Mary Jo; Shellbarger, Wynonna; Hanley, Chris; Killian, Mary Lea; Slemons, Richard D

2013-09-01

408

Journal of the Proceedings, School Law Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the speeches given at the 1972 New Jersey School Law Forum. The Forum is held to encourage the research of timely legal issues involving the structure and operation of the New Jersey public schools, to assist the school law practitioner by affording him the opportunity to hear and discuss research and opinion on selected…

New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

409

2009 SREB State Leadership Forum Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Learning-Centered Leadership Program hosted its sixth Annual State Leadership Forum May 7 and 8, 2009, in Atlanta. More than 160 education leaders, district officials and policymakers from 25 states attended the forum to hear from practitioners who are getting results in student learning amidst…

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

410

The Art of Citizenship: Public Issue Forums.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines past and present public issue forums and their role in the United States political system. The first chapter describes traditional forms of the public forum such as town meetings, neighborhood societies, lyceums, university extension programs, and settlement house networks. Analyzed next are the content, organization, and…

Oliver, Leonard P.; Feldmann, Ann, Ed.

411

Discussion Forum for Technical Codes Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

One goal of the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is to provide useful, easy to understand information about the national energy codes. A forum where users could ask for, and receive clarification on these codes and software from other users would allow the Energy codes project to reach and instruct a broader audience for a modest resource cost. The forum

Bryce P. Kaspar; Heather E. Dillon

2006-01-01

412

Northern Ireland Squirrel Forum 24 November 2009  

E-print Network

Northern Ireland Squirrel Forum 24 November 2009 1 Northern Ireland Squirrel Forum 24 November 2009 with a brief history of the NISF. JG mentioned the five red squirrel preferred areas which were highlighted by the 2007 squirrel survey by Carey et al. These research papers indicate there has been a continued

413

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER Winter 2008 paired state judicial systems with Russian courts. The Alaska Justice Forum asked Judge David Mannheimer of the Alaska Court of Appeals and Marla Greenstein, Executive Director of the Commission on Judicial Conduct

Pantaleone, Jim

414

ECEF Research Forum Report, September 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents a record of the content covered at a 2-day research forum on linking research, policy, and practice in vocational education and training (VET) and on school-to-work transitions in Australia. The first half of the document contains the following materials from and about day 1 of the forum: an executive summary; a list of key…

2001

415

IV Nanotechnology International Forum (RUSNANOTECH 2011)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The RUSNANOTECH 2011 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from 26–28 October 2011, in Moscow, Russia. It was the fourth forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology

Anatoly Dvurechenskii; Mikhail Alfimov; Igor Suzdalev; Vyacheslav Osiko; Aleksey Khokhlov; Eduard Son; Konstantin Skryabin; Rem Petrov; Sergey Deev

2012-01-01

416

Sustainability Forum..............2 Finance Roundtable................3  

E-print Network

· Sustainability Forum..............2 · Finance Roundtable................3 · International the "father" of the cybercar concept. AirTAP forum focuses on service, safety, sustainability The 2011 Airport, and sustainability play a role in secur- ing the future of the MAC airports (consisting of Minneapolis-St. Paul

Minnesota, University of

417

European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures ESFRI  

E-print Network

European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures ESFRI Roadmap 2010 StrategyReport onResearchInfrastructures Roadmap 2010 European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures ESFRI March 2011 #12;StrategyReportonResearchInfrastructures Roadmap 2010 #12;3esfriForeword > Strategy Report on Research Infrastructures Dear Ministers, Dear

Horn, David

418

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Registration  

Cancer.gov

Thank you for your interest in the 2014 NCI SBIR Investor Forum. The forum is designed for investors, venture capitalists, and strategic partners including pharmaceutical and device companies, and philanthropic organizations that fund innovative cancer-related technologies. We hope to have the opportunity to see you at the event.

419

AAAS Science & Technology Policy Forum 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To outline notable events of the 31st Annual Science & Technology Policy Forum of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), held in Washington, DC, in April 2006. Design\\/methodology\\/approach –- Gives a brief review of the main features of the conference. Findings – The annual AAAS Policy Forum is the venue for when journalists and the

G. Arthur Mihram

2006-01-01

420

Asynchronous Learning Forums for Business Acculturation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of IT as a facilitator for student collaboration in higher business education has grown rapidly since 2000. Asynchronous discussion forums are used abundantly for collaborative training purposes and for teaching students business-relevant tools for their future careers. This article presents an analysis of the asynchronous discussion forum

Pence, Christine Cope; Wulf, Catharina

2009-01-01

421

Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health  

E-print Network

5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known acknowledges the wisdom of conducting research and expanding knowledge about women's health and sex differences

Kay, Mark A.

422

Your Career as Alumni Student Careers Forum  

E-print Network

10/23/2008 1 Your Career as G l i Alumni Student Careers Forum Earth and Planetary Science Presenter: a Geologist at Bechtel Earth and Planetary Science 325 McCone Hall October 22, 2008 Peter Yen Student Career Forum Earth and Planetary Science Presenter: Andina Project. Earth and Planetary Science

Militzer, Burkhard

423

[Fatal attacks of zoo animals on humans--a case report].  

PubMed

Media reports about fatal work accidents in zoos caused by zoo animals seem to appear in increasing numbers all around the world. In many cases the cause of such an accident can only be clarified by a detailed reconstruction of the event in combination with the autopsy results. This applies particularly in cases where no eyewitnesses were present. This report is about the case of a musk ox that killed its keeper, in which the fatal accident could be completely reconstructed. PMID:18522381

Schalinski, Sarah; Hollmann, Tanja; Tsokos, Michael

2008-01-01

424

Conservation caring: measuring the influence of zoo visitors' connection to wildlife on pro-conservation behaviors.  

PubMed

Zoos in the 21st century are striving to make effective contributions to conservation. Although zoos are extremely popular and host over 600 million visitors worldwide, one challenge zoos face is how to effectively engage visitors and raise awareness and action for conservation. To this end, zoos commonly rely on charismatic megafauna, which have been shown to elicit a connection with zoo visitors. However, little is known about how to measure a connection to a species or how this connection may influence conservation behaviors. This study had two sequential objectives. The first was to develop a scale to measure visitors' connection to a species (Conservation Caring). The second was to investigate the relationship of Conservation Caring to pro-conservation behaviors, following a zoo experience. Pre- (n = 411) and post-visit (n = 452) responses were collected from three sites in order to assess the reliability and validity of a scale to measure Conservation Caring. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between Conservation Caring and pro-conservation behaviors. Conservation Caring was deemed a valid and reliable scale and was a strong predictor of species oriented behaviors (? = 0.62), for example, "adopting" an animal, but a weak predictor for biodiversity oriented behaviors (? = 0.07), for example, supporting sustainability policies. Results support the role zoos can play in fostering a connection to wildlife and stimulating pro-conservation behaviors. Additionally, visitors connected to a wide array of animals. On the basis of these results, zoos may recruit a wider assemblage of species as potential flagships. PMID:23877958

Skibins, Jeffrey C; Powell, Robert B

2013-01-01

425

Forum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a study conducted by Cornelia Yarbrough and Jennifer Whitaker titled "Analysis of Reviewer Comments About Quantitative Manuscripts Accepted by the "Journal of Research in Music Education"." The study aims to analyze reviewers' comments for quantitative manuscripts with regard to the following categories: section discussed…

Sims, Wendy, Ed.

2009-01-01

426

Galaxy Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interacting galaxies are a natural arena for studies of non-equilibrium stellar dynamics, gas dynamics, and thermodynamics. Only galaxy formation itself is as deeply concerned with as many different aspects of dynamics, and the connection between interactions and the formation of galaxies is probably no coincidence. This review discusses tidal interactions, halos and orbit decay, dissipative effects in galaxy interactions, properties of merger remnants, and origins of starbursts.

Barnes, Joshua E.

1999-08-01

427

Galaxy Photometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity asks students to observe the images of three spiral galaxies of different surface brightnesses. Each of the loaded images is active in the sense that you can place a rectangular aperture on them and determine the flux. The flux through the aperture equals the galaxy flux + the sky flux. Hence to determine the galaxy flux you need to put an aperture on the sky background (where there is little or no galaxy light) and measure that.

Department, University O.

2005-06-17

428

The influence of an interactive educational approach on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new but costly approach to providing visitors of zoos with information on conservation is the presentation of small exhibits by zoo professionals or volunteers. At these touch tables visitors can find out about the biology, ecology, and conservation of animals kept in the zoo. We studied the effect of a touch table on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo (Tierpark Goldau) using an experimental approach. For half of each day, visitors could choose to gain information from labels next to the enclosures and posters. In addition, for the other half of the day visitors could also choose to make use of a touch table on the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus). More than 600 visitors participated in the study. Results revealed that the modern approach was successful. Visitors using the touch table knew more about the biology, ecology, and conservation of bearded vultures, both immediately after their visit to the zoo and two months later. It is suggested that more use be made of touch tables in zoos, museums, visitor centers, and other settings for nature education.

Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Kamer, Tobias

2006-03-01

429

Identifying Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students describe the characteristics of different types of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, barred spiral, peculiar, or irregular) in their own words. They also classify galaxies seen in the Hubble Deep Field. This activity includes a student worksheet and background information for the teacher. This is activity two in "The Hidden Lives of Galaxies" information and activity booklet.

430

Galaxy You  

Microsoft Academic Search

Galaxy You uses a 3D environment to display a galaxy in a new way. Zoom out to see the collection of stars as an entire galaxy, and zoom in far enough to see a solar system in whatever way you want to see it, even from on top of a planet or asteroid. It allows for more than just viewing

Cory Lehan; P. L. Gay

2010-01-01

431

Galaxy Transformations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage has descriptions and animations from numerical simulations of colliding galaxies. Normal observation shows interacting galaxies apparently frozen in the midst of billion-year-long collisions. These movies transcend a limited view of time by indicating the past and future of such encounters. The webpage examines interactions between galaxies, paths of different orbits, and theories of structure.

Barnes, Joshua E.

2007-09-21

432

Chromosomal homeologies between human, harbor seal ( Phoca vitulina ) and the putative ancestral carnivore karyotype revealed by Zoo-FISH  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We report on the construction of the first comparative Zoo-FISH map of a marine mammal. Zoo-FISH with DNA probes from a human\\u000a chromosome-specific library to metaphase spreads of the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) disclosed 31 conserved syntenic segments covering the complete autosomal complement and the X chromosome. Comparison with\\u000a Zoo-FISH maps of other species reveals that the harbor seal

Lutz Frönicke; Jutta Müller-Navia; Konstantinos Romanakis; Harry Scherthan

1997-01-01

433

La rouverture du Parc zoologique devrait avoir lieu en avril 2014. Ce sera Le zoo du XXIe sicle .  

E-print Network

Vincennes La réouverture du Parc zoologique devrait avoir lieu en avril 2014. Ce sera « Le zoo du° 2 « Les zoos et la préserva- tion des espèces » vous aura plu. La société des Amis du Muséum vous La Ménagerie, le zoo du Jardin des Plantes, est heureuse de vous faire part de la naissance d

434

E+A galaxies in the SDSS. Stellar population and morphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Galaxies with E+A spectrum have deep Balmer absorption and no H_{?} and [OII] emission. This suggest recent star formation and the lack of ongoing star formation. With an E+A sample from the SDSS DR 7 (Aihara et al. 2011) we study the morphology with Galaxy Zoo 1 data and the star formation history fitting models from Bruzual & Charlot, 2003. We found an underpopulation of spiral and disk like galaxies and an overpopulation of interacting galaxies, the last seems consistent with the scenario where, at low z, the interaction mechanism is responsible for at least part of the E+A galaxies. The star formation history (SFH) fits most of the spectra indicating an increased star formation around 2 Gyr in the past. Additional parameters like dust internal extinction need to be included to improve the fitting.

Leiva, R.; Galaz, G.

2014-10-01

435

Scalable Automated Detection of Spiral Galaxy Arm Segments  

E-print Network

Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment and perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in the segment. The algorithm takes about 1 minute per galaxy, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ~644,000 Sloan objects classified as "galaxy" and large enough to observe some structure. Our algorithm is stable in the sense that the statistics across a large sample of galaxies vary smoothly based on algorithmic parameters, although results for individual galaxies can sometimes vary in a non-smooth but easily understood manner. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by humans via Galaxy Zoo. In addition, we find that pitch angle often varie...

Davis, Darren R

2014-01-01

436

Research Forum Held in Conjunction with the University  

E-print Network

2013 Research Forum Held in Conjunction with the University of Tulsa Student Research Consortium #12;WELCOME Research Forum Thursday, April 4, 2013 #12;2013 OU-TULSA RESEARCH FORUM STEERING COMMITTEE Forum Chair: Julie Miller-Cribbs, PhD School of Social Work Past Chair: Jennifer Hays

Oklahoma, University of

437

Results and Lessons Learned from Nordic Foresight Forum  

E-print Network

Results and Lessons Learned from Nordic Foresight Forum Per Dannemand Andersen Risø ­ DTU Foresight Forum ­ the Need The need for a Nordic Foresight Forum as expressed by a "ministerial civil · And some money for preparing small reports and investigations between the meetings of the forum #12

438

Ford Policy Forum 2002: Exploring the Economics of Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ford Policy Forum is an integral part of the annual symposium of the Forum for the Future of Higher Education. The Forum studies key economic issues likely to influence the quality and performance of colleges and universities. This publication contains the work of the Ford Policy Forum Scholars of 2001 for the annual symposium. In early 1991,…

Devlin, Maureen E., Ed.

439

Sarcocystosis among wild captive and zoo animals in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Sarcocystis sp. infection was investigated in 20 necropsied captive wild mammals and 20 birds in 2 petting zoos in Malaysia. The gross post-mortem lesions in mammals showed marbling of the liver with uniform congestion of the intestine, and for birds, there was atrophy of the sternal muscles with hemorrhage and edema of the lungs in 2 birds. Naked eye examination was used for detection of macroscopic sarcocysts, and muscle squash for microscopic type. Only microscopically visible cysts were detected in 8 animals and species identification was not possible. Histological examination of the sections of infected skeletal muscles showed more than 5 sarcocysts in each specimen. No leukocytic infiltration was seen in affected organs. The shape of the cysts was elongated or circular, and the mean size reached 254 x 24.5 µm and the thickness of the wall up to 2.5 µm. Two stages were recognized in the cysts, the peripheral metrocytes and large numbers of crescent shaped merozoites. Out of 40 animals examined, 3 mammals and 5 birds were positive (20%). The infection rate was 15% and 25% in mammals and birds, respectively. Regarding the organs, the infection rate was 50% in the skeletal muscles followed by tongue and heart (37.5%), diaphragm (25%), and esophagus (12.5%). Further ultrastructural studies are required to identify the species of Sarcocystis that infect captive wild animals and their possible role in zoonosis. PMID:20877499

Latif, Baha; Vellayan, Subramaniam; Omar, Effat; Abdullah, Suliman; Mat Desa, Noryatimah

2010-09-01

440

Sarcocystosis among Wild Captive and Zoo Animals in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Sarcocystis sp. infection was investigated in 20 necropsied captive wild mammals and 20 birds in 2 petting zoos in Malaysia. The gross post-mortem lesions in mammals showed marbling of the liver with uniform congestion of the intestine, and for birds, there was atrophy of the sternal muscles with hemorrhage and edema of the lungs in 2 birds. Naked eye examination was used for detection of macroscopic sarcocysts, and muscle squash for microscopic type. Only microscopically visible cysts were detected in 8 animals and species identification was not possible. Histological examination of the sections of infected skeletal muscles showed more than 5 sarcocysts in each specimen. No leukocytic infiltration was seen in affected organs. The shape of the cysts was elongated or circular, and the mean size reached 254 × 24.5 µm and the thickness of the wall up to 2.5 µm. Two stages were recognized in the cysts, the peripheral metrocytes and large numbers of crescent shaped merozoites. Out of 40 animals examined, 3 mammals and 5 birds were positive (20%). The infection rate was 15% and 25% in mammals and birds, respectively. Regarding the organs, the infection rate was 50% in the skeletal muscles followed by tongue and heart (37.5%), diaphragm (25%), and esophagus (12.5%). Further ultrastructural studies are required to identify the species of Sarcocystis that infect captive wild animals and their possible role in zoonosis. PMID:20877499

Vellayan, Subramaniam; Omar, Effat; Abdullah, Suliman; Mat Desa, Noryatimah

2010-01-01

441

Isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans in Antwerp Zoo's nocturnal house.  

PubMed

Cryptococcosis was diagnosed postmortem in a striped grass mouse (Lemniscomys barbarus) housed in the nocturnal department of Antwerp Zoo. Eight of the remaining mice in the cage were captured. Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the lung of one animal. Two mice had an elevated serum cryptococcal antigen titre. On examination of the pooled faecal samples collected from 17 animal species housed in 23 cages of the nocturnal department, the pathogenic yeast was isolated from the faeces of the striped grass mice and a degu (Octodon degus). Numerous Cr. neoformans colonies were isolated from a tree-trunk, tree-stumps, and decaying wood collected from a hollow tree used to decorate the animals cage. Subsequent examination in four other cages of the nocturnal department revealed that all the sampled tree-trunks were colonized by Cr. neoformans. The fungus was isolated from the air sampled in the cage of the degu. Air samples collected in the public and service corridors remained negative. All the isolated strains were identified as Cr. neoformans var. neoformans serotype A. PMID:15310332

Bauwens, L; Vercammen, F; Wuytack, C; Van Looveren, K; Swinne, D

2004-08-01

442

Helsinki Journal, Entry 15, November 12, 2006 We went to the zoo this weekend and, on a whim, we went to see if the lions were  

E-print Network

Helsinki Journal, Entry 15, November 12, 2006 We went to the zoo this weekend and, on a whim, we at Helsinki Zoo. I've also included some other pictures from the past week: Jen on the University Library

Bardsley, John

443

Science Teaching Forum January 30, 2013 Speaker  

E-print Network

Science Teaching Forum ­ January 30, 2013 Speaker: Leslie Reid, Ph.D. Associate Dean ­ Teaching and Learning Faculty of Science Presentation Overview: Our presenter focused on a few key ideas to explain what it means to teach

de Leon, Alex R.

444

Stanford University School of Medicine Neuroscience Forum  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Neuroscience Forum Salil Soman Midlife hypo metabolism, and Multiple Health Complaints Joyce Chung Gender and the Effects of TBI/Polytrauma: Comparative Analysis damage in cervical spinal cord injury Vidya Saravanapandian Stereotypical Alterations in Cortical

Kay, Mark A.

445

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Genetic Health Forum (G.H.F.) is a week long activity in preparation for a group presentation on a human genetic condition, such as dwarfism, Marfan's Syndrome, albinsim, Huntington's disease, PKU, or any other inheritable genetic condition. The activity is designed to encourage and teach students how to research and present scientific information on human genetic conditions. The teacher provides a list of conditions from which students select their research topic. The students, in groups of three, choose a topic to present at the Genetic Health Forum at the conclusion of that week. The students also choose from one of three jobs: the Forum Delegate, the Research Reporter, or the Graphic Artist. This will be the basis for teacher evaluation of their share of the project. Halfway through the week, students are invited to the Genetic Health Forum to be held the following two days.

Tamsen Profit (Borah High School REV)

1995-06-30

446

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

1992-12-31

447

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies  

Cancer.gov

The 28 SBIR-funded companies selected to present at the 2014 NCI SBIR Investor Forum represent promising innovators that are developing the next generation of cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices primed for commercialization.

448

Colorado State University Public Forums concerning the  

E-print Network

education · Childhood obesity · Bicycle safety summit · Diversity Dialogues at CSU Diversity Conference · Statewide dropout rate · Colorado Health Care Reform · NIF "Energy Problem" forums · Improving higher

Stephens, Graeme L.

449

Colorado State University Public Forums concerning the  

E-print Network

· Colorado Health Care Reform · NIF "Energy Problem" forums · Improving higher education · Childhood obesity mission of schools · Grade configuration of Poudre School District schools · Statewide dropout rate

Stephens, Graeme L.

450

NSTC Regional Forum on Research Business Models  

NSF Publications Database

... Technology Council Regional Forum on Research Business Models Hosted by the University of Minnesota ... has chartered a Subcommittee on Research Business Models (RBM), which is undertaking a review of ...

451

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Collaborators  

Cancer.gov

The 2012 NCI SBIR Investor Forum was sponsored by The National Cancer Institute's SBIR Development Center in partnership with the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) and in collaboration with Prescience International.

452

International Forum for Reactor Aging Management (IFRAM)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This article discusses the international forum for reactor aging management.

Bond, Leonard J.

2010-11-01

453

The impact of curiosity on learning during a school field trip to the zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was designed to examine (a) differences in cognitive learning as a result of a zoo field trip, (b) if the trip to the zoo had an impact on epistemic curiosity, (c) the role epistemic curiosity plays in learning, (d) the effect of gender, race, prior knowledge and prior visitation to the zoo on learning and epistemic curiosity, (e) participants' affect for the zoo animals, and (f) if prior visitation to the zoo contributes to prior knowledge. Ninety-six fourth and fifth grade children completed curiosity, cognitive, and affective written tests before and after a field trip to the Lowery Park Zoo in Tampa, Florida. The data showed that students were very curious about zoo animals. Dependent T-tests indicated no significant difference between pretest and posttest curiosity levels. The trip did not influence participants' curiosity levels. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the dependent variable, curiosity, and the independent variables, gender, race, prior knowledge, and prior visitation. No significant differences were found. Dependent T-tests indicated no significant difference between pretest and posttest cognitive scores. The field trip to the zoo did not cause an increase in participants' knowledge. However, participants did learn on the trip. After the field trip, participants identified more animals displayed by the zoo than they did before. Also, more animals were identified by species and genus names after the trip than before. These differences were significant (alpha = .05). Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the dependent variable, posttest cognitive performance, and the independent variables, curiosity, gender, race, prior knowledge, and prior visitation. A significant difference was found for prior knowledge (alpha = .05). No significant differences were found for the other independent variables. Chi-square tests of significance indicated significant differences (alpha = .05) in preferences for types of animals and preference for animals by gender. Significant differences (alpha = .05) were also found between the reasons why animals were preferred. Differences occurred between animals that were liked and disliked, between genders, and between the pretest and the posttest.

Carlin, Kerry Ann

1999-11-01

454

Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after…

Patrick, Patricia; Mathews, Cathy; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

2013-01-01

455

Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Strain from Fecal Samples of Zoo Animal  

PubMed Central

The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment. PMID:24489514

Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

2013-01-01

456

MoZis: mobile zoo information system: a case study for the city of Osnabrueck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a new project of the Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing, funded by the German Federal Foundation for the Environment (DBU, Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt www.dbu.de). The goal of this project is to develop a mobile zoo information system for Pocket PCs and Smart phones. Visitors of the zoo will be able to use their own mobile devices or use Pocket PCs, which could be borrowed from the zoo to navigate around the zoo's facilities. The system will also provide additional multimedia based information such as audio-based material, animal video clips, and maps of their natural habitat. People could have access to the project at the zoo via wireless local area network or by downloading the necessary files using a home internet connection. Our software environment consists of proprietary and non-proprietary software solutions in order to make it as flexible as possible. Our first prototype was developed with Visual Studio 2003 and Visual Basic.Net.

Michel, Ulrich

2007-10-01

457

Unsilencing voices: a study of zoo signs and their language of authority  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zoo signs are important for informal learning, but their effect on visitor perception of animals has been sparsely studied. Other studies have established the importance of informal learning in American society; this study discusses zoo signs in the context of such learning. Through the lens of Critical Theory framed by informal learning, and by applying critical discourse analysis, I discovered subtle institutional power on zoo signs. This may influence visitors through dominant ideological discursive formations and emergent discourse objects, adding to the paradox of "saving" wild animals while simultaneously oppressing them. Signs covering a variety of species from two different United States-accredited zoos were analyzed. Critical Theory looks to emancipate oppressed human populations; here I apply it zoo animals. As physical emancipation is not practical, I define emancipation in the sociological sense—in this case, freedom from silence. Through this research, perhaps we can find a way to represent animals as living beings who have their own lives and voices, by presenting them honestly, with care and compassion.

Fogelberg, Katherine

2014-08-01

458

Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strain from fecal samples of zoo animal.  

PubMed

The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment. PMID:24489514

Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

2013-01-01

459

Galaxy Morphology  

E-print Network

Galaxy morphology is a product of how galaxies formed, how they interacted with their environment, how they were influenced by internal perturbations, AGN, and dark matter, and of their varied star formation histories. This article reviews the phenomenology of galaxy morphology and classification with a view to delineating as many types as possible and how they relate to physical interpretations. The old classification systems are refined, and new types introduced, as the explosion in available morphological data has modified our views on the structure and evolution of galaxies.

Buta, Ronald J

2011-01-01

460

The Catalog of Edge-on Disk Galaxies from SDSS. I. The Catalog and the Structural Parameters of Stellar Disks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

2014-05-01

461

Applied Research and Zoo Education: The Evolution and Evaluation of a Public Talks Program using Unobtrusive Video Recording of Visitor Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The provision of high-quality conservation education has become a priority for modern zoos. This can be delivered in a number of differing ways to account for differences in learning styles and prior knowledge of zoo visitors. At Chester Zoo (United Kingdom), a team of full-time and highly trained interpreters (known as presenters) deliver a diverse public talks program every day

Andrew Moss; Maggie Esson; Sarah Bazley

2010-01-01

462

Detroit Zoo Seeks PR Interns for a "Wild" Fall Semester Want to mingle with the macaronis and connect with the camels while  

E-print Network

Detroit Zoo Seeks PR Interns for a "Wild" Fall Semester Want to mingle with the macaronis and connect with the camels while learning valuable PR and communications skills? Then the Detroit Zoo has the internship for you! The Detroit Zoo is seeking enthusiastic student interns for the fall semester who

Cinabro, David

463

Pathways for Success in Developing a Nature Trail at a Zoo: A Mixed-Methods Evaluative Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Modern zoos serve as tourist attractions and recreational facilities, while providing educational outreach programs in ecology, conservation, and animal needs. However, in the 21st century, there has been a negative backlash of people associating zoos with animals being shut away in cages or pits. This case study included an examination of the…

Hendrickson, Carol F.

2010-01-01

464

Adolescent Learning in the Zoo: Embedding a Non-Formal Learning Environment to Teach Formal Aspects of Vertebrate Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of a zoo visit in terms of learning and retention of knowledge concerning the adaptations and behavior of vertebrate species. Basis of the work was the concept of implementing zoo visits as an out-of-school setting for formal, curriculum based learning. Our theoretical framework centers on the…

Randler, Christoph; Kummer, Barbara; Wilhelm, Christian

2012-01-01

465

Hypography.com | Forums | Gallery | Links | Quizzes | Hypographies | Arcade | Chat | Word Seek | Bookstore Optical Task Light  

E-print Network

Hypography.com | Forums | Gallery | Links | Quizzes | Hypographies | Arcade | Chat | Word Seek For Endoscopy Luxtel a brilliant choice Headlights, Video Cam, Illuminator Register Forum Portal Forum Index

Braun, Paul

466

Analysis of post-blood meal flight distances in mosquitoes utilizing zoo animal blood meals  

PubMed Central

We assessed the post-blood meal flight distance of four mosquito species in a unique environment using blood meal analysis. Mosquitoes were trapped at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, NM, and the blood source of blood-engorged mosquitoes was identified. The distance from the enclosure of the animal serving as a blood source to the trap site was then determined. We found that mosquitoes captured at the zoo flew no more than 170 m with an average distance of 106.7 m after taking a blood meal. This is the first study in which the flight distance of wild mosquitoes has been assessed using blood meal analysis and the first in which zoo animals have served as the exclusive source of blood meals. PMID:22548540

Greenberg, Jacob A.; DiMenna, Mark A.; Hanelt, Ben

2012-01-01

467

The Big, the Bad, and the Ugly: Citizen scientist sunspot classification with Sunspot Zoo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is not currently possible to reliably forecast the occurrence of solar flares. To date, one of the best predictors for the occurrence of flares is that a sunspot group has already produced large flares. Without knowledge of prior activity, the best predictions are generally achieved by systems using human-based visual recognition (e.g., human expert forecasters). This project explores the possibility of using `the crowd' to feed information to a forecasting algorithm to improve the current state of flare prediction. The aims of Sunspot Zoo are: to create a crowd-sourced sunspot group complexity ranking; to test if complexity predicts flaring; to stimulate interest in solar physics and citizen science in school students and the public. Sunspot Zoo will soon be made available through Zooniverse.org to allow large-scale participation. An outreach program will bring Sunspot Zoo to schools in Ireland this Autumn.

Higgins, P. A.; O'Callaghan, D.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Roche, J.; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.; Slater, G. L.; Murray, S.; Gallagher, P.

2013-12-01

468

The rate of Salmonella spp. infection in zoo animals at Seoul Grand Park, Korea  

PubMed Central

Salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease that affects both people and animals. The incidence of reptile-associated salmonellosis has increased in Western countries due to the increasing popularity of reptiles as pets. In Korea, where reptiles are not popular as pets, many zoos offer programs in which people have contact with animals, including reptiles. So, we determined the rate of Salmonella spp. infection in animals by taking anal swabs from 294 animals at Seoul Grand Park. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 14 of 46 reptiles (30.4%), 1 of 15 birds (6.7%) and 2 of 233 mammals (0.9%). These findings indicate that vigilance is required for determining the presence of zoonotic pathogen infections in zoo animals and contamination of animal facilities to prevent human infection with zoonotic diseases from zoo facilities and animal exhibitions. In addition, prevention of human infection requires proper education about personal hygiene. PMID:18487939

Jang, Y. H.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, J. G.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, T. J.; Park, J. H.; Chung, B. H.

2008-01-01

469

An ecological study of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a The seasonal changes for a year in the physico-chemical variables of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton are traced.\\u000a The important features of the pond water are its low oxygen content, slight alkalinity, high organic content, scarcity of\\u000a phyto-plankton and abundance of zoo-plankton and mussels.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a The dominant zoo-plankton consisted of Copepods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 3. \\u000a Interrelationship existing between the environmental

S. V. Ganapati

1943-01-01

470

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo Academy: Where Science Education Comes to Life!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo has become a leader in both informal and formal science education. Its Zoo Academy is one example of an effective nontraditional teaching model for science education. The academy has become an excellent work-based learning model and demonstrates how to collaborate and form partnerships successfully between school districts and the nonprofit/business world. From the Zoo Academy model, over 24 academy programs and five informal summer career camps have been developed and used with students in the Omaha Metropolitan area. This unique opportunity places students in a rich learning environment where they can make discoveries about the natural world and apply the knowledge gained to real-world situations.

Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

2008-01-01

471

Alaska Justice Forum 21(3), Fall 2004 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Alaska Justice Forum 21(3), Fall 2004 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Fall 2004 UNIVERSITY of ALASKA at Judicial Selection in Alaska Antonia Moras An overview of the whole judicial selec- tion and retention process in Alaska reveals a rather elegant balance of interests in the formal structure of the appointment

Pantaleone, Jim

472

Alaska Justice Forum 21(4), Winter 2005 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Alaska Justice Forum 21(4), Winter 2005 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM WWWWWinter 2005inter 2005inter 2005 THETHETHETHETHE JJJJJUSTICEUSTICEUSTICEUSTICEUSTICE CCCCCENTERENTERENTERENTERENTER Please see Rural Alaska, page 3 Improving Public Safety in Rural Alaska: A Review of Past Studies Rural Justice and Law Enforcement

Pantaleone, Jim

473

Proceedings of The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering Forum 2010 CSME FORUM 2010  

E-print Network

Proceedings of The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering Forum 2010 CSME FORUM 2010 June 7 GRID INTERACTIONS T.J.Williams Mechanical Engineering Department University of Victoria Victoria, Canada tjw@uvic.ca Dr.C.Crawford Mechanical Engineering Department University of Victoria Victoria

Victoria, University of

474

A modified operational sequence methodology for zoo exhibit design and renovation: conceptualizing animals, staff, and visitors as interdependent coworkers.  

PubMed

Human factors analyses have been used to improve efficiency and safety in various work environments. Although generally limited to humans, the universality of these analyses allows for their formal application to a much broader domain. This paper outlines a model for the use of human factors to enhance zoo exhibits and optimize spaces for all user groups; zoo animals, zoo visitors, and zoo staff members. Zoo exhibits are multi-faceted and each user group has a distinct set of requirements that can clash or complement each other. Careful analysis and a reframing of the three groups as interdependent coworkers can enhance safety, efficiency, and experience for all user groups. This paper details a general creation and specific examples of the use of the modified human factors tools of function allocation, operational sequence diagram and needs assessment. These tools allow for adaptability and ease of understanding in the design or renovation of exhibits. PMID:24838689

Kelling, Nicholas J; Gaalema, Diann E; Kelling, Angela S

2014-01-01

475

The Ultraviolet Attenuation Law in Backlit Spiral Galaxies  

E-print Network

(Abridged) The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use GALEX, XMM Optical Monitor, and HST data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with candidates provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law close to the Calzetti et al. (1994) form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al. (2011), a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives accuracy almost equal ...

Keel, William C; Holwerda, Benne W; Lintott, Chris J; Schawinski, Kevin

2014-01-01

476

Galaxies Galore  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Amazing Space activity will develop skills required in scientific inquiry (observation, recognition of pattern, identification of attributes, and classification), to gain a general understanding of the structure of galaxies, and to acquire knowledge about galaxy types (irregular, elliptical, and spiral). An instructor guide provides background information, links, and follow-up activities.

477

Colliding galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is presented of observations and computer simulations indicating that cosmic collisions between galaxies may form elliptical galaxies and activate quasars. Recent observations, combined with advances in theory and enhanced computer models, have demonstrated that collisions must be far more common than previously thought. Increasingly sensitive observations made at visible wavelengths have shown that even some apparently quiescent and

Joshua Barnes; Lars Hernquist; Francois Schweizer

1991-01-01

478

Occupational exposure to allergenic mites in a Polish zoo.  

PubMed

The study was carried out from April 2000-March 2001. During this period 49 samples of dust, litter, debris and residues from cages and run-offs of mammals, birds and reptiles in the Silesian Zoo, were examined for the presence of mites, especially the allergenic taxa. Mites were extracted using the Berlese method and preserved in 70 % ethanol. For identification, the mites were mounted in Hoyer's medium on microscope slides. Mites were found in 44 of 49 samples analyzed (89.8 %). A total of 5,097 mites were collected, from which 60.3 % were found in samples collected in spring, whereas only 13 % in summer and 24.1 % in autumn. The remaining 2.6 % of the total mite population was found in winter. Majority of mites (82.7 %) were collected from aviaries of macaws and cockatiels (Ara ararauna and Nymphicus hollandicus). A total of 10 species of astigmatid mites were identified that belong to 4 families--Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, Anoetidae and Pyroglyphidae. Generally, the allergenic mites of the order Astigmata constituted 49.5 % of the total count. Among them Acarus farris was predominant (34 % of the total count), followed by Tyrophagus putrescentiae (4.7 %), Caloglyphus sp. (4.35 %) and Acarus immobilis (4.31 %). Dermatophagoides farinae, the house-dust-mite species, was for the first time found in this environment. D. farinae (0.05 % of the total population) was associated with parrots, canids and artiodactyls. Summarizing, it should be stressed, that cages and run-offs of different mammals, aviaries of parrots and terrariums of snakes are important sources of some allergenic mites, especially A. farris and T. putrescentiae, that might cause allergies in workers. PMID:15236495

Solarz, Krzysztof; Szilman, Piotr; Szilman, Ewa

2004-01-01

479

Seroprevalences of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals.  

PubMed

Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and abortions in cattle. Little is known about the prevalence of antibodies to this parasite in zoo animals. Sera from 556 animals, from 13 Czech and Slovak zoos were tested for antibodies to N. caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 31 of 556 zoo animals (5.6%), representing 18 of 114 species tested: Eurasian wolf (Canis lupus lupus), Maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), fennec (Vulpes zerda), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarondi), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), Indian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis), fisher (Martes pennanti), blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra), European bison (Bison bonasus), lechwe (Kobus leche), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer), eland (Taurotragus oryx), sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekei gratus), Thorold's deer (Cervus albirostris), Eastern elk (C. elaphus canadensis), Vietnam sika deer (C. nippon pseudaxis) and Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus). Titres ranged from 1:40 to 1:2560. The highest prevalence 50% was found in family mustelidae of the order carnivora. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 193 of 556 zoo animals (34.7%) representing 72 of 114 species tested, with titres ranging from 1:40 to 1:40960. The highest prevalence 100% was found in families: hyaenidae, mustelidae, ursidae and viveridae of the order carnivora. The results of this study indicate that zoo animals have more exposure to T. gondii than to N. caninum. It is the first report of seroprevalence of antibodies to N. caninum in European zoo animals. PMID:16387445

Sedlák, K; Bártová, E

2006-03-31

480

Galaxies Galore  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online module includes three activities: Spiral Shapes, Elliptical Slide, and Imagine Irregular. By completing these activities, students discover that galaxies come in different shapes and learn about the process used by astronomers to classify them. Additional background information is provided in the Galaxy Gossip and Galaxy Gallery sections of this module. Students may complete this activity independently or in small groups. This activity should be completed before Galaxy Games. Detailed teacher pages, identified as Teaching Tips on the activity title page, provide science background information, lesson plan ideas, related resources, and alignment with national education standards. This activity is part of the online exploration "Galaxies Galore, Games and More" available on the Amazing Space website.

481

Classifying Galaxies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site allows students to examine images of galaxies and learn to recognize the various shapes used in the Hubble classification system. The Hubble Tuning Fork Diagram is presented as a way to classify the various types of galaxies observed in space. Students will examine pictures of galaxies and discover that these pictures have been arranged according to a scheme or plan laid out by Edwin Hubble, which is still in use today. Students practice using the scheme to classify unidentified galaxies, as presented in pictures. At the end of the activity, students will be able to display the knowledge gained during this activity using a worksheet presented by the teacher and demonstrate an understanding of what classification means as it relates to science. They will also be able to examine an unidentified galaxy image and classify it based on the methods that they have learned.

482

Colliding galaxies  

SciTech Connect

Galaxies, like people, are social: they tend to gather in pairs, small groups and even large crowds. In most such aggregates, galaxies are separated by large distances, typically 10 to 100 times their own diameters. Yet under the influence of gravity, these galaxies travel a galactic diameter every few hundred million years. Over the lifetime of the universe - 10 to 20 billion years by most cosmologists' estimates - some galactic collisions are inevitable. A decade ago many astronomers had serious doubts about the frequency or import of galactic collisions. But recent observations, combined with advances in theory and greatly improved computer models, have demonstrated that collisions must be far more common than previously thought. Moreover, mounting evidence suggests that colliding galaxies often merge into a new kind of object. The authors have become increasingly convinced that such collisions control the evolution of many galaxies and lead to the formation of a variety of peculiar objects, possibly including the distant and extraordinarily luminous quasars.

Barnes, J.; Hernquist, L.; Schweizer, F.

1991-08-01

483

Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_zoo\\/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) and video (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/videos\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for

D. Daou; A. Gauthier

2003-01-01

484

Combining human and machine learning for morphological analysis of galaxy images  

E-print Network

The increasing importance of digital sky surveys collecting many millions of galaxy images has reinforced the need for robust methods that can perform morphological analysis of large galaxy image databases. Citizen science initiatives such as Galaxy Zoo showed that large datasets of galaxy images can be analyzed effectively by non-scientist volunteers, but since databases generated by robotic telescopes grow much faster than the processing power of any group of citizen scientists, it is clear that computer analysis is required. Here we propose to use citizen science data for training machine learning systems, and show experimental results demonstrating that machine learning systems can be trained with citizen science data. Our findings show that the performance of machine learning depends on the quality of the data, which can be improved by using samples that have a high degree of agreement between the citizen scientists. The source code of the method is publicly available.

Kuminski, Evan; Wallin, John; Shamir, Lior

2014-01-01

485

Combining Human and Machine Learning for Morphological Analysis of Galaxy Images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing importance of digital sky surveys collecting many millions of galaxy images has reinforced the need for robust methods that can perform morphological analysis of large galaxy image databases. Citizen science initiatives such as Galaxy Zoo showed that large data sets of galaxy images can be analyzed effectively by nonscientist volunteers, but since databases generated by robotic telescopes grow much faster than the processing power of any group of citizen scientists, it is clear that computer analysis is required. Here, we propose to use citizen science data for training machine learning systems, and show experimental results demonstrating that machine learning systems can be trained with citizen science data. Our findings show that the performance of machine learning depends on the quality of the data, which can be improved by using samples that have a high degree of agreement between the citizen scientists. The source code of the method is publicly available.

Kuminski, Evan; George, Joe; Wallin, John; Shamir, Lior

486

Discussion Forum for Technical Codes Users  

SciTech Connect

One goal of the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is to provide useful, easy to understand information about the national energy codes. A forum where users could ask for, and receive clarification on these codes and software from other users would allow the Energy codes project to reach and instruct a broader audience for a modest resource cost. The forum proposed would be a staff moderated discussion board where staff would post topics, and users would post discussion of those topics, with staff joining in to the discussions. The forum would be moderated by staff members, to remove objectionable and irrelevant postings, and to answer any technical questions that arise. The topics and discussions would be archived and searchable to allow users to answer their own questions, if they pertain to a previously discussed topic.

Kaspar, Bryce P.; Dillon, Heather E.

2006-03-30

487

The 3rd World Water Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Convened in March 2003 in Japan, the 3rd World Water Forum dealt with 38 interlocked themes concerning how to bring safe water and sanitation to the world. Considered the most important international water meeting to date, the forum hosted close to 24,000 persons from 182 countries. On this well-designed site, users can read various documents presented at the Forum, along with reading the daily newspaper produced at the meeting and its newsletter. The finest feature of the site is the streaming video archive of select meetings and plenary sessions. Here, visitors can listen and watch the participants discuss a number of timely topics, such as dams and development, water and transport, and floods. Equally valuable is the ability to browse through the different sessions, and, in some cases, users can download background documents and entire papers. [KMG

488

Molecular content of polar-ring galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have searched for CO lines in a sample of 21 new morphologically determined polar-ring galaxies (of which nine are kinematically confirmed), obtained from a wide search in the Galaxy Zoo project by Moiseev and collaborators. Polar-ring galaxies (PRGs) are a unique class of objects, tracing special episodes in the galaxy mass assembly: they can be formed through galaxy interaction and merging, but also through accretion from cosmic filaments. Furthermore, they enable the study of dark matter haloes in three dimensions. The polar ring itself is a sub-system rich in gas, where molecular gas is expected, and new stars are formed. Among the sample of 21 PRGs, we have detected five CO-rich systems, that can now be followed up with higher spatial resolution. Their average molecular mass is 9.4 × 109M?, and their average gas fraction is 27% of their baryonic mass, with a range from 15 to 43%, implying that they have just accreted a large amount of gas. The position of the detected objects in the velocity-magnitude diagram is offset from the Tully-Fisher relation of normal spirals, as was already found for PRGs. This work is part of our multi-wavelength project to determine the detailed morphology and dynamics of PRGs, test through numerical models their formation scenario, and deduce their dark matter content and 3D-shape. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Spectra of detections are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5">130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/554/A11

Combes, F.; Moiseev, A.; Reshetnikov, V.

2013-06-01

489