Sample records for galaxy zoo forum

  1. A Zoo of Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Masters, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    We live in a universe filled with galaxies with an amazing variety of sizes and shapes. One of the biggest challenges for astronomers working in this field is to understand how all these types relate to each other in the background of an expanding universe. Modern astronomical surveys (like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) have revolutionised this field of astronomy, by providing vast numbers of galaxies to study. The sheer size of the these databases made traditional visual classification of the types galaxies impossible and in 2007 inspired the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org); starting the largest ever scientific collaboration by asking members of the public to help classify galaxies by type and shape. Galaxy Zoo has since shown itself, in a series of now more than 30 scientific papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this Invited Discourse I spoke a little about the historical background of our understanding of what galaxies are, of galaxy classification, about our mode...

  2. Polar Ring Galaxies in the Galaxy Zoo

    E-print Network

    Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of 16 candidate polar ring galaxies (PRGs) identified by the Galaxy Zoo project in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Deep images of five galaxies are available in the SDSS Stripe82 database, while to reach similar depth we observed the remaining galaxies with the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We derive integrated magnitudes and u-r colours for the host and ring components and show continuum-subtracted H\\alpha+[NII] images for seven objects. We present a basic morphological and environmental analysis of the galaxies and discuss their properties in comparison with other types of early-type galaxies. Follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow a kinematic confirmation of the nature of these systems and a more detailed analysis of their stellar populations.

  3. Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

  4. Citizen Science Case Study: Galaxy Zoo / Zooniverse Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-print Network

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: Galaxy Zoo / Zooniverse Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract Galaxy Zoo and other "Zooniverse" websites are citizen science projects designed Zoo and its sister citizen science websites as interactive technology artifacts, with emphasis placed

  5. Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Cardamone, Carie; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers' motivations for participating. This paper analyzes results from an online survey of nearly 11000 volunteers in Galaxy Zoo, an astronomy citizen…

  6. An Interpretive Study of Meanings Citizen Scientists Make When Participating in Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankowski, T. S.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

    2011-09-01

    As the Web 2.0 world lurches forward, so do intellectual opportunities for students and the general public to meaningfully engage in the scientific enterprise. In an effort to assess the intrinsic motivation afforded by participation in Galaxy Zoo, we have inductively analyzed more than 1,000 contributions in the Galaxy Zoo Forum and coded posts thematically. We find that participants overwhelmingly want to meaningfully contribute to a larger scientific enterprise as well as have seemingly unique access to high quality, professional astronomical data. While other citizen science projects work through large data sets, Galaxy Zoo is unique in its motivations and retention abilities. Many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses, while not compromising the scientific value of the project. From the data emerged several trends of motivation, the primary being the sense of community created within the project that promotes professional-amateur collaboration; fulfilling a dream of being an astronomer, physicist, or astronaut; tapping into a potential well of interest created during the space race era; the spiritual aspect generated when the imagination interacts with Galaxy Zoo; and, uniting them all, the aesthetic appeal of the galaxy images. In addition, a very powerful tool also emerged as a method of retention unique to Galaxy Zoo. This tool, known as variable ratio reinforcement in behavioral psychology, uses the most appealing images as positive reinforcement to maintain classification rates over time.

  7. Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jordan Raddick; Georgia Bracey; Pamela L. Gay; Chris J. Lintott; Phil Murray; Kevin Schawinski; Alexander S. Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

    2010-01-01

    The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers had made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this paper, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and demographics of Galaxy Zoo volunteers,

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Morphological Classification and Citizen Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucy Fortson; Karen Masters; Robert Nichol; Kirk Borne; Edd Edmondson; Chris Lintott; Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; John Wallin

    2011-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of the Galaxy Zoo and Zooniverse projects, including a short discussion of the history of, and motivation for, these projects as well as reviewing the science these innovative internet-based citizen science projects have produced so far. We briefly describe the method of applying en-masse human pattern recognition capabilities to complex data in data-intensive research. We

  9. The "Valencian-GALAXY-zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, J.; Ricciardelli, E.; Quilis, V.; Vazdekis, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a sample of the most massive galaxies (M^{*}>10^{11}{M}_{?}) found at z=0 in a fully cosmological simulation performed with MASCLET (Mesh Adaptative Scheme for CosmologicaL structurE evoluTion). te{quilis04} The Upper (lower) pannel shows the merger (quiet) galaxies depending on elipticity (?) and velocity vs velocity-dispersion (v/?). We use the ssp MILES models to make our galaxies bright and study some observables of our fully cosmological synthetic galaxies.

  10. Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jordan Raddick; Georgia Bracey; Pamela L. Gay; Chris J. Lintott; Phil Murray; Kevin Schawinski; Alexander S. Szalay; Jan Vandenberg

    2009-01-01

    The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet\\u000aconnection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan\\u000aDigital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers had made\\u000amore than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this paper, we present results\\u000aof a pilot study into the motivations and demographics of Galaxy Zoo\\u000avolunteers,

  11. Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists

    E-print Network

    Raddick, M Jordan; Gay, Pamela L; Lintott, Chris J; Cardamone, Carie; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers' motivations for participating. This paper analyzes results from an online survey of nearly 11,000 volunteers in Galaxy Zoo, an astronomy citizen science project. Results show that volunteers' primary motivation is a desire to contribute to scientific research. We encourage other citizen science projects to study the motivations of their volunteers, to see whether and how these results may be generalized to inform the field of citizen science.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: Morphological Classification and Citizen Science

    E-print Network

    Fortson, Lucy; Nichol, Robert; Borne, Kirk; Edmondson, Edd; Lintott, Chris; Raddick, Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Wallin, John

    2011-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of the Galaxy Zoo and Zooniverse projects, including a short discussion of the history of, and motivation for, these projects as well as reviewing the science these innovative internet-based citizen science projects have produced so far. We briefly describe the method of applying en-masse human pattern recognition capabilities to complex data in data-intensive research. We also provide a discussion of the lessons learned from developing and running these community--based projects including thoughts on future applications of this methodology. This review is intended to give the reader a quick and simple introduction to the Zooniverse.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Edmond; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Bosma, A; Bell, Eric F; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Lintott, Chris; Melvin, Thomas; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Willett, Kyle W

    2013-01-01

    Observations have shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy. In a parallel effort, simulations have shown that this connection is consistent with the theory of bar-driven secular evolution. But observational evidence of bar-driven secular evolution has been sparse. In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to look for evidence of this secular evolution. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 +/- 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. We characterize bars by the bar likelihood, the likelihood a bar is present in a given galaxy, and the bar length. These two bar properties show interesting correlations with the specific star formation rate and the inner central structure of galaxies. Comparing these observations to state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution, which include live halos and ...

  14. Galaxy Zoo: Outreach and Science Hand in Hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org) is familiar to many as a hugely successful public engagement project. Hundreds of thousands of members of the public have contributed to Galaxy Zoo which collects visual classifications of galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Hubble Space Telescope images. Galaxy Zoo has inspired a suite of similar Citizen Science projects known as ``The Zooniverse`` (www.zooniverse.org) which now has well over half a million participants. Galaxy Zoo has also shown itself, in a series of peer reviewed papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this invited talk I described how that public engagement via citizen science is not only an effective means of outreach from data intensive surveys, but if done right can and must also increase the scientific output of the survey.

  15. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lintott, Chris [Oxford Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Schawinski, Kevin [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Skibba, Ramin A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, 9500 Gilman Drive, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Willett, Kyle W., E-mail: ec2250@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  16. Dreamers, Poets, Citizens, and Scientists: Motivations for Engaging in GalaxyZoo Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, S. J.; Mankowski, T.; Slater, T. F.; CenterAstronomy; Physics Education Research Caper Team

    2010-12-01

    A particularly successful effort to engage the public in science has been to move the nearly countless galaxies imaged by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to citizen scientists in a project known widely as Galaxy Zoo (URL; http://www.galaxyzoo.org). To everyone’s surprise, the unexpectedly large participation in the website has caused the data set, numbering over a million images, to be classified multiple times, quicker than the project leader anticipated, and continues to boast a high hit count on the website (15 classifications per second). Within 24 hours of launch, the site was receiving 70,000 classifications an hour, and more than 50 million classifications were received by the project during its first year, from almost 150,000 people. In a parallel effort, the Galaxy Zoo forum was created to handle the flood of emails that occurred alongside the flood of classifications, the team hoping that it would encourage the participants to handle each others' questions. By examining the motivations, methods and appeal of Galaxy Zoo to the participating public, other models of citizen science might be purposefully formulated to take advantage of the success exhibited in Galaxy Zoo. In addition, we want to understand the reasons people engage in science in informal settings in order to better enhance teaching methods in formal settings. Although in the past citizen science has primarily been used as a data collection method, there are many new opportunities contained in citizen science motivations and methods that we can use in future applications. This new and innovative method of online citizen science creates data for researchers of galaxies, but there is a parallel set of underlying data that has not yet been deeply analyzed: the motivations and underlying themes within the population of citizen scientists that could lead us to improve future citizen science projects. To address this, we pursued an investigation of the underlying reasons for the success of Galaxy Zoo revealed by inductively analyzing contributor’s posts and discussions through the accompanying Galaxy Zoo online bulletin board forum - When investigating the data interpretively collected from the Galaxy Zoo forum, what sort of trends emerge as motivations which contribute to the overall success of this citizen science model? Using a grounded theory approach, we learned that many of these motivations originate in the aesthetic power of astronomical images, which Galaxy Zoo successfully harnesses while not compromising the scientific value of the project. From within the data emerged several trends of motivation, the primary being: the sense of community created within the project that promotes professional-amateur collaboration; fulfilling a dream of being an astronomer, physicist, or astronaut; tapping into a potential well of interest created during the space race era; the spiritual aspect generated when the imagination interacts with Galaxy Zoo; and uniting them all, the aesthetic appeal of the galaxy images. In addition, a very powerful tool also emerged as a method of retention unique to Galaxy Zoo. This tool, known as variable ratio reinforcement in behavioral psychology, uses the most appealing images as positive reinforcement to maintain classification rates over time.

  17. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, L.; Masters, K.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Zoo, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    In this talk, I use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR), and inner galactic structure, i.e., the prominence of the bulge as parameterized by Sérsic index and central surface stellar mass density. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 ± 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. I find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anti-correlated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. I find that the trends of bar likelihood with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR, i.e., in star-forming galaxies, bulges are more prominent in galaxies more likely to host bars, while in quiescent disk galaxies, bars are less frequent where there are prominent bulges. Our observations of bar length reveal a complex picture. In star-forming disks, longer bars are found where the bulges are more prominent, while in quiescent disks there is a maximum in the average bar length as a function of bulge prominence. I interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution which include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. I suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks; a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. I interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution, and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies, but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  18. Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers have made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this article, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and…

  19. Galaxy Zoo: Chiral correlation function of galaxy spins

    E-print Network

    Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

    2008-10-22

    Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the spiral sense of rotation of galaxy arms for a sizeable number of galaxies. We measure the correlation function of spin chirality (the sense in which galaxies appear to be spinning) of face-on spiral galaxies in angular, real and projected spaces. Our results indicate a hint of positive correlation at separations less than ~0.5 Mpc at a statistical significance of 2-3 sigma. This is the first experimental evidence for chiral correlation of spins. Within tidal torque theory it indicates that the inertia tensors of nearby galaxies are correlated. This is complementary to the studies of nearby spin axis correlations that probe the correlations of the tidal field. Theoretical interpretation is made difficult by the small distances at which the correlations are detected, implying that substructure might play a significant role, and our necessary selection of face-on spiral galaxies, rather than a general volume-limited sample.

  20. Ultraviolet Extinction in Backlit Galaxies - from Galaxy Zoo to GALEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Manning, A.; Holwerda, B. W.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2012-01-01

    We examine the ultraviolet extinction of galaxies on large scales, combining optical and GALEX UV data on backlit galaxies (most found in the Galaxy Zoo citizen-science project). We analyze the images in matching ways, modelling both foreground and background galaxies by symmetry or elliptical isophote families as appropriate, and using the non-overlapping regions of the galaxies to estimate errors in the derived transmission T=e-?. Spirals appear less symmetric in the UV, as star-forming regions become more dominant, so that our most reliable results are mean values across multiple regions and multiple galaxies. Our mean effective extinction curve is dominated by the contribution of luminous spirals,and shows a fairly flat gray" extinction law into the ultraviolet. For example, the median of ?NUV/?B in spiral arms is only 1.3. Along with previous high-resolution HST studies of a few nearby backlit galaxies, this suggests that on kpc scales the effective extinction is dominated by the dust clumping rather than the intrinsic reddening law. This implies that extrapolation of local properties to short wavelengths, a step toward the history of dust in galaxies through comparison of local properties with a similar analysis in deep HST fields, can be done without introducing much additional error. This work was supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX10AD54G.

  1. Galaxy Zoo: Quantifying Morphological Indicators of Galaxy Interaction

    E-print Network

    Casteels, Kevin R V; Skibba, Ramin A; Masters, Karen L; Lintott, Chris J; Keel, William C; Schawinski, Kevin; Nichol, Robert C; Smith, Arfon M

    2012-01-01

    We use Galaxy Zoo 2 visual classifications to study the morphological signatures of interaction between similar-mass galaxy pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that many observable features correlate with projected pair separation; not only obvious indicators of merging, disturbance and tidal tails, but also more regular features, such as spiral arms and bars. These trends are robustly quantified, using a control sample to account for observational biases, producing measurements of the strength and separation scale of various morphological responses to pair interaction. For example, we find that the presence of spiral features is enhanced at scales 10^9.5 M_\\odot and mass ratio < 4, to be between 0.4 - 2.7 per cent.

  2. MNRAS 429, 10511065 (2013) doi:10.1093/mnras/sts391 Galaxy Zoo: quantifying morphological indicators of galaxy interaction

    E-print Network

    Skibba, Ramin A.

    2013-01-01

    MNRAS 429, 1051­1065 (2013) doi:10.1093/mnras/sts391 Galaxy Zoo: quantifying morphological; in original form 2012 June 21 ABSTRACT We use Galaxy Zoo 2 visual classifications to study the morphological possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project

  3. Galaxy Zoo: Bulgeless Galaxies With Growing Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Simmons, B D; Schawinski, K; Moran, E C; Han, A; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L; Urry, C M; Willett, K W; Bamford, S P; Nichol, R C

    2012-01-01

    The growth of supermassive black holes appears to be driven by both galaxy mergers and `secular' processes that occur in their absence. In order to quantify the effects of secular evolution on black hole growth, we require a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxies that have formed without significant mergers, a population that heretofore has been difficult to locate. Here we present an initial sample of 13 AGN in massive (M_* \\gtrsim 1e10 M_sun) bulgeless galaxies -- which lack the classical bulges believed inevitably to result from mergers -- selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using visual classifications from Galaxy Zoo. Parametric morphological fitting confirms the host galaxies lack classical bulges; any contributions from pseudobulges are very small (typically < 5%). This is the largest such sample yet assembled. We compute black hole masses for the two broad-line objects in the sample (4.2e6 and 1.2e7 M_sun) and place lower limits on black hole masses for the remaining sample (typi...

  4. The Intrinsic Shape of Galaxies in SDSS/Galaxy Zoo

    E-print Network

    Rodríguez, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    By modelling the axis ratio distribution of SDSS DR8 galaxies we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of $E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026}$ in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of $ 0.267 \\pm 0.009 $, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of $0.215 \\pm 0.013$. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of $0.584 \\pm 0.006$, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlo...

  5. Galaxy Zoo 2: Statistics of Morphological Sub-Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Zachary; Willett, K.; Fortson, L.

    2014-01-01

    In the past, large galaxy surveys have been mapped in color-magnitude space, and fit to Schechter luminosity functions, enabling detailed, quantitative descriptions of their distributions. A similar approach is implemented, for many of the morphological classification groups available in the Galaxy Zoo 2 data release. We investigate photometry of elliptical galaxies, spiral galaxies, barred galaxies, and their sub-populations. Several of those populations are found to have qualitatively different distributions from the full sample, and we experiment with methods of fitting and distinguishing between them. Such methods include peak comparison, ridgeline function fitting, and statistical bootstrapping.

  6. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of morphology and colour on environment

    E-print Network

    Steven P. Bamford; Robert C. Nichol; Ivan K. Baldry; Kate Land; Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Mehri Torki; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; Christopher J. Miller; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Jan Vandenberg

    2008-11-14

    We analyse the relationships between galaxy morphology, colour, environment and stellar mass using data for over 100,000 objects from Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled. We conclusively show that colour and morphology fractions are very different functions of environment. Both are sensitive to stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass, while colour is also highly sensitive to environment, morphology displays much weaker environmental trends. Only a small part of both relations can be attributed to variation in the stellar mass function with environment. Galaxies with high stellar masses are mostly red, in all environments and irrespective of their morphology. Low stellar-mass galaxies are mostly blue in low-density environments, but mostly red in high-density environments, again irrespective of their morphology. The colour-density relation is primarily driven by variations in colour fractions at fixed morphology, in particular the fraction of spiral galaxies that have red colours, and especially at low stellar masses. We demonstrate that our red spirals primarily include galaxies with true spiral morphology. We clearly show there is an environmental dependence for colour beyond that for morphology. Before using the Galaxy Zoo morphologies to produce the above results, we first quantify a luminosity-, size- and redshift-dependent classification bias that affects this dataset, and probably most other studies of galaxy population morphology. A correction for this bias is derived and applied to produce a sample of galaxies with reliable morphological type likelihoods, on which we base our analysis.

  7. Galaxy Zoo: Disentangling the Environmental Dependence of Morphology and Colour

    E-print Network

    Ramin A. Skibba; Steven P. Bamford; Robert C. Nichol; Chris J. Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Edward M. Edmondson; Phil Murray; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Alexander S. Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

    2009-07-01

    We analyze the environmental dependence of galaxy morphology and colour with two-point clustering statistics, using data from the Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies yet compiled, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present two-point correlation functions of spiral and early-type galaxies, and we quantify the correlation between morphology and environment with marked correlation functions. These yield clear and precise environmental trends across a wide range of scales, analogous to similar measurements with galaxy colours, indicating that the Galaxy Zoo classifications themselves are very precise. We measure morphology marked correlation functions at fixed colour and find that they are relatively weak, with the only residual correlation being that of red galaxies at small scales, indicating a morphology gradient within haloes for red galaxies. At fixed morphology, we find that the environmental dependence of colour remains strong, and these correlations remain for fixed morphology \\textit{and} luminosity. An implication of this is that much of the morphology--density relation is due to the relation between colour and density. Our results also have implications for galaxy evolution: the morphological transformation of galaxies is usually accompanied by a colour transformation, but not necessarily vice versa. A spiral galaxy may move onto the red sequence of the colour-magnitude diagram without quickly becoming an early-type. We analyze the significant population of red spiral galaxies, and present evidence that they tend to be located in moderately dense environments and are often satellite galaxies in the outskirts of haloes. Finally, we combine our results to argue that central and satellite galaxies tend to follow different evolutionary paths.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

  9. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 12251232 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14127.x Galaxy Zoo: chiral correlation function of galaxy spins

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 1225­1232 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14127.x Galaxy Zoo 12 ABSTRACT Galaxy Zoo is the first study of nearby galaxies that contains reliable information about the This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo

  10. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 389, 11791189 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13689.x Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 389, 1179­1189 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13689.x Galaxy Zoo. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified

  11. Revealing galactic scale bars with the help of Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    We use visual classifications of the brightest 250,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org, Lintott et al. 2008) to identify a sample of local disc galaxies with reliable bar identifications. These data, combined with information on the atomic gas content from the ALFALFA survey (Haynes et al. 2011) show that disc galaxies with higher gas content have lower bar fractions. We use a gas deficiency parameter to show that disc galaxies with more/less gas than expected for their stellar mass are less/more likely to host bars. Furthermore, we see that at a fixed gas content there is no residual correlation between bar fraction and stellar mass. We argue that this suggests previously observed correlations between galaxy colour/stellar mass and (strong) bar fraction (e.g. from the sample in Masters et al. 2011, and also see Nair & Abraham 2010) could be driven by the interaction between bars and the gas content of the disc, since more massive, optically redder disc galaxies are observed to have lower gas contents. Furthermore we see evidence that at a fixed gas content the global colours of barred galaxies are redder than those of unbarred galaxies. We suggest that this could be due to the exchange of angular momentum beyond co-rotation which might stop a replenishment of gas from external sources, and act as a source of feedback to temporarily halt or reduce the star formation in the outer parts of barred discs. These results (published as Masters et al. 2012) combined with those of Skibba et al. (2012), who use the same sample to show a clear (but subtle and complicated) environmental dependence of the bar fraction in disc galaxies, suggest that bars are intimately linked to the evolution of disc galaxies.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS Barred Disks and Bar Fractions

    E-print Network

    Simmons, B D; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Willett, Kyle W; Keel, William C; Smethurst, R J; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Bell, Eric F; Casteels, Kevin R V; Conselice, Christopher J; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; McIntosh, Daniel H; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N A; Grutzbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Haussler, Boris; Jek, Kian J; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bars in disk galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. Here we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS. From within a sample of 876 disk galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a sub-sample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5< z < 2 (f_bar = 10.7 +6.3 -3.5% after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 bil...

  13. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS barred discs and bar fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, B. D.; Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Willett, Kyle W.; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, R. J.; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Bell, Eric F.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N. A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Häußler, Boris; Jek, Kian J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-12-01

    The formation of bars in disc galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in discs decreases from the local Universe to z ˜ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature discs should be extremely rare. Here, we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disc galaxies at z ˜ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. From within a sample of 876 disc galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a subsample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5 ? z ? 2 ( f_{bar} = 10.7^{+6.3}_{-3.5} per cent after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disc galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

  14. Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anÿze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one\\u000amust first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive\\u000asystems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project,\\u000aGalaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one\\u000amillion galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This\\u000aachievement was made possible by inviting

  15. Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Land, Kate; Bamford, Steven; Thomas, Daniel; Raddick, M. Jordan; Nichol, Robert C.; Szalay, Alex; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Vandenberg, Jan

    2008-09-01

    In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 4 × 107 individual classifications made by ~105 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provide a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structural parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour-magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk (CJL); kevins@astro.ox.ac.uk (KS)

  16. Lecture 6: Creating the Galactic Zoo: Galaxy Interactions and the Hubble Sequence

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    . · Typical galaxies in the field had their last major mergers about 10 billion years ago. Such galaxies would gas accretion after this last merger. 1.4 Galaxy Interactions · While major mergers are thoughtLecture 6: Creating the Galactic Zoo: Galaxy Interactions and the Hubble Sequence Risa H. Wechsler

  17. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 966982 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15334.x Galaxy Zoo: disentangling the environmental dependence of morphology

    E-print Network

    Skibba, Ramin A.

    2009-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 966­982 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15334.x Galaxy Zoo-point clustering statistics, using data from the Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classified morphologies of scales, analogous to similar measurements with galaxy colours, indicating that the Galaxy Zoo

  18. Galaxy Zoo: bar lengths in local disc galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Hoyle; Karen. L. Masters; Robert C. Nichol; Edward M. Edmondson; Arfon M. Smith; Chris Lintott; Ryan Scranton; Steven Bamford; Kevin Schawinski; Daniel Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of bar length measurements of 3150 local galaxies in a volume-limited sample of low-redshift (z =3), and we find that observers were able to reproduce their own bar lengths to 3 per cent and each others' to better than 20 per cent. We find a colour bimodality in our disc galaxy population with bar length, i.e.

  19. Galaxy Zoo : Morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-print Network

    Chris J. Lintott; Kevin Schawinski; Anze Slosar; Kate Land; Steven Bamford; Daniel Thomas; M. Jordan Raddick; Robert C. Nichol; Alex Szalay; Dan Andreescu; Phil Murray; Jan van den Berg

    2008-04-29

    In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 40,000,000 individual classifications made by ~100,000 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provides a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structual parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour--magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology.

  20. Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: atomic gas and the regulation of star formation in barred disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large-scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' H I content from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) blind H I survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas-rich disc galaxies than gas-poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangulation removing gas). All three explanations are consistent with the observed correlations. In addition our observations suggest bars may reduce or halt star formation in the outer parts of discs by holding back the infall of external gas beyond bar co-rotation, reddening the global colours of barred disc galaxies. This suggests that secular evolution driven by the exchange of angular momentum between stars in the bar, and gas in the disc, acts as a feedback mechanism to regulate star formation in intermediate-mass disc galaxies. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at South East Physics Network, E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.ukEinstein fellow.

  1. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000000 (0000) Printed 25 February 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies

    E-print Network

    Bureau, Martin

    .2) Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies with prominent dust lanes Sugata Kaviraj1,000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Morphological types from Galaxy Zoo 2 (Willett+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, K. W.; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Masters, K. L.; Simmons, B. D.; Casteels, K. R. V.; Edmondson, E. M.; Fortson, L. F.; Kaviraj, S.; Keel, W. C.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Raddick, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R. J.; Skibba, R. A.; Smith, A. M.; Thomas, D.

    2013-09-01

    Morphological classifications of galaxies from Galaxy Zoo 2. Each galaxy has several objIDs (from SDSS) and positions that can be used for cross-matching. Morphological classifications include six parameters for each of 37 categories: unweighted and weighted versions of both the total number of votes and the vote fraction for that response, the vote fraction after being debiased, and flags for systems identified as being in clean samples. (5 data files).

  3. Galaxy Zoo 1: data release of morphological classifications for nearly 900 000 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Linott, C.; Slosar, A.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S.; Slosar, A.; Land, K.; Thomas, D.; Edmondson, E.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.C.; Raddick, M.J.; Szalay, A.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Vandenberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    Morphology is a powerful indicator of a galaxy's dynamical and merger history. It is strongly correlated with many physical parameters, including mass, star formation history and the distribution of mass. The Galaxy Zoo project collected simple morphological classifications of nearly 900,000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, contributed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers. This large number of classifications allows us to exclude classifier error, and measure the influence of subtle biases inherent in morphological classification. This paper presents the data collected by the project, alongside measures of classification accuracy and bias. The data are now publicly available and full catalogues can be downloaded in electronic format from http://data.galaxyzoo.org.

  4. Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: Atomic Gas and the Regulation of Star Formation in Barred Disc Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Masters, Karen L; Haynes, Martha P; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' HI content from the ALFALFA blind HI survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas rich disc galaxies than gas poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation, and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangu...

  5. Galaxy Zoo: spiral galaxy morphologies and their relation to the star-forming main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle; Schawinski, Kevin; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Skibba, Ramin A.; Nichol, Robert; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke D.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo volunteers

    2015-01-01

    We examine the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate in disk galaxies at z<0.085, measuring different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. The morphologies of disk galaxies are obtained from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, which includes the number of spiral arms, the arm pitch angle, and the presence of strong galactic bars. We show that both the slope and dispersion of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS) is constant no matter what the morphology of the spiral disk. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by 0.3 dex; this is a significant reduction over the increase seen in merging systems at higher redshifts (z > 1). Of the galaxies that do lie significantly above the SFMS in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers, with a large contribution from the compact green pea galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence that the number and pitch angle of spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms for star formation or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback.

  6. Commons at the Intersection of Peer Production, Citizen Science, and Big Data: Galaxy Zoo

    E-print Network

    Madison, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge commons research framework is applied to a case of commons governance grounded in research in modern astronomy. The case, Galaxy Zoo, is a leading example of at least three different contemporary phenomena. In the first place Galaxy Zoo is a global citizen science project, in which volunteer non-scientists have been recruited to participate in large-scale data analysis via the Internet. In the second place Galaxy Zoo is a highly successful example of peer production, sometimes known colloquially as crowdsourcing, by which data are gathered, supplied, and/or analyzed by very large numbers of anonymous and pseudonymous contributors to an enterprise that is centrally coordinated or managed. In the third place Galaxy Zoo is a highly visible example of data-intensive science, sometimes referred to as e-science or Big Data science, by which scientific researchers develop methods to grapple with the massive volumes of digital data now available to them via modern sensing and imaging technologies. This ...

  7. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 388, 16861692 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13490.x Galaxy Zoo: the large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 388, 1686­1692 (2008) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13490.x Galaxy Zoo Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find effect. Key words: galaxies: spiral ­ large-scale structure of Universe. 1 INTRODUCTION Galaxy Zoo (GZ)1

  8. Galaxy Zoo: A Catalog of Overlapping Galaxy Pairs for Dust Studies

    E-print Network

    Keel, William C; Holwerda, Benne W; Mezzoprete, Massimo; Lintott, Chris J; Schawinski, Kevin; Gay, Pamela; Masters, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of galaxies with overlapping images offers a direct way to probe the distribution of dust extinction and its effects on the background light. We present a catalog of 1990 such galaxy pairs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by volunteers of the Galaxy Zoo project. We highlight subsamples which are particularly useful for retrieving such properties of the dust distribution as UV extinction, the extent perpendicular to the disk plane, and extinction in the inner parts of disks. The sample spans wide ranges of morphology and surface brightness, opening up the possibility of using this technique to address systematic changes in dust extinction or distribution with galaxy type. This sample will form the basis for forthcoming work on the ranges of dust distributions in local disk galaxies, both for their astrophysical implications and as the low-redshift part of a study of the evolution of dust properties. Separate lists and figures show deep overlaps, where the inner regions of the foregrou...

  9. GALAXY ZOO MORPHOLOGY AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    It has recently been demonstrated that one can accurately derive galaxy morphology from particular primary and secondary isophotal shape estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging catalog. This was accomplished by applying Machine Learning techniques to the Galaxy Zoo morphology catalog. Using the broad bandpass photometry of the SDSS in combination with precise knowledge of galaxy morphology should help in estimating more accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies. Using the Galaxy Zoo separation for spirals and ellipticals in combination with SDSS photometry we attempt to calculate photometric redshifts. In the best case we find that the root-mean-square error for luminous red galaxies classified as ellipticals is as low as 0.0118. Given these promising results we believe better photometric redshift estimates for all galaxies in the SDSS ({approx}350 million) will be feasible if researchers can also leverage their derived morphologies via Machine Learning. These initial results look to be promising for those interested in estimating weak lensing, baryonic acoustic oscillation, and other fields dependent upon accurate photometric redshifts.

  10. Galaxy Zoo: Evidence for Diverse Star Formation Histories through the Green Valley

    E-print Network

    Smethurst, R J; Simmons, B D; Schawinski, K; Marshall, P J; Bamford, S; Fortson, L; Kaviraj, S; Masters, K L; Melvin, T; Nichol, R C; Skibba, R A; Willett, K W

    2015-01-01

    Does galaxy evolution proceed through the green valley via multiple pathways or as a single population? Motivated by recent results highlighting radically different evolutionary pathways between early- and late-type galaxies, we present results from a simple Bayesian approach to this problem wherein we model the star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy with two parameters, [t, \\tau] and compare the predicted and observed optical and near-ultraviolet colours. We use a novel method to investigate the morphological differences between the most probable SFHs for both disc-like and smooth-like populations of galaxies, by using a sample of 126,316 galaxies (0.01 Zoo. We find a clear difference between the quenching timescales preferred by smooth- and disc-like galaxies, with three possible routes through the green valley dominated by smooth- (rapid timescales, attributed to major mergers), intermediate- (intermediate timescales, attributed to ...

  11. Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304,122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-print Network

    Willett, Kyle W; Bamford, Steven P; Masters, Karen L; Simmons, Brooke D; Casteels, Kevin R V; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy F; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304,122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with m_r>17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original Galaxy Zoo project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types, or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges, and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relat...

  12. Galaxy Zoo : Evidence for a Diversity of Routes through the Green Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris; Smethurst, Rebecca; Simmons, Brooke; Galaxy Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ways in which galaxies change as they move from blue to red is critical to understanding the build up of the present-day galaxy population, and can best be addressed by looking at systems in the process of transitioning. We present the results of a new analysis of the population of galaxies which passes through the 'green valley' evident in optical colour-mass diagrams. Using data from SDSS and Galex, and a Bayesian analysis of their most probable star formation histories, we show that multiple routes through the green valley exist. By using Galaxy Zoo morphologies, we are able to draw on probabilistic estimates of morphology and find - in contrast to previous work - that there is evidence for slow, intermediate and rapid transitions from blue to red. Constraining these populations provides evidence for rapid morphological change in some populations, presumably through major mergers, and underpins our understanding of the build up of the red sequence.

  13. Managing the Big Data Avalanche in Astronomy - Data Mining the Galaxy Zoo Classification Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    2014-01-01

    We will summarize a variety of data mining experiments that have been applied to the Galaxy Zoo database of galaxy classifications, which were provided by the volunteer citizen scientists. The goal of these exercises is to learn new and improved classification rules for diverse populations of galaxies, which can then be applied to much larger sky surveys of the future, such as the LSST (Large Synoptic Sky Survey), which is proposed to obtain detailed photometric data for approximately 20 billion galaxies. The massive Big Data that astronomy projects will generate in the future demand greater application of data mining and data science algorithms, as well as greater training of astronomy students in the skills of data mining and data science. The project described here has involved several graduate and undergraduate research assistants at George Mason University.

  14. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 393, 13241352 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14252.x Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of morphology and colour on environment

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 393, 1324­1352 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14252.x Galaxy Zoo from Galaxy Zoo, the largest sample of visually classi- fied morphologies yet compiled. We conclusively volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. The

  15. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 423, 14851502 (2012) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20972.x Galaxy Zoo: the environmental dependence of bars and bulges

    E-print Network

    Skibba, Ramin A.

    2012-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 423, 1485­1502 (2012) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20972.x Galaxy Zoo morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project. We find that the likelihood of having a bar, or bulge, in disc

  16. Selection of Dual AGN Candidate Using Wise & Galaxy Zoo: A Chandra Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Since the vast majority of galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy interactions trigger nuclear gas accretion, a direct consequence of the hierarchical model of galaxy formation would be the existence of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The existence, frequency, and characteristics of such binary AGNs have important astrophysical implications on the SMBH mass function, the interplay between SMBHs and the host galaxy, and the M-? relation. Despite decades of searching, and strong theoretical reasons that they should exist, observationally confirmed cases of binary AGNs are extremely rare, and most have been discovered serendipitously. Using extremely red mid-IR colors from the all-sky WISE survey and Galaxy Zoo close interaction identifications, we identified a sample of 90 strongly interacting galaxies with mid-IR signatures of powerful AGNs. Although these galaxies are optically quiescent, all galaxies in the sample for which archival Chandra observations are available, contain double X-ray nuclear sources suggestive of dual AGNs. We present these archival X-ray observations. This study suggests that the WISE survey may open up a promising pre-selection strategy for finding dual AGNs that is complementary to optical studies and will enable larger systematic investigations of dual AGN candidates.

  17. Galaxy Zoo: The large-scale spin statistics of spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-print Network

    Kate Land; Anze Slosar; Chris Lintott; Dan Andreescu; Steven Bamford; Phil Murray; Robert Nichol; M. Jordan Raddick; Kevin Schawinski; Alex Szalay; Daniel Thomas; Jan Vandenberg

    2008-05-28

    We re-examine the evidence for a violation of large-scale statistical isotropy in the distribution of projected spin vectors of spiral galaxies. We have a sample of $\\sim 37,000$ spiral galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with their line of sight spin direction confidently classified by members of the public through the online project Galaxy Zoo. After establishing and correcting for a certain level of bias in our handedness results we find the winding sense of the galaxies to be consistent with statistical isotropy. In particular we find no significant dipole signal, and thus no evidence for overall preferred handedness of the Universe. We compare this result to those of other authors and conclude that these may also be affected and explained by a bias effect.

  18. Galaxy Zoo: evidence for diverse star formation histories through the green valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Marshall, P. J.; Bamford, S.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2015-06-01

    Does galaxy evolution proceed through the green valley via multiple pathways or as a single population? Motivated by recent results highlighting radically different evolutionary pathways between early- and late-type galaxies, we present results from a simple Bayesian approach to this problem wherein we model the star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy with two parameters, [t, ?] and compare the predicted and observed optical and near-ultraviolet colours. We use a novel method to investigate the morphological differences between the most probable SFHs for both disc-like and smooth-like populations of galaxies, by using a sample of 126 316 galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.25) with probabilistic estimates of morphology from Galaxy Zoo. We find a clear difference between the quenching time-scales preferred by smooth- and disc-like galaxies, with three possible routes through the green valley dominated by smooth- (rapid time-scales, attributed to major mergers), intermediate- (intermediate time-scales, attributed to minor mergers and galaxy interactions) and disc-like (slow time-scales, attributed to secular evolution) galaxies. We hypothesize that morphological changes occur in systems which have undergone quenching with an exponential time-scale ? < 1.5 Gyr, in order for the evolution of galaxies in the green valley to match the ratio of smooth to disc galaxies observed in the red sequence. These rapid time-scales are instrumental in the formation of the red sequence at earlier times; however, we find that galaxies currently passing through the green valley typically do so at intermediate time-scales.†

  19. Galaxy Zoo: AGN may be fueled by stellar bars in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo Science Team

    2015-01-01

    Bars are a mechanism that have been proposed to explain how gas in the outer regions of a galaxy can be channeled inward and fuel AGN. Multiple observational studies have reported a significantly higher bar fraction in AGN than non-AGN. To accurately probe whether an excess of bars in AGN host galaxies exists because the galaxies host a bar, it is necessary to compare bar and AGN fractions at fixed mass and color, because the presence of bars strongly correlates with both. Thus, a sufficiently large sample is necessary to maintain adequate numbers in subsets of fixed mass and color. We have created a large, volume-limited sample of 19,765 disc galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By using morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we identify stellar bars in 51.8% of AGN hosts and 37.1% of star-forming disk galaxies. Once mass and color are fixed, there remains a statistically significant increase in the fraction of barred AGN over their unbarred counterparts. Using the L[O III]/MBH ratio as a measure of accretion efficiency, we also show that barred AGN do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGN at fixed mass or color. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fueling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to AGN fueling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

  20. Moon Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The goal of the Moon Zoo website is "to provide detailed crater counts for as much of the Moon's surface as possible." On the website, interested parties can help out with this effort by examining images of the moon's surface and providing feedback to be used by the team of researchers in charge of the Moon Zoo project. First-time visitors should click on the "How To Take Part" for a tutorial that will help determine which project they might be best suited for. Visitors who wish to take part in the project will need to register on the website, and that process only takes a few minutes. Moving on, the website has an online forum where users can trade information as well as a blog.

  1. Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, E; Bamford, Steven P; Bell, Eric F; Bosma, A; Cardamone, Carolin N; Casteels, Kevin R V; Faber, S M; Fang, Jerome J; Fortson, Lucy F; Kocevski, Dale D; Koo, David C; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W

    2014-01-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  2. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    E-print Network

    Teng, Stacy H; Urry, C Megan; Darg, Dan W; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W; Cardamone, Carolin N; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Simmons, Brooke D; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10$^{11}$ $M_\\odot$ that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured ($N_H \\lesssim 1.1 \\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint ($< 40$ counts per nucleus; $f_{2-10 keV} \\lesssim 1.2 \\times 10^{-13}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  3. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2012-07-10

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  4. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  5. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schwainski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10(sup 11) solar mass that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) less than or approximately 1.1 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (less than 40 counts per nucleus; f(sub 2-10 keV) less than or approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -13) ergs per second per square centimeter) to separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  6. The Green Valley is a Red Herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies

    E-print Network

    Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Sarzi, Marc; Ramin,; Skibba,; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W; Wong, O Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2014-01-01

    We use SDSS+\\textit{GALEX}+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disk to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant disks, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of co...

  7. The green valley is a red herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Simmons, Brooke D.; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Sarzi, Marc; Skibba, Ramin; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W.; Wong, O. Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2014-05-01

    We use SDSS+GALEX+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disc to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant discs, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of cosmic gas supply and gas reservoirs. We conclude that late-type galaxies are consistent with a scenario where the cosmic supply of gas is shut off, perhaps at a critical halo mass, followed by a slow exhaustion of the remaining gas over several Gyr, driven by secular and/or environmental processes. In contrast, early-type galaxies require a scenario where the gas supply and gas reservoir are destroyed virtually instantaneously, with rapid quenching accompanied by a morphological transformation from disc to spheroid. This gas reservoir destruction could be the consequence of a major merger, which in most cases transforms galaxies from disc to elliptical morphology, and mergers could play a role in inducing black hole accretion and possibly active galactic nuclei feedback.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan; Athanassoula, Lia; Bamford, Steven; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, Albert; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy; Kocevski, Dale; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo J.; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Nichol, Robert; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle; Galaxy Zoo, Aegis, Cosmos, Goods

    2015-01-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disk galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame color, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the bar fraction in the control sample by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  9. Galaxy Zoo: Are bars responsible for the feeding of active galactic nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan R.; Athanassoula, E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Faber, S. M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS (All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey), COSMOS (Cosmological Evolution Survey), and (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South) GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of 2, at 99.7 per cent confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fuelling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  10. GALAXY ZOO: THE FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT CO-EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Virani, Shanil; Coppi, Paolo; Cardamone, Carolin N. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bamford, Steven P. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Treister, Ezequiel [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lintott, Chris J.; Kaviraj, Sugata [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Sarzi, Marc [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Blvd., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Hampshire Terrace, Portsmouth, PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); Ross, Nicholas P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Andreescu, Dan [LinkLab, 4506 Graystone Avenue, Bronx, NY 10471 (United States); Murray, Phil [Fingerprint Digital Media, 9 Victoria Close, Newtownards, Co. Down, Northern Ireland, BT23 7GY (United Kingdom); Raddick, M. Jordan; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Slosar, Anze, E-mail: kevin.schawinski@yale.ed [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and visual classifications of morphology from the Galaxy Zoo project to study black hole growth in the nearby universe (z < 0.05) and to break down the active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxy population by color, stellar mass, and morphology. We find that the black hole growth at luminosities L[O{sub III}]>10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} in early- and late-type galaxies is fundamentally different. AGN host galaxies as a population have a broad range of stellar masses (10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub sun}), reside in the green valley of the color-mass diagram and their central black holes have median masses around 10{sup 6.5} M{sub sun}. However, by comparing early- and late-type AGN host galaxies to their non-active counterparts, we find several key differences: in early-type galaxies, it is preferentially the galaxies with the least massive black holes that are growing, while in late-type galaxies, it is preferentially the most massive black holes that are growing. The duty cycle of AGNs in early-type galaxies is strongly peaked in the green valley below the low-mass end (10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of the red sequence at stellar masses where there is a steady supply of blue cloud progenitors. The duty cycle of AGNs in late-type galaxies on the other hand peaks in massive (10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) green and red late-types which generally do not have a corresponding blue cloud population of similar mass. At high-Eddington ratios (L/L{sub Edd}>0.1), the only population with a substantial fraction of AGNs are the low-mass green valley early-type galaxies. Finally, the Milky Way likely resides in the 'sweet spot' on the color-mass diagram where the AGN duty cycle of late-type galaxies is highest. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the role of AGNs in the evolution of galaxies.

  11. Switcheroo Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As the name implies, the colorfully animated Switcheroo Zoo -- produced by Tubehead, an interactive multimedia studio -- allows you to swap the heads, legs, or tails of various zoo animals to create fantastical new creatures. Not just a place to watch cool morphing animation, this Web site has educational applications as well. Click on Educators' Resources, and scroll to the bottom of the page for a simple lesson plan geared toward younger students. The lesson plan is designed to "expand students' knowledge of animals and develop critical thinking skills," and "engage students in the creative application of that knowledge, as information about the characteristics of animals and their habitats is used to describe imaginary creatures." Useful links for researching the animals are provided on the same page, as are links to other education-oriented sites. By September 2002, users should find Switcheroo Zoo 50% faster with dozens of new animals.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: an independent look at the evolution of the bar fraction over the last eight billion years from HST-COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Thomas; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Chris; Nichol, Robert C.; Simmons, Brooke; Bamford, Steven P.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, Arfon M.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2014-03-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of the bar fraction in a sample of 2380 visually selected disc galaxies found in Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The visual classifications used both to identify the disc sample and to indicate the presence of stellar bars were provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. We find that the overall bar fraction decreases by a factor of 2, from 22 ± 5 per cent at z = 0.4 (tlb = 4.2 Gyr) to 11 ± 2 per cent at z = 1.0 (tlb = 7.8 Gyr), consistent with previous analysis. We show that this decrease, of the strong bar fraction in a volume limited sample of massive disc galaxies [stellar mass limit of log (M?/M?) ? 10.0], cannot be due to redshift-dependent biases hiding either bars or disc galaxies at higher redshifts. Splitting our sample into three bins of mass we find that the decrease in bar fraction is most prominent in the highest mass bin, while the lower mass discs in our sample show a more modest evolution. We also include a sample of 98 red disc galaxies. These galaxies have a high bar fraction (45 ± 5 per cent), and are missing from other COSMOS samples which used SED fitting or colours to identify high-redshift discs. Our results are consistent with a picture in which the evolution of massive disc galaxies begins to be affected by slow (secular) internal process at z ˜ 1. We discuss possible connections of the decrease in bar fraction to the redshift, including the growth of stable disc galaxies, mass evolution of the gas content in disc galaxies, as well as the mass-dependent effects of tidal interactions.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: An independent look at the evolution of the bar fraction over the last eight billion years from HST-COSMOS

    E-print Network

    Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Nichol, Robert C; Simmons, Brooke; Bamford, Steven P; Casteels, Kevin R V; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Willett, Kyle W

    2014-01-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of the bar fraction in a sample of 2380 visually selected disc galaxies found in Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The visual classifications used to identify both the disc sample and to indicate the presence of stellar bars were provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. We find that the overall bar fraction decreases by a factor of two, from 22+/-5% at z=0.4 (tlb = 4.2 Gyr) to 11+/-2% at z=1.0 (tlb = 7.8 Gyr), consistent with previous analysis. We show that this decrease, of the strong bar fraction in a volume limited sample of massive disc galaxies [stellar mass limit of log(Mstar/Msun) > 10.0], cannot be due to redshift dependent biases hiding either bars or disc galaxies at higher redshifts. Splitting our sample into three bins of mass we find that the decrease in bar fraction is most prominent in the highest mass bin, while the lower mass discs in our sample show a more modest evolution. We also include a...

  14. Our Zoo to You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickless, Mimi; Brooks, David W.; Abuloum, Amjad; Mancuso, Brian; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Mayo, Lois

    2003-01-01

    An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes,…

  15. Our Zoo to You

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lois Mayo

    2003-09-01

    An innovative zoo outreach program, Our Zoo to You, places zoo animals in local classrooms for extended observation periods. With guidance and support from zoo staff, students are able to safely experience a variety of animals, including geckos, snakes, legless lizards, horned toads, ringneck doves, ferrets, hedgehogs, African brown millipedes, and Madagascar hissing cockroaches.

  16. Oregon Zoo Polar Bear

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Tasul, an Oregon Zoo polar bear, sports a high-tech collar that will help researchers study her endangered wild counterparts in the Arctic. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo. Photo by Michael Durham, courtesy of the Oregon Zoo....

  17. First Results from Galaxy Zoo CANDELS: The Settling of Galactic Disks from 0.5 < z < 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Brooke; Melvin, Tom; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen; Willett, Kyle; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert; Schawinski, Kevin; Galaxy Zoo, Candels

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale bar features in disk galaxies are tracers of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. We report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS, implying the host disks are dynamically settled enough to be unstable to bar formation. The fraction of disk galaxies hosting barred structures does not significantly evolve across the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2 (fbar = 10.7+6.3-3.5% after correcting for incompleteness). We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

  18. Zoo Praxis and Theories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Frances Burton

    2004-07-01

    Zoo projects that encourage reflective learning and are legitimate undertakings for untrained undergraduates are hard to develop. The two themes of the author's primate studies course lead students to observe and evaluate the social behavior of nonhuman primates. Students use a rigorous methodology focused on the use of space, and their findings are forwarded to zoo administrators. This results in improvements in zoo housing and makes the exercise intrinsically meaningful.

  19. Bronx Zoo cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rivet, P.H.

    1988-09-01

    The New York Zoological Society commenced feasibility studies for a proposed cogeneration and district heating system for the Bronz Zoo in spring 1982. Early studies focused on evaluating the Zoo's energy loads, infrastructure, and energy delivery and financing systems. The Zoological Society and New York City joined in the decision to support the construction of a system which would serve not only the Bronx Zoo but also five nearby City-funded installations, including the adjacent New York Botanical Garden. Since the submission of that study, the project has been modified in scope, scaling back to a generating capacity designed to serve only the Bronz Zoo.

  20. Visitor Behavior at Singapore Zoo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, David; Bossler, Charles

    In this study, data were collected on 15 visitor groups for the duration of their stay, and on 1556 visitor groups at 18 exhibits at the Singapore Zoo. Mean time at the zoo was 155 minutes; the distribution of the time spent among four activities was analyzed by ethnicity and group size. The actual route followed was traced on zoo maps and group…

  1. San Diego Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Zoological Society of San Diego brings to the web the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Wild Animal Park, and the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species. Each unit of the zoo has a main page, from which the user can meet the animals and find out about the humans who watch over them. The photographs of new arrivals at the zoo should be a big draw, and there is informative text underlying the visuals. The "Guest Book" is a game in which users attempt to match animals with their "signatures": the tracks they leave. Use the table of contents to find your way to the animals you're most interested in.

  2. Microbe Zoo Water World

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-01-28

    This site is maintained by the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology. A Microbe Zoo and the Microbe of the Month are included. The site provides some background material on many different types of Microbes, in ponds, around the deep sea vents, and various other locations. Two water regions are represented on the site, although mention is made of several others.

  3. Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo (BAMZ) online provides: visitor information, news about exhibits, education programs, memberships and activities for children and adults, including behind the scenes exploration of their facility. It is also a resource for information about Bermuda's biodiversity, conservation work, and research projects. Located in Flats Village.

  4. The modern zoo: How do people perceive zoo animals?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise S. Reade; Natalie K. Waran

    1996-01-01

    Despite the recent growth in scientific attention focusing upon human-animal relationships, very little research has been conducted in relation to the human experience of, and relationship with, zoo animals. In order to assess how the general public perceive zoo animals, a street survey questionnaire was used (Study 1, n = 200). In addition, a second study was carried out within

  5. ZooScope. Teacher's Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrie, Charis

    This curriculum provides background information and activities for teaching inquiry-based science in the classroom and at the Oregon Zoo. The ZooScope program was created to provide students with hands-on and minds-on activities that are crucial to taking theoretical learning into the real world. The hope is that as students begin asking about the…

  6. K-2 at the Zoo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Lori; Andrews, Steve

    This packet is designed to help teachers maximize a zoo visit for children ages 5 to 7. The packet provides activities for use before, during, and after the zoo visit. Activities are provided to enhance student skills in language arts, reading, art, science, and math, and are correlated to the Oregon Essentials Learning Skills Common Curriculum…

  7. SAN DIEGO ZOO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Dept. of Education, CA.

    A BROCHURE GEARED TO HELP TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN THE SAN DIEGO AREA TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES OF THE SAN DIEGO ZOO IS PRESENTED. THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF THE ZOO EMPLOYS TWO FULL-TIME TEACHERS AND A DRIVER-GUIDE. THE PROGRAM OFFERED IS BRIEFLY DESCRIBED--(1) IN "PRESCHOOL AND FIRST GRADE," INTRODUCTIONS ARE MADE TO…

  8. It's a Zoo out There!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Zoos can provide exciting educational opportunities for students to learn about a wide range of science subject matter. Zoos and similar nonschool sites have the added advantage of getting students out of school and into another environment, demonstrating that science learning can take place anywhere--not only in formal school settings. Through…

  9. Modern Zoos: New Challenges, New Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandford, Floyd

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the changing function of the modern zoo from its merely recreational role to its newly emerging role as preserver of species, educator, and center for research. Describes the San Diego Zoo as the model for the modern zoo and provides tips for planning field trips to a zoo. (JM)

  10. The Neutron Star Zoo

    E-print Network

    Harding, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  11. Oxyspiruriasis in zoo birds.

    PubMed

    Vellayan, S; Jeffery, J; Oothuman, P; Zahedi, M; Krishnasamy, M; Paramaswaran, S; Rohela, M; Abdul-Aziz, N M

    2012-06-01

    Oxyspiruriasis caused by the bird eyeworm, Oxyspirura mansoni, a thelaziid nematode, in three species of pheasants, 3 Chrysolophus pictus (golden pheasant), 7 Lophura nycthemera (silver pheasant) and 9 Phasianus colchicus (common pheasant) in Zoo Negara Malaysia are reported. Birds with the disease were treated with a solution of 0.5% iodine or 0.5% lysol. Antistress powder for 4 days in water and non-strep vitamin powder in water was also provided. Control measures included removal of the cockroach intermediate host, Pycnoscelus surinamensis (Surinam cockroach) from the vicinity of the birds. The golden pheasant is a new host for O. mansoni in peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22735854

  12. Dirtland Microbe Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carrie Heeter

    From the Digital Learning Center for Microbial Ecology, this web site features "Dirtland", an interactive microbe zoo. The site explores the endless varieties of microorganisms and the environments they inhabit. These habitats include composts, at home, agriculture, hot springs, snow and ice, mines, root cellars, toxic waste, animals, soil, food, space, and water. Each habitat link provides a description of the environment as well as images and descriptions of particular species of microorganisms that thrive there. The site also contains a ?What is a microbe?? link with an interactive image comparing the size of a microbe to a mouse and a tree of life with an outline of the major groups of organisms.

  13. World Zoo Conservation Strategy: a blueprint for zoo development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Wheater

    1995-01-01

    People need a sense of purpose, the setting of clear targets, the encouragement and support of others in striving for and\\u000a achieving tasks that have been set. This is particularly true for zoo personnel, a profession which is often under critical\\u000a attack, especially from those who have a philosophical difficulty in accepting the idea of animals in captivity. The zoo

  14. Pioneer Middle School Virtual Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Virtual Zoo showcases middle-school students' research and reports on the animal kingdom and animal classification. A broad outline of animal taxonomy organizes the student reports into the overarching animal kingdoms: Animalia, Plantea, Fungi, Protista, and Monera.

  15. San Diego Zoo: Kid Territory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This San Diego Zoo website is absolutely packed with fun and informative stuff for kids, and features not only the residents of the zoo, but also the people who work there. Read All About It offers a look at how the San Diego Zoo began, why we give scientific names to animals, why animal enrichment is important, and much more. Science in Action offers simple experiments to do at home or in the classroom, like exploring what life would be like without an opposable thumb (with tape, not via amputation). The website also provides interesting essays on zoo-related careers, as well as cool multimedia games, animal-themed recipes, and loads of other great features.

  16. New at the Zoo: ZIMS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JEFFREY P. COHN (; )

    2006-07-01

    This peer reviewed resource is on the topic "New at the Zoo" by Jeffrey P Cohn. A new database about to be launched for zoos and aquariums will overhaul outdated record-keeping systems. Through the Zoological Information Management System, keepers, curators, and veterinarians will have access to integrated, up-to-date information about collections worldwide to track animals, diagnose diseases, and communicate treatments.

  17. Managing Soil Science Experiments Using ZOO (http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ ZOO)

    E-print Network

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    Managing Soil Science Experiments Using ZOO ¢¡ (http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ ZOO) Yannis Ioannidis Experiment Management Environment (DEME) called Zoo. Our work has proceeded in a tight loop between developing generic experiment management tech- nology that is implemented in a generic tool, Zoo, installing

  18. 4-H Zoo Snooze March 29, 2013

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    4-H Zoo Snooze March 29, 2013 Come spend the night at the OKC Zoo and learn about animal camouflage and how camouflage is used in many people's careers. Later that night we will venture outdoors for a night

  19. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not clear how effective it is or on what timescale a buried field might re-emerge. One piece of evidence in favor of accretion-driven field reduction is the fact that NSs in LMXBs, which are older systems (> 108 yr), have mostly low fields and NSs in HMXBs, which are younger systems (107 - 108 yr), have higher fields. This may be an indication that accretion-driven field reduction or decay has not had enough time to operate in HMXBs but has in LMXBs. However, there does not seem to be any evidence of decaying fields in either the LMXB or HMXB populations; e.g. smaller magnetic fields in older systems. On the other hand, CCOs are very young so if they acquired their low fields through mass fallback accretion, the field submergence would have had to operate on much faster timescales than it apparently does in LMXBs. But as we continue to find new species in the NS zoo, one of these may someday be the "Rosetta Stone" that will give us the clues for solving these puzzles.

  20. Zoo Interchange Reconstruction Project Update

    E-print Network

    Gutierrez - WisDOT Ryan Luck - WisDOT #12;Today's presentation · Overview of Zoo IC project · Milwaukee ­ Bluemound Road ­ 84th Street ­ WIS 100 ­ Greenfield Avenue · Major arterial roadways ­ WIS 100 ­ Watertown impacts in 2013 · MRMC area impacts in 2014 · MRMC internal communications · Wrap-up and Q&A #12;WIS 100

  1. Leukosen bei zoo? und wildvögeln

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Loupal

    1984-01-01

    Im Zeitraum 1974–1983 konnten wir unter 2589 obduzierten Zoo? und Wildvögeln bei 26 Vögeln, die 13 verschiedenen Arten aus fünf Ordnungen angehörten, Leukose nachweisen. Bei 11 Vögeln (zwei x Melopsittacus undulatus, zwei x Psittacus erithacus, ein Platycerus eximius, eine Columba livia, eine Streptopelia decaocto, ein Polyplectron bicalcaratum, ein Pavo cristatus, ein Aptenodytes patachonia, ein Fink, Spezies nicht bekannt) fanden wir

  2. Buying time for wild animals with zoos.

    PubMed

    Conway, William G

    2011-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums exhibit many rare species, but sustain few for long periods. Demanding genetic, demographic, and behavioral requirements are a part of the sustainability challenge, and historical zoo goals and limiting animal management objectives are another, but they have been overtaken by worldwide wildlife population contraction and endangerment. New policies are essential for zoo continuance and, if vanishing species are to be helped by zoo propagation, they must be given priority. However, zoos have little animal carrying capacity and propagation must be much more sharply focused. In addition, it is becoming urgent that zoos help to support parks and reserves and, where possible, manage some especially endangered species mutually with parks. PMID:20938970

  3. SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN ZOO ANIMALS IN SELECTED ZOOS IN MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, h...

  4. How Zoos Are Meeting the Challenges Facing Biodiversity: Bristol Zoo Gardens as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Simon

    2010-01-01

    As ideas about effective conservation of biodiversity develop, zoos are adapting their roles to meet the new challenges. This article considers these changes, using the work of Bristol and other UK zoos as a case study. The significance of zoos in both global and local conservation of biodiversity, their role in promoting public engagement and…

  5. Molecular Expressions: The Silicon Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Although most of us will never examine a computer chip under a microscope, computer engineers are showing their creative side by hiding silicon artwork in a chip's layout. The Silicon Zoo has a collection of highly-magnified images that showcase the designer's talent, and each image is accompanied by an interesting, and often humorous, explanation. The silicon doodles have many different themes, ranging from cartoon characters to King Arthur's sword. Two Java tutorials are also on the Web site: the first describes how engineers create their "creatures," while the second explains how computer chips are searched to find them. There are many interesting sections of The Silicon Zoo, so be sure to explore! This site is also reviewed in the March 15, 2002 NSDL Math, Engineering, and Technology Report.

  6. Zoo and aquarium webcams: an informed view.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Gary; Murphy, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Providing webcams for public viewing is a relatively new but growing phenomenon among zoos and aquariums. Reasons for incorporating this programmatic feature are varied, and no guidelines exist to aid institutions considering webcam installations. Decision makers need to know how much effort the cameras require as well as how successful other zoos have found them to be. We evaluated existing webcams and provide an overview of their characteristics, including reliability. Quantitative evaluations provided by zoo/aquarium staff and by zoo members indicate generally positive perceptions of webcams, whereas staff acknowledge a notable level of effort required. Here, we strive to offer guidelines that will help institutions considering this venture. PMID:21688310

  7. Forum Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanno, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Social class has been underresearched in the field of applied linguistics. The central goal of this forum was to stimulate more conversation about social class as it impacts language learning and teaching. In this article, I comment on 3 salient themes that have emerged in the 5 articles: (1) agency and structure in language learning and teaching,…

  8. The HI absorption 'Zoo'

    E-print Network

    Gereb, K; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the HI absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S_1.4 GHz > 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). HI absorption is detected in 32 galaxies, showing a broad variety of widths, shapes and kinematical properties. We characterize the HI spectra of the individual detections using the busy function (Westmeier et al. 2014). With the goal of identifying different morphological structures of HI, we study the kinematical and radio source properties of the detections as function of their width. Narrow lines (FWHM = 500 km/s). These detections are good candidates for being HI outflows. The detection rate of HI outflows is 5 percent in the total radio AGN sample. This fraction represents a lower limit, however it could suggests that, if outflows are a characteristic phenomenon of all radio sources, they would have a short depletion timescale compared to the lifetime of the AGN. Blueshifted and broad/asymmetric lines are more often present among young...

  9. Zoos, Aquariums, and Expanding Students' Data Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokros, Jan; Wright, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    Zoo and aquarium educators are increasingly providing educationally rigorous programs that connect their animal collections with curriculum standards in mathematics as well as science. Partnering with zoos and aquariums is a powerful way for teachers to provide students with more opportunities to observe, collect, and analyze scientific data. This…

  10. KEEPING AND BREEDING JERBOAS AT MOSCOW ZOO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. VAKHRUSHEVA; I. VOLODIN; O. ILCHENKO; E. PAVLOVA

    Jerboas are interesting and exotic rodents, inhabiting steppes, semi- deserts and deserts. However, current zoo collections are unable to even approximately represent this unique group. There are a lot of difficulties in the captive maintenance of jerboas. First, little is known about their breeding, particularly that of jerboas from Central Asia and Kazakhstan. The International Zoo Yearbook does report some

  11. The greening of polar bears in zoos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph A. Lewin

    1979-01-01

    POLAR BEARS (Thalarctos maritimus) normally have creamy-white fur, presumably an adaptation for camouflage in a snowy environment. However, during the summer of 1978, the fur on the back and sides of three adults in the San Diego Zoo turned green, though the animals remained otherwise healthy. (Of these bears, one female was born in the zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada,

  12. Research at Canadian zoos and botanical gardens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Galbraith; William A. Rapley

    2005-01-01

    Research is an important part of the work of botanical gardens and zoos in Canada, enriching their public programs and improving management of living collections. Most of these institutions participate in research activities to some extent. Approximately a half-dozen zoos and aquaria, and a similar number of botanical gardens, have large, on-going research programs and are important centres for the

  13. parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --une nouvelle espce de zoo

    E-print Network

    parczoologiquedeparis.fr -- 1 -- une nouvelle espèce de zoo PARC ZOOLOGIQUE DE PARIS Dossier de presse #12;-- 2 -- parczoologiquedeparis.fr SOmmAIRE NOm Parc Zoologique de Paris ou le zoo de Vincennes ou tout simplement le zoo. SItUAtION le Parc Zoologique de Paris est un zoo urbain, il est situé au

  14. Zoo: A tool for traffic analysis and characterization User manual

    E-print Network

    Owezarski, Philippe

    Zoo: A tool for traffic analysis and characterization User manual Nicolas LARRIEU, Philippe Introduction This paper introduces the Zoo tool that has been designed in the French Metropolis project, explaining why Zoo speaks French; we will soon teach Zoo how to speak English. More technically speaking

  15. Bring the Zoo to You!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dawn Renee Wilcox

    2008-04-01

    This hands-on, minds-on zoo project provides a fun and safe opportunity for students to experience the world of animals and nature right in their own classroom. Students have the chance to work individually or in small groups to explore, observe, and discover answers to their questions about the natural world. In addition, it provides numerous occasions to integrate science, math, reading, and art. The nearly month-long experience described here was conducted with a group of top-notch first-grade zookeepers!

  16. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1) detections, which are associated with gas-rich mergers, we find three new cases of profiles with blueshifted broad wings (with FW20 ? 500 km s-1) in high radio power AGN. These detections are good candidates for being HI outflows. Together with the known cases of outflows already included in the sample (3C 293 and 3C 305), the detection rate of H I outflows is 5% in the total radio AGN sample. Because of the effects of spin temperature and covering factor of the outflowing gas, this fraction could represent a lower limit. However, if the relatively low detection rate is confirmed by more detailed observations, it would suggest that, if outflows are a characteristic phenomenon of all radio AGN, they would have a short depletion timescale compared to the lifetime of the radio source. This would be consistent with results found for some of the outflows traced by molecular gas. Using stacking techniques, in our previous paper we showed that compact radio sources have higher ?, FWHM, and column density than extended sources. In addition, here we find that blueshifted and broad/asymmetric lines are more often present among compact sources. In good agreement with the results of stacking, this suggests that unsettled gas is responsible for the larger stacked FWHM detected in compact sources. Therefore in such sources the H I is more likely to be unsettled. This may arise as a result of jet-cloud interactions, as young radio sources clear their way through the rich ambient gaseous medium. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. The effect of use of visitor facilities in zoos on duration and intensity of zoo visits 

    E-print Network

    Shughart, Melinda Joy

    1979-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS QN DURATION AND INTENSII'Y OF ZOO VISITS A I'hesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May I979 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development THE EFFECT OF USE OF VISITOR FACILITIES IN ZOOS ON DURATION AND INTENSITY OF ZOO VISITS A Thesis by MELINDA JOY SHUGHART Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  18. Efficiently Sorting Zoo-Mesh Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R; Max, N; Silva, C; Williams, P

    2001-03-26

    The authors describe the SXMPVO algorithm for performing a visibility ordering zoo-meshed polyhedra. The algorithm runs in practice in linear time and the visibility ordering which it produces is exact.

  19. The beast within : measuring the minds of zoo animals

    E-print Network

    Duke, Julia Jane

    2014-01-01

    Though zoos have come far from their early days of concrete boxes in caring for their residents' physical health, zoo animals' mental health-the feelings and thoughts beneath the furry and scaly exteriors-has only recently ...

  20. The longevity legacy: the problem of old animals in zoos 

    E-print Network

    Kitchener, Andrew; Macdonald, Alastair A

    2002-01-01

    Zoos once demonstrated their skill in keeping wild mammals in captivity by longevity records. However, as our knowledge of animal husbandry in zoos has increased and breeding in most species has become commonplace, so the ...

  1. World Urban Forum III

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    There are forums on many topics, ranging from animal husbandry to the latest trends in fashion technology, but there is only one forum sponsored by the United Nations that draws such a tremendously diverse mix of practitioners, politicians, and pundits: the World Urban Forum. In its third edition, the Forum and its participants have descended upon Vancouver, and this website brings together materials they are working on during their time at this third meeting. Visitors can learn about the governing bodies that oversee the Forum’s operations, read speeches and statements from those speaking at the event, and also learn about a related event, the World Youth Forum. Visitors with specific interests in various aspects of urbanism will want to look over their “Programmes” area, which contains specific information about the Forum’s initiatives, including land tenure, housing policies, and urban economic development.

  2. RADIO DETECTION OF GREEN PEAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MAGNETIC FIELDS IN YOUNG GALAXIES

    E-print Network

    Chakraborti, Sayan

    Green Peas are a new class of young, emission line galaxies that were discovered by citizen volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their low stellar mass, low metallicity, and very high star formation rates make Green Peas ...

  3. Zoo Biology 27:470487 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-print Network

    Timberlake, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Zoo Biology 27:470­487 (2008) RESEARCH ARTICLE Mutual Benefits of Research Collaborations Between Zoos and Academic Institutions Eduardo J. Fernandez,à and William Timberlakeà Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana Zoos focus on welfare, conservation

  4. LES REPRSENTATIONS DE L'EXEMPLE DES ZOOS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LES REPRÉSENTATIONS DE LA NATURE: L'EXEMPLE DES ZOOS Eric Baratay Elisabeth Hardouin-Fugier P artout, les zoos attirent les foules. En 1995, six cent millions de personnes auraient visité les 1100.-même et sur les autres. Le succès vient aussi du fait que les zoos permettent une rencontre particu- lière

  5. ZOO: A Desktop Experiment Management Environment Yannis E. Ioannidis

    E-print Network

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    ZOO: A Desktop Experiment Management Environment Yannis E. Ioannidis ¡ Miron Livny Shivani Gupta on their desk. The environment is called ZOO and is developed in collaboration with do- main scientists from Soil Sciences and Biochem- istry. We first describe the overall architecture of ZOO, and then focus

  6. Math in a Zoo Math in the Wild Gary Flewelling

    E-print Network

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    199 Math in a Zoo Math in the Wild Gary Flewelling Independent Consultant flew these two games and the significance of these differences. I do this by comparing a trip to a zoo. These two learning games differ in ways similar to the ways that a trip to a zoo differs from a trip

  7. Representing the Zoo World and the Trac World

    E-print Network

    Lifschitz, Vladimir

    Representing the Zoo World and the TraÆc World in the Language of the Causal Calculator Varol Akman of that language. The Zoo World and the TraÆc World have been proposed by Erik Sandewall in his Logic Modelling Workshop|an environment for communicating axiomatizations of action domains of nontrivial size. The Zoo

  8. Assessment of Change in Conservation Attitudes through Zoo Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in fall 2010 and subjects were students' ages 14-18 who either participated in a formal conservation education class led by zoo educators or in a field trip in which they were engaged in free-choice learning. Two research questions were: 1) Does a trip to the zoo affect conservation attitudes and…

  9. At the Zoo: Kindergartners Reinvent a Dramatic Play Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowne, Mary; Brokmeier, Sue

    2008-01-01

    In a South Dakota early childhood program, children and adults in the kindergarten classroom collaborated to build a "classroom zoo" in support of the children's pretend play. Creation of the zoo incorporated information about animals and zoos that the children and their families and teachers located in secondary sources such as nonfiction books…

  10. The Risk of Delivering Disturbing Messages to Zoo Family Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esson, Maggie; Moss, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    One of the roles of the modern zoo is to provide environmental education. Zoo visitation comprises primarily family groups seeking to spend time together. There is potential for tension between message and audience expectation as zoos seek to raise awareness of the effects of irresponsible human behavior on the environment. This may unsettle…

  11. An investigation into the determining factors of zoo visitor attendances in UK zoos.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Andrew William

    2012-01-01

    The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126 and n?=?34, r?=?-0.430, P?=?0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations. PMID:22253799

  12. An Investigation into the Determining Factors of Zoo Visitor Attendances in UK Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Andrew William

    2012-01-01

    The debate as to which animals are most beneficial to keep in zoos in terms of financial and conservative value is readily disputed; however, demographic factors have also been shown to relate to visitor numbers on an international level. The main aims of this research were: (1) To observe the distribution and location of zoos across the UK, (2) to develop a way of calculating zoo popularity in terms of the species kept within a collection and (3) to investigate the factors related to visitor numbers regarding admission costs, popularity of the collection in terms of the species kept and local demographic factors. Zoo visitor numbers were positively correlated with generated popularity ratings for zoos based on the species kept within a collection and admission prices (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126 and n?=?34, r?=??0.430, P?=?0.011). Animal collections are aggregated around large cities and tourist regions, particularly coastal areas. No relationship between demographic variables and visitor numbers was found (Pearson correlation: n?=?34, r?=?0.268, P?=?0.126), which suggests that the popularity of a zoo's collection relative to the types and numbers of species kept is more indicative of a collection's visitor numbers than its surrounding demographic figures. Zoos should incorporate generating high popularity scores as part of their collection planning strategies, to ensure that they thrive in the future, not only as tourist attractions but also as major conservation organizations. PMID:22253799

  13. Art Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The website for Art Forum magazine offers a wide range of features, including a Chinese language version, and a host of interactive extras and reports from the art world. The interactive feature "Artguide", which can be accessed via a tab near the top of the page, or by clicking on the box with a world map made of colorful continents, provides a list of "Art Fairs Everywhere", "Special Events", and hotels and restaurants, under "Eat & Sleep". Looking for art exhibits in a particular country? Visitors can click on one of the colorful continents, or choose a "region" or a "country/city" from the drop down boxes underneath the colorful map. Clicking on "Calendar" lets visitors browse by date. Visitors interested in the picks of art critics will find "Picks" helpful, which can be linked to via a tab near the top of any page. Currently there are almost two dozen cities in which work has been chosen, and some cities have more than one exhibit.

  14. Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2003-04-07

    Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

  15. Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation. PMID:19598253

  16. The Virtual Astronomical Observatory Users Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, August A.; Emery Bunn, S.; Astronomical Observatory, Virtual

    2013-01-01

    We present the online forum astrobabel.com, which has the goal of being a gathering place for the collective community intelligence about astronomical computing. The audience for this forum is anyone engaged in the analysis of astronomical or planetary data, whether that data be observational or theoretical. It is a free, community driven site where discussions are formulated primarily around the "question and answer" format. Current topics on the forum range from “Is there a photometry package in Python?” to “Where are the support forums for astronomy software packages?” and “Why is my SDSS SkyQuery query missing galaxies?” The poster will detail the full scope of discussions in the forum, and provide some basic guidelines for ensuring high quality forum posts. We will highlight the ways astronomers can discover and participate in discussions. Further, we view this as an excellent opportunity to gather feedback and feature requests from AAS221 attendees. Acknowledgement: The Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is managed by the VAO, LLC, a non-profit company established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. The VAO is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Zoo Biology 29 : 397404 (2010) BRIEF REPORT

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    2010-01-01

    Osborn Laboratories for Marine Science, New York Aquarium of the Wildlife Conservation Society, Brooklyn general behavior and activity patterns of Walruses in zoos or aquariums, less is known about how group of four Pacific Walruses at the New York Aquarium. Study 1 examined behavior in relation

  18. IQ Zoo and Teaching Operant Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bihm, Elson M.; Gillaspy, J. Arthur, Jr.; Lammers, William J.; Huffman, Stephanie P.

    2010-01-01

    Psychology texts often cite the work of Marian and Keller Breland and their business, Animal Behavior Enterprises (ABE), to demonstrate operant conditioning and the "misbehavior of organisms" from an evolutionary perspective. Now available on the Internet at the official IQ Zoo website (http://www3.uca.edu/iqzoo/), the artifacts of ABE's work, in…

  19. Zoo Biology 29 : 114 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS

    E-print Network

    2010-01-01

    Zoo Biology 29 : 1­14 (2010) HUSBANDRY REPORTS First Captive Breeding of the Imperial Parrot the rearing and development of the first imperial parrot (Amazona imperialis) hatched and raised in captivity; captive breeding INTRODUCTION The imperial parrot, or sisserou (Amazona imperialis), Dominica's national

  20. Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristin

    The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

  1. Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22753040

  2. Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miller, Kristen

    This tutorial begins with a description of Hubble's discovery that other galaxies exsist besides the Milky Way and how these galxies are classified. Hubble denoted galaxies as being either spiral, elliptical, or irregular. Under these topics there is a link that gives information about the structure, components, classification system, diameter, and the average number of stars for each galaxy type. The next section talks about the different ways that galaxies can interact, collide, or merge. The tutorial ends with a short quiz.

  3. 13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN FOREGROUND. - Connecting Railway, Schuylkill River Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, north of Girard Avenue Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth presents the science and research of galaxies. First, the University of Cambridge offers clear, logical descriptions and images of the Milky Way, spiral and elliptical galaxies, clusters, and dark matter of the Universe (1). Users can also find educational tutorials on many other cosmology topics. Next, the Space Telescope Science Institute's "Galaxies Galore, Games and More is a learning module designed to allow elementary students to use their observational skills, recognize patterns, and learn how galaxies are classified" (2). Through the fun, interactive materials, students can learn about spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies. The third website, developed by NASA, introduces students to Seyfert Galaxies, quasars, and blazars (3). Visitors can find cool facts about the topic, quizzes, an advanced-level article on galaxies and pulsars, and additional resources. Next, Professor Bill Keel at Leiden University and the University of Alabama supplies graduate level virtual lectures on the topic of extragalactic astronomy (4). While the website is only updated to the most recent class he taught (Spring of 2003), the wealth of high-quality information offered on topics such as star formation, environmental effects on galaxies, and galaxy interactions and mergers makes it worth the visit. The fifth website, produced by the Jodrell Bank Observatory, is "an electronic publication dedicated to the observations and theory of active galaxies" (5). The newsletter promotes new papers, conferences, dissertations, employment opportunities, and more. Sixth, the Science Museum of Virginia educates users about the differences among galaxies through a series of images and clear text (6). Visitors can view images collected by the Hubble telescope and can test their skills at classifying galaxies. The seventh website, produced by National Academy of Engineering member Edward Barlow, presents concepts of general relativity and the new developments and tools used to study galaxies and other cosmological phenomena (7). The complex materials offer great examples of how models are used to help scientists understand facets of the universe. Lastly, Wikipedia offers concise explanations of the characteristics of galaxies, their history, and etymology (8). Throughout the text, visitors can find links to more information on the concepts discussed.

  5. People's Perceptions of AnimalsThe Influence of Zoo Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ted Finlay; Lawrence R. James; Terry L. Maple

    1988-01-01

    Eleven semantic differential scales were developed to assess the effects of contextual setting on peoples' perceptions of animals. The scales were given to subjects viewing slides of eight species of animals in either the wild, naturalistic zoo, or caged zoo environments. A control group, which saw no slides, also rated the animals. The ratings on the semantic differential scales were

  6. Conservation and Education: Prominent Themes in Zoo Mission Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Patricia G.; Matthews, Catherine E.; Ayers, David Franklin; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the mission statements of 136 zoos in the United States that the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) has accredited, and report on the predominant themes of education and conservation in the statements. To explore the relation between these two themes, the authors present a literature review of the roles…

  7. parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --A new species of zoo

    E-print Network

    of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy. The Museum manages two other animal parks: the Ménagerie (zoo welfare conditions. The zoo that visitors see today boasts an array of attractive features designed'S LA PAMPA TO THE MADAGASCAR DRY DECIDUOUS FOREST VISITOR ASSISTANCE PRACTICAL INFO P38 ANNEXES #12

  8. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

  9. The "Science" Behind a Successful Field Trip to the Zoo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Catherine Marie; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    A field trip to the local zoo is often a staple in many elementary school curricula. Many zoos offer free entry to local teachers and their students. Teachers take students on field trips to enrich the curriculum, make connections to what students are learning in school, and provide students with meaningful learning experiences (Kisiel 2007).…

  10. Zoos as a Source of Free Choice Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofield, Sara; Coll, Richard K.; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Indicates that the zoo considers that it has an important role in education and provides many opportunities for learning but that visitors' prime purpose is for entertainment. Concludes that science learning at the zoo is limited for general visitors, but is enhanced for school children by pre- and post-visit activities and strong curricular…

  11. Free-Choice Learning at a Metropolitan Zoo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Tofield, Sara; Vyle, Brent; Bolstad, Rachel

    This paper reports on an inquiry into the use of zoos as a source of informal or free choice learning. The study was contextualized within the zoo's environmental enrichment program - an animal husbandry principle that seeks to develop species-typical behavior for captive animals by using naturalistic enclosures or artificial items that stimulate…

  12. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals in selected zoos in the midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    de Camps, Silvia; Dubey, J P; Saville, W J A

    2008-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of the midwestern United States was determined by using the modified agglutination test (MAT). A titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of T. gondii exposure. Among wild felids, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 6 (27.3%) of 22 cheetahs (Acynonyx jubatus jubatus), 2 of 4 African lynx (Caracal caracal), 1 of 7 clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), 1 of 5 Pallas cats (Otocolobus manul), 12 (54.5%) of 22 African lions (Panthera leo), 1 of 1 jaguar (Panthera onca), 1 of 1 Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), 1 of 1 Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), 5 (27.8%) of 18 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), 1 of 4 fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), 3 of 6 pumas (Puma concolor), 2 of 2 Texas pumas (Puma concolor stanleyana), and 5 (35.7%) of 14 snow leopards (Uncia uncia). Antibodies were found in 10 of 34 feral domestic cats (Felis domesticus) trapped in 3 zoos. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were not found in any of the 78 fecal samples from wild and domestic cats. Among the macropods, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 Dama wallabies (Macropus eugenii), 1 of 1 western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus), 1 of 2 wallaroos (Macropus robustus), 6 of 8 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), 21 (61.8%) of 34 red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), and 1 of 1 dusky pademelon (Thylogale brunii). Among prosimians, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 blue-eyed black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons), 1 of 21 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 2 of 9 red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra), and 2 of 4 black- and white-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata). Among the avian species tested, 2 of 3 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were seropositive. Among 7 possible risk factors, sex, freezing meat temperature (above -13 C vs. below -13 C), washing vegetables thoroughly, frequency of feral cat sightings on zoo grounds (occasionally vs. frequently), frequency of feral cat control programs, capability of feral cats to enter hay/grain barn, and type of animal exhibit, exhibiting animals in open enclosures was the only factor identified as a significant risk (OR 3.22, P = 0.00). PMID:18605803

  13. Learning on Zoo Field Trips: The Interaction of the Agendas and Practices of Students, Teachers, and Zoo Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Susan Kay; Passmore, Cynthia; Anderson, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a case study that investigated the interaction of the agendas and practices of students, teachers, and zoo educators during a class field trip to a zoo. The study reports on findings of the analysis of two case classes of students and their perceptions of their learning experiences during the field trip. The…

  14. Zoo Biology 21:14 (2002) 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Zoo Biology 21:1­4 (2002) © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. DOI 10.1002/zoo.10023 COMMENTARY Opportunities Lost: Zoos and the Marsupial That Tried To Be a Wolf Chris Wemmer* Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Front Royal, Virginia In the archives of the National Zoo there is a story

  15. How does the zoo environment affect the behaviour of captive primates?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey R. Hosey

    2005-01-01

    It is important for us to be able to understand the behaviour of primates in zoos for at least three reasons: firstly as a means towards ensuring their welfare, secondly to use that understanding to ensure a positive zoo experience for zoo visitors, and thirdly so that results of basic research undertaken on zoo primates can be properly evaluated. Often,

  16. The influence of an interactive educational approach on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petra Lindemann-Matthies; Tobias Kamer

    2006-01-01

    A new but costly approach to providing visitors of zoos with information on conservation is the presentation of small exhibits by zoo professionals or volunteers. At these touch tables visitors can find out about the biology, ecology, and conservation of animals kept in the zoo. We studied the effect of a touch table on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo

  17. A Trip to the Infrared Zoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this multi-day activity, students use infrared and visible images of animals and sort them into broad categories based upon the learner's own reasoning and observations of the images. Further explorations reveal that warm and cold-blooded animals can be identified and characterized using infrared images. The lesson features background information for the teacher, pre-requisite skills and knowledge for the student, a mini-exploration of Infrared Image Technology, multiple image sets, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and additional resources. This is lesson 1 on the Infrared Zoo website.

  18. Sea Slug Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by the Australian Museum and maintained by Dr. Bill Rudman, the recently redesigned Sea Slug Forum is an excellent resource for information on nudibranchs and related sea slugs such as bubble-shells, sea hares, and side-gilled slugs. One of the chief features of the site is a lengthy species list that links to lovely photos, brief descriptions, distribution information, and related messages from the site's Forum. The site also offers a sizable collection of short pieces and archived forum messages on a variety of general topics, arranged alphabetically. Users can send their own questions and review messages sent to the site along with Dr. Rudman's replies by date or via a keyword search engine. Additional resources include suggested reading, related annotated links, and information on forum participants.

  19. Forum on Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Janet Ruth; Jenkins, Trish; Mechenbier, Mahli Xuan; Moeller, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The forum contributors draw on their personal experiences and insights to put forth ideas about how contingent faculty might improve their working conditions through various kinds of alliances. (Contains 1 note.)

  20. The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

  1. Quantitative analysis of spirality in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojcsak, Levente; Shamir, Lior

    2014-04-01

    We use an automated galaxy morphology analysis method to quantitatively measure the spirality of galaxies classified manually as elliptical. The data set used for the analysis consists of 60,518 galaxy images with redshift obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and classified manually by Galaxy Zoo, as well as the RC3 and NA10 catalogues. We measure the spirality of the galaxies by using the Ganalyzer method, which transforms the galaxy image to its radial intensity plot to detect galaxy spirality that is in many cases difficult to notice by manual observation of the raw galaxy image. Experimental results using manually classified elliptical and S0 galaxies with redshift <0.3 suggest that galaxies classified manually as elliptical and S0 exhibit a nonzero signal for the spirality. These results suggest that the human eye observing the raw galaxy image might not always be the most effective way of detecting spirality and curves in the arms of galaxies.

  2. Lighting retrofits at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, E.C. [Pittsburgh Zoo and Aviary, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Pittsburgh Zoo occupies approximately 52 acres in the City`s Highland Park. Thirty structures serve as animal holding facilities, public display buildings, classrooms, food service facilities, offices, warehouses, a veterinary hospital, and gift shops. The cost of energy for heating, cooling, lighting, pumping, food service, etc. is approximately $280,000 a year. Of this, about 79 percent, or $220,000, is spent for electricity. About 20 percent ($44,000) of that electricity cost is spent directly on lighting. In mid-1992 a series of retrofits to the lighting systems in the Zoo`s buildings was begun. These were completed in mid-1994. These improvements cost $127,690, and they are expected to reduce electricity costs by $24,500 a year. The most interesting projects were carried out in the Tropical Forest Building, the Aqua Zoo, and the Niches of the World Building.

  3. 20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Zoo Substation. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 87.25. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Wild Jobs with Wildlife: Jobs in Zoos and Aquariums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Olivia

    2001-01-01

    Provides job descriptions and information for keepers and other animal caretakers at zoos and aquariums. Includes information about skills and training needed, working conditions, employment outlook, and earnings. Includes a list of resources for further information. (JOW)

  5. American Zoo and Aquarium Association Multi-Institutional Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierking, Lynn D.

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes the results of a literature review of the level of conservation-related knowledge, attitudes, affect, and behavior among visitors to zoos and aquariums. Includes some details of the pilot project related to the literature review. (DDR)

  6. ZooDecisions! When Thursday, June 5, 2014

    E-print Network

    Memphis, University of

    , carefully researching the habitat, diet, and special characteristics of their favorite animals." ! The unit includes a reusable map for zoo design. To Register Contact Dr. Doug Campbell at the Center

  7. Exploring the 4d Superconformal Zoo

    E-print Network

    Ken Intriligator; Brian Wecht

    2004-02-11

    We discuss a new constraint for determining the superconformal U(1)_R symmetry of 4d N=1 SCFTs: It is the unique one which locally maximizes a(R) = 3Tr R^3-Tr R. This constraint comes close to proving the conjectured "a-theorem" for N=1 SCFTs. Using this "a-maximization", exact results can now be obtained for previously inaccessible 4d N=1 SCFTs. We apply this method to a rich class of examples: 4d N=1 SQCD with added matter chiral superfields in the adjoint representation. We classify a zoo of SCFTs, finding that Arnold's ADE singularity classification arises in classifying these theories via all possible relevant Landau-Ginzburg superpotentials. We verify that all RG flows are indeed compatible with the "a-theorem" conjecture, a_{IR}

  8. Wild and zoo animal interactive management and habitat conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Conway

    1995-01-01

    This review considers interactive management of wild and zoo populations as a stratesy to support habitat preservation, help\\u000a sustain key endangered species, and hasten the evolution of zoos and aquaria as proactive conservation organizations. Interactive\\u000a management supports key species' subpopulations in an integrated fashion, using their study in nature as a way to understand\\u000a wildlife habitats, ecological processes and conservation

  9. An analysis of zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarek-Sandor, Joy

    Informal science institutions are a significant provider of science teacher professional development. As pressure continues to critically analyze the work of teachers and their effectiveness in the classroom, it is important to understand how informal science institutions contribute to effective change in teacher science content knowledge and pedagogy. This research study analyzed zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development to respond to the research questions: How do zoos and aquaria determine and assess their goals for teacher professional development? How do these goals align with effective teacher change for science content knowledge and pedagogy? Theoretical frameworks for high quality teacher professional development, effective evaluation of teacher professional development, and learning in informal science settings guided the research. The sample for the study was AZA accredited zoos and aquariums providing teacher professional development (N=107). Data collection consisted of an online questionnaire, follow-up interviews, and content analysis of teacher professional development artifacts. Analysis revealed that by and large zoos and aquariums are lacking in their provision of science teacher professional development. Most professional development focuses on content or resources, neglecting pedagogy. Assessments mismatch the goals and rely heavily on self-report and satisfaction measures. The results demonstrate a marked difference between those zoos and aquariums that are larger in capacity versus those that are medium to small in size. This may be an area of research for the future, as well as analyzing the education resources produced by zoos and aquariums as these were emphasized heavily as a way they serve teachers.

  10. Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roberta Johnson

    2000-07-01

    This section of the Windows to the Universe web site provides information and images about galaxies including detailed information about the Milky Way galaxy, ellipticals, spirals, and irregulars. Windows to the Universe is a user-friendly learning system pertaining to the Earth and Space sciences. The objective of this project is to develop an innovative and engaging web site that spans the Earth and Space sciences and includes a rich array of documents, including images, movies, animations, and data sets that explore the Earth and Space sciences and the historical and cultural ties between science, exploration and the human experience. Links at the top of each page allow users to navigate between beginner, intermediate and advanced levels.

  11. Math Forum@Drexel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Math Forum is an online resource for mathematics education intended for teachers, parents, students, and others interested in math and math education. The site includes a help page with an ask-the-expert feature, a searchable, annotated library of links to math-related web sites, and a searchable archive of teacher-to-teacher discussions about teaching mathematics. There is also a problems page that includes problems and puzzles, a problem-of-the-week feature, and "Write Math with the Math Forum," a tool for curriculum support that features grade-specific problems aligned to state and national standards. Other materials include links to online forums and discussion groups, links to resources and tools (including a teacher exchange page for user-contributed lessons and activities), links to discussions of key issues, a newsletter, and information about professional development opportunities.

  12. The global reach of zoos and aquariums in visitor numbers and conservation expenditures.

    PubMed

    Gusset, Markus; Dick, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A survey conducted by the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums, in collaboration with national and regional zoo and aquarium associations, showed that annually more than 700 million people visit zoos and aquariums worldwide and are thus potentially exposed to environmental education. Furthermore, the world zoo and aquarium community reportedly spends about US$ 350 million on wildlife conservation each year. Therefore, the world zoo and aquarium community has the potential to play an important role in both environmental education and wildlife conservation. Systematic reviews are encouraged to provide further evidence for the effectiveness of zoos and aquariums as centers of education and conservation. PMID:21136509

  13. Alaska Science Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Alaska Science Forum Web site is provided by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The forum consists of articles written about various science subjects by scientists from the Geophysical Institute. Categories include the aurora, earthquakes, fun science facts, historic Alaska, mountains, rocks and geology, volcanoes, weather, and more. One of the latest articles, by Ned Rozell, is titled: Bogs, Permafrost and the Global Carbon Equation. Each of the articles is listed along with the author's name and a direct link to the online publication, most of which are fairly short and geared towards nonscientists making reading easy and interesting. [JAB

  14. Management and leadership forum.

    PubMed

    2015-04-29

    Online subscribers to Nursing Management can now access the RCNi management and leadership forum, a more direct way to contact other RCNi subscribers, especially those in your field of practice. Go to rcni.com/hub for more information. Please submit articles and opinion pieces for publication in the usual way, by emailing the editor at nick.lipley@rcni.com. PMID:25921904

  15. Forestry: Forum summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, R.

    1981-01-01

    A synopsis of a forum addressing the use of LANDSAT data in forestry is given. Broad inventory studies, clear-cut monitoring, and insect and disease detection were among the subject areas discussed. Concerns regarding the vailability of data, cloud cover, resolution and classification accuracy, and product format were expressed by foresters.

  16. Distressed animal behaviors and some recommendations for improvements at the Kuala Lumpur Zoo, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Haque, Amber

    2006-01-01

    The artificial living conditions of captive animals present numerous challenges for animal caretakers. In this study I explored abnormal behaviors in certain caged animals at the Kuala Lumpur Zoo. Findings obtained from observations of animals and interviews of the zoo staff are followed by recommendations: including the development of standards and manuals, licensing of zoos and animals, and increased budgets from governments or alternative sources. Such interventions should bring considerable improvements in animal welfare at the zoos in the region. PMID:17209757

  17. Belles captives : une histoire des zoos du ct des btes Eric Baratay

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Belles captives : une histoire des zoos du côté des bêtes Eric Baratay Les artistes ont beaucoup représenté les bêtes exposées dans les zoos, se passionnant pour leurs beautés, leurs formes (fig. 147'émergeaient des interrogations sur la légitimité des zoos. Max Slevogt (fig. 150) et Otto Dill (Tigres dans une

  18. The Internet Topology Zoo Simon Knight, Hung X. Nguyen, Nickolas Falkner, Rhys Bowden, Matthew Roughan

    E-print Network

    Roughan, Matthew

    1 The Internet Topology Zoo Simon Knight, Hung X. Nguyen, Nickolas Falkner, Rhys Bowden, Matthew,nickolas.falkner,rhys.bowden,matthew.roughan}@adelaide.edu.au www.topology-zoo.org Abstract--The study of network topology has attracted a great deal of attention questions about network structure. The Internet Topology Zoo is a store of network data created from

  19. Zoo Biology 17:481497 (1998) 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Kalinowski, Steven T

    1998-01-01

    Zoo Biology 17:481­497 (1998) © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc. An Improved Method for Estimating Inbreeding is discussed. Zoo Biol 17:481­497, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: endangered species; fitness; lethal. For example, in a classic study, Ralls et al. [1988] exam- ined 40 mammalian zoo pedigrees and found decreased

  20. ModelingVisitor-Exhibit Interaction at Dynamic Zoo and Aquarium Exhibits for

    E-print Network

    ModelingVisitor-Exhibit Interaction at Dynamic Zoo and Aquarium Exhibits for Developing Real of Technology b Sonification Lab, Georgia Institute of Technology Abstract. Zoos and aquaria are dynamic, vision impairment Introduction Over 140 million people visit zoos and aquaria each year ensuring

  1. Paris, mai 2014 LA MNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES

    E-print Network

    Paris, mai 2014 LA MÉNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES Exposition : les coulisses en bande dessinée Ouverte en 1794, la Ménagerie, zoo historique au coeur de Paris, fête ses 220 ans cette année ! À exposer le travail qu'elle a réalisé lors de son immersion au sein du zoo du Jardin des Plantes pour la

  2. GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo In het mooie Zuid-Limburg ligt een prachtig dierenpark;

    E-print Network

    Franssen, Michael

    GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo In het mooie Zuid-Limburg ligt een prachtig dierenpark; GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo. In 2005 opende GaiaPark Kerkrade Zoo haar deuren. Het is het eerste dierenpark dat volledig in de 21e eeuw

  3. Paris, le 24 janvier 2013 MNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES

    E-print Network

    Paris, le 24 janvier 2013 MÉNAGERIE, LE ZOO DU JARDIN DES PLANTES Après l'épisode neigeux, la Ménagerie rouvre ses portes au public et sonne la fin de la récréation pour les Orangs-outans ! Le zoo a du zoo de Twycross (Angleterre). Infos pratiques Accès par le Jardin des Plantes, 57 rue Cuvier. Ouvert

  4. 2.10 A&GApril2011Vol.52 oon Zoo is an online lunar citizen

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Ian

    2.10 A&G·April2011·Vol.52 M oon Zoo is an online lunar citizen science project designed to address by the Citizen Science Alliance in a collection of online citizen science projects known as the Zooniverse independent observations. The Moon Zoo project The goal of Moon Zoo, like all other citizen science projects

  5. Monkeying Around: Examining the Effects of a Community Zoo on the Science Achievement of Third Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined the efficacy of a model of integrated science and literacy instruction situated at a community zoo. Three intact cohorts of third grade urban students received instruction via different treatments: inquiry-based instruction at a zoo; inquiry-based instruction at school; and activity-based instruction at a zoo. All three…

  6. Dark web forums portal: Searching and analyzing jihadist forums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yulei Zhang; Shuo Zeng; Li Fan; Yan Dang; Catherine A. Larson; Hsinchun Chen

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of Web 2.0, the Web is acting as a platform which enables end-user content generation. As a major type of social media in Web 2.0, Web forums facilitate intensive interactions among participants. International Jihadist groups often use Web forums to promote violence and distribute propaganda materials. These Dark Web forums are heterogeneous and widely distributed. Therefore, how

  7. The PRIVACY Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Begun in 1992, the PRIVACY Forum is a moderated digest of "the discussion and analysis of issues relating to the general topic of privacy (both personal and collective) in the 'information age'." It is sponsored by the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), internetMCI and Cisco Systems, but they do not influence its content. The digest mailing itself is a once- or twice-weekly publication, and submissions are generally, though not always, signed by the author. The archive includes all of the Privacy Forum's digests as well as various reports, legislative acts, fact sheets and other materials that are topically related. The archive is keyword searchable but results contain no descriptive information--only the volume and number of the issue.

  8. Inquiry Learning Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Inquiry Learning Forum (ILF) is an online community of K-12 math and science teachers interested in inquiry-based teaching and learning. Materials at the ILF web site include discussions on what inquiry is and why it is useful,and how it connects to local and national educational standards. The ILF library is a collection of lesson ideas and web links suggested by teachers, including inquiry-based lesson plans, activities, and unit ideas, as well as links to online resources from other web sites. Teachers can create their own personal portals with links to ILF and external resources, personal profiles, and a personal journal. There are also discussion forums for teachers; a collaborative group space for sharing ideas; virtual visits to classrooms; and information on professional development activities.

  9. A Cosmic Zoo in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    Astronomers often turn their telescopes to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the closest galaxies to our own Milky Way, in their quest to understand the Universe. In this spectacular new image from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, a celestial menagerie of different objects and phenomena in part of the LMC is on display, ranging from vast globular clusters to the remains left by brilliant supernovae explosions. This fascinating observation provides data for a wide variety of research projects unravelling the life and death of stars and the evolution of galaxies. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is only about 160 000 light-years from our own Milky Way - very close on a cosmic scale. This proximity makes it a very important target as it can be studied in far more detail than more distant systems. The LMC lies in the constellation of Dorado (the Swordfish), deep in the southern sky and well placed for observations from ESO's observatories in Chile. It is one of the galaxies forming the Local Group surrounding the Milky Way [1]. Though enormous on a human scale, the LMC is less than one tenth the mass of our home galaxy and spans just 14 000 light-years compared to about 100 000 light-years for the Milky Way. Astronomers refer to it as an irregular dwarf galaxy [2]. Its irregularity, combined with its prominent central bar of stars suggests to astronomers that tidal interactions with the Milky Way and fellow Local Group galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, could have distorted its shape from a classic barred spiral into its modern, more chaotic form. This image is a mosaic of four pictures from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image covers a region of sky more than four times as large as the full Moon. The huge field of view of this camera makes it possible to see a very wide range of objects in the LMC in a single picture, although only a small part of the entire galaxy can be included. Dozens of clusters of young stars can be seen as well as traces of glowing gas clouds. Huge numbers of faint stars fill the image from edge to edge and in the background, more galaxies, far beyond the LMC, are visible. Globular clusters are collections of hundreds of thousands to millions of stars bound by gravity into a roughly spherical shape just a few light-years across. Many clusters orbit the Milky Way and most are ancient, over ten billion years old, and composed mainly of old red stars. The LMC also has globular clusters and one is visible as the fuzzy white oval cluster of stars in the upper right part of the image. This is NGC 1978, an unusually massive globular cluster. Unlike most other globular clusters, NGC 1978 is believed to be just 3.5 billion years old. The presence of this kind of object in the LMC leads astronomers to think that the LMC has a more recent history of active star formation than our own Milky Way. As well as being a vigorous region of star birth, the LMC has also seen many spectacular stellar deaths in the form of brilliant supernova explosions. At the top right of the image, the remnant of one such supernova, a strangely shaped wispy cloud called DEM L 190, often also referred to as N 49, can be seen. This giant cloud of glowing gas is the brightest supernova remnant in the LMC, and is about 30 light-years across. At the centre, where the star once burned, now lies a magnetar, a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. It was only in 1979 that satellites orbiting Earth detected a powerful gamma-ray burst from this object, drawing attention to the extreme properties of this new class of stellar exotica created by supernova explosions. This part of the Large Magellanic Cloud is so packed with star clusters and other objects that astronomers can spend entire careers exploring it. With so much activity, it is easy to see why astronomers are so keen to study the strange creatures in this heavenly zoo. Notes [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Group [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_mor

  10. Organic Chemistry Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

  11. Organic Chemistry Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

  12. Young physicists' forum

    SciTech Connect

    T. Adams et al.

    2001-11-02

    The Young Physicists' Forum was an opportunity for the younger members of the particle-physics community to gather at Snowmass 2001 and to study and debate major issues that face the field over the next twenty years. Discussions were organized around three major topics: outreach and education, the impact of globalization, and building a robust and balanced field. We report on the results of these discussions, as presented on July 17, 2001.

  13. Assessment of change in conservation attitudes through zoo education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Teresa

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in fall 2010 and subjects were students' ages 14-18 who either participated in a formal conservation education class led by zoo educators or in a field trip in which they were engaged in free-choice learning. Two research questions were: 1) Does a trip to the zoo affect conservation attitudes and 2) does learning experience, free-choice or formal, affect conservation attitudes? A criterion group design was used and the instrument used to measure conservation attitudes was Tool 4 from the Visitor Evaluation Toolbox produced by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums MIRP study (Falk, J., Bronnenkant, K., Vernon, C., & Heimlich, J., 2009). Group one (N=110) engaged in a free-choice (field trip only) experience and group two (N=367) engaged in a formal conservation education class. The survey was administered retrospectively to both groups upon completion of their learning experience at the zoo. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 17.0. A paired sample t-test showed the overall mean within both groups increased in a positive direction from 67.965 (retrospective) to 72.345 (present). With alpha set at .05 the two-tailed probability was <0.001, therefore confirming that the change in conservation attitudes was significant. An independent sample t-test of the change in scores between the groups produced p values of 0.792 and 0.773 and revealed that the change was not significant. Findings did illustrate that a trip to the zoo did positively and significantly affect conservation attitudes among teens and that the type of learning experience did not significantly affect change in conservation attitude scores.

  14. The C. elegans Zonula Occludens Ortholog ZOO-1 Cooperates with the Cadherin-Catenin Complex to Recruit Actin during

    E-print Network

    Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    The C. elegans Zonula Occludens Ortholog ZOO-1 Cooperates with the Cadherin-Catenin Complex embryo, we have characterized the sole C. elegans ZO family member, ZOO-1. ZOO-1 localizes proteins HMR- 1/E-cadherin and VAB-9/claudin, but surprisingly, not HMP-1/-catenin or HMP-2/-catenin. zoo-1

  15. Wonder how your MSU degree can move you toward a career in a zoo or aquarium? Want to

    E-print Network

    Wonder how your MSU degree can move you toward a career in a zoo or aquarium? Want to apply your at Binder Park Zoo in Bat- tle Creek collaborate with MSU Department of Zoology to offer an intensive field per week with zoo professionals. Their mission guides the work efforts of the whole Binder Park Zoo

  16. Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos.

    PubMed

    Silva, J C; Ogassawara, S; Marvulo, M F; Ferreira-Neto, J S; Dubey, J P

    2001-09-01

    Serum samples from 37 captive exotic felids in 12 zoos from six Brazilian states were assayed for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using formalin-fixed whole tachyzoites. Titers greater than or equal to 1:20 were considered positive. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 24 of 37 (64.9%) felids, including one European lynx (Lynx lynx), two jungle cats (Felis chaus), two servals (Leptailurus serval), two tigers (Panthera tigris), three leopards (Panthera pardus), and 14 of 27 lions (Panthera leo). This is the first serologic analysis for T. gondii infection in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos. PMID:12785684

  17. Quantification of false positives within Moon Zoo crater annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how a quantitative pattern recognition system can be used to estimate the quantity of contamination in Moon Zoo data from erroneous annotations. The proposed method produces not only estimates of true verses false crater annotations, but also a full error covariance, with additional conformity checks, which is essential for the meaningful interpretation of measurements, e.g. for plotting error bars.

  18. Agricultural Outlook Forum '98: USDA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture organized Agricultural Outlook Forum '98 to provide "up-to-date assessment of farm and commodity prospects and major economic developments in agriculture." The topics covered in the forum include agricultural and trade prospects, new frontiers for agriculture, food safety, economic opportunities for small farms, risk management, trade barriers, biotechnology, marketing organic food products, conservation, international marketing, price indexes and transportation. Selected speeches from the forum are now available for downloading.

  19. 68 FR 6747 - Public Forum: Spam Email

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-02-10

    ...FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Public Forum: Spam Email AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (FTC...potential solutions to unsolicited commercial email (``UCE'' or ``spam''). The forum...and Forum Goals Unsolicited commercial email (``UCE'' or ``spam'') is...

  20. It's a Zoo out There!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Amy Larrison; Hebert, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The People Learning Urban Science (PLUS) program creates partnerships and coordinates efforts involving a local zoo, university, and school district, seeking to instill within students a sense of the natural environment. Even though the majority of students live among concrete and metal structures, their eyes and ears can be trained to make…

  1. The slashdot zoo: mining a social network with negative edges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jérôme Kunegis; Andreas Lommatzsch; Christian Bauckhage

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the corpus of user relationships of the Slash- dot technology news site. The data was collected from the Slashdot Zoo feature where users of the website can tag other users as friends and foes, providing positive and negative en- dorsements. We adapt social network analysis techniques to the problem of negative edge weights. In particular, we con- sider

  2. School visits to zoos and museums: a missed educational opportunity?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sue Dale Tunnicliffe; A. M. Lucas; Jonathan Osborne

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies in exhibitions have begun to consider the cognitive content of the ‘dialogue’ between visitor and exhibit designer. Such studies have focused on the leisure visitor and not on organised school visits. The study reported here compares the conversational content of primary school and family visitors at the London Zoo and the Natural History Museum, London. The data show

  3. Factors facilitating research: a survey of zoo and aquarium professionals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ursula S; Maple, Terry L; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the background, training, and perceptions of professionals conducting and coordinating research at North American zoos and aquariums accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and to identify the factors they considered critical to successful scientific programs. We analyzed responses to a 57-item questionnaire from 231 professionals at AZA zoos and aquariums. The majority of those surveyed conducted behavioral research, conducted research only in a captive setting, held curatorial positions, had their salaries supported by their institutions' operating budget, and considered themselves part of a successful scientific program. About 30% of those we surveyed possessed a doctoral research degree in comparison to 55% possessing lesser level degrees-19% with master's, 34% with bachelor's, and 2% with other degrees. Support from the chief executive officer and personnel dedicated to conducting scientific programs were judged as the two most important factors contributing to the successful scientific programs. The information provided in this report may be used to develop and improve both established and newly initiated scientific programs in zoos and aquariums. PMID:20127961

  4. Beyond Borders: Zoo as Training Location for Wildlife Biologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melber, Leah M.; Bergren, Rachel; Santymire, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The role of institutions such as zoos in global conservation efforts is critical. In addition to serving as informal learning centers for the general public, these institutions are well-positioned to provide training and professional development for the next generation of conservation scientists. And while many organizations traditionally have…

  5. Observing Animal Behavior at the Zoo: A Learning Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Debra B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate students in a learning laboratory course initially chose a species to study; researched that species' physical and behavioral characteristics; then learned skills necessary to select, operationalize, observe, and record animal behavior accurately. After their classroom preparation, students went to a local zoo to observe the behavior…

  6. Forum on Economic Freedom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Forum on Economic Freedom web site was developed by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) to build and strengthen democracy around the world through promoting private enterprise. The highlight of the site is Economic Reform Today, a journal published by CIPE to help educate policymakers on successful economic strategies. Recent issues have focused on challenges for policymakers in new democracies, globalization, reshaping government and market solutions to social issues. Other resources available include materials from CIPE "Central and Eastern Europe: Economic Policy Roundtables" and "Women in Business" programs.

  7. Ideas Economy: Innovation Forum 2013

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Ideas Economy: Innovation Forum 2013 Guy Wollaert Senior vice-president, chief technical officer of the world's most admired corporate innovators. James Curleigh President, the Levi's brand Levi Strauss & Co, and innovate fastenough to compete in the 21stcentury? Join us at the Ideas Economy: Innovation Forum

  8. London International Youth Science Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

  9. Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or discussion boards, are web applications that provide online discussions. Like wikis, your forum

  10. (Tribology conferences and forums)

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.

    1990-11-30

    The principal meeting attended during this trip was the Japan International Tribology Conference Nagoya 1990. The conference encompassed a wide range of topics, including the tribology of ceramics, the tribology in high-performance automobiles, and many aspects of lubrication technology. Associated forums were also held on the tribology of advanced ceramics, on solid lubrication, and on automotive lubricants. Presentations made during the latter forum discussed anticipated trends in engine development and anticipated improvements in lubricants required for the next generation of engines. In addition to meetings, site visits were made to five industrial organizations to discuss ceramic tribology. Nippon Steel Corporation and Toshiba Corporation are both very active in the ceramic area, Nippon Steel from their interest in research on new materials and Toshiba from both an interest in new materials and in support of their work in electronic devices. Two engine manufacturers were also visited, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. These companies were somewhat reserved in their discussion of progress in the utilization of ceramics in automobile engines.

  11. PALM BEACH ZOO The Palm Beach Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full-time position is filled by

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    PALM BEACH ZOO The Palm Beach Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full, and installation of flora · Provide technical horticulture expertise during new exhibit development · Assist WCC the horticulture in an ecologically friendly manner · Develops and maintains SOPs and emergency management protocol

  12. How Do Zoos "Talk" to Their General Visitors? Do Visitors "Listen"? A Mixed Method Investigation of the Communication between Modern Zoos and Their General Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew; Mansfield, Caroline F.

    2014-01-01

    Modern zoos utilise a variety of education tools for communicating with visitors. Previous research has discussed the benefits of providing multiple education communications, yet little research provides an indication of what communications are being employed within zoos today. This research is a two-phased, mixed-methods investigation into the…

  13. Regional Technical Forum AND 2012 PROGRESS UPDATE

    E-print Network

    Regional Technical Forum AND 2012 PROGRESS UPDATE 2011 Annual Report #12;PAGE 2 > REGIONAL TECHNICAL FORUM > 2011 ANNUAL REPORT In this second annual report, the Regional Technical Forum documents Chair A Brief RTF History The Regional Technical Forum (RTF) was chartered by the Northwest Power

  14. Regional Technical Forum 2013 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    the RTF Chair #12;PAGE 5 > Regional Technical FoRum > 2013 ANNUAL REPORT Energy efficiency has now becomeRegional Technical Forum 2013 Annual Report #12;PAGE 3 > Regional Technical FoRum > 2013 ANNUAL REPORT I'm pleased to present the Regional Technical Forum's 2013 Annual Report, detailing its progress

  15. Northern Ireland Squirrel Forum -26 May 2010 Declan Looney (DL) CHAIR-NIEA

    E-print Network

    ­ Belfast Zoo Mark Challis ­ Belfast Zoo Allan Galway ­ Belfast Zoo Phil Davidson ­ NT Gregor Fulton to discuss the control of greys on their properties. DL: gave a brief up date of the Belfast Zoo captive breeding and translocation plans in the absence of Zoo staff: the plan is currently delayed for various

  16. Global Policy Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United Nations has a number of policy initiatives occurring in all parts of the globe, and some might ask the question: Who evaluates the effectiveness of such programs? The United Nations does some of this work themselves, but the Global Policy Forum is also intimately concerned with monitoring their programs, along with "promoting accountability of global decisions." Visitors who know what types of material they are looking for will want to search through the headings which include such themes as globalization, international justice, and UN reform. Each one of these sections contains a brief essay on their work, along with a smattering of reports, tables, and charts that highlight their analyses, past and present.

  17. Musical Instrument Makers Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With links to over 400 pages on acoustic guitar building, violin, dulcimer, flute, recorder, and bagpipe making, brass instrument building and repair, drum making and much, much more this is the site to visit to better understand how musical instruments are made and maintained. The Forum itself hosts a long list of topics which include discussions related to everything from splitting spruce billets to how to alter a violin to better fit a musician's hand to how to use bird's eye maple in guitar building. And as if all of that were not enough the site also provides links to appropriate books, magazines and hosts a tools store section with links to wood turning tools, hand tools and everything else that's needed to keep your fiddle, guitar or flute in tip top shape.

  18. Closed sets of correlations: answers from the zoo

    E-print Network

    Ben Lang; Tamas Vertesi; Miguel Navascues

    2014-02-12

    We investigate the conditions under which a set of multipartite nonlocal correlations can describe the distributions achievable by distant parties conducting experiments in a consistent universe. Several questions are posed, such as: are all such sets "nested", i.e., contained into one another? Are they discrete or do they form a continuum? How many of them are supraquantum? Are there non-trivial polytopes among them? We answer some of these questions or relate them with established conjectures in complexity theory by introducing a "zoo" of physically consistent sets which can be characterized efficiently via either linear or semidefinite programming. As a bonus, we use the zoo to derive, for the first time, concrete impossibility results in nonlocality distillation.

  19. Closed sets of correlations: answers from the zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ben; Vértesi, Tamás; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the conditions under which a set of multipartite nonlocal correlations can describe the distributions achievable by distant parties conducting experiments in a consistent universe. Several questions are posed, such as: are all such sets ‘nested’, i.e., contained into one another? Are they discrete or do they form a continuum? How many of them are supraquantum? Are there non-trivial polytopes among them? We answer some of these questions or relate them to established conjectures in complexity theory by introducing a ‘zoo’ of physically consistent sets, which can be characterized efficiently via either linear or semidefinite programming. As a bonus, we use the zoo to derive, for the first time, concrete impossibility results in nonlocality distillation. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

  20. "Fall" Forum Our College is....

    E-print Network

    Welcome Everyone #12;"Fall" Forum #12;Our College is.... ....helping animals · Ensure the CVMBS is THE place to work #12;Transparency Financial · Ability to reinvest tuition be responsible #12;Collaboration · Across College & Campus · Shared Facilities · Combined Programs · SAU

  1. Cover Crops Soil Health Forum

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    blinking light, onto Silk Farm Road. 4. Entrance to Center and Sanctuary is on the left. See sign. Cover Crops & Soil Health Forum February 18, 2014 NH Audubon Center 84 Silk Farm Road Concord, NH 03301

  2. Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sami Kahn

    2009-07-01

    Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or disc

  3. Forum on orthophotography: Summary Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1990-01-01

    A Forum on Orthophotography was held on May 15, 1990, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The forum was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Governors' Association, and the National Association of Counties. The purpose of the forum was to expand the understanding and use of orthophoto products among the user community, as well as among those currently considering, or as yet unfamiliar with, the use of these products. It was also intended to provide a forum for assessing requirements for, and interest in, orthophoto products and for the identification and discussion of issues and future needs concerning orthophoto use and coordination. The 1-day forum was organized into three major sessions that focussed on technical aspects, user applications, and management issues. The first session presented a brief background and overview of the technical characteristics of standard and digital orthophotos. The second session included formal presentations by Federal, State, and county government agencies on their current and planned applications of orthophoto products, with particular emphasis on their use within geographic information systems. In the third session, private industry addressed their community's interest, capabilities, and potential role. This session also included a proposal by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service for a national cooperative program for the production of l:12,000-scale orthophotoquad products. In addition to the formal presentations, the forum provided a time for open discussion in which attendees had an opportunity to exchange information and make statements about their needs or other items pertinent to the production and dissemination of orthophoto products. Several agency orthophoto product exhibits and interactive demonstrations were also available throughout the day. This report includes a forum agenda and summaries of the various presentations given by the program participants. The appendixes to the report include a list of forum cosponsoring agencies and cooperating organizations, a summary listing of forum registrants by organizational affiliation, and the forum registration list. Also included in the appendkes is the Higher Resolution Orthophoto Products Survey that was sent to each participant following the forum to assist in the identification of near- and longer-term applications, and the determination of requirements, for higher-resolution orthophoto products.

  4. A Critical Review of Zoo-based Olfactory Enrichment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fay Clark; Andrew J. King

    Olfactory stimuli are frequently integrated into zoo enrichment programs. This ‘olfactory enrichment’ can stimulate reproduction\\u000a or naturalistic behaviour, enhance enclosure exploration, or reduce inactivity. However, not all scents achieve their desired\\u000a goals, and can in fact bring about undesirable behaviour such as increased levels of stereotypy. Few attempts have been made\\u000a to quantify the impact of introducing olfactory stimuli to

  5. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda’s potentially dangerous behavior. PMID:25550978

  6. A survey of diabetes prevalence in zoo-housed primates.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, C W; Fuller, G A; Dennis, P M

    2013-01-01

    In humans, type II diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas is capable of producing insulin but cells do not appropriately respond to insulin with an uptake of glucose. While multiple factors are associated with type II diabetes in humans, a high calorie diet and limited exercise are significant risk factors for the development of this disease. Zoo primates, with relatively high caloric density diets and sedentary lifestyles, may experience similar conditions that could predispose them to the development of diabetes. We surveyed all Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) facilities with primates in their collections to determine the prevalence of diabetes, diagnosis and treatment methods, and treatment outcomes. Nearly 30% of responding institutions reported at least one diabetic primate in their current collection. Although the majority of reported cases were in Old World Monkeys (51%), all major taxonomic groups were represented. Females represented nearly 80% of the diagnosed cases. A wide variety of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment techniques were reported. It is clear from these results diabetes should be considered prominently in decisions relating to diet, weight and activity levels in zoo-housed primates, as well as discussions surrounding animal health and welfare. PMID:22847472

  7. Endoparasite Infections in Pet and Zoo Birds in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Roberto; Girivetto, Martine; Marangi, Marianna; Mancianti, Francesca; Giangaspero, Annunziata

    2012-01-01

    Faecal samples were individually collected from pet (n = 63) and zoo (n = 83) birds representing 14 orders and 63 species. All the samples were examined by faecal flotation technique. In a subgroup of samples (n = 75), molecular assays were also used to detect Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts. Overall, 35.6% of the birds harboured parasites (42.2% of zoo birds and 27% of pet birds), including Strongyles-Capillarids (8.9%), Ascaridia (6.8%), Strongyles (5.5%), G. duodenalis Assemblage A (5.3%), Coccidia (4.1%), Cryptosporidium (4%), Porrocaecum (2.7%), Porrocaecum-Capillarids (2%), and Syngamus-Capillarids (0.7%). The zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A and Cryptosporidium were exclusively found in Psittaciformes, with prevalences of 10.3% and 7.7% within this bird group. Zoo birds were more likely to harbor mixed infections (OR?=?14.81) and symptomatic birds to be parasitized (OR?=?4.72). Clinicians should be aware of the public health implications posed by zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblages and Cryptosporidium species in captive birds. PMID:22536128

  8. Contact: Tina Rolen, Knoxville Zoo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (865) 637-5331 ext. 377 June 30, 2011

    E-print Network

    Contact: Tina Rolen, Knoxville Zoo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (865) 637-5331 ext. 377 June 30, 2011, a science educator at the Knoxville Zoo, recently returned after 18 days of assisting scientists surveying

  9. Global Policy Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Global Policy Forum (GPF) monitors the United Nations' global policy making. Based in New York City, the internationally represented GPF has consultative status at the UN. Their visually simple, information-rich Website is divided into the following subsections: UN Financial Crisis, Security Council, Social/ Economic Policy, NGOs, Nations and States, and UN Reform. The content includes essays from the GPF staff, issue summaries, excerpts from conference presentations, news articles, and reports from the UN and other government agencies. Other special in-depth sections on the Iraq crisis, international justice, globalization, and additional timely topics are definitely worth a look. Also, check out GPF's What's New section to keep on top of current UN issues -- for instance, this week's What's New contains critical articles and essays on middle east peace negotiation, sanctions against Iraq, and the rumblings of a possible second genocide in Rwanda, among other topics. In addition, the GPF site offers a publications list, numerous links, an electronic mailing list, a search engine, an index, and a virtual visitors center.

  10. Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Patrick; Cathy Mathews; Sue Dale Tunnicliffe

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers\\/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after listening to students' conversations during a field trip to the zoo. In order to

  11. Radio Detection of Green Peas: Implications for Magnetic Fields in Young Galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sayan Chakraborti; Naveen Yadav; Carolin Cardamone; Alak Ray

    2011-01-01

    Green Peas are a new class of young, emission line galaxies that were discovered by citizen volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their low stellar mass, low metallicity and very high star formation rates make Green Peas the nearby (z~0.2) analogs of the Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs) which account for the bulk of the star formation in the early universe (z~2-5).

  12. F E AT U R E PA P E R Mammal and bird species held in zoos are less endemic

    E-print Network

    Mooers, Arne

    F E AT U R E PA P E R Mammal and bird species held in zoos are less endemic and less threatened than their close relatives not held in zoos T. E. Martin1 , H. Lurbiecki2 , J. B. Joy2 & A. O. Mooers2; mammals; zoos Correspondence A. O. Mooers, Department of Biological Sciences and IRMACS, Simon Fraser

  13. La rouverture du Parc zoologique devrait avoir lieu en avril 2014. Ce sera Le zoo du XXIe sicle .

    E-print Network

    Vincennes La réouverture du Parc zoologique devrait avoir lieu en avril 2014. Ce sera « Le zoo du° 2 « Les zoos et la préserva- tion des espèces » vous aura plu. La société des Amis du Muséum vous La Ménagerie, le zoo du Jardin des Plantes, est heureuse de vous faire part de la naissance d

  14. Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K; Jones, Owen R

    2013-01-01

    Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful. PMID:24348999

  15. The educational claims of zoos: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Zoos exude a certain self-confidence regarding their roles as education providers. Indeed, the education outputs of zoos are, at face value, pretty impressive, with most investing in learning opportunities for leisure visitors, education groups and in some cases, as part of their in situ programs. However, these outputs are not necessarily reliable indicators of the educational achievements of zoos. Quantity does not necessarily equate to quality, just as outputs do not necessarily lead to outcomes. Zoo-accreditation organizations such as the AZA and EAZA offer us clear insight into the strategic vision underpinning the education goals for zoo visitors; a heightened appreciation of the value of biodiversity and a connectedness with the natural world. Unsurprisingly, most zoos have educational goals that ally neatly with the vision of their respective accreditation body. Consequently, we are left with fairly narrow, top-down educational goals. This does not necessarily sit well with what we know about the unpredictability of "free choice" learning in environments such as zoos and aquariums, or what is known about public science communication. Research that seeks to explore the impacts of zoo visits often focuses on evaluating performance based on educational goals and the findings are used as a means of providing evidence of institutional achievement. However, any visitor outcome that falls outside of this narrow range could well be missed by the research. In this article, we propose that research that takes unpredictable and unexpected outcomes into account is necessary and overdue. PMID:22674295

  16. A Curriculum Plan for the Columbus Zoo Aquarium. Grades 3 through 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsdorf, Brian

    This curriculum plan is submitted as a framework for developing educational programs at the Columbus Zoo Aquarium (CZA) for elementary school students in grades 3 through 6. It is intended to provide support and assistance to those involved with CZA programs. Major sections include: (1) "Review of Columbus Zoo's Educational Programs"; (2)…

  17. Shedding of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by Felidae in zoos in the Czech Republic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lukešová; I. Literák

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 and 1996, the shedding of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts was monitored in the faeces of Felidae in six zoos in the Czech Republic. In all, 2287 samples of faeces from 19 species of Felidae were examined. In Ostrava Zoo, four episodes of shedding of Toxoplasma-like oocysts were identified, using a flotation examination, in a pair of wild cats (Felis

  18. Serologic survey of trichinellosis in wild mammals kept in a Mexico City Zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Yépez-Mulia; C. Arriaga; M. A. Peña; F. Gual; G. Ortega-Pierres

    1996-01-01

    A serologic survey of Trichinella infection was carried out to determine the prevalence of this parasitosis among wild mammals kept in captivity at the Chapultepec Zoo. This was prompted by the necropsy finding of a heavy Trichinella infection in a Canadian polar bear (Ursus maritimus) that had been kept at the Zoo for more than 11 years. The parasites recovered

  19. Seroprevalences of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sedlák; E. Bártová

    2006-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and abortions in cattle. Little is known about the prevalence of antibodies to this parasite in zoo animals. Sera from 556 animals, from 13 Czech and Slovak zoos were tested for antibodies to N. caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were

  20. From a Zoo to a Zoology: Descriptive Complexity for Graph Polynomials

    E-print Network

    Makowsky, Johann A. "Janos"

    From a Zoo to a Zoology: Descriptive Complexity for Graph Polynomials J.A. Makowsky Department) and the echidna (tachyglossus aculeatus). Zoology is the science 1 It was T. Zaslavsky who suggested the titel "From a zoo to a zoology" for this research program. #12;of comparing and classifying animals

  1. 77 FR 43167 - Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ...Number USCG-2012-0588] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY AGENCY: Coast...as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0588 Safety Zone; Electronic Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY. (a)...

  2. Identification of Plasmodium relictum causing mortality in penguins ( Spheniscus magellanicus) from São Paulo Zoo, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina Galvão Bueno; Rodrigo Pinho Gomez Lopez; Regiane Maria Tironi de Menezes; Maria de Jesus Costa-Nascimento; Giselle Fernandes Maciel de Castro Lima; Radamés Abrantes de Sousa Araújo; Fernanda Junqueira Vaz Guida; Karin Kirchgatter

    2010-01-01

    This study reports avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum in Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) from São Paulo Zoo. The disease was highly infective among the birds and was clinically characterized by its acute course and high mortality. The penguins of São Paulo Zoo were housed for at least 2 years without malaria; however, they had always been maintained in an

  3. The green highway forum

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

  4. Monkeying around: Examining the effects of a community zoo on the science achievement of third graders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Heather A.

    This investigation examined the efficacy of a model of integrated science and literacy instruction situated at a community zoo. Three intact cohorts of third grade urban students received instruction via different treatments: inquiry-based instruction at a zoo; inquiry-based instruction at school; and activity-based instruction at a zoo. All three treatment conditions promoted increased science achievement. There was no difference between the zoo groups at post-test; however the classroom group outperformed both zoo groups. When examined in light of contextual factors (differences in socioeconomic status, teacher level of experience, familiarity of the learning environment), results suggest the effectiveness of the integrated instructional model in promoting increased science achievement. In planning instruction, teachers should consider the novelty of a learning environment, student interest, and how texts can support inquiry.

  5. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum,

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum, Central Area, A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES, Address Informatics Forum. University Of Edinburgh. 10 Crichton Street. Edinburgh. E,H,8, 9,A,B. Telephone. 0,1,3,1, 6,5,1, 5,6,6,1, Map Link. http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/?building=informatics-forum #12;Page 1

  6. Coalescence and refinement of Moon Zoo crater annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how data from multiple users can be combined to give a consensus as to the parameters of annotated craters. The process uses annotations and image data to provide Likelihood solutions, revealing the most probable crater parameters, from which crater Size-Frequency Distributions (SFDs) might be produced.

  7. Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    an impact on offense patterns or inmate behavior. Incidence of Child Abuse According to Gallup polls the congregate survey instrument. Child Abuse Histories of Alaska's Long-term Inmates The survey instrument Self-Reported Child Abuse -- Physical (SRCAP) Scale #12;Alaska Justice Forum Page 2 A BJS Report

  8. Farmworker Organizations Hold Issue Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The 1977 conference of the National Association of Farmworker Organizations (NAFO) centered on the broad spectrum of administrative and legislative areas affecting farmworkers that need policy decisions and directions: labor, immigration, education, health, data/census, hunger/nutrition, rural development, and energy. The forums formulated…

  9. Premixed Prevaporized Combustor Technology Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Forum was held to present the results of recent and current work intended to provide basic information required for demonstration of lean, premixed prevaporized combustors for aircraft gas turbine engine application. Papers are presented which deal with the following major topics: (1) engine interfaces; (2) fuel-air preparation; (3) autoignition; (4) lean combustion; and (5) concept design studies.

  10. Naturally occurring and melengestrol acetate-associated reproductive tract lesions in zoo canids.

    PubMed

    Moresco, A; Munson, L; Gardner, I A

    2009-11-01

    As husbandry practices have improved, safe and effective contraception for captive wildlife management has become a necessity. Melengestrol acetate (MGA), a synthetic progestin, is highly effective and has been used in many zoo species. Long-term use of MGA has been associated with uterine lesions in zoo felids, but effects in zoo canids have not been evaluated. This retrospective study documented spontaneously occurring lesions and investigated the impact of MGA on the reproductive health of zoo canids. Reproductive tracts from adult females were submitted by US zoos to the Association of Zoos & Aquariums' Wildlife Contraception Center Health Surveillance Program. Reproductive tracts were sampled and processed for histopathologic examination following standard protocols. Microscopic evaluations were performed without prior knowledge of MGA treatment status. Prevalence of uterine lesions was evaluated and compared between MGA-treated animals (n = 20) and control (untreated) animals (n = 61). Common lesions within the study population as a whole included endometrial hyperplasia (predominantly cystic) (53%), hydrometra (33%), and adenomyosis (25%). Treatment with MGA was a risk factor for endometrial hyperplasia, hydrometra, fibrosis, and adenomyosis. Uterine mineralization occurred exclusively in MGA-treated animals. Results indicate that MGA contraception can lead to lesions that may permanently impair the fertility of females. Therefore, if long-term contraception of zoo canids is necessary, the use of alternate methods of reproductive control such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs or GnRH vaccines that reduce gonadal hormone exposure should be pursued. PMID:19605907

  11. Measuring animal personality for use in population management in zoos: suggested methods and rationale.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jason V; Powell, David M

    2012-01-01

    The concept that animals have personalities is gaining traction in the scientific community and is well established in zoos and aquariums. Applying knowledge of animal personalities has occurred more slowly and is most often only considered informally. However, animal personalities are likely to affect the welfare animals experience in captivity and thus should be of primary concern to zoo managers. In addition, animal personality likely affects the outcomes of zoo guest experiences and potentially guests' conservation-related behavior. With over 1,000,000 animals in the care of zoos internationally and hundreds of millions of visitors annually, it would be prudent and beneficial to maximize our use of animal personality data in zoos to effect positive conservation outcomes. Understanding how to broaden population planning techniques to include measures of animal personality and the important outcomes of welfare and education value is of prime importance to the zoo industry. In order to succeed, it is necessary to employ techniques that reliably assess animal personalities and provide measures that can easily be used in population planning models. We discuss the outcomes of recent workshops designed to determine the best techniques for measuring animal personalities in the zoo setting with the goal of incorporating personality into population planning. PMID:21370251

  12. Cosmic Collisions: Galaxy Mergers and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura; Willett, Kyle; Masters, Karen; Lintott, Christopher; Whyte, Laura; Lynn, Stuart; Tremonti, Christina A.

    2014-08-01

    Over the years evidence has mounted for a significant mode of galaxy evolution via mergers. This process links gas-rich, spiral galaxies; starbursting galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); post-starburst galaxies; and gas-poor, elliptical galaxies, as objects representing different phases of major galaxy mergers. The post-starburst phase is particularly interesting because nearly every galaxy that evolves from star-forming to quiescent must pass through it. In essence, this phase is a sort of galaxy evolution “bottleneck” that indicates that a galaxy is actively evolving through important physical transitions. In this talk I will present the results from the ‘Galaxy Zoo Quench’ project - using post-starburst galaxies to place observational constraints on the role of mergers and AGN activity in quenching star formation. `Quench’ is the first fully collaborative research project with Zooniverse citizen scientists online; engaging the public in all phases of research, from classification to data analysis and discussion to writing the article and submission to a refereed journal.

  13. Why Are They Doing That? Animal Investigations at the Local Zoo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melber, Leah M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes activities that link classroom science to real world scientific ventures. Uses field trips to zoos or wildlife centers for in-depth learning experiences that help students observe, investigate, and explore issues in animal science. (SAH)

  14. Alaska Justice Forum 21(4), Winter 2005 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Alaska Justice Forum 21(4), Winter 2005 1 ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM WWWWWinter 2005inter 2005inter 2005inter 2005inter 2005 UUUUUNIVERSITYNIVERSITYNIVERSITYNIVERSITYNIVERSITY ofofofofof two things in mind. First, most of these reports have been external pro- gram evaluations completed

  15. The Expanding Zoo of Calabi-Yau Threefolds

    E-print Network

    Rhys Davies

    2011-04-18

    This is a short review of recent constructions of new Calabi-Yau threefolds with small Hodge numbers and/or non-trivial fundamental group, which are of particular interest for model-building in the context of heterotic string theory. The two main tools are topological transitions and taking quotients by actions of discrete groups. Both of these techniques can produce new manifolds from existing ones, and they have been used to bring many new specimens to the previously sparse corner of the Calabi-Yau zoo where both Hodge numbers are small. Two new manifolds are also obtained here from hyperconifold transitions, including the first example with fundamental group S3, the smallest non-Abelian group.

  16. Brookfield Zoo: In Search of The Ways of Knowing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In Search of Ways of Knowing is an online Adventure Trail from the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois. The Adventure Trails each offer an "interactive journey to explore conservation efforts worldwide." Visitors to this Web site -- geared toward kids but fun for anyone -- will find a lively, virtual journey to the village of Epulu in central Africa's Ituri forest. With a choose-your-own-adventure-style educational game format, players hide from a rampaging elephant, snack on beetle grubs, and identify animal sounds in the dark of night. Players also learn about the people and wildlife of the area (with help from your Forest Factbook and the four local kids you meet on the way). Moral of the story: have respect for other ways of knowing. Great graphics and diverse story options make this fun Web site worth a repeat visit.

  17. WISE Zoo: Discovering Disks In The WISE Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Michelle; Kuchner, Marc; Padgett, Deborah; McElwain, Mike; Grady, Carol; Debes, John; Kenyon, Scott; Currie, Thayne; Whyte, Laura; Padget, Ed; Lintott, Chris; Bans, Alissa; Smith, Arfon; Rebull, Luisa; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The new WISE Zoo project will scour the data archive from NASA's WISE mission to fill in our knowledge of the distribution of protoplanetary and debris disks among stars of various populations. Using the power of citizen science to perform a robust, well-calibrated search, we stand to increase the pool of known debris disks by ~375, mostly by finding new disk candidates around B6-A6 dwarfs, A-F subgiants, and G-K giants. This new sample will trace the evolution of planetary systems around intermediate-mass stars from their youth through retirement and provide a crucial list of future targets for disk and exoplanet imaging with JWST.

  18. Low pathogenic influenza A virus activity at avian interfaces in Ohio zoos, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Jacqueline M; Dennis, Patricia; Long, Lindsey; Holtvoigt, Lauren; Brown, Deniele; King, Mary Jo; Shellbarger, Wynonna; Hanley, Chris; Killian, Mary Lea; Slemons, Richard D

    2013-09-01

    This investigation to examine influenza A virus activity in avian species at four Ohio zoos was initiated to better understand the ecology of avian-origin influenza A (AIV) virus in wild aquatic birds and the possibility of spill-over of such viruses into captive zoo birds, both native and foreign species. Virus isolation efforts resulted in the recovery of three low pathogenic (LP) AIV isolates (one H7N3 and two H3N6) from oral-pharyngeal or cloacal swabs collected from over 1000 zoo birds representing 94 species. In addition, 21 LPAIV isolates possessing H3N6, H4N6, or H7N3 subtype combinations were recovered from 627 (3.3%) environmental fecal samples collected from outdoor habitats accessible to zoo and wild birds. Analysis of oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected from free-ranging mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) live-trapped at one zoo in 2007 resulted in the recovery of 164 LPAIV isolates (48% of samples) representing five HA and six NA subtypes and at least nine HA-NA combinations. The high frequency of isolate recovery is undoubtedly due to the capture and holding of wild ducks in a common pen before relocation. Serologic analyses using an agar gel immune diffusion assay detected antibodies to the influenza A virus type-specific antigen in 147 of 1237 (11.9%) zoo bird sera and in 14 of 154 (9%) wild mallard sera. Additional analyses of a limited number of zoo bird sera demonstrated HA- and NA-inhibition activity to 15 HA and nine NA subtypes. The spectrum of HA antibodies indicate antibody diversity of AIV infecting zoo birds; however, the contribution of heterologous cross-reactions and steric interference was not ruled out. This proactive investigation documented that antigenically diverse LPAIVs were active in all three components of the avian zoologic-wild bird interfaces at Ohio zoos (zoo birds, the environment, and wild birds). The resulting baseline data provides insight and justification for preventive medicine strategies for zoo birds. PMID:24283133

  19. Effects of porcine zona pellucida immunocontraceptives in zoo felids.

    PubMed

    Harrenstien, Lisa A; Munson, Linda; Chassy, Lisa M; Liu, Irwin K M; Kirkpatrick, Jay F

    2004-09-01

    Methods of contraception are necessary for management of zoo felids; however, the most commonly used contraceptive (melengestrol acetate implant) is associated with serious adverse reactions with long-term use. Porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccines are promising as contraceptives, but their safety in zoo felids has not been tested. pZP vaccine was administered to 27 female felids representing 10 species, including African lion (Panthera leo), Asian leopard (P. pardus), jaguar (P. onca), tiger (P. tigris), snow leopard (P. uncia), cougar (Felis concolor), Siberian lynx (F. lynx), Canada lynx (F. canadensis), serval (F. serval), and bobcat (F. rufus), in 15 facilities. Over 6 wk, each animal received three i.m. injections of 65 microg pZP with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or carbopol as the adjuvant. Behavioral signs of estrus were seen in 14 of the vaccinated felids. An unacceptably high incidence of adverse reactions was seen including injection site swelling, lameness, limb swelling, or abscessation (or all) in five felids after injection with FCA as the initial adjuvant. Adverse behavioral signs, including increased irritability and aggression, were seen in four felids. Six of the felids were assayed for antibodies against pZP during the 12 mo after vaccination; all showed antibody production. Antibody levels appeared to peak 1-4 mo after vaccination began, although elevated antibody levels persisted in two animals for > 12 mo after the first injection. All vaccinated felids were ovariohysterectomized 3-13 mo after vaccination. Folliculogenesis was present in all treated animals, and there was no histopathologic evidence of inflammatory damage to ovaries. Contraceptive efficacy was not specifically evaluated in this study; however, two of the three felids housed with an intact male became pregnant during the study, one of which gave birth to healthy cubs. PMID:15526881

  20. PREVALENCE OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL PARASITES IN CAPTIVE BIRDS OF GUJARAT ZOOS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Patel; A. I. Patel; R. K. Sahu; Raju Vyas

    A total of 106 group faecal samples of different wild birds from Kamal Nehru Zoo, Ahmedabad and Sayyajibaug Zoo, Vadodara, were examined. Out of this 51 (48.11%) were found positive for parasitic infection. Eggs of Ascaris and Capillaria species were observed in 22 (20.75%) and 14 (13.2%) group faecal samples respectively, while the oocyst of Coccidia (Eimeria spe- cies) were

  1. The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, 9-12 September 2013The 20th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum was attended by a little over 100 participants from pharma, contract research, instrument vendors and academia. The Forum was divided into six broad themes, which included collaborative partnerships between CROs and pharmaceutical companies, technology developments, problem solving, the bioanalytical toolbox, biomarker analysis and regulations in bioanalysis. PMID:24423590

  2. Rotation-invariant convolutional neural networks for galaxy morphology prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieleman, Sander; Willett, Kyle W.; Dambre, Joni

    2015-06-01

    Measuring the morphological parameters of galaxies is a key requirement for studying their formation and evolution. Surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have resulted in the availability of very large collections of images, which have permitted population-wide analyses of galaxy morphology. Morphological analysis has traditionally been carried out mostly via visual inspection by trained experts, which is time consuming and does not scale to large (?104) numbers of images. Although attempts have been made to build automated classification systems, these have not been able to achieve the desired level of accuracy. The Galaxy Zoo project successfully applied a crowdsourcing strategy, inviting online users to classify images by answering a series of questions. Unfortunately, even this approach does not scale well enough to keep up with the increasing availability of galaxy images. We present a deep neural network model for galaxy morphology classification which exploits translational and rotational symmetry. It was developed in the context of the Galaxy Challenge, an international competition to build the best model for morphology classification based on annotated images from the Galaxy Zoo project. For images with high agreement among the Galaxy Zoo participants, our model is able to reproduce their consensus with near-perfect accuracy (>99 per cent) for most questions. Confident model predictions are highly accurate, which makes the model suitable for filtering large collections of images and forwarding challenging images to experts for manual annotation. This approach greatly reduces the experts' workload without affecting accuracy. The application of these algorithms to larger sets of training data will be critical for analysing results from future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  3. An epidemiological approach to welfare research in zoos: the Elephant Welfare Project.

    PubMed

    Carlstead, Kathy; Mench, Joy A; Meehan, Cheryl; Brown, Janine L

    2013-01-01

    Multi-institutional studies of welfare have proven to be valuable in zoos but are hampered by limited sample sizes and difficulty in evaluating more than just a few welfare indicators. To more clearly understand how interactions of husbandry factors influence the interrelationships among welfare outcomes, epidemiological approaches are needed as well as multifactorial assessments of welfare. Many questions have been raised about the housing and care of elephants in zoos and whether their environmental and social needs are being met in a manner that promotes good welfare. This article describes the background and rationale for a large-scale study of elephant welfare in North American zoos funded by the (U.S.) Institute of Museum and Library Services. The goals of this project are to document the prevalence of positive and negative welfare states in 291 elephants exhibited in 72 Association of Zoos and Aquariums zoos and then determine the environmental, management, and husbandry factors that impact elephant welfare. This research is the largest scale nonhuman animal welfare project ever undertaken by the zoo community, and the scope of environmental variables and welfare outcomes measured is unprecedented. PMID:24079487

  4. Math Forum Technology Problems of the Week

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    Technology Problems of the Week (tPoWs) are freely accessible problem-solving challenges, modeled on the Math Forum’s Problems of the Week, that take advantage of interactive mathematics tools such as Java applets, TI-Nspire™, The Geometer's Sketchpad®, Fathom™, or spreadsheets. A login is required. Teachers may choose a free class membership, providing the ability to create classes, create student logins, and use the Math Forum’s online mentoring and feedback system or choose a free individual membership, providing individual access to view the problems as well as any available teacher resources. Free student memberships are also available. Problems include hints and answer checks.

  5. Scholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum-NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships

    E-print Network

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    in journalism or have experience in campus sports journalism Specific academic areas: Sports Journalism DeadlineScholarship Updated (date) Freedom Forum- NCAA Sports Journalism Scholarships Scholarship source: NCAA and the Freedom Forum Address: Sports Journalism Scholarship Committee Freedom Forum Scholarships

  6. G20 YOUTH FORUM 2014 ..................................................................................... 3 PARTICIPATION STATISTICS ................................................................................. 4

    E-print Network

    Kuehnlenz, Kolja

    1 #12;CONTENTS: G20 YOUTH FORUM 2014 ......................................................................................... 9 G20 YOUTH SUMMIT ...............................................................................................................20 2 #12;G20 YOUTH FORUM 2014 (Munich, Germany, 7-11 May 2014) The G20 Youth Forum

  7. Chromosomal homeologies between human, harbor seal ( Phoca vitulina ) and the putative ancestral carnivore karyotype revealed by Zoo-FISH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lutz Frönicke; Jutta Müller-Navia; Konstantinos Romanakis; Harry Scherthan

    1997-01-01

    .   We report on the construction of the first comparative Zoo-FISH map of a marine mammal. Zoo-FISH with DNA probes from a human\\u000a chromosome-specific library to metaphase spreads of the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) disclosed 31 conserved syntenic segments covering the complete autosomal complement and the X chromosome. Comparison with\\u000a Zoo-FISH maps of other species reveals that the harbor seal

  8. Copyright 2004, 2005 WiMAX Forum "WiMAX ForumTM" and "WiMAX Forum CERTIFIEDTM" are

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    · University Collaborations · Cross-Team Relationship · System-Level NS-2 Simulator · NS-2 Software Architecture Document · Features by NS-2 Releases #12;WiMAX Forum Internal Use Only Slide 3 Copyright 2004 Library ­ System-Level NS-2 Simulator #12;WiMAX Forum Internal Use Only Slide 4 Copyright 2004, 2005, 2006

  9. Columbia News Video Forum Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Over the past few years, more and more universities and colleges have created video archives of important and timely conferences, proceedings, scholarly lectures, and have placed them online. Columbia University has created this fine archive that highlights many of these types of events, with many of them featuring the scholars in residence at the school. The video forum archive features thematically bundled commentaries (usually lasting close to one hour) on a variety of topics, such as globalization (featuring Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz), and the 21st century American city, which features Bernard Tschumi and Kenneth Jackson, the noted urban historian.

  10. Journal of the Proceedings, School Law Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

    This document consists of the speeches given at the 1972 New Jersey School Law Forum. The Forum is held to encourage the research of timely legal issues involving the structure and operation of the New Jersey public schools, to assist the school law practitioner by affording him the opportunity to hear and discuss research and opinion on selected…

  11. Henryand Sylvia WONG FORUM IN MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    Henryand Sylvia WONG FORUM IN MEDICINE The Henry and Sylvia WONG FORUM IN MEDICINE sciences education Guest Speaker Dr. Lorelei Lingard, PhD Professor, Department of Medicine Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry University of Western Ontario Professor, Faculty of Education University of Western

  12. National Dissemination Forum, 1977. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Henry M.

    Presented is an analysis of nine agreements focused on three areas of common concern to dissemination specialists involved in the 1977 National Dissemination Forum: resources, linkage, research, evaluation and quality control. FORUM participants represented the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC of the National Institute of Education…

  13. 2009 SREB State Leadership Forum Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Learning-Centered Leadership Program hosted its sixth Annual State Leadership Forum May 7 and 8, 2009, in Atlanta. More than 160 education leaders, district officials and policymakers from 25 states attended the forum to hear from practitioners who are getting results in student learning amidst…

  14. Asynchronous Learning Forums for Business Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Christine Cope; Wulf, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    The use of IT as a facilitator for student collaboration in higher business education has grown rapidly since 2000. Asynchronous discussion forums are used abundantly for collaborative training purposes and for teaching students business-relevant tools for their future careers. This article presents an analysis of the asynchronous discussion forum

  15. Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known acknowledges the wisdom of conducting research and expanding knowledge about women's health and sex differences

  16. Best Practice BestPracticeForum

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    the significance of the change, such as effects on children, changing roles of husbands and wives, increasinglyBest Practice BestPracticeForum Forum Center for Educational Resources c e r Innovative Instructor excellence at Johns Hopkins About the CER The Center for Educational Resources partners with faculty

  17. Proceedings of the Second UK Embedded Forum

    E-print Network

    Pont, Michael J.

    of ASIPs and customised Co-Processors in an Embedded Real-time System J. Whitham, N. Audsley, UniversityProceedings of the Second UK Embedded Forum A. Koelmans, A. Bystrov, M. Pont, R. Ong, A. Brown (Editors) #12;Foreword This volume contains the set of papers presented at the second UK Embedded Forum

  18. PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konstantin Kazaryan

    2011-01-01

    The Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from November 1-3, 2010, in Moscow, Russia. It was the third forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology

  19. Lavender Research Forum Highlighting Graduate and

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Lavender Research Forum Highlighting Graduate and Undergraduate LGBTQ Research The Lavender) Issues is accepting submissions for student research papers to be presented at the Lavender Research. All authors selected must be available to present their work at the Lavender Research Forum

  20. From the Exoplanetary Bestiary to the Exoplanetary Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterborn, C. T.; Panero, W. R.; Stixrude, L. P.; Kellogg, L. H.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Diamond, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    While much attention has been focused on the exoplanetary "bestiary" of super-Earths, lava worlds, and diamond planets, habitable planets are more likely to be found in a more similar exoplanetary "zoo." Many planet-hosting stars are similar in composition to the Sun, with moderate variations in metal abundances. Even for those stars with O and Fe abundances similar to the Sun, many have 100% variations in the refractory, rock-forming elements such as Si, Mg, Al and Ca. For an Earth sized planet, this variation creates planets with drastically different mantle mineral assemblages and variable melting, elastic, and viscous properties, leading to variable dynamical behavior. This dynamical behavior dictates the dominant mode of heat extraction, be it through a conducting rigid lid or via plate tectonics. Without tectonics, there is no mechanism known with which to create a deep water and carbon cycle, thus creating a long-lived habitable surface. We present the results of integrated modeling in which we consider the effects of variations in bulk mantle composition on Earth-mass planets. To explore the variations expected in this planetary zoo, we present condensation sequence calculations for stars of varying refractory element abundances. These calculations constrain the potential refractory mineral reservoir from which Earth-mass terrestrial planets will form. As planets of this size inevitably will convect, the thermal structure of the mantle is controlled by surface melting temperature and the first crust can be estimated from decompression melting of a convecting mantle. The thermodynamic code HeFESTo determines the mineralogy and resulting thermoelastic properties of both the mantle and potential foundering of crustal material. Finally, with parameterized convection modeling and 2- and 3-D convection modeling, we determine terrestrial mantle's convective regime as a function of bulk composition. We therefore consider a planet's potential for Earth-like plate tectonics by applying compositional perturbations from the Earth. Aspects affecting this potential include the location of the basalt-eclogite transition in the upper mantle and the density contrast, and thus negative buoyancy, between the foundering crust and mantle. Portions of this work were initiated at the CIDER 2014 program.

  1. Using a Field Trip Inventory to Determine If Listening to Elementary School Students' Conversations, While on a Zoo Field Trip, Enhances Preservice Teachers' Abilities to Plan Zoo Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Patricia; Mathews, Cathy; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after…

  2. Integrating evolution in the management of captive zoo populations

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F

    2015-01-01

    Both natural animal populations and those in captivity are subject to evolutionary forces. Evolutionary changes to captive populations may be an important, but poorly understood, factor that can affect the sustainability of these populations. The importance of maintaining the evolutionary integrity of zoo populations, especially those that are used for conservation efforts including reintroductions, is critical for the conservation of biodiversity. Here, we propose that a greater appreciation for an evolutionary perspective may offer important insights that can enhance the reproductive success and health for the sustainability of captive populations. We provide four examples and associated strategies that highlight this approach, including minimizing domestication (i.e., genetic adaptation to captivity), integrating natural mating systems into captive breeding protocols, minimizing the effects of translocation on variation in photoperiodism, and understanding the interplay of parasites/pathogens and inflammation. There are a myriad of other issues that may be important for captive populations, and we conclude that these may often be species specific. Nonetheless, an evolutionary perspective may mitigate some of the challenges currently facing captive populations that are important from a conservation perspective, including their sustainability.

  3. Integrating evolution in the management of captive zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F

    2015-06-01

    Both natural animal populations and those in captivity are subject to evolutionary forces. Evolutionary changes to captive populations may be an important, but poorly understood, factor that can affect the sustainability of these populations. The importance of maintaining the evolutionary integrity of zoo populations, especially those that are used for conservation efforts including reintroductions, is critical for the conservation of biodiversity. Here, we propose that a greater appreciation for an evolutionary perspective may offer important insights that can enhance the reproductive success and health for the sustainability of captive populations. We provide four examples and associated strategies that highlight this approach, including minimizing domestication (i.e., genetic adaptation to captivity), integrating natural mating systems into captive breeding protocols, minimizing the effects of translocation on variation in photoperiodism, and understanding the interplay of parasites/pathogens and inflammation. There are a myriad of other issues that may be important for captive populations, and we conclude that these may often be species specific. Nonetheless, an evolutionary perspective may mitigate some of the challenges currently facing captive populations that are important from a conservation perspective, including their sustainability. PMID:26029256

  4. Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strain from fecal samples of zoo animal.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment. PMID:24489514

  5. Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Strain from Fecal Samples of Zoo Animal

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2?g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment. PMID:24489514

  6. Unsilencing voices: a study of zoo signs and their language of authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelberg, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    Zoo signs are important for informal learning, but their effect on visitor perception of animals has been sparsely studied. Other studies have established the importance of informal learning in American society; this study discusses zoo signs in the context of such learning. Through the lens of Critical Theory framed by informal learning, and by applying critical discourse analysis, I discovered subtle institutional power on zoo signs. This may influence visitors through dominant ideological discursive formations and emergent discourse objects, adding to the paradox of "saving" wild animals while simultaneously oppressing them. Signs covering a variety of species from two different United States-accredited zoos were analyzed. Critical Theory looks to emancipate oppressed human populations; here I apply it zoo animals. As physical emancipation is not practical, I define emancipation in the sociological sense—in this case, freedom from silence. Through this research, perhaps we can find a way to represent animals as living beings who have their own lives and voices, by presenting them honestly, with care and compassion.

  7. Detroit Zoo Seeks PR Interns for a "Wild" Fall Semester Want to mingle with the macaronis and connect with the camels while

    E-print Network

    Cinabro, David

    Detroit Zoo Seeks PR Interns for a "Wild" Fall Semester Want to mingle with the macaronis and connect with the camels while learning valuable PR and communications skills? Then the Detroit Zoo has the internship for you! The Detroit Zoo is seeking enthusiastic student interns for the fall semester who

  8. Off Earth Mining Forum 19-21 February 2013

    E-print Network

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    1 Off Earth Mining Forum 19-21 February 2013 www.acser.unsw.edu.au/oemf Never Stand Still Faculty of Engineering Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research (ACSER) #12;Off Earth Mining Forum, UNSW, Sydney Australia's place in space. Off Earth Mining Forum Sponsors Off Earth Mining Forum The prospect of people

  9. School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences An investigation into factors affecting elephant welfare in UK zoos

    E-print Network

    Evans, Paul

    School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences An investigation into factors affecting elephant welfare in UK zoos A DEFRA-commissioned study to assess the `Welfare, Housing and Husbandry of Elephants in UK Zoos` identified areas for improvement relating to the continued maintenance of elephants in UK

  10. WEBMOZIS - WEB-BASED AND MOBILE ZOO INFORMATION SYSTEM - A CASE STUDY FOR THE CITY OF OSNABRUECK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Michel; Christian Plass; Constanze Tschritter; Manfred Ehlers

    The use of modern electronic media offers new ways of (environmental) knowledge transfer. All kind of information can be made quickly available as well as queryable and can be processed individually.The Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing (IGF) in collaboration with the Osnabrueck Zoo, is developing a zoo information system, especially for new media (e.g. mobile devices), which provides information

  11. An ecological study of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. V. Ganapati

    1943-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a The seasonal changes for a year in the physico-chemical variables of a garden pond containing abundant zoo-plankton are traced.\\u000a The important features of the pond water are its low oxygen content, slight alkalinity, high organic content, scarcity of\\u000a phyto-plankton and abundance of zoo-plankton and mussels.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a The dominant zoo-plankton consisted of Copepods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 3. \\u000a Interrelationship existing between the environmental

  12. The role of zoos in the rehabilitation of animals in the circus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brij Kishor; Chakraborty, Bipul

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, the government of India enforced a ban on performance/exhibition of 5 species of nonhuman animals: (a) lions, (b) tigers, (c) leopards, (d) bears, and (e) monkeys. The Ministry of Environment and Forests gave the responsibility to the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) for rehabilitation of these animals. Between 1999 and 2001, the CZA created rescue centers for rehabilitation of lions and tigers in the off-display areas of 5 zoos: (a) Bangalore, (b) Chennai, (c) Vishakhapatnam, (d) Tirupathi, and (e) Jaipur. Today, the CZA has rehabilitated 314 lions and tigers from circuses. The CZA has been meeting the expenses toward maintenance (feeding of and providing health care for) of the animals, outsourcing of staff, and maintaining enclosures. This article focuses on the mammoth work that the selected zoos had to carry out in rehabilitating the lions and tigers from the circuses. PMID:16436032

  13. Analysis of post-blood meal flight distances in mosquitoes utilizing zoo animal blood meals

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob A.; DiMenna, Mark A.; Hanelt, Ben

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the post-blood meal flight distance of four mosquito species in a unique environment using blood meal analysis. Mosquitoes were trapped at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, NM, and the blood source of blood-engorged mosquitoes was identified. The distance from the enclosure of the animal serving as a blood source to the trap site was then determined. We found that mosquitoes captured at the zoo flew no more than 170 m with an average distance of 106.7 m after taking a blood meal. This is the first study in which the flight distance of wild mosquitoes has been assessed using blood meal analysis and the first in which zoo animals have served as the exclusive source of blood meals. PMID:22548540

  14. Copyright 2004, 2005 WiMAX Forum "WiMAX ForumTM" and "WiMAX Forum CERTIFIEDTM" are

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    · Traffic Models · MAC layer model · NS-2 Modeling Activities #12;WiMAX Forum Internal Use Only Slide 3: · Capacity Planning: ­ How many VOIP users can I support with 2 levels of diffserv, packet header suppression

  15. Seroprevalences of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Sedlák, K; Bártová, E

    2006-03-31

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and abortions in cattle. Little is known about the prevalence of antibodies to this parasite in zoo animals. Sera from 556 animals, from 13 Czech and Slovak zoos were tested for antibodies to N. caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 31 of 556 zoo animals (5.6%), representing 18 of 114 species tested: Eurasian wolf (Canis lupus lupus), Maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), fennec (Vulpes zerda), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarondi), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), Indian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis), fisher (Martes pennanti), blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra), European bison (Bison bonasus), lechwe (Kobus leche), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer), eland (Taurotragus oryx), sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekei gratus), Thorold's deer (Cervus albirostris), Eastern elk (C. elaphus canadensis), Vietnam sika deer (C. nippon pseudaxis) and Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus). Titres ranged from 1:40 to 1:2560. The highest prevalence 50% was found in family mustelidae of the order carnivora. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 193 of 556 zoo animals (34.7%) representing 72 of 114 species tested, with titres ranging from 1:40 to 1:40960. The highest prevalence 100% was found in families: hyaenidae, mustelidae, ursidae and viveridae of the order carnivora. The results of this study indicate that zoo animals have more exposure to T. gondii than to N. caninum. It is the first report of seroprevalence of antibodies to N. caninum in European zoo animals. PMID:16387445

  16. Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Daou; A. Gauthier

    2003-01-01

    Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_zoo\\/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/image_galleries\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) and video (http:\\/\\/coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu\\/videos\\/ir_yellowstone\\/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for

  17. NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies

    Cancer.gov

    The 28 SBIR-funded companies selected to present at the 2014 NCI SBIR Investor Forum represent promising innovators that are developing the next generation of cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices primed for commercialization.

  18. SYNERGIA Forum Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    2nd SYNERGIA Forum «Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management: Recycling and Energy "Why is incineration a necessary cornerstone of a successful waste recycling?" *Bernd Bilitewski Change and Solid Waste Management" Anthony Mavropoulos President, Scientific Technical Committee

  19. IPM Technology Forum December 5th

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    IPM Technology Forum December 5th , 2013 Comfort Inn, Bozeman, Montana This program will focus Specialist & Jane Mangold, Invasive Plant Specialist) 1:45: IPM Technology in/around the Home & Garden (Toby

  20. The Metabolism and Growth of Web Forums

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfei; Zhang, Jiang; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    We view web forums as virtual living organisms feeding on user's clicks and investigate how they grow at the expense of clickstreams. We find that (the number of page views in a given time period) and (the number of unique visitors in the time period) of the studied forums satisfy the law of the allometric growth, i.e., . We construct clickstream networks and explain the observed temporal dynamics of networks by the interactions between nodes. We describe the transportation of clickstreams using the function , in which is the total amount of clickstreams passing through node and is the amount of the clickstreams dissipated from to the environment. It turns out that , an indicator for the efficiency of network dissipation, not only negatively correlates with , but also sets the bounds for . In particular, when and when . Our findings have practical consequences. For example, can be used as a measure of the “stickiness” of forums, which quantifies the stable ability of forums to remain users “lock-in” on the forum. Meanwhile, the correlation between and provides a method to predict the long-term “stickiness” of forums from the clickstream data in a short time period. Finally, we discuss a random walk model that replicates both of the allometric growth and the dissipation function . PMID:25115897

  1. Environments and morphologies of red sequence galaxies with residual star formation in massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Stott, John P.; Jones, D. Heath

    2014-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ˜ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray-selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX near-ultraviolet (NUV) photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by the blue NUV - R colour), regardless of the cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low-density, high-cluster-radius environments. The morphology of these UV-bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light profiles and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV-bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure infalling into the cluster, or high-mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

  2. Ubiquitous Discussion Forum: Introducing Mobile Phones and Voice Discussion into a Web Discussion Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Fu-Hsiang; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Li, Liang-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Web-based discussion forums enable users to share knowledge in straightforward and popular platforms. However, discussion forums have several problems, such as the lack of immediate delivery and response, the heavily text-based medium, inability to hear expressions of voice and the heuristically created discussion topics which can impede the…

  3. A survey of Blastocystis sp. in livestock, pets, and zoo animals in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niichiro Abe; Mizuho Nagoshi; Kazutoshi Takami; Yoshinori Sawano; Hisao Yoshikawa

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of Blastocystis sp. was examined in fecal samples collected from cattle, pigs, dogs, and a variety of zoo animals (primates, carnivores, herbivores, pheasants, and ducks) by direct observation of fresh fecal suspensions or cultured materials, using light microscopy. The cattle and pigs were randomly sampled from 11 and 12 commercial farms, respectively, located in the western region of

  4. Representing the Zoo World and the Traffic World in the language of the Causal Calculator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varol Akman; Selim T. Erdogan; Joohyung Lee; Vladimir Lifschitz; Hudson Turner

    2004-01-01

    The work described in this report is motivated by the desire to test the expressive possibilities of action language C+. The Causal Calculator (CCalc) is a system that answers queries about action domains described in a fragment of that language. The Zoo World and the Traffic World have been proposed by Erik Sandewall in his Logic Modelling Workshop—an environment for communicating

  5. Genetic characterization of orf viruses isolated from various ruminant species of a zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Guo; J Rasmussen; A Wünschmann; A de la Concha-Bermejillo

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, an outbreak of proliferative dermatitis in musk ox (Ovibos moschatus), Sichuan takin (Budorcas taxicolor tibetana) and domestic Shetland sheep (Ovis aries) in a zoo is described. Skin lesions consisted of severe, persistent, multifocal, proliferative dermatitis in musk ox, and mild, transient, focal, dermatitis in the Sichuan takin and Shetland sheep. Parapoxviruses were isolated from skin lesions,

  6. Measuring a professional conservation education training program for zoos and wildlife parks in China.

    PubMed

    Askue, Laurel; Heimlich, Joe; Yu, Jin Ping; Wang, Xiaohong; Lakly, Shelly

    2009-09-01

    Designed and implemented in 2006, the Academy for Conservation Training (ACT) is a conservation education academy modeled after the Association for Zoos and Aquariums' (AZA) professional conservation education course. ACT incorporates conservation education best practices utilized by AZA-accredited institutions to provide zoo and wildlife park professionals in China with the skills, knowledge, and tools needed to design, implement, and evaluate effective conservation education programs at their facilities. Initial findings indicate that the ACT model is an effective approach to connect these emerging educators with conservation education best practices. The strongest satisfaction responses in this study were in perceptions of the program preparing the individual for work and in personal development. In terms of the longitudinal survey conducted with ACT graduates after the training, the lowest scoring items were the opportunities to meet other zoo educators in China and the quantity of information provided. The most revealing trend in regards to preparedness in becoming zoo educators was that specific pedagogical skills were those where perceived gain was consistent and strong across all three academies. PMID:19821503

  7. Programmatic approaches to assessing and improving animal welfare in zoos and aquariums.

    PubMed

    Barber, Joseph C E

    2009-11-01

    There continues to be intense public, professional, and scientific focus on the welfare of animals in zoos and aquariums, but implementing welfare assessment tools consistently throughout this community remains challenging. Indirect measures can be used to assess "welfare potential"-the potential that animals will experience good welfare based on the care that they are provided with. Zoos and aquariums focus on welfare potential with their continued commitment to develop animal care guidelines (e.g. Animal Care Manuals) that can play a role within institutional accreditation or certification. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums Animal Welfare Committee has been pursuing approaches to maximize welfare potential by developing the concept of an integrated welfare approach or framework-an attempt to identify recommended animal care programs (e.g. enrichment, nutrition, veterinary care, research, and animal training programs) and their programmatic components. Objectively assessing the influence that animal care recommendations have on the welfare of individual animals is important to determine the efficacy of programmatic approaches. The future of welfare assessment within zoos and aquariums will include population-level evaluations-tracking emerging trends in health and behavior that come from both formal and informal institutional animal reports. Sharing this information, and performing meta-analyses of the data using epidemiological approaches, will become easier with advances in technology and database management software. Identifying welfare "red/green flags" throughout captive populations will provide direction for more focused assessments that will ultimately inform the design of more effective animal care programs. PMID:19593774

  8. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

  9. Conservation Learning in Wildlife Tourism Settings: Lessons from Research in Zoos and Aquariums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Roy; Packer, Jan; Hughes, Karen; Dierking, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non-captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential…

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in 3 zoos in Mexico City, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus...

  11. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in mammals and reptiles at the Lisbon Zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margarida Alves; Lihua Xiao; Vanessa Lemos; Ling Zhou; Vitaliano Cama; Margarida Barão da Cunha; Olga Matos; Francisco Antunes

    2005-01-01

    The presence of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammals and reptiles kept at the Lisbon Zoo was investigated. A total of 274 stool samples were collected from 100 mammals and 29 reptiles. The species and genotype of the isolates identified by light microscopy were determined by nested PCR and sequence analysis of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium oocysts

  12. First observations of fertilized eggs and preleptocephalus larvae of Rhinomuraena quaesita in the Vienna Zoo.

    PubMed

    Preininger, D; Halbauer, R; Bartsch, V; Weissenbacher, A

    2015-01-01

    For the first time worldwide, fertilized eggs of ribbon eels (Rhinomuraena quaesita) hatched into feeding preleptocephali and could be kept alive for a period of seven days in the Vienna Zoo. The study reports on husbandry, behavioral observations and dimensions of eggs and preleptocephalus larvae. Furthermore, body color variations of ribbon eels in captivity do not reflect its sex or sexual maturity. PMID:25385394

  13. How Full Is Your Luggage? Background Knowledge of Zoo Visitors Regarding Sharks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    das Neves, João Pedro Correia; Monteiro, Rute Cristina Rocha

    2013-01-01

    For the general population, sharks have a reputation that does not really fit with their biological and ecological nature. Informal surveys often classify sharks as dangerous, aggressive and/or man-eaters. This apparent common knowledge seems difficult to detach from the conscience of many worldwide zoo visitors, even with the help of…

  14. Mighty Math[TM] Zoo Zillions[TM]. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    Zoo Zillions contains five activities for grades K-2: Annie's Jungle Trail, 3D Gallery, Number Line Express, Gnu Ewe Boutique, and Fish Stories. These activities enable children to review and practice basic mathematics skills; identify three-dimensional shapes, watch them in motion, and create their own three-dimensional designs; locate numbers…

  15. Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Oh; Reuben Granich; Jim Scott; Ben Sun; Michael Joseph; Cynthia Stringfield; Susan Thisdell; Jothan Staley; Donna Workman-Malcolm; Lee Borenstein; Eleanor Lehnkering; Patrick Ryan; Jeanne Soukup; Annette Nitta; Jennifer Flood

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maxi- mus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associ- ated with training elephants

  16. Conservation learning in wildlife tourism settings: lessons from research in zoos and aquariums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Ballantyne; J. Packer; K. Hughes; L. Dierking

    2007-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non?captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential impact of wildlife encounters on visitors’ conservation attitudes and behaviour

  17. Yersiniosis in zoo marmosets ( Callitrix jacchuss) caused by Yersinia enterocolitica 4\\/O:3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Fredriksson-Ahomaa; Tomo Naglic; Nenad Turk; Branka Šeol; Željko Grabarevi?; Ingeborg Bata; Dunja Perkovic; Andreas Stolle

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to describe two fatal cases of Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4\\/O:3 infection in non-human primates and to characterise the isolates by PCR and PFGE. In July 2004, two marmosets (Callitrix jacchuss) born in captivity in Zagreb Zoo, died following a few days of intermittent diarrhoea in intervals of 2 weeks. The pathomorphological diagnosis of the

  18. J. Zoo!., Land. (1994) 232, 539-549 Habitat utilization by the Cape porcupine Hystrix africaeaustralis

    E-print Network

    Pretoria, University of

    1994-01-01

    J. Zoo!., Land. (1994) 232, 539-549 Habitat utilization by the Cape porcupine Hystrix ligures in the text) Habitat utilization on three scales by Cape porcupines (Hystrix africaeaustralis. The individual variation in macroscalc habitat preferences indicates that porcupines may be constrained in thcir

  19. Evaluation of public engagement activities to promote science in a zoo environment.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Jamie; Waller, Bridget M; Chanvin, Mathilde; Wallace, Emma K; Schel, Anne M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Macri, Alaina; Slocombe, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Scientists are increasing their efforts to promote public engagement with their science, but the efficacy of the methods used is often not scientifically evaluated. Here, we designed, installed and evaluated the educational impact of interactive games on touchscreens at two primate research centres based in zoo environments. The games were designed to promote interest in and understanding of primates and comparative psychology, as a scaffold towards interest in science more generally and with the intention of targeting younger individuals (under 16's). We used systematic observational techniques and questionnaires to assess the impact of the games on zoo visitors. The games facilitated increased interest in psychology and science in zoo visitors, and changed the knowledge of visitors, through demonstration of learning about specific scientific findings nested within the games. The impact of such devices was greatest on younger individuals (under 16's) as they were significantly more likely to engage with the games. On the whole, therefore, this study demonstrates that interactive devices can be successful educational tools, and adds to the growing body of evidence that conducting research on public view in zoos can have a tangible impact on public engagement with science. PMID:25415193

  20. Why domesticate food animals? Some zoo-archaeological evidence from the Levant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon J. M. Davis

    2005-01-01

    Zoo-archaeological remains from the southern Levant indicate two shifts in the pattern of animal exploitation from Palaeolithic to Pre-Pottery Neolithic times. These shifts were especially marked towards the end of this time span. One is the increased consumption of small animals and the other shift is an increased hunting of juvenile gazelles compared to adults. Both are interpreted in terms

  1. Dystopian dreams from South Africa: Lauren Beukes's Moxyland and Zoo City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl Stobie

    2012-01-01

    The central theoretical concept underpinning this article is Lyman Tower Sargent's notion of the ‘critical dystopian’ novel, which is not nihilistic, but which disrupts easy binarist classifications, and incorporates elements of opposition to oppression, as well as hope for a more egalitarian future. I examine critical dystopian dreaming as portrayed in two novels by Lauren Beukes, Moxyland (2008) and Zoo

  2. Endangerment and Conservation Ethos in Natural and Cultural Heritage: The Case of Zoos and Archaeological Sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cornelius Holtorf; Oscar Ortman

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, various external circumstances such as environmental pollution and urban development have been emphasised as threats to the conservation of both wild animals and ancient remains in the ground. This has been taken as an argument for the need to protect both endangered animal species and threatened archaeological sites. Nowadays, zoos often evoke the image of Noah’s Ark

  3. Dynamic Patterns of Academic Forum Activities

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show rich dynamic patterns. In this article, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic patterns of 50 thousands of researchers' activities in Sciencenet, the largest multi-disciplinary academic community in China. Through statistical analyses, we found that (i) there exists a power-law scaling between the frequency of visits to an academic forum and the number of corresponding visitors, with the exponent being about 1.33; (ii) the expansion process of academic forums obeys the Heaps' law, namely the number of distinct visited forums to the number of visits grows in a power-law form with exponent being about 0.54; (iii) the probability distributions of time interval and the number of visits taken to revisit the same academic forum both follow power-laws, indicating the existence of memory effect in academic forum activities. On the basis of these empirical results, we propose a dynamic model that incorporates the exploration, preferential return and memory effect, which ca...

  4. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    Welcome to America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being This year, the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (the Forum) published America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014 , a one-time ...

  5. 75 FR 54221 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  6. 75 FR 11225 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...FAA) Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF 10-01...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  7. 77 FR 13683 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  8. 76 FR 53530 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  9. 78 FR 52230 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  10. 77 FR 50759 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  11. 78 FR 12415 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  12. 76 FR 12211 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  13. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a.m.,...

  14. 10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Public information forums. 903...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums....

  15. 10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a)...

  16. 10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Public information forums. 903...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums....

  17. 10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Public information forums. 903...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums....

  18. 10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a)...

  19. 10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a)...

  20. 10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Public information forums. 903...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums....

  1. 10 CFR 903.15 - Public information forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Public information forums. 903...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.15 Public information forums....

  2. 10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 903.16 - Public comment forums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Public comment forums. 903.16...TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power...Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.16 Public comment forums. (a)...

  4. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  5. Engagement with and Participation in Online Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokoena, Sello

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a small-scale study that examined student engagement with and participation in a university online discussion forum site. The main aim of the study was to identify factors that encourage or discourage student participation in the forum. The study involved the tasks posted on the forum site with which students could engage…

  6. Global Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Forum Summary Report and Recommendations

    E-print Network

    Global Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Forum Summary Report and Recommendations This forum;Global Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Forum Acknowledgements This report was compiled by Dr. Karim Landis, MSU IPM Program (Moderador) Dr. Helga Blanco, University of Costa Rica (Co-Moderator) Ms

  7. Engineering Resources: The Engineers Forum on Sustainability

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cosponsored by three prominent engineering societies, the Engineers Forum on Sustainability was founded to "help promote the principles and practice of sustainability." The forum's newsletter can be viewed at this site. It contains information on worldwide activities and developments in the field of sustainability, including educational initiatives, environmental protection programs, international conferences, and more. The July 2003 issue features a special guest article written by the President of the World Federation of Engineering Societies, who touches on issues of sustainable development, technology transfer, and the role of engineers in developing countries. The newsletter is released roughly three times a year.

  8. Second Annual HEDS-UP Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    HEDS-UP (Human Exploration and Development of Space-University Partners) conducted its second annual forum on May 6-7, 1999, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. This year, the topics focused on human exploration of Mars, including considerations ranging from systems analysis of the transportation and surface architecture to very detailed considerations of surface elements such as greenhouses, rovers, and EVA suits. Ten undergraduate projects and four graduate level projects were presented with a total of 13 universities from around the country. Over 200 students participated on the study teams and nearly 100 students attended the forum meeting.

  9. A systematic development and evaluation of an undergraduate course in zoo biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Patrick Mullen

    The biology curricula offered by most institutions of higher education follow a classic pattern of basic taxonomy, phylogeny, physiology, genetics, molecular biology and biometry. This course regimen certainly provides a knowledge structure within the discipline, but is somewhat lacking in information that is directly applicable within the field of zoo biology. The zoo biology curriculum set forth in this dissertation was designed to offer students immersion into the rapidly evolving field of zoo biology. It also offers insight and perspectives into the zoo profession, encompassing 185 accredited zoological parks and aquariums, which employ numerous biologists. There is not a degree granting college or university in Texas that currently offers coursework in this specialization. In order to determine the merit and worth of a course in zoo biology, a field trial and a revised course were presented and subjected to a systematic evaluation. Four evaluative categories were utilized following Benton's (1992) design: (a) consistency between terminal performance objectives, activities and test instrument items, (b) effect on scientific knowledge, (c) activity usefulness as perceived by course participants and the instructor, (d) course worth. Student (N = 49) and component data were measured using a pre-post-test design, a questionnaire, and other informal instruments during the antecedent, transaction and outcome phases. Data from the pre-post-tests were analyzed using t-tests for correlated means. The analysis of activities and test items indicated that they were consistent with the terminal performance objectives. The pre-post-test results indicated that the course had a positive effect on knowledge gain within the field of study. A significant statistical difference was found between the test means at a probability of p ? 0.001. A post course attitudinal questionnaire elicited a rating of 4.65 on a Likert scale of 5.0 on perceived usefulness to the participants. A systematic evaluation was conducted to determine the worth of the zoo biology course using the four evaluative categories mentioned above. The conclusions were as follows: course elements and components were judged to be consistent with terminal performance objectives. There was a dramatic increase in scientific knowledge. The course was considered to be very useful by the participants completing the curriculum. The course was judged worthy of adoption.

  10. Sciences Participatives : du mutualisme entre science et socit. Exemple du Suivi Photographique des Insectes Pollinisateurs

    E-print Network

    participatifs en France ». Galaxy Zoo : « Welcome to Galaxy Zoo, where you can help astronomers explore : « 43 projets participatifs en France ». Galaxy Zoo : « Welcome to Galaxy Zoo, where you can help France ». Galaxy Zoo : « Welcome to Galaxy Zoo, where you can help astronomers explore the Universe

  11. Forum: Science & Society Interactions between biocontainment laboratories

    E-print Network

    Forum: Science & Society Interactions between biocontainment laboratories and their communities release of patho- genic microorganisms. The impact of such an event was demonstrated vividly in 2001 released on an unsuspecting public, result- ing in five deaths, illness in 17 US citizens and an untold

  12. Colorado State University Public Forums concerning the

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    into serious account any impact on neighbors in areas adjacent or near a new stadium. · State appropriation Subcommittees · Design and Best Practices · Alumni, Campus and Public Engagement · Site Selection · Market subcommittee · Design and facilitate face to face forums and online engagement opportunities · Provide

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

  14. Data Dance: An Interactive Movement Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jill

    This paper describes and discusses the interactive movement forum and the process of working on it as data itself. The paper revisits the theme of the creative process from a postmodern perspective, particularly considering creativity in relationship to women's bodies and detailing the problematic aspects of working with students in an artistic…

  15. Finance forum.........................2 LTAP Roads Scholars.............3

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    · Finance forum.........................2 · LTAP Roads Scholars.............3 · CTS Executive on page 3 Value capture continued on page 2 Current funding and finance mechanisms for transportation face completed research project led by CTS. "The project provides new financing meth- ods that are not currently

  16. Ranking mechanisms in twitter-like forums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anish Das Sarma; Atish Das Sarma; Sreenivas Gollapudi; Rina Panigrahy

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of designing a mechanism to rank items in forums by making use of the user reviews such as thumb and star ratings. We compare mechanisms where fo- rum users rate individual posts and also mechanisms where the user is asked to perform a pairwise comparison and state which one is better. The main metric used to

  17. 2009 NCI SBIR Investor Forum Program Book

    Cancer.gov

    LETTER FROM NCI SBIR Welcome to the inaugural National Cancer Institute (NCI) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Investor Forum. Thank you for joining us. I hope that today will be a valuable opportunity for you to learn more about the most

  18. Affect Intensity Analysis of Dark Web Forums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Abbasi; Hsinchun Chen

    2007-01-01

    Affects play an important role in influencing people's perceptions and decision making. Affect analysis is useful for measuring the presence of hate, violence, and the resulting propaganda dissemination across extremist groups. In this study we performed affect analysis of U.S. and Middle Eastern extremist group forum postings. We constructed an affect lexicon using a probabilistic disambiguation technique to measure the

  19. Interaction Coherence Analysis for Dark Web Forums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianjun Fu; Ahmed Abbasi; Hsinchun Chen

    2007-01-01

    Interaction coherence analysis (ICA) attempts to accurately identify and construct interaction networks by using various features and techniques. It is useful to identify user roles, user's social and information value, as well as the social network structure of Dark Web communities. In this study, we applied interaction coherence analysis for Dark Web forums using the hybrid interaction coherence (HIC) algorithm.

  20. Solar Server: Forum for Solar Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Based in Germany, this site provides a forum for news and information regarding all aspects of solar energy. The site provides background information on the technical aspects pertaining to solar energy and photovoltaics. A variety of images and descriptions provide useful background information about photovoltaic roof tiles and their role in solar buildings.

  1. Web Maintainers Forum 29 August 2013

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    1 Web Maintainers Forum 29 August 2013 Agenda Welcome and introduction Web team Update My Baker, WCMS Project Manager) Questions Web team update Web team site rebranded http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/web/ When was the last time you visited the web team site: August? June or July? 2013? 2012? Never

  2. Web Team Forum 27 August 2014

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    18/09/2014 1 Web Team Forum 27 August 2014 · Web Team Update · WCMS Update (Perrine Baker, WCMS Web Team Update · http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/web/ · When was the last time you visited the Web Team site: ­ August 2014? ­ May, June, July 2014? ­ 1st half of 2014? ­ 2013? ­ Never? Web Team website

  3. ACC forum looks at 'burning' questions

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.

    2005-06-01

    The American Coal Council's (ACC) Spring Coal Forum had as its theme: Coal's renaissance: prospects for regenerating coal generation'. It explored US coal demand, supply, end-user technology and market trends. The article gives an overview of the conference, highlighting several presentations. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Community Forum on Re-Accreditation

    E-print Network

    Snider, Barry B.

    Community Forum on Re-Accreditation April 7, 2006 #12;Page 2 Why Accreditation? Accreditation' Last Accreditation: 1996 Chair: James Freedman Areas to focus on for the next decade... · A salary plan overall direction for the accreditation effort ­ Serve as the primary liaison with NEASC ­ Approve

  5. Page 1 of 1 Fish Tagging Forum

    E-print Network

    & General Process Facilitator will provide an overview of the collaborative process and expectations. Forum participants will discuss the framework to clarify and/or modify how the process Goals to Fish Tagging Activities 4:00 to 4:30 Recap and Plan Next Meeting #12;

  6. GSD Student Forum Student Group Spending Guidelines

    E-print Network

    GSD Student Forum Student Group Spending Guidelines September 2010 Questions regarding and detailed schedule for spending? - Does the mission of the group enrich the social and extracurricular lives? - Is the group proposing to spend efficiently or are they interested in making capital expenditures (hard goods

  7. Distribution of mosquito larvae in various breeding sites in National Zoo Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad-Aidil, R; Imelda, A; Jeffery, J; Ngui, R; Wan Yusoff, W S; Aziz, S; Lim, Y A L; Rohela, M

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes are principal vectors of major vector-borne diseases. They are widely found throughout urban and rural areas in Malaysia. They are responsible for various vector-borne diseases such as dengue, malaria, filariasis and encephalitis. A total of 158 mosquito larvae specimens were collected from the National Zoo, Malaysia, from 11 types of breeding habitats during the study period from end of May 2007 to July 2007. Aedes albopictus was the predominant species (35.4%), followed by Tripteroides aranoides (26.6%), Lutzia halifaxii (11.4%), Aedes alboscutellatus (10.1%), Aedes caecus (8.9%), Armigeres spp. (4.4%), Malaya genurostris (2.5%) and Culex vishnui (0.6%). It is important to have a mosquito free environment in a public place like the zoo. Routine larval surveillance should be implemented for an effective mosquito control program in order to reduce mosquito population. PMID:25801269

  8. Avian tuberculosis of zoonotic importance at a zoo on the Bogotá Andean plateau (Sabana), Colombia

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Silva, Angela; Leon, Clara Inés; Guerrero, Martha Inírida; Neira, Rafael; Arias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, German

    2009-01-01

    Given that exposure to captive wild animals at circuses or zoos can be a source of zoonotic infection, a case and control study was carried out with a collection of exotic fowl at a zoo in Bogotá, Colombia. The presence of Mycobacterium avium-II was directly related to the death of birds kept in the original enclosure, and of 50% of a group of sentinel birds. Failure to detect the organism in a control group of birds outside the enclosure indicated that the infection was limited to the original enclosed area. We demonstrated that M. gordonae-IV was disseminated in all organs from 1 bird with macroscopic granulomatous lesion, a finding which has not been reported previously. We emphasize the importance of establishing handling norms to reduce the risk of zoonotic transmission. PMID:19881922

  9. Investigating the impact of large carcass feeding on the behavior of captive Andean condors (Vultur gryphus) and its perception by zoo visitors.

    PubMed

    Gaengler, Hannah; Clum, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Naturalistic feeding methods, such as the provision of whole carcasses to zoo animals, are potentially controversial because zoo visitors might not approve of them. However, since several species of zoo animals feed from large carcasses in the wild, this food type could benefit their welfare in captivity compared to other less-natural food types. Scavengers in particular almost exclusively live on carcasses in nature; therefore, their welfare in captivity could significantly depend on the opportunity to express behaviors related to carcass feeding. In this study, we assessed the frequency of carcass feeding for vultures in North American zoos and investigated the effect of different food types on the behavior of zoo-housed Andean condors (Vultur gryphus). We also evaluated the opinion of North American zoo visitors about carcass feeding. Our results show that small whole carcasses (rats, rabbits) are part of the diet of vultures in most North American zoos, but large whole carcasses (ungulates) are rarely fed. Our behavioral study indicated that Andean condors appear to be more motivated to feed on more natural food types, which also seem to physically engage the birds more and occupy them longer. Most zoo visitors approved of carcass feeding for captive vultures over a range of prey animals, and the majority would also like to observe the vultures eat. Collectively, our results demonstrate that carcass feeding, particularly with larger prey, potentially enriches both zoo-housed vultures as well as the visitor experience. PMID:25653198

  10. ZooNotes 9: 1-4 (2010) ...9... www.zoonotes.bio.uni-plovdiv.bg

    E-print Network

    Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

    2010-01-01

    and Methods. We examined 12 stomachs of adult specimens of the Slow Worm (Anguis fragilis), preserved in 70;...9... ZooNotes 9: 1-4 (2010) 2 I N Q 1 1-= , rising from 0 to 1, where N1 is the number of the food components occurring only once, and I is the total number of the food components. The diversity of the diet

  11. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates from synanthropic and zoo animals and identification of a new subtype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Rune Stensvold; Mohammed A. Alfellani; Sara Nørskov-Lauritsen; Katrine Prip; Emma L. Victory; Charlotte Maddox; Henrik V. Nielsen; C. Graham Clark

    2009-01-01

    Blastocystis isolates from 56 Danish synanthropic and zoo animals, 62 primates primarily from United Kingdom (UK) collections and 16 UK primate handlers were subtyped by PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A new subtype (ST) from primates and artiodactyls was identified and designated as Blastocystis sp. ST10. STs isolated from non-human primates (n=70) included ST3 (33%), ST8 (21%), ST2 (16%), ST5

  12. Outbreak of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among captive Asian elephants in a Swedish zoo.

    PubMed

    Lewerin, S Sternberg; Olsson, S L; Eld, K; Röken, B; Ghebremichael, S; Koivula, T; Källenius, G; Bölske, G

    2005-02-01

    Between 2001 and 2003, there was an outbreak of tuberculosis in a Swedish zoo which involved elephants, giraffes, rhinoceroses and buffaloes. Cultures of trunk lavages were used to detect infected elephants, tuberculin testing was used in the giraffes and buffaloes, and tracheal lavage and tuberculin testing were used in the rhinoceroses. The bacteria isolated were investigated by spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five elephants and one giraffe were found to have been infected by four different strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:15736698

  13. Human exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of multiple animal species in a Metropolitan Zoo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette; Flood, Jennifer

    2002-11-01

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

  14. Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette

    2002-01-01

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

  15. Evaluating the Conservation Mission of Zoos, Aquariums, Botanical Gardens, and Natural History Museums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN MILLER; WILLIAM CONWAY; RICHARD P. READING; CHRIS WEMMER; DAVID WILDT; DEVRA KLEIMAN; STEVEN MONFORT; ALAN RABINOWITZ; BETH ARMSTRONG; MICHAEL HUTCHINS

    2004-01-01

    Collection-based institutions—zoos, aquariums, museums, and botanical gardens—exhibit wildlife and thus have a special connection with nature. Many of these institutions emphasize a mission of conserva- tion, and, undeniably, they do contribute directly to conservation education and conservation science. They present an exceptional opportunity for many urban residents to see the wonders of life, and they can contribute to education and

  16. Diversity and prevalence of metastrongyloid nematodes infecting the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in European zoos.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Meyland-Smith, Frederik; Willesen, Jakob L; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Monrad, Jesper

    2010-09-20

    Metastrongyloid induced pneumonia has been described sporadically in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens). Early descriptions in pandas recently imported to the USA from China involved parasites morphologically similar to Angiostrongylus spp. and Crenosomatidae. More recently, four cases of severe verminous pneumonia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum have been reported from European zoos. A coprological survey of the red panda population within European zoos was conducted in 2008. Faecal samples from 115 pandas originating from 54 zoos were collected on 3 consecutive days. Using Baermann technique, 40 animals (35%) from 20 zoos (37%) were found to shed metastrongyloid first stage larvae (L(1)). Based on their morphology and size, the L(1) observed could be divided into three morphologically distinct types: (1) a Crenosoma sp. type (n=5, overall prevalence: 4.3%), (2) an A. vasorum type (n=3, 2.6%), and (3) an unidentified metastrongyloid species, similar to, but morphologically distinct from A. vasorum (n=32, 27.8%). Further confirmation of species identification was provided by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene, which confirmed three different species. The novel Crenosoma species was most genetically analogous to Crenosoma mephitidis and the unidentified metastrongyloid species was most similar to Stenurus minor and Torynurus convulutus. Routine and quarantine health care of red pandas in captivity should take account of the risk of Angiostrongylus and Crenosoma infection in endemic areas, but should also be cognisant of the widespread presence of an apparently less pathogenic species of lungworm. The identity of the two potentially novel species is subject to further work. PMID:20570049

  17. Extracting Structural information from Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2010-05-01

    The amount of data from sky images is large and growing. About 1 million galaxies can be discerned in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is being built and will scan the entire sky repeatedly, providing images of millions of galaxies and petabytes of data every night. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a proposed orbiting satellite that will repeatedly map the entire sky from orbit, providing images of perhaps billions of galaxies. Unfortunately, given an image of a spiral galaxy, there does not exist an automated vision algorithm that can even tell us which direction the spiral arms wind, much less count them or provide any other quantitative information about them. To wit, the largest galaxy classification project is the Galaxy Zoo, in which thousands of human volunteers classify images by eye over the web. Although valuable, such human classifications will provide only limited objective quantitative measurements, and will soon be overwhelmed with more data than humans can handle. However, such information would prove an invaluable source for astronomers and cosmologists to test current theories of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution (which can now be simulated with high accuracy on large computers, producing copious predictions that cannot be tested due to a lack of objective, quantitative observational data). In this talk, I will report on preliminary results from dynamical grammars and other machine learning and vision techniques to "parse" images of galaxies, starting us on the road towards producing quantitative data that will be useful for astronomers to test theories.

  18. E+A galaxies in the SDSS. Stellar population and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, R.; Galaz, G.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxies with E+A spectrum have deep Balmer absorption and no H_{?} and [OII] emission. This suggest recent star formation and the lack of ongoing star formation. With an E+A sample from the SDSS DR 7 (Aihara et al. 2011) we study the morphology with Galaxy Zoo 1 data and the star formation history fitting models from Bruzual & Charlot (2003). We found an underpopulation of spiral and disk like galaxies and an overpopulation of interacting galaxies, the last seems consistent with the scenario where, at low z, the interaction mechanism is responsible for at least part of the E+A galaxies. The star formation history (SFH) fits most of the spectra indicating an increased star formation around 2 Gyr in the past. Additional parameters like dust internal extinction need to be included to improve the fitting.

  19. The LSUHSC Department of Genetics celebrated DNA Day at the Audubon Zoo on April 15, 2011. The goal of the event was to make the general public aware of the

    E-print Network

    The LSUHSC Department of Genetics celebrated DNA Day at the Audubon Zoo on April 15, 2011. The goal the genetics of some of the animals found in the Audubon Zoo. Fruiflies were brought in from Dr. Pandey's lab

  20. Enhancing Mathematical Literacy with the Use of Metacognitive Guidance in Forum Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramarski, Bracha; Mizrachi, Nava

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of forum discussion embedded within metacognitive guidance on mathematical literacy. In particular the study compares two learning environments: (a) Forum discussion with metacognitive guidance (FORUM+META); and (b) Forum discussion without metacognitive guidance (FORUM). Participants…

  1. Zoology, evolution, and ecology for elementary teachers in a model alliance between a university biology department and a zoo

    SciTech Connect

    DuBrul, E.F. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Lewis N. [Toledo Zoo, OH (United States); Mesteller, P. [Toledo Public Schools, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Many of the goals and performance objectives for elementary science deal with hands-on experiences such as observing the characteristics of living things, sorting and classifying, and measuring and recording data. Ideal environments for learning episodes that can foster these objectives are zoos and parks or nature preserves. This poster describes a program that uses the University faculty, local master elementary teachers, and Zoo staff and facilities to: (1) educate K-6 teachers about zoology, ecology, and evolution, (2) provide practical, on-site learning exercises as examples of how teachers can develop zoo visits that will be true learning experiences, (3) help the participants develop zoo-related exercises of classroom use, (4) show the participants the behind-the scenes work that goes on at a zoo, and (5) establish a close rapport between the teachers and a large group of professional resource persons. We present the results of evaluations and follow-up interviews, and we note the key features of this program and suggest how our experience may be used by other partnerships.

  2. Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and tick-borne encephalitis virus in zoo animal species in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Sirmarová, Jana; Tichá, Lucie; Golovchenko, Marina; Salát, Ji?í; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia; Nowotny, Norbert; R?žek, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of antibodies against Borrelia bugdorferi (Bb) s.l. and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in zoo animals in the Czech Republic. We collected 133 serum samples from 69 animal species from 5 zoos located in different parts of the country. The samples were obtained from even-toed ungulates (n=78; 42 species), odd-toed ungulates (n=32; 11 species), carnivores (n=13; 9 species), primates (n=2, 2 species), birds (n=3; 2 species), and reptiles (n=5; 3 species). A high antibody prevalence (60%) was observed for Bb s.l. On the other hand, only two animals had TBEV-specific antibodies: a markhor (Capra falconeri) and a reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), both from the same zoo, located in an area endemic for TBEV. Both of these animals were also positive for Bb s.l. antibodies. Our results indicate that a high number of animal species in the Czech zoos were exposed to Bb s.l. and that TBEV infection occurred at least in one of the investigated zoos. Considering the pathogenic potential of these two tick-borne pathogens, clinical and serological monitoring should be continued, and therapeutic and preventive measures should be taken when necessary. PMID:24889036

  3. Harvard University Institute of Politics: Forum Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    If you are looking for a place online to find William Julius Wilson, Cesar Chavez, or Lech Walesa, you should look no further than the very fine online video archive of the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum from Harvard Universityâ??s Institute of Politics. Over the past thirty years, the Institute has held hundreds of public addresses and panel discussions on a myriad of topical issues. Recently, they created this online archive so that the web-browsing public could view some of these events at their leisure. Currently, the archive contains over 1200 Forum events, including those that deal with the environment, Afghanistan, aging, and the Cold War, among other themes. Visitors can use the online search engine to locate videos by participant, year, keyword, or topic.

  4. NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies

    Cancer.gov

    The 18 SBIR-funded companies that presented at the 2012 Investor Forum represented the most promising innovators developing the next generation of cancer therapeutics, diagnostics, and devices primed for commercialization. The presenting companies were selected based on the strength of their technology and commercialization potential by a competitive process and review panel comprised of life science investment and business development experts from companies such as Merck, Pfizer, Varian, Mohr Davidow Ventures, and Fidelity Biosciences.

  5. Hamilton Zoo University of Waikato Science and Engineering Studentship R E G U L A T I O N S F O R 2 0 1 3 / 2 0 1 4

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    Hamilton Zoo ­ University of Waikato Science and Engineering Studentship R E G U L A T I O N S F O R 2 0 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 BACKGROUND The Hamilton Zoo and the Faculty of Science and Engineering community, about the operation and the role of zoos. To this end, both parties collaborate in providing

  6. A new catalogue of polar-ring galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei V.; Smirnova, Ksenia I.; Smirnova, Aleksandrina A.; Reshetnikov, Vladimir P.

    2011-11-01

    Galaxies with polar rings (PRGs) are a unique class of extragalactic objects. Using these, we can investigate a wide range of problems, linked to the formation and evolution of galaxies, and we can study the properties of their dark haloes. The progress that has been made in the study of PRGs has been constrained by the small number of known objects of this type. The Polar Ring Catalogue (PRC) by Whitmore et al. and their photographic atlas of PRGs and related objects includes 157 galaxies. At present, there are only about two dozen kinematically confirmed galaxies in this PRG class, mostly from the PRC. We present a new catalogue of PRGs, supplementing the PRC and significantly increasing the number of known candidate PRGs. The catalogue is based on the results of the original Galaxy Zoo project. Within this project, volunteers performed visual classifications of nearly a million galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on the preliminary classifications of the Galaxy Zoo, we viewed more than 40 000 images of the SDSS and selected 275 galaxies to include in our catalogue. Our SDSS-based Polar Ring Catalogue (SPRC) contains 70 galaxies that we have classified as 'the best candidates'. Among these, we expect to have a very high proportion of true PRGs, and 115 good PRG candidates. There are 53 galaxies classified as PRG-related objects (mostly galaxies with strongly warped discs, and mergers). In addition, we have identified 37 galaxies that have their presumed polar rings strongly inclined to the line of sight (seen almost face-on). The SPRC objects are, on average, fainter and are located further away than the galaxies from the PRC, although our catalogue does include dozens of new nearby candidate PRGs. The SPRC significantly increases the number of genuine PRG candidates. It might serve as a good basis for both a further detailed study of individual galaxies and a statistical analysis of PRGs as a separate class of objects. We have performed spectroscopic observations of six galaxies from the SPRC at the 6-m Big Telescope Alt-Azimuthal (BTA). The existence of polar rings was confirmed in five galaxies, and one object appeared to be a projection of a pair of galaxies. Adding the data from the literature, we can already classify 10 galaxies from our catalogue as kinematically confirmed PRGs. This paper is partly based on observations collected with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is operated under the financial support of the Science Department of Russia (registration number 01-43).

  7. Y? The National Forum on People's Differences

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Y? forum, the first of its kind to our knowledge, is a moderated and edited online environment that is "designed to give readers a way to ask people from other ethnic or cultural backgrounds the questions they've always been too embarrassed or uncomfortable to ask." The site provides guidelines for both asking a question and providing the answer; however, both are read by the editor before posting "for space and readability, and to paraphrase questions and answers to render them suitable for general viewing." The result is a space where readers can safely follow a dialogue on sensitive topics without the fear of having to wade through racist attacks, foul language, or "flame wars." Topics welcome at Y? include those related to differences in age, class, disability, gender, geography, occupation, race/ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation. The Y? Forum was developed and is managed by Phillip J. Milano, an editor for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville. The site is not related to the newspaper. The site states that an unmoderated forum will be provided in the future in addition to the current moderated format.

  8. Do free-ranging Common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) play a role in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii within a zoo environment?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the possible role of Common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii within a zoo environment, a serological survey of a free-ranging population resident within Taronga Zoo, Sydney, Australia was undertaken using the modified agglutination tes...

  9. LA VISITE AU ZOO Regards sur l'animal sauvage captif au XIXe sicle et dans l'entre-deux-guerres

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LA VISITE AU ZOO Regards sur l'animal sauvage captif au XIXe siècle et dans l'entre-deux-guerres À mobiles scientifiques initiaux, ces zoos deviennent des vitrines de la nature sauvage pour des populations, Palomba, 1935, p. 67. halshs-00659775,version1-13Jan2012 Manuscrit auteur, publié dans "L'animal sauvage

  10. PREFACE: IV Nanotechnology International Forum (RUSNANOTECH 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurechenskii, Anatoly; Alfimov, Mikhail; Suzdalev, Igor; Osiko, Vyacheslav; Khokhlov, Aleksey; Son, Eduard; Skryabin, Konstantin; Petrov, Rem; Deev, Sergey

    2012-02-01

    Logo The RUSNANOTECH 2011 International Forum on Nanotechnology was held from 26-28 October 2011, in Moscow, Russia. It was the fourth forum organized by RUSNANO (Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies) since 2008. In March 2011 RUSNANO was established as an open joint-stock company through the reorganization of the state corporation Russian Corporation of Nanotechnologies. RUSNANO's mission is to develop the Russian nanotechnology industry through co-investment in nanotechnology projects with substantial economic potential or social benefit. Within the framework of the Forum Science and Technology Program, presentations on key trends of nanotechnology development were given by foreign and Russian scientists, R&D officers of leading international companies, universities and scientific centers. The science and technology program of the Forum was divided into four sections as follows (by following hyperlinks you may find each section's program including videos of all oral presentations): Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Nanomaterials Nanotechnology and Green Energy Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma (United business and science & technology section on 'RUSNANOTECH 2011') The scientific program of the forum included more than 50 oral presentations by leading scientists from 15 countries. Among them were world-known specialists such as Professor S Bader (Argonne National Laboratory, USA), Professor O Farokzhad (Harvard Medical School, USA), Professor K Chien (Massachusetts General Hospital, USA), Professor L Liz-Marzan (University of Vigo), A Luque (Polytechnic University of Madrid) and many others. The poster session consisted of over 120 presentations, 90 of which were presented in the framework of the young scientists' nanotechnology papers competition. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 47 submissions. Section editors of the proceedings: Nanoelectronics and nanophotonics Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Anatoly Dvurechenskii (Institute of Semiconductor Physics, RAS). Nanomaterials Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Mikhail Alfimov (Photochemistry Center, RAS), Professor Igor Suzdalev (Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Vyacheslav Osiko (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Science, Professor Aleksey Khokhlov (Physical department of Moscow State University). Nanotechnology and green energy Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Eduard Son (Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS). Nanotechnology in Healthcare and Pharma Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Konstantin Skryabin (Bioengineering Center, RAS), Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Rem Petrov (RAS), Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Sergey Deev (Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry).

  11. 14 CFR 253.10 - Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. 253.10...10 Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. No carrier...contract of carriage provision containing a choice-of-forum clause that...

  12. 14 CFR 253.10 - Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. 253.10...10 Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. No carrier...contract of carriage provision containing a choice-of-forum clause that...

  13. 14 CFR 253.10 - Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. 253.10...10 Notice of contract of carriage choice-of-forum provisions. No carrier...contract of carriage provision containing a choice-of-forum clause that...

  14. 78 FR 13072 - Seventh Annual Drug Information Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum-2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum--2013; Public Conference AGENCY...entitled ``Seventh Annual DIA/FDA Statistics Forum--2013.'' The purpose of...I. Background This annual FDA/DIA statistics forum will establish a unique,...

  15. IN-FORUM http://www.in-forum.com/articles/index.cfm?id=98106§ion=Opinion 1 of 2 7/20/2005 2:48 PM

    E-print Network

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    · IN-FORUM · http://www.in-forum.com/articles/index.cfm?id=98106§ion=Opinion 1 of 2 7/20/2005 2: A A A Print this article Email this article Most popular articles Purchase a print Breaking News Alerts Advertising Information View all WOW ads #12;· IN-FORUM · http://www.in-forum.com/articles/index.cfm?id=98106

  16. Semantic tagging of and semantic enhancements to systematics papers: ZooKeys working examples.

    PubMed

    Penev, Lyubomir; Agosti, Donat; Georgiev, Teodor; Catapano, Terry; Miller, Jeremy; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Roberts, David; Smith, Vincent S; Brake, Irina; Ryrcroft, Simon; Scott, Ben; Johnson, Norman F; Morris, Robert A; Sautter, Guido; Chavan, Vishwas; Robertson, Tim; Remsen, David; Stoev, Pavel; Parr, Cynthia; Knapp, Sandra; Kress, W John; Thompson, Chris F; Erwin, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The concept of semantic tagging and its potential for semantic enhancements to taxonomic papers is outlined and illustrated by four exemplar papers published in the present issue of ZooKeys. The four papers were created in different ways: (i) written in Microsoft Word and submitted as non-tagged manuscript (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.504); (ii) generated from Scratchpads and submitted as XML-tagged manuscripts (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.505 and doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.506); (iii) generated from an author's database (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.50.485) and submitted as XML-tagged manuscript. XML tagging and semantic enhancements were implemented during the editorial process of ZooKeys using the Pensoft Mark Up Tool (PMT), specially designed for this purpose. The XML schema used was TaxPub, an extension to the Document Type Definitions (DTD) of the US National Library of Medicine Journal Archiving and Interchange Tag Suite (NLM). The following innovative methods of tagging, layout, publishing and disseminating the content were tested and implemented within the ZooKeys editorial workflow: (1) highly automated, fine-grained XML tagging based on TaxPub; (2) final XML output of the paper validated against the NLM DTD for archiving in PubMedCentral; (3) bibliographic metadata embedded in the PDF through XMP (Extensible Metadata Platform); (4) PDF uploaded after publication to the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL); (5) taxon treatments supplied through XML to Plazi; (6) semantically enhanced HTML version of the paper encompassing numerous internal and external links and linkouts, such as: (i) vizualisation of main tag elements within the text (e.g., taxon names, taxon treatments, localities, etc.); (ii) internal cross-linking between paper sections, citations, references, tables, and figures; (iii) mapping of localities listed in the whole paper or within separate taxon treatments; (v) taxon names autotagged, dynamically mapped and linked through the Pensoft Taxon Profile (PTP) to large international database services and indexers such as Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Barcode of Life (BOLD), Encyclopedia of Life (EOL), ZooBank, Wikipedia, Wikispecies, Wikimedia, and others; (vi) GenBank accession numbers autotagged and linked to NCBI; (vii) external links of taxon names to references in PubMed, Google Scholar, Biodiversity Heritage Library and other sources. With the launching of the working example, ZooKeys becomes the first taxonomic journal to provide a complete XML-based editorial, publication and dissemination workflow implemented as a routine and cost-efficient practice. It is anticipated that XML-based workflow will also soon be implemented in botany through PhytoKeys, a forthcoming partner journal of ZooKeys. The semantic markup and enhancements are expected to greatly extend and accelerate the way taxonomic information is published, disseminated and used. PMID:21594113

  17. Assessing public engagement with science in a university primate research centre in a national zoo.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Mark T; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Whiten, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the 'Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre' in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial 'dwell times' in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences. PMID:22496822

  18. Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alongkorn Amonsin; Sunchai Payungporn; Apiradee Theamboonlers; Roongroje Thanawongnuwech; Sanipa Suradhat; Nuananong Pariyothorn; Rachod Tantilertcharoen; Sudarat Damrongwantanapokin; Chantanee Buranathai; Arunee Chaisingh; Thaweesak Songserm; Yong Poovorawan

    2006-01-01

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A\\/Tiger\\/Thailand\\/CU-T3\\/04 and A\\/Tiger\\/Thailand\\/CU-T7\\/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8

  19. The use of zoo exhibits by family groups to learn science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Loran Carleton

    In the last twenty years, research about science learning in informal contexts such as museums, science centers, zoos and aquariums has proliferated. Many studies have created detailed descriptions of learning as it occurs in informal contexts. Science education researchers have defined learning in several different ways. The selection of a conceptual framework through which to view science learning determines the questions that a researcher can explore. My study applied Roth and Lee's (2002) understanding of science learning as a collective praxis to the context of informal science learning at a community zoo. This conceptual framework is rooted in the view of learning as situated cognition as described by Lave and Wenger (1991). My research explored the interaction of the sociocultural and physical contexts for informal learning as defined by Falk (2000) and investigates how family groups collaborate to learn science at zoo exhibits and how they incorporate the physical features of the exhibit into their collaboration. My interpretations of each family's discourse yielded a variety of genres or accepted patterns used to learn science. All families engaged in highly parent-directed discourse during their visit. For one family parent-controlled, directed explanation was present in all science learning events; the other families' science learning events were a mixture of directed explanation and more collaborative genres of discourse. All the families in this study used exhibit text in two different ways: as a way of framing or guiding their interaction with the exhibit or as a resource in the context of the Family's own frame. For all of the families in this study, each exhibit was a separate learning event---none of the families applied or linked ideas or explanations created at one exhibit to ideas or explanations created at another exhibit. Implications of this study include more longitudinal research on the role of zoo visits on family learning and more explicit connections among exhibits that allow visitors to reflect on their learning and encourage a broader view of the nature of science.

  20. Zoo-heleoplankton structure in three artificial ponds of North-eastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Frutos, S M; Carnevali, R

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the abundance and species richness of zoo-heleoplankton bigger than 53 microm in an annual cycle under similar climate conditions in three artificial ponds, in order to observe the changes during an annual cycle. Samples were taken monthly from June 1993 to July 1994 in Corrientes, Argentina. The first pond (A) was covered an 80% by Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.), the second one (B) with bloom of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kurtzing) and the last one (C) with organic matter deposited in the bottom. The water was more acidic at pond A, and the water at pond B contained more dissolved oxygen concentration than the water at the other two ponds. The zoo-heleoplankton densities varied between 20-1728 ind.l(-1) at pond A, 42-4082 ind.l(-1) at pond B and 148-2447 ind.l(-1) at pond C. The maximum zoo-heleoplankton abundance was found in the pond with cyanobacteria bloom during Autumn 1994 and the minimum abundance was found in the one with a predominance of E. crassipes. The rank of species richness was pond A > pond B > pond C. Rotifera was the most abundant group in pond A whereas the larval stages of Copepoda were abundant in the other two ponds. Anuraeopsis navicula Rousselt 1910 was the dominant population in the pond with macrophytes prevalence. Brachionus calyciflorus Pallas 1776 and larval stage of Copepoda had variable proportions in the pond with cyanobacteria bloom. Thermocyclops decipiens (Kiefer 1929) was present during the annual cycle only in the pond with organic matter deposited in the bottom. The succession of taxa was observed in the pond with coverage of aquatic macrophytes and with cyanobacteria bloom. Differences in species richness and low similarity in zoo-heleoplankton between ponds were determined by differences in the quality of the water in relation to the presence of macrophytes, cyanobacteria, organic matter deposited in the bottom and fish predation. Multiple regression analysis (stepwise) revealed that water transparency, dissolved oxygen and conductivity were the environmental variables that explained more than 42% of variability in the abundance of the dominant species. PMID:19419034

  1. Spin Alignments of Spiral Galaxies within the Large-scale Structure from SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Luo, Wentao; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of spiral galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Galaxy Zoo 2, we investigate the alignment of spin axes of spiral galaxies with their surrounding large-scale structure, which is characterized by the large-scale tidal field reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the spin axes only have weak tendencies to be aligned with (or perpendicular to) the intermediate (or minor) axis of the local tidal tensor. The signal is the strongest in a cluster environment where all three eigenvalues of the local tidal tensor are positive. Compared to the alignments between halo spins and the local tidal field obtained in N-body simulations, the above observational results are in best agreement with those for the spins of inner regions of halos, suggesting that the disk material traces the angular momentum of dark matter halos in the inner regions.

  2. Combining Human and Machine Learning for Morphological Analysis of Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuminski, Evan; George, Joe; Wallin, John; Shamir, Lior

    2014-11-01

    The increasing importance of digital sky surveys collecting many millions of galaxy images has reinforced the need for robust methods that can perform morphological analysis of large galaxy image databases. Citizen science initiatives such as Galaxy Zoo showed that large data sets of galaxy images can be analyzed effectively by nonscientist volunteers, but since databases generated by robotic telescopes grow much faster than the processing power of any group of citizen scientists, it is clear that computer analysis is required. Here, we propose to use citizen science data for training machine learning systems, and show experimental results demonstrating that machine learning systems can be trained with citizen science data. Our findings show that the performance of machine learning depends on the quality of the data, which can be improved by using samples that have a high degree of agreement between the citizen scientists. The source code of the method is publicly available.

  3. The Catalog of Edge-on Disk Galaxies from SDSS. I. The Catalog and the Structural Parameters of Stellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Mosenkov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V.; Hillyer, R. W.

    2014-05-01

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  4. World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The World Forum for Acoustic Ecology (WFAE) is an international interdisciplinary coalition of individuals and institutions concerned with the world soundscape as an ecologically balanced entity. WFAE encourages the study of the relationship between living organisms and their sonic environment (soundscape), it is WFAE's main task to draw attention to unhealthy imbalances in this relationship, to improve the acoustic quality of a place wherever possible and to protect and maintain acoustically balanced soundscapes where they still exist. WFAE has recently established four on-line services and we invite anyone interested in acoustic ecology and communication to participate.

  5. Addendum 2: Forum for Injection Technique, India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Rishi, Shukla; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2014-01-01

    The second addendum to the Forum for Injection Techniques (FIT), India recommendations, first published in 2012 and followed by an addendum in 2013, covers various important issues. It describes how the impact of the so-called non-modifiable factors, which influence the injection technique, can be modulated; provides fresh information on timing of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist injections, methods of minimizing pain during injections, amyloidosis, and factors that impact adherence to insulin therapy. The addendum also lists semantic changes made to keep the FIT recommendations updated.

  6. The Forum State of the Field Survey 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blessing, Charlotte; Rayner, Elise; Kreutzer, Kim

    2010-01-01

    In October/November 2009, the Forum on Education Abroad conducted its third State of the Field Survey. This survey provides an annual or biannual assessment of key education abroad issues and topics of interest to Forum members and the field of education abroad at large. Previous State of the Field surveys were conducted in 2006 and 2008. The 2009…

  7. Patent Infringement and Forum Shopping in the European Union

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Perkins; Garry Mills

    1996-01-01

    This Article first considers the extent to which a patentee is entitled, under the various Conventions governing jurisdiction and enforcement, to which all EU Member States are signatories, to choose the forum in which to sue for infringement. This Article then considers the factors which a patentee is likely to look for when choosing the forum in which to bring

  8. (Integrated Energy Systems Forum monthly meetings). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gatton, D.

    1983-10-07

    During the life of the IES program, including the time it was administered by NBS, a total of 288 documents were designated as numbered IES documents, reproduced and made available to IES Forum participants. The documents constituted an important part of the technical information exchange function of the IES Forum. Included were reprints of articles from journals and magazines; papers presented at IES Forum meetings; papers prepared for other meetings and conferences; reports on topics of interest; Congressional testimony; and other papers and publications of interest. Current documents were placed on the literature table at each meeting to be taken by meeting participants; they also were provided by mail upon request. In addition, a variety of magazines, newsletters and other miscellaneous literature was provided to the IES Forum by their publishers. The Conference of Mayors Research and Education Foundation was successful in its purpose of maintaining the IES Forum as an important means of exchanging technical information during the one-year grant period. At this time, the future of the IES Forum is uncertain. The IES Advisory Council is exploring the possibility of obtaining outside funding to continue the group; but there is a general feeling that the IES Forum may no longer be necessary, since the technologies promoted by the IES Forum are now generally accepted and other organizations have instituted meetings and conferences which serve a technical information exchange function.

  9. Leadership Lessons from the State Early Childhood Policy Leadership Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Helene

    2004-01-01

    The State Early Childhood Policy Leadership Forum seeks to build state capacity to develop and strengthen statewide, cross-system early childhood policies and programs. The Forum provides intense leadership retreats, professional development opportunities, policy discussions, and one-on-one technical assistance for individuals who are leading…

  10. Meaningful Learning through Video-Supported Forum-Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkarainen, Paivi; Vapalahti, Kati

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first cycle of a design-based study at Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences, Finland, during which a video-supported forum-theater approach was implemented and evaluated. Students enrolled in the Drama course in the Civic Activities and Youth Work degree program produced and recorded forum-theater performances about…

  11. innovati nNREL's Industry Growth Forum Boosts Clean Energy

    E-print Network

    innovati nNREL's Industry Growth Forum Boosts Clean Energy Commercialization Efforts For more than's premier event for early-stage clean energy investment. The forum features presentations from the most innovative, promising, and emergent clean energy companies; provocative panels led by thought leaders

  12. Transitioning through College with Diabetes: Themes Found in Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravert, Russell D.; Boren, Suzanne A.; Wiebke, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Content analysis of Internet-based diabetes forum text was used to examine the experiences encountered by students with diabetes transitioning into and through college. Participants: Forum posts (N = 238) regarding attending college with diabetes were collected and analyzed. Methods: Thematic coding was used to identify prominent…

  13. Acceptability of an Asynchronous Learning Forum on Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2010-01-01

    Mobile learning has recently become noteworthy because mobile devices have become popular. To construct an asynchronous learning forum on mobile devices is important because an asynchronous learning forum is always an essential part of networked asynchronous distance learning. However, the input interface in handheld learning devices, which is…

  14. Capitolium.org: The Official Website of the Imperial Forums

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As part of the Imperial Forum Project, a Roman architectural preservation effort, the city of Rome presents this site documenting the forums built by its emperors. The central feature of the site is the Recovering the Forums section, where users can view images and read descriptions of the historic structures and areas that are being restored, which are: the Forums of Augustus, Caesar, and Nerva, the Temple of Peace (Forum of Vespasian), the Forum of Trajan, and Trajan's Market. Most of the material is available in both Italian and English, except an interactive map of the project area, which seems to be offered only in Italian at the moment. Another nice feature is the virtual tour area, where visitors can "fly" through reconstructions of the Forum of Caesar and Ulpia by viewing a 3D movie. The site is rounded out with background information about the history of Rome, including pictures of clothing styles and recipes for Roman foods, and Ludi, or games, such as a collection of Roman proverbs, images of Imperial Rome from movies, and a Forum visit quiz.

  15. BIO-FORUM: Inservice Education for High School Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, William C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is an inservice program (BIO-FORUM) for high school life science teachers. BIO-FORUM addresses issues of teacher alienation and isolation, while simultaneously providing teachers with up-to-date life science information, encouraging teacher-university professor contact, promoting contacts among life science teaches, and encouraging…

  16. The Eleanor Chelimsky Forum: Integrating Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jill; Kelley, John

    2015-01-01

    In response to Eleanor Chelimsky's inspiring plenary address 3 years ago, and with generous support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Eastern Evaluation Research Society launched the Eleanor Chelimsky Forum at its 2013 Annual Conference. The objective of this annual Forum, which has become a hallmark event in the evaluation world, is to…

  17. A Primer on the Effective Use of Threaded Discussion Forums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Orr, Robert L.

    Threaded discussion forums are asynchronous, World Wide Web-based discussions occurring under a number of different topics called threads. By allowing students to post, read, and respond to messages independently of time or place, threaded discussion forums give students an opportunity for deeper reflection and more thoughtful replies than chat…

  18. FARM RADIO FORUM PROJECT-GHANA, 1964-65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABELL, HELEN C.

    IN 1964-65 THE GOVERNMENT OF GHANA, IN COOPERATION WITH UNESCO AND THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA, CARRIED ON THE FARM RADIO FORUM PILOT PROJECT IN 80 VILLAGES IN GHANA TO TRANSMIT INFORMATION AND STIMULATE RURAL SELF-HELP ACTIVITIES. IN 20 VILLAGES ONE FORUM LISTENING GROUP WAS ORGANIZED, 20 VILLAGES HAD TWO LISTENING GROUPS, 20 CONTROL VILLAGES WERE…

  19. The Environmental and Ecological Forum 1970-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC. Office of Information Services.

    This report contains the papers presented in the 1970-1971 Environmental and Ecological Forum series, planned to provide an overview of the significant environmental, social, and economic aspects of electric power generation, more specifically, the pros and cons of nuclear power production. The Forum was organized as a public service to foster…

  20. CEDEFOP Forum (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, F. Alan

    1991-01-01

    This narrative account summarizes the 2-day research forum of the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP). Presentations focus on the central theme of the forum: new qualifications versus skill shortages. They include Kees Meijer's outline of the research undertaken in a series of national studies on skill shortages…

  1. Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Eric Gawiser

    2005-12-15

    I summarize current knowledge of galaxy formation with emphasis on the initial conditions provided by the Lambda CDM cosmology, integral constraints from cosmological quantities, and the demographics of high-redshift protogalaxies. Tables are provided summarizing the number density, star formation rate and stellar mass per object, cosmic star formation rate and stellar mass densities, clustering length and typical dark matter halo masses for Lyman break galaxies, Lyman alpha emitting galaxies, Distant red galaxies, Sub-millimeter galaxies, and Damped Lyman alpha absorption systems. I also discuss five key unsolved problems in galaxy formation and prognosticate advances that the near future will bring.

  2. Is painting by elephants in zoos as enriching as we are led to believe?

    PubMed

    English, Megan; Kaplan, Gisela; Rogers, Lesley J

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the activity of painting and performance of stereotyped and other stress-related behaviour was investigated in four captive Asian elephants at Melbourne Zoo, Australia. The activity involved the elephant being instructed to paint on a canvas by its keeper in front of an audience. Painting by elephants in zoos is commonly believed to be a form of enrichment, but this assumption had not been based on any systematic research. If an activity is enriching we would expect stress-related behaviour to be reduced but we found no evidence of the elephants anticipating the painting activity and no effect on the performance of stereotyped or other stress-related behaviour either before or after the painting session. This indicates that the activity does not fulfil one of the main aims of enrichment. However, if an elephant was not selected to paint on a given day this was associated with higher levels of non-interactive behaviour, a possible indicator of stress. Behavioural observations associated with ear, eye and trunk positions during the painting session showed that the elephant's attentiveness to the painting activity or to the keeper giving instruction varied between individuals. Apart from positive reinforcement from the keeper, the results indicated that elephants gain little enrichment from the activity of painting. Hence, the benefits of this activity appear to be limited to the aesthetic appeal of these paintings to the people viewing them. PMID:25071994

  3. An intrafamilial transmission of Arthroderma benhamiae in Canadian porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) in a Japanese zoo.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideo; Takahashi-Kyuhachi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yoko; Yarita, Kyoko; Takayama, Akiko; Inomata, Tomo; Sano, Ayako; Nishimura, Kazuko; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2008-08-01

    An intra-familial transmission of Arthroderma benhamiae in Canadian porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) housed in a Japanese zoo was studied. The family consisted of an adult couple and two offspring (a male and a female). The porcupettes, born in Japan, showed severe hair loss while the parent animals, imported from the USA. (male) and Canada (female), showed mild symptoms or were asymptomatic. Morphologically identical Tricophyton spp. isolates were recovered within seven days from quills of all animals on chloramphenicol-supplemented potato dextrose agar plates incubated at 37 degrees C. Two representative colonies from each animal were identified as Arthroderma benhamiae Americano-European race based on mating type (+) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1-5.5S-ITS 2 region of the rRNA gene sequences (AB236404-AB236408). The present cases constituted the second isolation of dermatophytes from porcupines. There were two different ITS types, i.e., the predominant one isolated from all animals and a secondary one recovered from only the mother porcupine. The sequences have never been recorded in Japan or in the GenBank database to the best of our knowledge. In addition, they were located at a cluster involving the type strain and mating strains of A. benhamiae Americano-European race and its F1 progeny. In contrast, 28 rodents (eight species) and three insectivora (1 species) exhibited in the petting zoo were negative for any dermatophytes as determined by culture. PMID:18608939

  4. Working in the Future. The Thinkahead Project Forum #3 (San Francisco, California, September 21, 1989). FIERI Forum Transcripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman Inst., San Francisco, CA.

    This document contains an edited transcript of a forum held as part of a research project called Thinkahead, which was designed to serve as a catalyst for developing educational models that will prepare people to think more critically and creatively in the world of the future. The forum participants, all business people concerned about the ways in…

  5. Museums, Zoos, and Gardens: How Formal-Informal Partnerships Can Impact Urban Students' Performance. Working Paper #04-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Meryle; Whitesell, Emilyn Ruble; Schwartz, Amy Ellen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide the first rigorous evidence of the impact of a partnership between public middle schools and informal science institutions (ISIs), such as museums and zoos, on student outcomes. This study focuses on Urban Advantage (UA), a program in New York City (NYC) that explicitly draws upon the expertise and resources of the city's…

  6. Group size: Determinants in the wild and implications for the captive housing of wild mammals in zoos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth E. Price; Tara S. Stoinski

    2007-01-01

    Group size is one of the most important factors influencing the formation and maintenance of successful social groups in captivity. For zoos, appropriate social groupings are of the utmost importance to provide examples of species-typical behaviors, as well as attain captive breeding goals. In the wild, group-living evolved largely in response to the need for predator avoidance and territory defense.

  7. Influence of Zoo Visitor Presence on the Behavior of Captive Indian Gaur (Bos gaurus gaurus) in a Zoological Park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahadevan Sekar; Thangavel Rajagopal; Govindaraju Archunan

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to zoos can be a source of potential disturbance and stress to some captive, nonhuman animals in the wild. To determine the influence of visitor presence on captive bison (Bos gaurus gaurus), the study analyzed the behavior of 4 individuals at the Arignar Anna Zoological Park, India. The study often observed the behavior of the animals on visitor-present days

  8. An outbreak of canine distemper virus in tigers (Panthera tigris): possible transmission from wild animals to zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Yumiko; Nishio, Yohei; Shiomoda, Hiroshi; Tamaru, Seiji; Shimojima, Masayuki; Goto, Megumi; Une, Yumi; Sato, Azusa; Ikebe, Yusuke; Maeda, Ken

    2012-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a morbillivirus that causes one of the most contagious and lethal viral diseases known in canids, has an expanding host range, including wild animals. Since December 2009, several dead or dying wild raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) were found in and around one safari-style zoo in Japan, and CDV was isolated from four of these animals. In the subsequent months (January to February 2010), 12 tigers (Panthera tigris) in the zoo developed respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, and CDV RNA was detected in fecal samples of the examined tigers. In March 2010, one of the tigers developed a neurological disorder and died; CDV was isolated from the lung of this animal. Sequence analysis of the complete hemagglutinin (H) gene and the signal peptide region of the fusion (F) gene showed high homology among these isolates (99.8-100%), indicating that CDV might have been transmitted from raccoon dog to tiger. In addition, these isolates belonged to genotype Asia-1 and had lower homology (<90%) to the vaccine strain (Onderstepoort). Seropositivity of lions (Panthera leo) in the zoo and wild bears (Ursus thibetanus) captured around this area supported the theory that a CDV epidemic had occurred in many mammal species in and around the zoo. These results indicate a risk of CDV transmission among many animal species, including large felids and endangered species. PMID:22214864

  9. OUTBREAKS OF E. COLI O157:H7 ASSOCIATED WITH PETTING ZOOS - NORTH CAROLINA, FLORIDA, AND ARIZONA, 2004-2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2004-2005, three outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections occurred among agricultural fair, festival and petting zoo visitors in North Carolina, Florida and Arizona. One hundred and eight cases, including 15 persons with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) were reported in the North Carol...

  10. Effects of construction noise on behaviour of and exhibit use by Snow leopards Uncia uncia at Basel zoo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. SULSER; B. L. STECK; B. BAUR

    2008-01-01

    Noise caused by human activities can cause stress in animals. We examined whether noise from construction sites affects the behaviour of and exhibit use by three Snow leopards Uncia uncia at Basel zoo. The behaviour and location of the animals were recorded at 1 minute intervals, using the instantaneous scan sampling method over a period of 216 hours (104 hours

  11. J. Zoo!., Lond. (1987) 211, 25-33. Pre-and postnatal growth of the Cape porcupine Hystrix africaeaustralis

    E-print Network

    Pretoria, University of

    1987-01-01

    J. Zoo!., Lond. (1987) 211, 25-33. Pre- and postnatal growth of the Cape porcupine Hystrix (Accepted 21 January 1986) (With 1 figure in the text) Pre- and postnatal growth of the Cape porcupine, and the von Bertalanffy equation. Specific foetal growth velocity for the Cape porcupine is higher than

  12. ZOO-FISH analysis with 7 human chromosome specific libraries detects conserved regions between human and camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Abdo, G; Rettenberger, G; Stranzinger, G

    1997-01-12

    Chromosomal homologies between individual human chromosomes and the camel karyotype have been established by using heterologous chromosome painting experiments called ZOO-FISH. Biotin-labelled DNA libraries from seven flow-sorted human chromosomes were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on camel chromosomes. Human DNA libraries 3, 4, 13, 14, 15, 19 and 21 hybridized to camel chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 21, 25, 32 and 33, were used in identifying and delineating 10 segments of homology. Comparison of ZOO-FISH results with several species within the artiodactyls allowed the study of karyotype rearrangements and the transfer results from the human genome project and the animal gene maps. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Homologe Chromosomenregionen zwischen einzelnen Humanchromosomen und dem Kamelkaryotyp wurden mittels Verwendung der heterologen Chromosomenhybridisierung, genannt ZOO-FISH, dargestellt. Biotin-markierte DNS-Bibliotheken von sieben durchflusszytometrisch sortierten Humanchromosomen wurden als Proben für die Fluoreszenz In Situ Hybridisierung (FISH) auf Kamelchromosomen verwendet. Human DNS-Bibliotheken der Chromosomen 3, 4, 13, 14, 15, 19 und 21 hybridisierten auf die Kamelchromosomen 2, 6, 7, 21, 25, 32 und 33, und identifizierten 10 homologe Segmente zwischen Mensch und Kamel. Vergleichende Ergebnisse aus ZOO-FISH Daten unterschiedlicher Spezies innerhalb der Artiodaktilen erlauben das Studium der Karyotypenbildung und die Uebertragung von Daten aus dem Human Genom Projekt und den Genkarten der Tiere. PMID:21395831

  13. Active Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource covers Seyfert galaxies, radio galaxies, BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, quasars, supermassive black holes, determining masses in galactic centers using the virial theorem, and a model for active galactic nuclei.

  14. Successive deaths of a captive snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) by infection with feline panleukopenia virus at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Mochizuki, Masami; Umemura, Takashi; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2011-04-01

    Feline parvoviruses were isolated from frozen samples of intestines taken from a snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) that died successively at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo in Hokkaido, Japan. Isolates possessed an antigenic epitope for both the feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and mink enteritis virus, identified with a hemagglutination inhibition test. Sequencing analyses of the VP2 region of the isolates revealed that the two isolates were identical and of the FPLV-type. These results suggested that FPLV was introduced from a feral cat which entered the zoo and transmitted the virus inside the zoo. PMID:21116104

  15. Isolated galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Vettolani; R. de Souza; G. Chincarini

    1986-01-01

    Using a catalogue of galaxies complete to mz <= 14.5, the authors investigate the possibility of extracting a sample of nonclustered galaxies and identifying it with a homogeneous background of objects. They conclude, in agreement with previous findings, that such a background does not exist observationally and stress the fact that the sample of isolated galaxies listed in this paper

  16. Identifying Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students describe the characteristics of different types of galaxies (spiral, elliptical, barred spiral, peculiar, or irregular) in their own words. They also classify galaxies seen in the Hubble Deep Field. This activity includes a student worksheet and background information for the teacher. This is activity two in "The Hidden Lives of Galaxies" information and activity booklet.

  17. Arthropod-borne pathogens circulating in free-roaming domestic cats in a zoo environment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    André, Marcos Rogério; Baccarim Denardi, Nathani Cristina; Marques de Sousa, Keyla Carstens; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Henrique, Paloma Canedo; Grosse Rossi Ontivero, Claudia Regina; Lima Gonzalez, Irys Hany; Cabral Nery, Carolina Vaz; Fernandes Chagas, Carolina Romeiro; Monticelli, Cauê; Alexandre de Santis, Ana Cláudia Gabriela; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2014-09-01

    Recently, tick and flea-borne pathogens have been detected in wild carnivores maintained in captivity in Brazilian zoos. Since free-roaming cats are frequently found in Brazilian zoos, they could act as reservoirs for arthropod-borne pathogens, which could be transmitted to endangered wild carnivores maintained in captivity in these institutions. On the other hand, stray cats in zoos may play a role as sentinels to pathogens that circulate among wild animals in captivity. The present work aimed to detect the presence of Anaplasmataceae agents, hemoplasmas, Bartonella species, piroplasmas, and Hepatozoon sp. DNA in blood samples of 37 free-roaming cats in a Brazilian zoo. Three (8%) cats were positive for Anaplasma spp. closed related to Anaplasma phagocytophilum; 12 (32%) cats were positive for hemoplasmas [two (5%) for Mycoplasma haemofelis, five (13.5%) for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, and five (13.5%) for Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis]; 11 (30%) were positive for Bartonella spp., six (16%) were positive Babesia vogeli and one (3%) for Theileria sp. Coinfection with multiple arthropod-borne agentes was observed in sampled cats. None of sampled cats were positive for Ehrlichia spp., Cytauxzoon spp., or Hepatozoon spp. in PCR. This is the first molecular detection of Babesia vogeli and Theileria sp. in domestic cats in Brazil. The control of the population of free-roaming cats in these conservation institutions is much needed aiming to prevent the potential transmission to endangered wild animals maintained in captivity, such as wild neotropical wild felids, as well as to human beings visiting zoos. PMID:24889035

  18. Can Anonymous Posters on Medical Forums be Reidentified?

    PubMed Central

    Bobicev, Victoria; El Emam, Khaled; Jafer, Yasser; Dewar, Brian; Jonker, Elizabeth; Matwin, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Background Participants in medical forums often reveal personal health information about themselves in their online postings. To feel comfortable revealing sensitive personal health information, some participants may hide their identity by posting anonymously. They can do this by using fake identities, nicknames, or pseudonyms that cannot readily be traced back to them. However, individual writing styles have unique features and it may be possible to determine the true identity of an anonymous user through author attribution analysis. Although there has been previous work on the authorship attribution problem, there has been a dearth of research on automated authorship attribution on medical forums. The focus of the paper is to demonstrate that character-based author attribution works better than word-based methods in medical forums. Objective The goal was to build a system that accurately attributes authorship of messages posted on medical forums. The Authorship Attributor system uses text analysis techniques to crawl medical forums and automatically correlate messages written by the same authors. Authorship Attributor processes unstructured texts regardless of the document type, context, and content. Methods The messages were labeled by nicknames of the forum participants. We evaluated the system’s performance through its accuracy on 6000 messages gathered from 2 medical forums on an in vitro fertilization (IVF) support website. Results Given 2 lists of candidate authors (30 and 50 candidates, respectively), we obtained an F score accuracy in detecting authors of 75% to 80% on messages containing 100 to 150 words on average, and 97.9% on longer messages containing at least 300 words. Conclusions Authorship can be successfully detected in short free-form messages posted on medical forums. This raises a concern about the meaningfulness of anonymous posting on such medical forums. Authorship attribution tools can be used to warn consumers wishing to post anonymously about the likelihood of their identity being determined. PMID:24091380

  19. LLW Forum meeting report, October 26--27, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held October 26-27, 1994.

  20. Below is an updated announcement for the Strategic Plan III Open forums. The committee has added two new open forums. The intent of these new forums is to encourage the participation and input of

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    any of the scheduled forums. A live stream will be available at http://live Journey Room * This is the only forum that will be streamed live for those who cannot physically attend of the forums, we invite you to provide input using our online survey at http

  1. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-384-1580, Crystal Zoo, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, B.; Thoburn, T.W.

    1985-04-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples werr analyzed for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, toluene, petroleum distillate, lead, quartz, cristobalite, and total particulates at Crystal Zoo, Boulder, Colorado in August, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the management because of concern for the workers health. Medical questionnaires were administered to eight workers in the leaded-crystal grinding room. Blood lead and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) concentrations were measured in the grinding-room workers and in three comparisons. The authors conclude that a health hazard due to overexposure to lead exists in the grinding department. Recommendations include improving work practices, prohibiting dry grinding of polishing of leaded glass, and installing down-draft ventilation.

  2. FATAL ENCEPHALOMYOCARDITIS VIRUS INFECTION IN AN AFRICAN SAVANNA ELEPHANT (LOXODONTA AFRICANA) IN A FRENCH ZOO.

    PubMed

    Lamglait, Benjamin; Joris, Antoine; Romey, Aurore; Bakkali-Kassimi, Labib; Lemberger, Karin

    2015-06-01

    A fatal case of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) involving an African elephant ( Loxodonta africana ) occurred in November 2013 at the Réserve Africaine de Sigean, France. An adult female was found dead without any preliminary symptoms. Gross pathologic changes consisted of petechiae and hemorrhages on mucosae and internal organs, abundant transudate in the abdominal and pericardial cavities, and myocarditis. Histopathologic examination showed extensive degeneration and necrosis of ventricular cardiomyocytes with concurrent lymphoplasmocytic and eosinophilic infiltrate. An EMCV was isolated from several organs and considered the causative agent of the myocarditis. The same strain of virus was also isolated in rodents captured on zoo premises and considered to be the reservoir of the virus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first EMCV case in a captive African elephant in Europe. PMID:26056902

  3. Protozoan parasites of four species of wild anurans from a local zoo in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, K N; Badrul, M M; Mohamad, N; Zainal-Abidin, A H

    2013-12-01

    The parasitic protozoan fauna in sixty-six anurans comprising of Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Phrynoidis juxtaspera, Hylarana erythraea and Polypedates leucomystax collected from Zoo Negara Malaysia was investigated. The distribution and prevalence rate of parasitic species in the digestive tract and blood were examined. Seven species of intestinal protozoa (Opalina ranarum, Cepedea dimidiata, Nycthetorus cordiformis, Entamoeba ranarum, Iodamoeba butschlii, Endamoeba blattae, and Tritrichomonas sp.) and two species of blood protozoa (Lankesterella sp. and Trypanosoma sp.) were recorded. Opalina ranarum was the most common protozoan found in the rectum and intestine (prevalence rate: 34.8%) infecting all host species, with P. juxtaspera heavily infected with the parasite, whereas Tritrichomonas sp. was the least prevalent intestinal species infecting only D. melanostictus. Both Lankesterella sp. and Trypanosoma sp. were found in the blood of H. erythraea. PMID:24522131

  4. Leptospira and Brucella antibodies in collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) in Brazilian zoos.

    PubMed

    Sales, Indiara dos Santos; Folly, Márcio Manhães; Garcia, Luize Néli Nunes; Ramos, Tatiane Mendes Varela; da Silva, Mariana Cristina; Pereira, Martha Maria

    2012-12-01

    The presence of Leptospira spp. and Brucella spp. antibodies was investigated in serum samples from 28 collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) kept in seven Brazilian zoos. Sera were tested against 19 Leptospira serovars using microscopic agglutination. Samples reacted to the following serovars: two (7.14%) to Patoc, three (10.71%) to Tarrasovi, three (10.71%) to both Patoc and Tarrasovi, two (7.14%) to Wolffi, and one (3.57%) to Australis. Two (7.14%) samples reacted to the buffered Brucella antigen test, but no confirmatory reaction occurred using the 2-mercaptoethanol slow slide agglutination test. No sample was reactive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test for rugose species of Brucella. The presence of anti-leptospira agglutinins in captive T. tetradactyla serum indicates that this species may be susceptible to infection by these bacteria. PMID:23272339

  5. Haemochromatosis in a Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) in an Australian zoo.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Raidal, S R; Blake, A H; Atkinson, M M; Atkinson, P R; Eggins, G P

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old Brazilian, or lowland, tapir with a 6-month history of loss of body condition developed clinical signs and laboratory findings consistent with liver failure. The animal was euthanased and a diagnosis of hepatic haemochromatosis was made based on histopathology. Two other healthy tapirs in the same collection had chronically elevated serum and tissue iron concentrations. The excessive accumulation of iron in tissues with resultant tissue damage (i.e. haemochromatosis) has been reported in a range of captive species. This and other reported cases of haemochromatosis in the Brazilian tapir would suggest that this condition is an important consideration in the management of this species in zoos. Further research into the endogenous regulation of iron metabolism, especially the role of hepcidin, in tapirs and other species at risk of iron storage disorders may be helpful in the prevention of this condition. PMID:22256982

  6. Zoo Labs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alison Brooks

    These five laboratory activities are designed for observation of primates and humans in a zoological environment and include studies of locomotion, communication, mother-infant interaction, general behavior, and dominance/submissive behavior. Students make observations and interpretations.

  7. AsteroidZoo: A New Zooniverse project to detect asteroids and improve asteroid detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M.; Lewicki, C. A.; Smith, A.; Lintott, C.; Christensen, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new citizen science project: AsteroidZoo. A collaboration between Planetary Resources, Inc., the Zooniverse Team, and the Catalina Sky Survey, we will bring the science of asteroid identification to the citizen scientist. Volunteer astronomers have proved to be a critical asset in identification and characterization of asteroids, especially potentially hazardous objects. These contributions, to date, have required that the volunteer possess a moderate telescope and the ability and willingness to be responsive to observing requests. Our new project will use data collected by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), currently the most productive asteroid survey, to be used by anyone with sufficient interest and an internet connection. As previous work by the Zooniverse has demonstrated, the capability of the citizen scientist is superb at classification of objects. Even the best automated searches require human intervention to identify new objects. These searches are optimized to reduce false positive rates and to prevent a single operator from being overloaded with requests. With access to the large number of people in Zooniverse, we will be able to avoid that problem and instead work to produce a complete detection list. Each frame from CSS will be searched in detail, generating a large number of new detections. We will be able to evaluate the completeness of the CSS data set and potentially provide improvements to the automated pipeline. The data corpus produced by AsteroidZoo will be used as a training environment for machine learning challenges in the future. Our goals include a more complete asteroid detection algorithm and a minimum computation program that skims the cream of the data suitable for implemention on small spacecraft. Our goal is to have the site become live in the Fall 2013.

  8. Intake and digestion of horned guan Oreophasis derbianus diets measured in three Mexican zoos.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Gretel; Cornejo, Juan; Macek, Michael; Dierenfeld, Ellen S

    2009-07-01

    We conducted nutritional analyses of diets offered to and ingested by seven pairs of horned guans (Oreophasis derbianus) in three zoos. Digestibility was calculated with individually housed birds (n=1 at each zoo). Diets offered varied widely among institutions, both in ingredients fed as well as in nutrient composition. Feeding selectivity was evident through differences in composition of diets offered vs. consumed, with fruit (bananas, grape, and/or plantain) and avocado (when offered) highly preferred; green leaves, poultry pellets, and other vegetables comprised lesser proportions of the diet. All facilities fed 2-3X more food than consumed, allowing a great degree of choice of preferred items and potentially consumption of nutritionally imbalanced diets-in particular, mineral constituents. Diets were highly digestible; dry matter (DM) digestion coefficients ranged from 70 to approximately 90%; protein digestibility varied from 30 to 80%; fat was >90% digestible. Diet composition was compared with known nutritional requirements of domestic avian species, and feeding recommendations discussed. Despite the wide variability in nutrient composition of diets eaten (i.e. protein 6-10% of DM; fat 2-17% of DM), no overt health problems were noted and all pairs had successfully reproduced on these diets. It is suggested that horned guans may have nutrient requirements more similar to those suggested for other frugivorous birds than values determined for poultry as the physiologic model. Comparisons with native food items, as well as more detailed nutrient balance studies, may provide even better guidelines for captive management of this highly endangered species. PMID:19681153

  9. Quality vs. quantity: assessing the visibility of the jaguars housed at Chester Zoo, UK.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Suzanne; Moss, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    To fulfill an educational or visitor-related role in the zoo's collection, a species needs to be visible to the visiting public. However, this may not always be achievable for animals housed in naturalistic enclosures, particularly species which are highly camouflaged and have an elusive nature, such as jaguars. Four jaguars housed at Chester Zoo (UK) were studied to assess the quality of visibility from the public viewing area and to provide recommendations for assessing visibility to evaluate the educational role of elusive species. Data were recorded on whether the jaguar could be seen, the proportion of the body that was visible and their behavior. The jaguars could be seen 19.5% (i.e. quantity), from the public viewing area, of the observed time. 69.2% of this time the whole of the jaguars' body was on-show and it was possible to observe their behavior during all of these observations. However, when less of the body was visible, the behavior of the jaguars could be observed on significantly fewer occasions (P?

  10. Proceedings of the Fifth Triennial Software Quality Forum 2000, Software for the Next Millennium, Software Quality Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Scientific Software Engineering Group, CIC-12

    2000-04-01

    The Software Quality Forum is a triennial conference held by the Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee for the Department of Energy's Quality Managers. The forum centers on key issues, information, and technology important in software development for the Nuclear Weapons Complex. This year it will be opened up to include local information technology companies and software vendors presenting their solutions, ideas, and lessons learned. The Software Quality Forum 2000 will take on a more hands-on, instructional tone than those previously held. There will be an emphasis on providing information, tools, and resources to assist developers in their goal of producing next generation software.

  11. DOI 10.1515/forum-2013-0014The Forum 2012; 10(4): 127131 Avi Feller*, Andrew Gelman and Boris Shor

    E-print Network

    Gelman, Andrew

    DOI 10.1515/forum-2013-0014The Forum 2012; 10(4): 127­131 Avi Feller*, Andrew Gelman and Boris Shor 10027, USA Boris Shor: University of Chicago and University of California, Berkeley Introduction Since

  12. Space Technology and Applications International Forum {minus} 1998. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Space Technology and Applications International Forum {minus} 1998. This Forum consisted of six hosted conferences covering a broad spectrum of space science and technology. The technology spanned from basic research, such as thermophysics in microgravity and breakthrough physics for propulsion, to the most recent advances in space power and propulsion, space exploration and commercialization, and next generation launch systems. The Forum provided opportunity for professional interaction among academia, industry, and government. Program managers and developers of space technologies in the United States and abroad got together to exchange ideas. There was an emphasis on international participation and collaboration. The theme for the 1998 Forum was ``Progress in expanding the space frontier.`` There were four plenary sessions on ``View of the future.`` There were 340 presentations altogether; 255 papers are included in these proceedings, out of which 31 have been abstracted for the Energy, Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  13. Procurement Services Forum Minutes Presentation by Enterprise Cars

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    Procurement Services Forum Minutes Presentation by Enterprise Cars o Enterprise reservation tool: o http://www.enterprise.com/car_rental/deeplinkmap.do?bid=028&refId=TXTECHU Presentation by IKON Copiers

  14. Second National Forum on Biomedical Imaging in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    September 14-15, 2000 Forum Agenda - September 14, 2000 (PDF document) Workshop Agenda - September 15, 2000 (PDF document) Meeting Summary (PDF document) For further information, please contact: Cancer Imaging ProgramNational Cancer InstituteCancer Imaging

  15. Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 on Energy & Water Sustainability in 2007 successfully brought together policy-makers, researchers, energy of energy and water sustainability, considering the important linkages between these two resources

  16. Commercial Crew Planning Status Forum - Duration: 2 hours, 8 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA presents an overview of common themes captured from industry responses provided to NASA's Commercial Crew Initiative Request for Information (RFI) published on May 21, 2010. The forum includes...

  17. Policy Forum Disclosure of Investigators' Recruitment Performance in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Policy Forum Disclosure of Investigators' Recruitment Performance in Multicenter Clinical Trials, Pasqual Maragall Foundation, Barcelona, Spain, 2 Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research, Ottawa, Canada, 3 Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Rigshospitalet

  18. Quality of weight loss advice on Internet forums

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kevin O.; Farheen, Kiran; Johnson, Craig W.; Thomas, Eric J.; Barnes, Ann S.; Bernstam, Elmer V.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults use the Internet for weight loss information, sometimes by participating in discussion forums. Our purpose was to analyze the quality of advice exchanged on these forums. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of messages posted to 18 Internet weight loss forums during one month in 2006. Advice was evaluated for congruence with clinical guidelines; potential for causing harm; and subsequent correction when it was contradictory to guidelines (erroneous) or potentially harmful. Message- and forum-specific characteristics were evaluated as predictors of advice quality and self-correction. Results: Of 3368 initial messages, 266 (7.9%) were requests for advice. Of 654 provisions of advice, 56 (8.6%) were erroneous and 19 of these 56 (34%) were subsequently corrected. Forty-three (6.6%) provisions of advice were harmful and 12 of these 43 (28%) were subsequently corrected. Messages from low-activity forums (fewer messages) were more likely than those from high-activity forums to be erroneous (10.6% vs. 2.4%, p<0.001) or harmful (8.4% vs. 1.2%, p<0.001). In high-activity forums, 2 of 4 (50%) erroneous provisions of advice and 2 of 2 (100%) potentially harmful provisions of advice were corrected by subsequent postings. Compared to general weight loss advice, medication-related advice was more likely to be erroneous (p=0.02) or harmful (p=0.01). Conclusions: Most advice posted on highly-active Internet weight loss forums is not erroneous or harmful. However, clinical and research strategies are needed to address the quality of medication-related advice. PMID:17602934

  19. Proceedings of the third annual Nevada energy forum and exposition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a forum on energy conservation. The papers include subjects on the following topics: third party financing; heat recovery and indirect evaporative cooling; computer literacy; practical power factor survey methodology; the measured energy performance of buildings; casino cogeneration; employees and energy conservation; daylighting; infrared heating; peak shaving and cogeneration. These subjects were orientated toward the management, purchasing and engineering professions and coincided with the forum goal of promoting energy conservation literacy.

  20. Archives of SOUTH-EAST-EUROPE-FORUM@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This electronic discussion list, created by the South East European Research Unit at the University of Glasgow, aims to be an interdisciplinary forum for academics and researchers interested in the socio-cultural and geopolitical issues of southeastern Europe. The forum will emphasize discussion of the major transitional processes occurring in the Balkans, promote the exchange of scholarly information, and foster understanding of the region.

  1. Exploring the Dark Side of the Web: Collection and Analysis of U.S. Extremist Online Forums

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yilu Zhou; Jialun Qin; Guanpi Lai; Edna Reid; Hsinchun Chen

    2006-01-01

    Contents in extremist online forums are invaluable data sources for extremism reseach. In this study, we propose a systematic Web mining approach to collecting and monitoring extremist forums. Our proposed approach identifies extremist forums from various resources, addresses practical issues faced by researchers and experts in the extremist forum collection process. Such collection provides a foundation for quantitative forum analysis.

  2. Launch of the North West People in Research Forum The North West People in Research (NWPiR) Forum is a new organisation that aims to support

    E-print Network

    Diggle, Peter J.

    Launch of the North West People in Research Forum The North West People in Research (NWPiR) Forum, successfully engaged almost 120 people with workshop sessions highlighting good practice within Universities a workshop that asked people to think about the barriers to PPI/E and how the Forum could help to address

  3. The Sam Nunn Bank of America Policy Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Georgia Tech Library and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs have just unveiled this new Website offering presentations from the annual Sam Nunn Policy Forum. The forum, jointly sponsored by the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Georgia, and Emory University, features experts from the academy, government, and the private sector discussing a selected public policy topic. Thus far, the site offers material from the 1997 forum, "Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and U.S. Security," and the 1998 forum, "Information Security: Risks, Opportunities and the Bottom Line." The former includes videos and transcripts from key speakers; the latter currently contains videos of presentations by keynote speakers. Georgia Tech Library promises to soon have the 2001 forum online. That forum focused on partnerships and investments in Russia, and as such, participants included high-ranking Russian government officials and scientists as well as US government, business and academic leaders. Note that the RealVideo files were not accessible when we reviewed the site; however, Georgia Tech promises to have them restored soon.

  4. Hepatic calodium hepaticum (Nematoda) infection in a zoo colony of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Landolfi, Jennifer A; Karim, Baktiar O; Poynton, Sarah L; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2003-12-01

    Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica), a nematode parasite commonly found in the liver of wild rodents, infects a wide variety of mammals, including humans. A retrospective study of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at the Baltimore Zoo showed that 5 of 21 (24%) of the prairie dogs submitted for postmortem examination between 1981 and 2001 had hepatic capillariasis, with all the infections diagnosed during or after 1997. Affected livers contained multifocal granulomas containing numerous eggs and occasional adult nematodes. Asymptomatic wild rats in the zoo with a high prevalence of infection may have served as a reservoir for the disease. Wild rodent control is essential to minimize exposure of susceptible exhibition animals as well as humans to C. hepaticum. PMID:15077713

  5. PROVIDING ENRICHMENT IN HIGHLY CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENTS: BLACK-FOOTED FERRET (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) ENRICHMENT PROGRAM AT THE PHOENIX ZOO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hilda Tresz; Phoenix Zoo

    2007-01-01

    The black-footed ferret was believed to have been extinct until 1981, when it was rediscovered in Wyoming. In 1987, several institutions led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service teamed up to save the species. The Phoenix Zoo has played a significant part in the recovery program since 1991. Enrichment options are being synchronized with recommendations from the U.S. Fish

  6. Detection of Salmonella serovars in zoo and pet reptiles, rabbits, and rodents in Iran by culture and PCR methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Zahraei Salehi; M. Mahzounieh; E. Khaksar

    2010-01-01

    Diseases caused by Salmonella serovars are well-recognized in humans, livestock, and zoo animals and can result in morbidity, mortality, and significant\\u000a economic losses. Salmonella serovars have found greater significance due to their ubiquitous distribution, growing number of serovars, wide host range,\\u000a complex pathogenesis, and complicated epizootiology involving humans, animals, and the environment. The prevalence of Salmonella serovar infection were determined

  7. A comparative ZOO-FISH analysis in bats elucidates the phylogenetic relationships between Megachiroptera and five microchiropteran families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Volleth; K.-G. Heller; R. A. Pfeiffer; H. Hameister

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization with human whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) was applied to compare the karyotypes of members of five\\u000a bat families. Twenty-five evolutionarily conserved units (ECUs) were identified by ZOO-FISH analysis. In 10 of these 25 ECUs,\\u000a thorough GTG-band comparison revealed an identical banding pattern in all families studied. Differences in the remaining ECUs\\u000a were used as characters to

  8. Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

    2013-12-01

    Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception option in zoo animals, even in endangered species. Ongoing use of gamete and embryo freezing may salvage vanishing species. PMID:24437091

  9. Ecological ethics in captivity: balancing values and responsibilities in zoo and aquarium research under rapid global change.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Ben A; Collins, James P

    2013-01-01

    Ethical obligations to animals in conservation research and management are manifold and often conflicting. Animal welfare concerns often clash with the ethical imperative to understand and conserve a population or ecosystem through research and management intervention. The accelerating pace and impact of global environmental change, especially climate change, complicates our understanding of these obligations. One example is the blurring of the distinction between ex situ (zoo- and aquarium-based) conservation and in situ (field-based) approaches as zoos and aquariums become more active in field conservation work and as researchers and managers consider more intensive interventions in wild populations and ecosystems to meet key conservation goals. These shifts, in turn, have consequences for our traditional understanding of the ethics of wildlife research and management, including our relative weighting of animal welfare and conservation commitments across rapidly evolving ex situ and in situ contexts. Although this changing landscape in many ways supports the increased use of captive wildlife in conservation-relevant research, it raises significant ethical concerns about human intervention in populations and ecosystems, including the proper role of zoos and aquariums as centers for animal research and conservation in the coming decades. Working through these concerns requires a pragmatic approach to ethical analysis, one that is able to make trade-offs among the many goods at stake (e.g., animal welfare, species viability, and ecological integrity) as we strive to protect species from further decline and extinction in this century. PMID:23904531

  10. Historical perspective and future directions in training of veterinary pathologists with an emphasis on zoo and wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Lowenstine, Linda J; Montali, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the history of the field of zoo and wildlife pathology, training opportunities for veterinary students and graduate veterinarians, and current and future job opportunities. The niches occupied by veterinarians in this field and their contributions to animal and human health are also highlighted. The field of zoo and wildlife, or "non-traditional" species, pathology has its roots in comparative anatomy, zoology, wildlife biology, and medical pathology in the mid- to late nineteenth century. The initial emphasis was on comparisons between animal and human diseases or on management of game animals. Veterinarians became increasingly involved during the twentieth century, gradually changing the emphasis to improvement of conservation strategies, captive care, and elucidation of diseases of concern for the animals themselves. Currently there are several zoos and wildlife agencies in the United States employing full-time veterinary pathologists. Private and government diagnostic laboratories, veterinary schools, and other academic institutions in the United States with pathology departments are other employers. The field requires post-DVM training by means of a residency program leading to board certification, graduate school (MS or PhD degrees), or both. Veterinary students can gain valuable experience in the field through externships and, at some schools, through elective courses in the curriculum. Current concerns about ecosystem health, bioterrorism, and the recognition that captive and free-ranging wildlife can serve as sentinel species will increase the demand for veterinary pathologists choosing this very rewarding career path specializing in non-traditional species. PMID:17035204

  11. Using ZooImage automated system for the estimation of biovolume of copepods from the northern Argentine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, R.; Cepeda, G.; Capitanio, F.; Viñas, M. D.

    2011-08-01

    A total of 46 samples from coastal and shelf sectors from the northern Argentine Sea (34°-41° S) were digitized to compare the performance of the new ZooImage analysis method for copepod abundance and biovolume estimations. A training set of 1437 objects were used for automatic discrimination using a Random Forest algorithm with a general accuracy of 83.92%. A total of 11 taxa were automatically classified. Copepods were divided in three categories: Large calanoids, small calanoids and cyclopoids and identified with an accuracy of 83.15%, 79.5% and 85.7% respectively. The discriminant analysis revealed both the equivalent circular diameter (ECD) and the area were the best variables to differentiate the three copepod categories. Samples were previously quantified by optical methods in order to compare with automated results. Automated copepod biovolume measurements were estimated from individual calculations applying new ZooImage allometric parameters, and were compared with manual calculations using specific size/biovolume equations. It was demonstrated that ZooImage can potentially be used as a tool for abundance and biovolume estimations of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods and allow us to obtain results more rapidly by reducing the time lag involved using traditional measuring methods.

  12. Galaxies Galore

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Amazing Space activity will develop skills required in scientific inquiry (observation, recognition of pattern, identification of attributes, and classification), to gain a general understanding of the structure of galaxies, and to acquire knowledge about galaxy types (irregular, elliptical, and spiral). An instructor guide provides background information, links, and follow-up activities.

  13. 78 FR 78338 - Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19...Japan-United States Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum (``Fukushima Recovery Forum'') on February 18-19...

  14. The Ultraviolet Attenuation Law in Backlit Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    The effective extinction law (attenuation behavior) in galaxies in the emitted ultraviolet (UV) regime is well known only for actively star-forming objects and combines effects of the grain properties, fine structure in the dust distribution, and relative distributions of stars and dust. We use Galaxy Evolution Explorer, XMM Optical Monitor, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to explore the UV attenuation in the outer parts of spiral disks which are backlit by other UV-bright galaxies, starting with the candidate list of pairs provided by Galaxy Zoo participants. New optical images help to constrain the geometry and structure of the target galaxies. Our analysis incorporates galaxy symmetry, using non-overlapping regions of each galaxy to derive error estimates on the attenuation measurements. The entire sample has an attenuation law across the optical and UV that is close to the Calzetti et al. form; the UV slope for the overall sample is substantially shallower than found by Wild et al., which is a reasonable match to the more distant galaxies in our sample but not to the weighted combination including NGC 2207. The nearby, bright spiral NGC 2207 alone gives an accuracy almost equal to the rest of our sample, and its outer arms have a very low level of foreground starlight. Thus, this widespread, fairly "gray" law can be produced from the distribution of dust alone, without a necessary contribution from differential escape of stars from dense clouds. Our results indicate that the extrapolation needed to compare attenuation between backlit galaxies at moderate redshifts from HST data, and local systems from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and similar data, is mild enough to allow the use of galaxy overlaps to trace the cosmic history of dust in galaxies. For NGC 2207, HST data in the near-UV F336W band show that the covering factor of clouds with small optical attenuation becomes a dominant factor farther into the UV, which opens the possibility that widespread diffuse dust dominates over dust in star-forming regions deep into the UV. Comparison with published radiative-transfer models indicates that the role of dust clumping dominates over differences in grain populations at this coarse spatial resolution. Based in part on observations made with the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer. GALEX is operated for NASA by the California Institute of Technology under NASA contract NAS5-98034.

  15. Friday Forum: Reading from the Primary Literature

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cameron Davidson

    Friday forum is an integral part of my course. I choose papers before the term begins based on my own interest, the interests of my students (e.g. senior thesis topics), and the types of projects we plan to complete in the course that term (e.g. term-long or multi-week research problem ). The number of papers is based on enrollment so that two students are responsible for one paper. I integrate the papers into my syllabus so the students know when each paper must be read and discussed. At the beginning of the term, I have the students rank order their choice of paper. Their decision is typically based on interest and timing with respect to the term. I then assign them a paper based on their ranking. This works well in that they typically get their first or second choice , and the students feel like they have a say in what they are going to present. At the beginning of the term I hand out the first paper we are going to read. Everyone in the course reads the paper, and must submit three questions about the paper to me via e-mail by 4:00 PM the day before we discuss the paper. After the deadline, I compile the questions, identified by name, and send to everyone in the course as soon as possible. This typically ensures that the students read the paper, and that we have plenty of ammunition for the discussion. On the day of Friday forum (typically Friday), the two students responsible for the paper give a 10-15 minute presentation on the paper emphasizing the main point(s) of the paper, along with any background information they think is necessary to fully understand the paper. Sometime before their presentation (usually the day before), I schedule a one-hour meeting with the presenters to give them the chance to ask me any questions they have before putting together their presentation. I believe this is an essential part of the process in order to clear up any fundamental questions. After the presentation, we sit around one large table (four lab tables put together) for the discussion. I think the round table format, with everyone facing each other, helps promote discussion. Its up to the student presenters how they want to lead the discussion, but typically they focus on themes that emerged from the question s submitted by the rest of the students. This has the added benefit of drawing the rest of the class into the discussion. The hardest part for me to control as an instructor is to try and keep my mouth shut, and allow the students to explore ideas on their own.

  16. SpArcFiRe: Scalable automated detection of spiral galaxy arm segments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B., E-mail: drdavis@uci.edu, E-mail: whayes@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3435 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ?644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as 'galaxies'. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral 'arm', leading us to prefer the term 'arm segment'. We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  17. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  18. SpArcFiRe: Scalable Automated Detection of Spiral Galaxy Arm Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B.

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ~644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as "galaxies." We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral "arm," leading us to prefer the term "arm segment." We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  19. 75 FR 41577 - VBA/VHA Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability Evaluation Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VBA/VHA Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability...Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability...pertain to diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. See 38 CFR...

  20. 77 FR 17104 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting: Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting: Correction...Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related...

  1. 77 FR 26509 - Notice of Public Meeting-Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ...Technology Notice of Public Meeting--Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop V to be held...information on the U.S. Government (USG) Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap...

  2. 76 FR 62373 - Notice of Public Meeting-Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...Technology Notice of Public Meeting--Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV AGENCY...SUMMARY: NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV to be held...information on the U.S. Government (USG) Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap...

  3. A survey of abnormal repetitive behaviors in North American river otters housed in zoos.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Paige; Bashaw, Meredith J

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypic behaviors, indicating poor welfare and studied in a variety of species (especially carnivores), appear related to characteristics of current and past environments. Although North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) often develop abnormal, repetitive, possibly stereotypic behaviors, no published reports describe otter housing and management or characterize how these variables relate to abnormal repetitive behavior (ARB) occurrence. The first author developed surveys to gather data on housing, individual history, management, and the prevalence of ARBs in otters housed in facilities accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Consistent with anecdotal evidence that otters are prone to ARBs, 46% of river otters in the study exhibit them. ARBs were mostly locomotor and often preceded feeding. Exhibits where otters were fed and trained housed a greater percentage of nonhuman animals with ARBs. This study supports the Tarou, Bloomsmith, and Maple (2005) report that more hands-on management is associated with higher levels of ARBs because management efforts are only for animals with ARBs. Escape motivation, breeding season, feeding cues, and ability to forage may affect ARBs in river otters and should be investigated. PMID:22742198

  4. [Hantaviruses in Germany: threat for zoo, pet, companion and farm animals?].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Rainer G; Imholt, Christian; Krüger, Detlev H; Krautkrämer, Ellen; Scheibe, Thomas; Essbauer, Sandra S; Pfeffer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hantaviruses are so-called "emerging" and "re-emerging" viruses because of the new and sudden nature of their appearance. Human infections can lead to two distinct disease patterns, the Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome and the Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome. All known human pathogenic hantaviruses are transmitted through rodent hosts. There are three rodent-associated hantaviruses in Germany. The bank vole-associated Puumala virus (PUUV) is responsible for most of the human hantavirus infections. The Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) associated with the striped field mouse is causing hantavirus disease in the North and Northeast of Germany. The human pathogenicity of Tula virus (TULV) is still controversially discussed--the virus has been mainly associated with the common vole as the reservoir, but was molecularly detected also in the field and the water vole. More recently, two shrew-borne hantaviruses were described in Germany, i. e. Seewis virus in the common shrew and Asikkala virus in the pygmy shrew. Systematic studies about hantavirus infections of zoo, pet, companion and farm animals are still lacking. Hence, the aim of this review article is to summarise the current knowledge on this topic and raise the attention of veterinarians to potentially overlooked clinical disease patterns. PMID:24511827

  5. A survey of husbandry practices for lorisid primates in North American zoos and related facilities.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Grace; Kuhar, Christopher W; Dennis, Patricia M; Lukas, Kristen E

    2013-01-01

    Zoos and related facilities in North America currently manage five species in the primate family Lorisidae: the greater (Nycticebus coucang), Bengal (N. bengalensis) and pygmy (N. pygmaeus) slow lorises, red slender loris (Loris tardigradus), and potto (Perodicticus potto). We used an online survey to describe institutional housing and husbandry practices for these species and assess the extent to which practices are consistent with established guidelines. Our results show that most captive lorisids are housed solitarily or in pairs. Most individuals occupy a single exhibit space in a building dedicated to nocturnal animals. Facilities are commonly meeting recommendations for abiotic exhibit design and are providing animals with an enriched environment. However, pottos and slender lorises currently occupy exhibit spaces smaller than the recommended minimum, and the impact of cleaning protocols on olfactory communication should be critically evaluated. Few facilities are taking advantage of the benefits of positive reinforcement training for promoting animal welfare. Research is greatly needed on the effects of exhibit lighting on behavior, health, and reproduction; and to determine how best to manage the social needs of lorisids with naturally dispersed social structures. Although captive populations of slender lorises, pottos, and slow lorises are declining, we suggest that improved husbandry knowledge has the potential to positively influence population sustainability and to enhance future efforts to manage the growing pygmy loris population. PMID:23161761

  6. Effects of summer microclimates on behavior of lions and tigers in zoos.

    PubMed

    Young, Tory; Finegan, Esther; Brown, Robert D

    2013-05-01

    The surrounding thermal environment has a direct influence on the well-being of an animal. However, few studies have investigated the microclimatic conditions that result from outdoor zoo enclosure designs and whether this affects where animals choose to spend time. Two African lions (Panthera leo) and two Siberian/Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) were observed for a total of 18 full days during the summer and fall of 2009. Their activities and locations were recorded to the nearest minute of each test day. Simultaneous on-site microclimate measurements were taken of air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind. Observations indicated that the locations where the animals chose to spend time were influenced by the microclimatic conditions. All subjects spent more time in the shade on their sunny warm days than on other days and differed from one another in their choice of shade source on all days. Temperature-comparable sunny and cloudy days showed a greater use of sun on the cloudy days. Species-specific differences between the lions (whose native habitat is hot) and the tigers (whose native habitat is temperate with cold winters) were observed with the tigers displaying more cooling behaviors than the lions in terms of solar radiation input and evaporative heat loss. The tigers were also more active than the lions. The results of this study provide new insight into how lions and tigers respond to microclimatic conditions in a captive environment. PMID:22707238

  7. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp. (Testudines: Testudinidae), from the Dallas Zoo.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Roberts, David T

    2014-02-01

    During January 1994, feces from a captive juvenile Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp., from the Dallas Zoo, Dallas County, Texas was examined for coccidia. The tortoise was found to harbor an eimerian which is described as new. Sporulated oocysts of Eimeria iversoni n. sp. were ovoidal with a smooth, single-layered wall (? 0.5-0.8) that measured (L × W) 13.5 × 10.3 ?m, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule(s) were all absent; 2 conical projections were present on 1 end of oocyst and measured 1.0-1.5. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal and measured 8.3 × 4.5 ?m, with L/W of 1.8; a Stieda body (? 0.5 high) was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent; a sporocyst residuum was composed of 2-5 granules in a compact mass between sporozoites; sporozoites were banana-shaped and measured 9.5 × 2.5 in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is only the second time an eimerian has been reported from Galápagos tortoises. PMID:24006862

  8. Narrating dementia: self and community in an online forum.

    PubMed

    Rodriquez, Jason

    2013-09-01

    In this article, I examine how individuals diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease use illness narratives to construct community. The ability to narrate is a fundamental component of the self. Using 354 posts by 32 members of an Internet forum, I argue that people with Alzheimer's, whose ability to narrate, and thus create a self, was compromised, nonetheless managed to tell stories of redemption out of which a salvaged self emerged. Narratives are essential for the construction of self, but as I show in this article, they are also essential for the construction of community. Forum members shared stories, gave advice, offered encouragement, and commiserated about their symptoms in ways that generated solidarity. Internet forums provide a venue for people with illnesses who are unable to leave the home to construct community. PMID:23907588

  9. LLW Forum meeting report, January 24--26 1990

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held January 24-26, 1990.

  10. Teenage Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, T.; Epinat, B.; Vergani, D.; Queyrel, J.; Tasca, L.; Amram, P.; Garilli, B.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Fèvre, O.; Moultaka, J.; Paioro, L.; Tresse, L.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Perez-Montero, E.; Perret, V.; Bournaud, F.; Divoy, C.

    2012-03-01

    The early growth stages of galaxies are still poorly understood. The aim of the MASSIV survey is to better understand the key processes that govern the evolution of galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1-2, a particularly turbulent period similar to the teenage years. This paper presents this ambitious survey, together with the main results obtained so far from this ESO Large Programme with SINFONI at the VLT.

  11. Active Galaxies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This guide accompanies an educational wallsheet that uses active galaxies as an engagement to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Web site. Active galaxies have super-massive black holes in their cores, some of which emit jets of particles and light. It features three curriculum enhancement activities, background information, assessment information, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and detailed information about the physical science and mathematics content standards that are supported.

  12. 1.April 2011 Forum fr Universitt und Gesellschaft Institut fr Geologie

    E-print Network

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    in der Schweiz Prof. Adrian Pfiffner 1.April 2011 Forum für Universität und Gesellschaft Institut für 4 Hebung und Seismizität in der Schweiz #12;1.April 2011 Forum für Universität und Gesellschaft Geologie 10 Erdbeben in der Schweiz seit 1300 Quelle: SED #12;1.April 2011 Forum für Universität und

  13. Lasting Lessons: Following up with Recipients of the Forum's Undergraduate Research Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum on Education Abroad, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The annual Forum on Education Abroad Undergraduate Research Award showcases rigorous and significant undergraduate research that occurs as part of education abroad programs. Every year, the award recipients present their research at a plenary luncheon at the Forum's Annual Conference. The Forum granted the first Undergraduate Research Awards in…

  14. The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior

    E-print Network

    The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior: Presentations and discussions at the two-day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior for High employer. #12;2013 CERC-BEE Forum on Human Behavior and Integrated Design for High Performance Buildings

  15. Graduate Student Forums Sponsored by the Office of Graduate Education (OGE)

    E-print Network

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    for Graduate Students 10/17/2012 Writing tips for Graduate Students 10/31/2012 Stress Management Workshop/2/2014 Graduate Student Forum: You're Hired, Now What 4/16/2014 Graduate Student Forum: Stress Management 4Graduate Student Forums Sponsored by the Office of Graduate Education (OGE) A weekly series of co

  16. Regional Technical Forum and 2011 PRogRess UPdaTe

    E-print Network

    Regional Technical Forum and 2011 PRogRess UPdaTe Northwest Power Conservation Council and 2010. Tom Eckman, Chair Regional Technical Forum Letter From the RTF Chair We are just beyond the 12-year anniversary of the Regional Technical Forum. The report,the first for the RTF,signals an important milestone

  17. Regional Technical Forum and 2013 PRogRess UPdaTe

    E-print Network

    Regional Technical Forum and 2013 PRogRess UPdaTe 2012 annual Report #12;Page 2 > Regional Technical FoRum > 2012 annUaL RePoRT I am pleased to present the third annual report of the Regional Technical Forum, a unique organization that plays a vital role in the northwest's continuing quest

  18. The Stem Advisory Forum: A Means of Allowing People to Influence the Government's STEM Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onion, Alice; Follett, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of the UK government's STEM agenda and then considers one aspect in depth--the STEM Advisory Forum. It explains how the Forum operates to draw together views from across the STEM community through online discussions and face-to-face events. Four examples are given of topics that have been dealt with by the Forum.…

  19. 78 FR 21191 - NHTSA Activities Under the United Nations World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ...NHTSA Activities Under the United Nations World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...the upcoming scheduled meetings of the World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...provide a list of scheduled meetings of the World Forum for the Harmonization of...

  20. 77 FR 4618 - NHTSA Activities Under the United Nations World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...NHTSA Activities Under the United Nations World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...the scheduled upcoming meetings under the World Forum for the Harmonization of Vehicle...provide a list of scheduled meetings of the World Forum for the Harmonization of...