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Sample records for galileo mission program

  1. Galileo Mission Science Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The first of two tapes of the Galileo Mission Science press briefing is presented. The panel is moderated by George Diller from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Public Affairs Office. The participants are John Conway, the director of Payload and operations at Kennedy; Donald E. Williams, Commander of STS-43, the shuttle mission which will launch the Galileo mission; John Casani, the Deputy Assistant Director of Flight Projects at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL); Dick Spehalski, Galileo Project Manager at JPL; and Terrence Johnson, Galileo Project Scientist at JPL. The briefing begins with an announcement of the arrival of the Galileo Orbiter at KSC. The required steps prior to the launch are discussed. The mission trajectory and gravity assists from planetary and solar flybys are reviewed. Detailed designs of the orbiter are shown. The distance that Galileo will travel from the sun precludes the use of solar energy for heat. Therefore Radioisotope heater units are used to keep the equipment at operational temperature. A video of the arrival of the spacecraft at KSC and final tests and preparations is shown. Some of the many science goals of the mission are reviewed. Another video showing an overview of the Galileo mission is presented. During the question and answer period, the issue of the use of plutonium on the mission is broached, which engenders a review of the testing methods used to ensure the safety of the capsules containing the hazardous substance. This video has actual shots of the orbiter, as it is undergoing the final preparations and tests for the mission.

  2. Atmospheric science on the Galileo mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.; Colin, L.; Hansen, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The atmospheric science goals of the Galileo mission, and instruments of the probe and orbiter are described. The current data available, and the goals of the Galileo mission concerning the chemical composition of the Jovian atmosphere; the thermal structure of the atmosphere; the nature of cloud particles and cloud layering; the radiative energy balance; atmospheric dynamics; and the upper atmosphere are discussed. The objectives and operations of the atmospheric structure instrument, neutral mass spectrometer, helium abundance interferometer, nephelometer, net flux radiometer, lightning and radio emission detector, solid state imaging system, NIR mapping spectrometer, photopolarimeter radiometer, and UV spectrometer are examined.

  3. The GalileoMobile Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, P. F.

    2014-10-01

    GalileoMobile is an itinerant science education program that is bringing astronomy closer to young people around the world since 2009 (http://galileo-mobile.org/). GalileoMobile acts in areas where outreach projects are scarce or non-existent. It is a purely non-profit initiative run by 22 volunteers (astronomers, educators and science communicators) from all over the world. The team seeks to promote cultural interaction among people beyond geographical borders and spread the message that we all live under the same sky.

  4. Update to the safety program for the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generators for the Galileo and Ulysses missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Bradshaw, C. T.; Englehart, Richard W.; Bartram, Bart W.; Cull, Theresa A.; Zocher, Roy W.; Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera; Brenza, Peter T.; Chan, Chris C.

    1992-01-01

    With the rescheduling of the Galileo and Ulysses launches and the use of new upper stages following the Challenger accident, the aerospace nuclear safety program for the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) was extended to accommodate the new mission scenarios. As in the original safety program, the objectives were to determine the response of the GPHS-RTG to the various postulated accident environments and to determine the risk (if any) associated with these postulated accidents. The extended GPHS-RTG safety program was successfully completed in sufficient time to prepare an updated Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) with revisions for the October 1989 launch of the Galileo spacecraft.

  5. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Galileo Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of completing the preparation and operation of the Galileo spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle in October 1989, and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The Tier 1 (program level) EIS (NASA 1988a) considered the Titan IV launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in May 1991 or later. The May 1991 Venus launch opportunity is considered a planetary back-up for the Magellan (Venus Radar Mapper) mission, the Galileo mission, and the Ulysses mission. Plans were underway to enable the use of a Titan IV launch vehicle for the planetary back-up. However, in November 1988, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan IV for NASA, notified NASA that it could not provide a Titan IV vehicle for the May 1991 launch opportunity due to high priority Department of Defense requirements. Consequently, NASA terminated all mission planning for the Titan IV planetary back-up. A minimum of 3 years is required to implement mission-specific modifications to the basic Titan IV launch configuration; therefore, insufficient time is available to use a Titan IV vehicle in May 1991. Thus, the Titan IV launch vehicle is no longer a feasible alternative to the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) for the May 1991 launch opportunity.

  6. Cost overruns will affect Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Recent news of the cost overruns in the development of the shuttle's upper stages that will affect launching of the proposed Galileo mission prompted the following statement from Robert A. Frosch, on the eve of his resignation from the post of NASA Administrator: You know that we have been carrying out a concentrated study of Shuttle upper stages for 2 1/2 months now. This study was initiated in early November when we became concerned with the continued rapid escalation of estimated costs for the three-stage IUS (inertial upper stage). We have decided on the best course of action for the future, and I want to outline for you how I believe the nation should proceed.

  7. Mission to Jupiter: A History of the Galileo Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This book attempts to convey the creativity, leadership, and vision that were necessary for the Galileo mission's success. It is a book about dedicated people and their scientific and engineering achievements. The Galileo mission faced many significant problems. Some of the most brilliant accomplishments and work-arounds of the Galileo staff occurred precisely when these challenges arose. Throughout the mission, engineers and scientists found ways to keep the spacecraft operational from a distance of nearly half a billion miles, enabling one of the most impressive voyages of scientific discovery. The following chapters are included in the book and give a general overview of its contents: 1) The Importance of the Galileo Project; 2) From Conception to Congressional Approval; 3) The Struggle To Launch Galileo: Technical Difficulties and Political Opposition; 4) The Challenger Accident and Its Impact on the Galileo Mission; 5) The Galileo Spacecraft; 6) Galileo Deployment, the Inner Solar System Tour, and the Asteroid Belt; 7) The High-Gain Antenna Failure: A Disappointment and a Challenge; 8) Jupiter Approach and Arrival; 9) The Orbiter Tour; 10) Profiles of Selected People Important to the Mission; 11) Conclusion.

  8. Deep space mission integration with the space transportation system. [Galileo mission using Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The Galileo mission is the first interplanetary mission scheduled to use the Space Transportation System (STS). Therefore, Galileo is the trailblazer for mission integration of a deep space mission with the STS. A short overview of the Galileo mission is presented as background for the discussion of the mission integration effort. The components of the STS and the mission integration system are defined, documentation requirements explained, the work of the Flight Design Working Group described, and several examples of the types of problems dealt with are given. The steps of mission integration are shown from introducing requirements into the system to resolving conflicts that arise between the payload project and the STS operator. Conclusions are drawn from the Galileo mission integration effort to aid future payload projects in working with the STS.

  9. GPHS-RTG performance on the Galileo mission

    SciTech Connect

    Hemler, R.J.; Cockfield, R.D. )

    1991-01-05

    The Galileo spacecraft, launched in October, 1989, is powered by two General Purpose Heat source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTGs). These RTGs were designed, built, and tested by General Electric under contract from the Office of Special Applications of the Department of Energy (DOE). Isotope heat source installation and additional testing of these RTGs were performed at DOE's EG G Mound Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio. This paper provides a report on performance of the RTGs during launch and the early phases of the eight year Galileo mission.The effect of long term storage of the RTGs on power output, since the originally scheduled launch data in May, 1986, will be dicussed, including the effects of helium buildup and subsequent purging with xenon. The RTGs performed as expected during the launch transient, met all specified power requirements for Beginning of Mission (BOM), and continue to follow prediced performance characteristics during the first year of the Galileo mission.

  10. Asteroid/comet encounter opportunities for the Galileo VEEGA mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesen, Jennie R.; Nolan, Brian G.; Byrnes, Dennis V.; D'Amario, Louis A.

    1988-01-01

    The opportunity for the Galileo spacecraft to perform a close flyby of an asteroid or distant observation of a comet while on the Venus-Earth-Earth-Gravity-Assist (VEEGA) mission to Jupiter is discussed. More than 120 nominal trajectories were used in a scan program to identify asteroids passing within 30 million km of the spacecraft. A total of 47 asteroids were examined to determine the propellant cost of a close flyby. The possible flybys include a double asteroid flyby with No. 951 in October, 1991, with a flyby of No. 243 in August 1993. The factors considered in the selection of an asteroid include the propellant margin cost of modifying a nominal trajectory to include a close flyby, the size and type of asteroid, and the Jupiter arrival date.

  11. Chart titled GALILEO MISSION EVENTS shows spacecraft's timeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Chart titled GALILEO MISSION EVENTS shows spacecraft's timeline from launch into low Earth orbit through its Jupiter tour. Other events include Venus encounter, Earth 1 encounter, Gaspra encounter, Earth 2 encounter, Ida encounter, probe release, and Io/Relay/Joi satellite encounters. The events span approximately eight years (1989 through 1997).

  12. Galileo mission planning for Low Gain Antenna based operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, R.; Buxbaum, K. L.; Ludwinski, J. M.; Paczkowski, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo mission operations concept is undergoing substantial redesign, necessitated by the deployment failure of the High Gain Antenna, while the spacecraft is on its way to Jupiter. The new design applies state-of-the-art technology and processes to increase the telemetry rate available through the Low Gain Antenna and to increase the information density of the telemetry. This paper describes the mission planning process being developed as part of this redesign. Principal topics include a brief description of the new mission concept and anticipated science return (these have been covered more extensively in earlier papers), identification of key drivers on the mission planning process, a description of the process and its implementation schedule, a discussion of the application of automated mission planning tool to the process, and a status report on mission planning work to date. Galileo enhancements include extensive reprogramming of on-board computers and substantial hard ware and software upgrades for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The principal mode of operation will be onboard recording of science data followed by extended playback periods. A variety of techniques will be used to compress and edit the data both before recording and during playback. A highly-compressed real-time science data stream will also be important. The telemetry rate will be increased using advanced coding techniques and advanced receivers. Galileo mission planning for orbital operations now involves partitioning of several scarce resources. Particularly difficult are division of the telemetry among the many users (eleven instruments, radio science, engineering monitoring, and navigation) and allocation of space on the tape recorder at each of the ten satellite encounters. The planning process is complicated by uncertainty in forecast performance of the DSN modifications and the non-deterministic nature of the new data compression schemes. Key mission planning steps include

  13. Final environmental impact statement for the Galileo Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of completing the preparation and operation of the Galileo spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle in October 1989, and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The only expected environmental effects of the proposed action are associated with normal launch vehicle operation, and are treated in published National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents on the Shuttle (NASA 1978) and the Kennedy Space Center (NASA 1979), and in the KSC Environmental Resources Document (NASA 1986) and the Galileo Tier 1 EIS (NASA 1988a). The environmental impacts of a normal launch were deemed insufficient to preclude Shuttle operations. Environmental impacts may also result from launch or mission accidents that could release plutonium fuel used in the Galileo power system. Intensive analysis of the possible accidents associated with the proposed action reveal small health or environmental risks. There are no environmental impacts in the no-action alternative. The remote possibility of environmental impacts of the proposed action must be weighed against the large adverse fiscal and programmatic impacts inherent in the no-action alternative.

  14. Post Galileo-Europa-Mission Satellite Tour Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. G.; Johannesen, J. R.; Halsell, C. A.; Haw, R. J.; Pojman, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The Galileo orbiter mission as originally envisioned would orbit Jupiter eleven times, closely encountering either Europa, Ganymede, or Callisto on ten of those orbits. This nominal or prime mission began with Jupiter orbit insertion on December 7, 1995 and ended as designed ten encounters later on December 1, 1997. An extension to this nominal mission was proposed, developed and accepted in 1997 and was designed to continue orbital operations through an additional two years until December 31, 1999. This follow- on mission, labelled the Galileo Europa Mission, visits Europa eight times, Callisto four times, and ends with two visits to Io. It augments the prime mission by offering many attractive additional opportunities for science, especially remote sensing. The opportunities include increased scrutiny of Europa, a world with a possible global ocean hidden beneath the surface ice-cap, and the first high resolution images of Io (the only major satellite not encountered during the nominal tour). In 1998 a new effort was begun to investigate a possible extension to GEM. Remote sensing observations will continue to be important but moreover, valuable unique in situ fields and particles measurements will be a high priority motivation in the design and selection of any post-GEM tour. A significant design feature of a possible post-GEM tour would be the extension of the mission through the December 2000 timeframe. This would permit the possibility of simultaneous fields and particles experiments coordinated with the Cassini spacecraft as it swings by the Jupiter system for the final gravity assist enroute to Saturn.

  15. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W., III; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.

    1985-01-01

    The Galileo consists of two main parts: a Jupiter orbiter and a probe. After a 1000 day journey, the Galileo will assume orbit around the giant planet, an orbit which will last for 200 days, in the hopes of astronomers. The orbit will carry the Galileo past its four Jovian satellites--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto - a combined total of 11 times. This will enable scientists to study the atmosphere of not only the largest planet in the solar system, but its large moons as well. Sometime in August of 1988, the Galileo will approach Jupiter and begin its important activities. Fifty-six days away from planetary encounter, the Galileo will release the probe which will continue the trip to Jupiter and enter the atmosphere. As it descends through the atmosphere, the probe will unfurl a parachute to slow its speed as it broadcasts information back to the waiting orbiter, which will in turn relay it back to the waiting scientists on Earth. The probe's descent time is expected to be approximately 15 min before Jupiter's pressure and heat overwhelm the probe's protection. However, scientists are hopeful that the probe will survive longer than 15 min, possibly up to 60 min.

  17. The Production and Archiving of Navigation and Ancillary Data for the Galileo Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Clarke, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Mission to Jupiter is using the SPICE formats developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility, a node of the Planetary Data System, to archive its navigation and ancillary data.

  18. Draft environmental impact statement for the Galileo Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by the preparation and operation of the Galileo spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The launch configuration will use the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special (PAM-S) combination. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. However, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4 for NASA, could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The only expected environmental effects of the proposed action are associated with normal Shuttle launch operations. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects have been judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. In the event of: (1) an accident during launch, or (2) reentry of the spacecraft from earth orbit, there are potential adverse health and environmental effects associated with the possible release of plutonium dioxide from the spacecraft's radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG).

  19. The Galileo Teacher Training Program Global Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, R.; Pennypacker, C.; Ferlet, R.

    2012-08-01

    The Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP) successfully named representatives in nearly 100 nations in 2009, the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009). The challenge had just begun. The steps ahead are how to reach educators that might benefit from our program and how to help build a more fair and science literate society, a society in which good tools and resources for science education are not the privilege of a few. From 2010 on our efforts have been to strengthen the newly formed network and learn how to equally help educators and students around the globe. New partnerships with other strong programs and institutions are being formed, sponsorship schemes being outlined, new tools and resources being publicized, and on-site and video conference training conducted all over the world. Efforts to officially accredit a GTTP curriculum are on the march and a stronger certification process being outlined. New science topics are being integrated in our effort and we now seek to discuss the path ahead with experts in this field and the community of users, opening the network to all corners of our beautiful blue dot. The main aim of this article is to open the discussion regarding the urgent issue of how to reawaken student interest in science, how to solve the gender inequality in science careers, and how to reach the underprivileged students and open to them the same possibilities. Efforts are in strengthening the newly formed network and learning how to equally help educators and students around the globe.

  20. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Phillips, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.

    2004-01-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of Patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  1. Surface Changes on Io during the Galileo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Phillips, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.

    2003-04-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an un-named patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and groundbased thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom (1983). Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150 to 200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur- rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate, whereas dust

  2. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Paul; McEwen, Alfred; Phillips, Cynthia; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Spencer, John

    2004-05-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO 2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO 2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  3. Galileo spacecraft integration - International cooperation on a planetary mission in the Shuttle era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spehalski, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Galileo mission is designed to greatly expand scientific knowledge of Jupiter and its system. The retropropulsion module (RPM) as a major functional element of the Galileo spacecraft is described. The major mission and spacecraft requirements on the RPM are presented. Complexities of the integration process due to the international interface are identified. Challenges associated with integration with new launch vehicles, the Shuttle and upper stage, and their relationships to the RPM are discussed. The results of the integration process involving mission and propulsion performance, reliability, mechanical and thermal interfaces, and safety are described. Finally, considerations and recommendations for future missions involving international cooperation are given.

  4. Operation Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Operation Galileo education program took off with the first of four flights on board a U.S. Air Force C-130 transport aircraft from Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Teachers from Mississippi and Louisiana participated in the program which aims to enhance math and science education of high-risk students by allowing junior high and middle school teachers, students and parents to fly in cargo and tanker aircraft during routine training missions. The Air Force Reserve created Operation Galileo, which was implemented by NASA's Educator Resource Center at Stennis.

  5. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo S-band mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1993-01-01

    A coding system under consideration for the Galileo S-band low-gain antenna mission is a concatenated system using a variable redundancy Reed-Solomon outer code and a (14,1/4) convolutional inner code. The 8-bit Reed-Solomon symbols are interleaved to depth 8, and the eight 255-symbol codewords in each interleaved block have redundancies 64, 20, 20, 20, 64, 20, 20, and 20, respectively (or equivalently, the codewords have 191, 235, 235, 235, 191, 235, 235, and 235 8-bit information symbols, respectively). This concatenated code is to be decoded by an enhanced decoder that utilizes a maximum likelihood (Viterbi) convolutional decoder; a Reed Solomon decoder capable of processing erasures; an algorithm for declaring erasures in undecoded codewords based on known erroneous symbols in neighboring decodable words; a second Viterbi decoding operation (redecoding) constrained to follow only paths consistent with the known symbols from previously decodable Reed-Solomon codewords; and a second Reed-Solomon decoding operation using the output from the Viterbi redecoder and additional erasure declarations to the extent possible. It is estimated that this code and decoder can achieve a decoded bit error rate of 1 x 10(exp 7) at a concatenated code signal-to-noise ratio of 0.76 dB. By comparison, a threshold of 1.17 dB is required for a baseline coding system consisting of the same (14,1/4) convolutional code, a (255,223) Reed-Solomon code with constant redundancy 32 also interleaved to depth 8, a one-pass Viterbi decoder, and a Reed Solomon decoder incapable of declaring or utilizing erasures. The relative gain of the enhanced system is thus 0.41 dB. It is predicted from analysis based on an assumption of infinite interleaving that the coding gain could be further improved by approximately 0.2 dB if four stages of Viterbi decoding and four levels of Reed-Solomon redundancy are permitted. Confirmation of this effect and specification of the optimum four-level redundancy profile

  6. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo S-band mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1993-08-01

    A coding system under consideration for the Galileo S-band low-gain antenna mission is a concatenated system using a variable redundancy Reed-Solomon outer code and a (14,1/4) convolutional inner code. The 8-bit Reed-Solomon symbols are interleaved to depth 8, and the eight 255-symbol codewords in each interleaved block have redundancies 64, 20, 20, 20, 64, 20, 20, and 20, respectively (or equivalently, the codewords have 191, 235, 235, 235, 191, 235, 235, and 235 8-bit information symbols, respectively). This concatenated code is to be decoded by an enhanced decoder that utilizes a maximum likelihood (Viterbi) convolutional decoder; a Reed Solomon decoder capable of processing erasures; an algorithm for declaring erasures in undecoded codewords based on known erroneous symbols in neighboring decodable words; a second Viterbi decoding operation (redecoding) constrained to follow only paths consistent with the known symbols from previously decodable Reed-Solomon codewords; and a second Reed-Solomon decoding operation using the output from the Viterbi redecoder and additional erasure declarations to the extent possible. It is estimated that this code and decoder can achieve a decoded bit error rate of 1 x 10(exp 7) at a concatenated code signal-to-noise ratio of 0.76 dB. By comparison, a threshold of 1.17 dB is required for a baseline coding system consisting of the same (14,1/4) convolutional code, a (255,223) Reed-Solomon code with constant redundancy 32 also interleaved to depth 8, a one-pass Viterbi decoder, and a Reed Solomon decoder incapable of declaring or utilizing erasures. The relative gain of the enhanced system is thus 0.41 dB. It is predicted from analysis based on an assumption of infinite interleaving that the coding gain could be further improved by approximately 0.2 dB if four stages of Viterbi decoding and four levels of Reed-Solomon redundancy are permitted. Confirmation of this effect and specification of the optimum four-level redundancy profile

  7. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  8. Global Distribution of Active Volcanism on Io as Known at the End of the Galileo Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Kamp. Lucas W.; Smythe, W. D.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E.; Perry, J.; Bruno, B.

    2004-01-01

    Hot spots are manifestations of Io s mechanism of internal heating and heat transfer. Therefore, the global distribution of hot spots and their power output has important implications for how Io is losing heat. The end of the Galileo mission is an opportune time to revisit studies of the distribution of hot spots on Io, and to investigate the distribution of their power output.

  9. Integrating the GalileoScope into Successful Outreach Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Peter D.; Slater, S.; Goldstein, J.; Harvey, J.; Garcia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2004, the Gemini Observatory’s week-long Journey Through the Universe (JTtU) program has successfully shared the excitement of scientific research with teachers, students and the public on Hawaii’s Big Island. Based on the national JTtU program started in 1999, the Hawai‘i version reaches an average of 7,000 students annually and each year features a different theme shared with a diverse set of learners. In 2010, the theme includes the integration of the GalileoScope-produced as a keystone project for the International Year of Astronomy. In preparation, a pilot teacher workshop (held in October 2009) introduced local island teachers to the GalileoScope and a 128-page educator’s activity resource book coordinated by the University of Wyoming. Response from this initial teacher’s workshop has been strong and evaluations plus follow-up actions by participating teachers illustrate that the integration of the GalileoScope has been successful based upon this diverse sample. Integrating GalileoScopes into Chilean schools in 2010 is also underway at Gemini South. This program will solicit informal proposals from educators who wish to use the telescopes in classrooms and a Spanish version of the teacher resource book is planned. The authors conclude that integration of the GalileoScope into an existing outreach program is an effective way to keep content fresh, relevant and engaging for both educators and students. This initiative is funded by Gemini Observatory outreach program. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (US), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva

  10. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo low-gain antenna mission: Viterbi redecoding with four decoding stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords. A previous article analyzed a two-stage decoding option that was not selected by Galileo. The present article analyzes the four-stage decoding scheme and derives the near-optimum set of redundancies selected for use by Galileo. The performance improvements relative to one- and two-stage decoding systems are evaluated.

  11. Enhanced decoding for the Galileo low-gain antenna mission: Viterbi redecoding with four decoding stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-05-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords. A previous article analyzed a two-stage decoding option that was not selected by Galileo. The present article analyzes the four-stage decoding scheme and derives the near-optimum set of redundancies selected for use by Galileo. The performance improvements relative to one- and two-stage decoding systems are evaluated.

  12. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission. Volume 1: Reference design document

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume 1, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes 2 and 3. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume 1 which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  14. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) will be used as the prime source of electric power for the spacecraft on the Galileo mission. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel and by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The purpose of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) is to present the analyses and results of the latest evaluation of the nuclear safety potential of the GPHS-RTG as employed in the Galileo mission. This evaluation is an extension of earlier work that addressed the planned 1986 launch using the Space Shuttle Vehicle with the Centaur as the upper stage. This extended evaluation represents the launch by the Space Shuttle/IUS vehicle. The IUS stage has been selected as the vehicle to be used to boost the Galileo spacecraft into the Earth escape trajectory after the parking orbit is attained.

  15. Deep space network radio science system for Voyager Uranus and Galileo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K.; Donivan, F. F.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is presented of major new requirements, challenges and conceptual designs for the DSN Radio Science System in the 1985 to 1988 period. The Voyager Uranus encounter is being supported with larger combined aperture, higher sample rate, and a centrally controlled network. The Galileo mission will be provided with a high resolution S-Band Faraday rotation detection capability and a high-stability Doppler system with X-Band uplink for gravitational wave search.

  16. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Book 1, Accident model document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The Accident Model Document (AMD) is the second volume of the three volume Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Galileo outer planetary space science mission. This mission employs Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) as the prime electrical power sources for the spacecraft. Galileo will be launched into Earth orbit using the Space Shuttle and will use the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster to place the spacecraft into an Earth escape trajectory. The RTG's employ silicon-germanium thermoelectric couples to produce electricity from the heat energy that results from the decay of the radioisotope fuel, Plutonium-238, used in the RTG heat source. The heat source configuration used in the RTG's is termed General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), and the RTG's are designated GPHS-RTGs. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel as well as by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The FSAR presents the results of a rigorous safety assessment, including substantial analyses and testing, of the launch and deployment of the RTGs for the Galileo mission. This AMD is a summary of the potential accident and failure sequences which might result in fuel release, the analysis and testing methods employed, and the predicted source terms. Each source term consists of a quantity of fuel released, the location of release and the physical characteristics of the fuel released. Each source term has an associated probability of occurrence. 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. A Comprehensive Orbit Reconstruction for the Galileo Prime Mission in the J2000 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.; Haw, Robert J.; McElrath, Tim P.; Antreasian, Peter G.

    1999-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft arrived at Jupiter in December of 1995 to begin an orbital tour of the Jovian system. The objective of the tour was up close study of the planet, its satellites, and its magnetosphere. The spacecraft completed its 11 orbit prime mission in November of 1997 having had 16 successful close encounters with the Galilean satellites (including two prior to Jupiter orbit insertion). Galileo continues to operate and will have made an additional 10 orbits of Jupiter by the date of this Conference. Earlier papers discuss the determination of the spacecraft orbit in support of mission operations from arrival at Jupiter through the first 9 orbits. In this paper we re-examine those earlier orbits and extend the analysis through orbit 12, the first orbit of the Galileo Europa Mission (GEM). The objective of our work is the reconstruction of the spacecraft trajectory together with the development of a consistent set of ephemerides for the Galilean satellites. As a necessary byproduct of the reconstruction we determine improved values for the Jovian system gravitational parameters and for the Jupiter pole orientation angles. Our preliminary analyses have already led to many of the results reported in the scientific literature. Unlike the Galileo Navigation Team which operates in the EME-1950 coordinate system, we elected to work in the (J2000) International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), the reference frame of the current JPL planetary and satellite ephemerides as well as the standard frame of the international astronomical and planetary science community. Use of this frame permits more precise modelling of the spacecraft and satellite observations. Moreover, it is the frame of choice for all other operational JPL missions and will probably be the frame for future missions for some time. Consequently, our adoption of the ICRF will facilitate the combination of our results with any obtained from future missions (e.g. the proposed Europa Orbiter mission). In

  18. Final (Tier 1) environmental impact statement for the Galileo and Ulysses Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Presented here is a Final (Tier 1) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addressing the potential environmental consequences associated with continuing the modifications of the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft for launch using a booster/upper stage combination that is different from the one planned for use prior to the Challenger accident, while conducting the detailed safety and environmental analysis in order to preserve the October 1989 launch opportunity for Galileo and an October 1990 launch opportunity for Ulysses. While detailed safety and environmental analyses associated with the missions are underway, they currently are not complete. Nevertheless, sufficient information is available to enable a choice among the reconfiguration alternatives presented. Relevant assessments of the potential for environmental impacts are presented.

  19. Lunar scout missions: Galileo encounter results and application to scientific problems and exploration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Belton, M.; Greeley, R.; Pieters, C.; Mcewen, A.; Neukum, G.; Mccord, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Lunar Scout Missions (payload: x-ray fluorescence spectrometer, high-resolution stereocamera, neutron spectrometer, gamma-ray spectrometer, imaging spectrometer, gravity experiment) will provide a global data set for the chemistry, mineralogy, geology, topography, and gravity of the Moon. These data will in turn provide an important baseline for the further scientific exploration of the Moon by all-purpose landers and micro-rovers, and sample return missions from sites shown to be of primary interest from the global orbital data. These data would clearly provide the basis for intelligent selection of sites for the establishment of lunar base sites for long-term scientific and resource exploration and engineering studies. The two recent Galileo encounters with the Moon (December, 1990 and December, 1992) illustrate how modern technology can be applied to significant lunar problems. We emphasize the regional results of the Galileo SSI to show the promise of geologic unit definition and characterization as an example of what can be done with the global coverage to be obtained by the Lunar Scout Missions.

  20. Enhanced Decoding for the Galileo Low-Gain Antenna Mission: Viterbi Redecoding With Four Decoding Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, S.; Belongie, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission will be supported by a coding system that uses a (14,1/4) inner convolutional code concatenated with Reed-Solomon codes of four different redundancies. Decoding for this code is designed to proceed in four distinct stages of Viterbi decoding followed by Reed-Solomon decoding. In each successive stage, the Reed-Solomon decoder only tries to decode the highest redundancy codewords not yet decoded in previous stages, and the Viterbi decoder redecodes its data utilizing the known symbols from previously decoded Reed-Solomon codewords.

  1. (abstract) MEASURE-Jupiter: Low Cost Missions to Explore Jupiter in the Post-Galileo Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. A.; Stern, S. A.; Ayon, J. A.; Lane, A. L.; Nunez, C. L.; Sauer, C. G.; Stetson, D. G.; West, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    MEASURE-Jupiter is a new mission concept for the exploration of giant planets, with initial application to Jupiter. By flying sets of lightweight spacecraft with highly focused measurement objectives, it is designed to break the apparent impass in giant planet exploration beyond Cassini. The MEASURE-Jupiter concept is characterized by: 1) intensive exploration of a giant planet system, 2) multiple small missions flown in focused waves using spacecraft costing $100M to $200M, and 3) mission sets launched every 2 to 3 years. Why Jupiter? Jupiter is the most complex planetary system in the Solar System with many scientifically intriguing bodies and phenomena to explore. The Galileo mission will scratch the surface of the exploration of Jupiter, posing many questions for the MEASURE-Jupiter missions to address. Jupiter is also the easiest planet in the Outer Solar System to reach, making possible flight times of 2 years and total mission durations of 3 years or less. Concept design studies have uncovered a number of scientifically rewarding, simple, low-cost mission options. These options have the additional attraction of being able to launch on 2-year trajectories to Jupiter with low-cost Delta II expendable launch vehicles. A partial list of mission concepts studied to date include: Io Very Close Flyby, Jupiter Close Polar Pass, Mini-Orbiters, and Galilean Satellite Penetrators. Key to the realization of the MEASURE-Jupiter missions is the judicious use of the new low power consuming advanced technology and applicable systems from the Pluto Fast Flyby mission spacecraft design. Foremost of the new technologies planned for inclusion are the elements of hybrid solar array/battery power systems which make it possible to perform the identified missions without the need for Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). This relieves the mission design of the attendant programmatic complexities, cost, and constraints attendant with the use of RTGs.

  2. An image assessment study of image acceptability of the Galileo low gain antenna mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S. L.; Haines, R. F.; Grant, T.; Gold, Yaron; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California on the image acceptability of the Galileo Low Gain Antenna mission. The primary objective of the study is to determine the impact of the Integer Cosine Transform (ICT) compression algorithm on Galilean images of atmospheric bodies, moons, asteroids and Jupiter's rings. The approach involved fifteen volunteer subjects representing twelve institutions involved with the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. Four different experiment specific quantization tables (q-table) and various compression stepsizes (q-factor) to achieve different compression ratios were used. It then determined the acceptability of the compressed monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images were evaluated. Each observer viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high resolution monitor, each was compressed using a different quantization stepsize. They were requested to select which image had the highest overall quality to support them in carrying out their visual evaluations of image content. Then they rated both images using a scale from one to five on its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four pre-selected types of images were presented with and without noise to each subject based upon results of a previously administered survey of their image preferences. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were studied. The results showed that: (1) acceptable compression ratios vary widely with the type of images; (2) noisy images detract greatly from image acceptability and acceptable compression ratios; and (3) atmospheric images of Jupiter seem to have higher compression ratios of 4 to 5 times that of some clear surface satellite images.

  3. Silicon Germanium (SiGe) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Program for space missions. Fifteenth technical progress report, August 1-31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, C. W.; Silverman, G.

    1980-01-01

    This program consists of the following three tasks: Multi-Hundred Watt RTG for the Galileo Probe Mission; Reestablishment of Silicon Germanium Unicouple Capability; and General Purpose Heat Source RTG for the International Solar Polar and Galileo Orbiter Missions. Details of program progress for each task, including a milestone schedule and a discussion of current problem areas (if any) are presented.

  4. Impact Features on Europa: Results of the Galileo Europa Mission (GEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Asphaug, E.; Morrison, D.; Sullivan, R. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Greeley, R.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Kadel, S.; Chuang, F.; Moreau, J.; Williams, K. K.; Geissler, P. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Turtle, E. A.; Phillips, C. B.; Tufts, B. R.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.; Neukum, G.; Wagner, R.; Klaasen, K. P.; Breneman, H. H.; McGee, K. P.; Senske, D. A.; Granahan, J.; Belton, M. J. S.; Galileo SSI Team

    1998-09-01

    The Galileo Orbiter, during the GEM phase of this mission, has examined a number of impact features on Europa at considerably better resolution and coverage than was possible from either Voyager or during the Galileo nominal mission. The new data allow us to describe the morphology and infer the geology of the largest impact features on Europa, which are probes into the crust. The GEM observations allow us to construct a suite of primary impact features on Europa; a comprehensive "family" portrait and ordering (by size on one axis and morphologic variations within a given size bin along the other). We have also made detailed description of individual impact features including topography (from stereo), crater-related materials deposits, cross-cutting relations, and material-related color variations. We observe two basic types of large impact features: (1) "classic" impact craters that grossly resemble well-preserved lunar craters of similar size but are more topographically subdued (e.g., Pwyll); and (2) very flat circular features that lack the basic topographic structures of impact craters such as raised rims, a central depression, or central peaks, and which largely owe their identification as impact features to the field of secondary craters radially sprayed about them (e.g., Callanish). One of our preliminary conclusions are that Callanish and Tyre display non-"classic" impact features morphologies and a series of large concentric structural rings cutting impact-feature-related materials. Impact simulations suggest that Callanish and Tyre would not be produced by impact into a solid ice target, but may be explained by impact into an ice layer 10 to 15 km thick overlying a low viscosity material such as water.

  5. Proposed data compression schemes for the Galileo S-band contingency mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Tong, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft is currently on its way to Jupiter and its moons. In April 1991, the high gain antenna (HGA) failed to deploy as commanded. In case the current efforts to deploy the HGA fails, communications during the Jupiter encounters will be through one of two low gain antenna (LGA) on an S-band (2.3 GHz) carrier. A lot of effort has been and will be conducted to attempt to open the HGA. Also various options for improving Galileo's telemetry downlink performance are being evaluated in the event that the HGA will not open at Jupiter arrival. Among all viable options the most promising and powerful one is to perform image and non-image data compression in software onboard the spacecraft. This involves in-flight re-programming of the existing flight software of Galileo's Command and Data Subsystem processors and Attitude and Articulation Control System (AACS) processor, which have very limited computational and memory resources. In this article we describe the proposed data compression algorithms and give their respective compression performance. The planned image compression algorithm is a 4 x 4 or an 8 x 8 multiplication-free integer cosine transform (ICT) scheme, which can be viewed as an integer approximation of the popular discrete cosine transform (DCT) scheme. The implementation complexity of the ICT schemes is much lower than the DCT-based schemes, yet the performances of the two algorithms are indistinguishable. The proposed non-image compression algorith is a Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) variant, which is a lossless universal compression algorithm based on a dynamic dictionary lookup table. We developed a simple and efficient hashing function to perform the string search.

  6. Charge-coupled device (CCD) television camera for NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaasen, K. P.; Clary, M. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The CCD detector under construction for use in the slow-scan television camera for the NASA Galileo Jupiter orbiter to be launched in 1985 is presented. The science objectives and the design constraints imposed by the earth telemetry link, platform residual motion, and the Jovian radiation environment are discussed. Camera optics are inherited from Voyager; filter wavelengths are chosen to enable discrimination of Galilean-satellite surface chemical composition. The CCO design, an 800 by 800-element 'virtual-phase' solid-state silicon image-sensor array with supporting electronics, is described with detailed discussion of the thermally generated dark current, quantum efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and resolution. Tests of the effect of ionizing radiation were performed and are analyzed statistically. An imaging mode using a 2-1/3-sec frame time and on-chip summation of the signal in 2 x 2 blocks of adjacent pixels is designed to limit the effects of the most extreme Jovian radiation. Smearing due to spacecraft/target relative velocity and platform instability will be corrected for via an algorithm maximizing spacial resolution at a given signal-to-noise level. The camera is expected to produce 40,000 images of Jupiter and its satellites during the 20-month mission.

  7. IMP - INTEGRATED MISSION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauro, V. A.

    1994-01-01

    IMP is a simulation language that is used to model missions around the Earth, Moon, Mars, or other planets. It has been used to model missions for the Saturn Program, Apollo Program, Space Transportation System, Space Exploration Initiative, and Space Station Freedom. IMP allows a user to control the mission being simulated through a large event/maneuver menu. Up to three spacecraft may be used: a main, a target and an observer. The simulation may begin at liftoff, suborbital, or orbital. IMP incorporates a Fehlberg seventh order, thirteen evaluation Runge-Kutta integrator with error and step-size control to numerically integrate the equations of motion. The user may choose oblate or spherical gravity for the central body (Earth, Mars, Moon or other) while a spherical model is used for the gravity of an additional perturbing body. Sun gravity and pressure and Moon gravity effects are user-selectable. Earth/Mars atmospheric effects can be included. The optimum thrust guidance parameters are calculated automatically. Events/maneuvers may involve many velocity changes, and these velocity changes may be impulsive or of finite duration. Aerobraking to orbit is also an option. Other simulation options include line-of-sight communication guidelines, a choice of propulsion systems, a soft landing on the Earth or Mars, and rendezvous with a target vehicle. The input/output is in metric units, with the exception of thrust and weight which are in English units. Input is read from the user's input file to minimize real-time keyboard input. Output includes vehicle state, orbital and guide parameters, event and total velocity changes, and propellant usage. The main output is to the user defined print file, but during execution, part of the input/output is also displayed on the screen. An included FORTRAN program, TEKPLOT, will display plots on the VDT as well as generating a graphic file suitable for output on most laser printers. The code is double precision. IMP is written in

  8. Deep Space Network Support for the Galileo Mission to Jupiter: Jupiter Orbital Operations From Post-Jupiter Orbit Insertion Through the End of the Prime Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Yetter, B. G.; Torres, R. G.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) support for the Galileo mission to Jupiter began at launch in October 1989 and continued through the end of the prime mission in December 1997. The tracking and data acquisition support that was provided by the DSN up to the time that the spacecraft arrived at Jupiter (December 1995) is described in earlier issues of this publication [1,2,3]. This article, the final one of the series, covers the period from January 1996 through December 1997 and describes DSN support for the Galileo orbital operations at Jupiter, which included 10 satellite encounters over a period of 17 months. For a substantial portion of this period, the DSN was operated in the fully arrayed configuration for Galileo passes. This involved real-time combining of spacecraft signals from the DSN 70-m and 34-m antennas at Canberra with those from the 70-m antenna at Goldstone. The combined signals were enhanced further by the addition of the signal from the Australian 64-m radio astronomy antenna at Parkes, located 260-km northwest of Canberra. This article describes the implementation and remarkable performance of this very complex arrangement under real-time operational conditions.

  9. Galileo's tortuous journey to Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Eric J.

    1989-08-01

    The development of the Galileo mission is discussed. Particular attention is given to the funding of the mission and the development and use of the Space Shuttle. Changes to the Galileo design due to the post-Challenger mission objectives of the spacecraft are described and a diagram of the spacecraft is provided. The proposed flight path and objectives of the mission are considered.

  10. Ground-Based Observations of Io's Volcanos in Support of the Galileo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Dumas, C.; Vakil, D.

    1996-09-01

    We have obtained frequent 1.7--4.8 mu m observations of Io's volcanic thermal emission in 1995 and 1996, from the NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea and from Lowell Observatory. In 1995 there were several dramatic volcanic events, including major outbursts on the leading hemisphere in March and September 1995; one of Loki's periodic brightenings during the Fall of 1995, in the months before the Galileo Io flyby; and three high-temperature events of a few weeks' duration (in late March, July, and August) on the Jupiter-facing hemisphere. In contrast, intensive monitoring in 1996 has shown no bright volcanic events at all between early February and mid-August. High-quality IRTF observations in June 1996, near the time of the first Galileo images at the "G1" encounter, provided fluxes and locations for up to 11 faint hot spots on the Jupiter-facing hemisphere. Due to the loss of Galileo G1 NIMS and PPR Io observations, these and other ground-based observations provided our only information on Io's volcanic thermal emission at the time that the Galileo images were taken. Notable features of the volcanic emission at the G1 encounter included the following: (i) Loki's thermal emission was at the faint end of its normal range. Its 3.5 mu m flux was about 6 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) , compared to about 34 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) at the time of the Voyager 1 flyby (Pearl and Sinton 1982), and about 70 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) during the winter 1991 Loki brightening (Spencer et al. 1994). (ii) No 3.5 mu m emission was seen from Ra Patera, the site of a plume seen by Galileo, with an upper flux limit of about 1 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) . This suggests that the current Ra plume eruption is from a low-temperature source: cooler than 370 K for a source diameter of 20 km, for example. (iii) A small burst of thermal emission from Surt, with a 3.5 mu m flux of 5 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) , was seen in early and late June. Surt is not normally a site of detectable emission in groundbased observations, though it may have

  11. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo mission: Volume 3 (Book 1), Nuclear risk analysis document: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-13

    It is the purpose of the NRAD to provide an analysis of the range of potential consequences of accidents which have been identified that are associated with the launching and deployment of the Galileo mission spacecraft. The specific consequences analyzed are those associated with the possible release of radioactive material (fuel) of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). They are in terms of radiation doses to people and areas of deposition of radioactive material. These consequence analyses can be used in several ways. One way is to identify the potential range of consequences which might have to be dealt with if there were to be an accident with a release of fuel, so as to assure that, given such an accident, the health and safety of the public will be reasonably protected. Another use of the information, in conjunction with accident and release probabilities, is to estimate the risks associated with the mission. That is, most space launches occur without incident. Given an accident, the most probable result relative to the RTGs is complete containment of the radioactive material. Only a small fraction of accidents might result in a release of fuel and subsequent radiological consequences. The combination of probability with consequence is risk, which can be compared to other human and societal risks to assure that no undue risks are implied by undertaking the mission. 4 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  12. Safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission. Volume 3, book 2: Nuclear risk analysis document. Appendices, revision 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-01-01

    It is the purpose of the NRAD to provide an analysis of the range of potential consequences of accidents which have been identified that are associated with the launching and deployment of the Galileo mission spacecraft. The specific consequences analyzed are those associated with the possible release of radioactive material (fuel) of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). They are in terms of radiation doses to people and areas of deposition of radioactive material. These consequence analyses can be used in several ways. One way is to identify the potential range of consequences which might have to be dealt with if there were to be an accident with a release of fuel, so as to assure that, given such an accident, the health and safety of the public will be reasonably protected. Another use of the information, in conjunction with accident and release probabilities, is to estimate the risks associated with the mission. That is, most space launches occur without incident. Given an accident, the most probable result relative to the RTGs is complete containment of the radioactive material. Only a small fraction of accidents might result in a release of fuel and subsequent radiological consequences. The combination of probability with consequence is risk, which can be compared to other human and societal risks to assure that no undue risks are implied by undertaking the mission. Book 2 contains eight appendices.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo mission: Volume 3 (Book 2), Nuclear risk analysis document: Appendices: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-25

    It is the purpose of the NRAD to provide an analysis of the range of potential consequences of accidents which have been identified that are associated with the launching and deployment of the Galileo mission spacecraft. The specific consequences analyzed are those associated with the possible release of radioactive material (fuel) of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). They are in terms of radiation doses to people and areas of deposition of radioactive material. These consequence analyses can be used in several ways. One way is to identify the potential range of consequences which might have to be dealt with if there were to be an accident with a release of fuel, so as to assure that, given such an accident, the health and safety of the public will be reasonably protected. Another use of the information, in conjunction with accident and release probabilities, is to estimate the risks associated with the mission. That is, most space launches occur without incident. Given an accident, the most probable result relative to the RTGs is complete containment of the radioactive material. Only a small fraction of accidents might result in a release of fuel and subsequent radiological consequences. The combination of probability with consequence is risk, which can be compared to other human and societal risks to assure that no undue risks are implied by undertaking the mission. Book 2 contains eight appendices.

  14. The Block V Receiver fast acquisition algorithm for the Galileo S-band mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aung, M.; Hurd, W. J.; Buu, C. M.; Berner, J. B.; Stephens, S. A.; Gevargiz, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A fast acquisition algorithm for the Galileo suppressed carrier, subcarrier, and data symbol signals under low data rate, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high carrier phase-noise conditions has been developed. The algorithm employs a two-arm fast Fourier transform (FFT) method utilizing both the in-phase and quadrature-phase channels of the carrier. The use of both channels results in an improved SNR in the FFT acquisition, enabling the use of a shorter FFT period over which the carrier instability is expected to be less significant. The use of a two-arm FFT also enables subcarrier and symbol acquisition before carrier acquisition. With the subcarrier and symbol loops locked first, the carrier can be acquired from an even shorter FFT period. Two-arm tracking loops are employed to lock the subcarrier and symbol loops parameter modification to achieve the final (high) loop SNR in the shortest time possible. The fast acquisition algorithm is implemented in the Block V Receiver (BVR). This article describes the complete algorithm design, the extensive computer simulation work done for verification of the design and the analysis, implementation issues in the BVR, and the acquisition times of the algorithm. In the expected case of the Galileo spacecraft at Jupiter orbit insertion PD/No equals 14.6 dB-Hz, R(sym) equals 16 symbols per sec, and the predicted acquisition time of the algorithm (to attain a 0.2-dB degradation from each loop to the output symbol SNR) is 38 sec.

  15. A comparison of full-spectrum and complex-symbol combining techniques for the Galileo S-band mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Million, S.; Shah, B.; Hinedi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC) are two antenna-arraying techniques being considered for the Galileo spacecraft's upcoming encounter with Jupiter. This article describes the performance of these techniques in terms of symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) degradation and symbol SNR loss. It is shown that both degradation and loss are approximately equal at low values of symbol SNR but diverge at high SNR values. For the Galileo S-band (2.2 to 2.3 GHz) mission, degradation provides a good estimate of performance as the symbol SNR is typically below -5 dB. For the following arrays - two 70-m antennas, one 70-m and one 34-m antenna, one 70-m and two 34-m antennas, and one 70-m and three 34-m antennas - it is shown that FSC has less degradation than CSC when the subcarrier and symbol window-loop bandwidth products are above 3.0, 10.0, 8.5, and 8.2 mHz at the symbol rate of 200 sym/sec, and above 1.2, 4.5, 4.0, and 3.5 mHz at a symbol rate of 400 sym/sec, respectively. Moreover, for an array of four 34-m antennas, FSC has less degradation than CSC when the subcarrier and symbol window-loop bandwidth products are above 0.32 mHz at the symbol rate of 50 sym/sec and above 0.8 mHz at the symbol rate of 25 sym/sec.

  16. Galileo Regio Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Galileo Regio region on Ganymede (Latitude 18 N, Longitude: 149 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, about 58 degrees above the horizon. The smallest features that can be discerned are about 80 meters (262 feet) in size in the Galileo images. These Galileo images show fine details of the dark terrain that makes up about half of the surface of the planet-sized moon. Ancient impact craters of various sizes and states of degradation testify to the great age of the terrain, dating back several billion years. The images reveal distinctive variations in albedo from the brighter rims, knobs, and furrow walls to a possible accumulation of dark material on the lower slopes, and crater floors. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,580 kilometers (4,738 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system. Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. Galileo spacecraft system level environmental test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Schlue, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Project Galileo, the United States' next planetary mission, will be launched by the Shuttle/Centaur in May 1986. The Galileo spacecraft consists of both a planetary Orbiter and an atmospheric Probe. The spacecraft was environmentally tested as a system in the fall and winter of 1984/1985 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The protoflight qualification program consisted of vibration, acoustics, pyrotechnic shock, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and Solar Thermal Vacuum (STV) tests. This test program was accomplished on a large, complex, dual-spin spacecraft without the benefit of precursor spacecraft prototype tests. This paper discusses the objectives of these tests and the implementation, and summarizes the results.

  18. Manned Mars Mission program concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, E. C.; Johnson, P.; Pearson, J.; Tucker, W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the SRS Manned Mars Mission and Program Analysis study designed to support a manned expedition to Mars contemplated by NASA for the purposes of initiating human exploration and eventual habitation of this planet. The capabilities of the interactive software package being presently developed by the SRS for the mission/program analysis are described, and it is shown that the interactive package can be used to investigate the impact of various mission concepts on the sensitivity of mass required in LEO, schedules, relative costs, and risk. The results, to date, indicate the need for an earth-to-orbit transportation system much larger than the present STS, reliable long-life support systems, and either advanced propulsion or aerobraking technology.

  19. Large Impact Features on Europa: Results of the Galileo Nominal Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Johnnie N.; Asphaug, E.; Sullivan, R.J.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Bender, K.C.; Greeley, R.; Geissler, P.E.; McEwen, A.S.; Turtle, E.P.; Phillips, C.B.; Tufts, B.R.; Head, J. W., III; Pappalardo, R.T.; Jones, K.B.; Chapman, C.R.; Belton, M.J.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Morrison, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter examined several impact features on Europa at considerably better resolution than was possible from Voyager. The new data allow us to describe the morphology and infer the geology of the largest impact features on Europa, which are probes into the crust. We observe two basic types of large impact features: (1) "classic" impact craters that grossly resemble well-preserved lunar craters of similar size but are more topographically subdued (e.g., Pwyll) and (2) very flat circular features that lack the basic topographic structures of impact craters such as raised rims, a central depression, or central peaks, and which largely owe their identification as impact features to the field of secondary craters radially sprayed about them (e.g., Callanish). Our interpretation is that the classic craters (all <30 km diameter) formed entirely within a solid target at least 5 to 10 km thick that exhibited brittle behavior on time scales of the impact events. Some of the classic craters have a more subdued topography than fresh craters of similar size on other icy bodies such as Ganymede and Callisto, probably due to the enhanced viscous relaxation produced by a steeper thermal gradient on Europa. Pedestal ejecta facies on Europa (and Ganymede) may be produced by the relief-flattening movement of plastically deforming but otherwise solid ice that was warm at the time of emplacement. Callanish and Tyre do not appear to be larger and even more viscously relaxed versions of the classic craters; rather they display totally different morphologies such as distinctive textures and a series of large concentric structural rings cutting impact-feature-related materials. Impact simulations suggest that the distinctive morphologies would not be produced by impact into a solid ice target, but may be explained by impact into an ice layer ~10 to 15 km thick overlying a low-viscosity material such as water. The very wide (near antipodal) separation of Callanish and Tyre imply

  20. Large Impact Features on Europa: Results of the Galileo Nominal Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Asphaug, Erik; Sullivan, Robert J.; Klemaszewski, James E.; Bender, Kelly C.; Greeley, Ronald; Geissler, Paul E.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Phillips, Cynthia B.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter examined several impact features on Europa at considerably better resolution than was possible from Voyager. The new data allow us to describe the morphology and infer the geology of the largest impact features on Europa, which are probes into the crust. We observe two basic types of large impact features: (1) "classic" impact craters that grossly resemble well-preserved lunar craters of similar size but are more topographically subdued (e.g., Pwyll) and (2) very flat circular features that lack the basic topographic structures of impact craters such as raised rims, a central depression, or central peaks, and which largely owe their identification as impact features to the field of secondary craters radially sprayed about them (e.g., Callanish). Our interpretation is that the classic craters (all <30 km diameter) formed entirely within a solid target at least 5 to 10 km thick that exhibited brittle behavior on time scales of the impact events. Some of the classic craters have a more subdued topography than fresh craters of similar size on other icy bodies such as Ganymede and Callisto, probably due to the enhanced viscous relaxation produced by a steeper thermal gradient on Europa. Pedestal ejecta facies on Europa (and Ganymede) may be produced by the relief-flattening movement of plastically deforming but otherwise solid ice that was warm at the time of emplacement. Callanish and Tyre do not appear to be larger and even more viscously relaxed versions of the classic craters; rather they display totally different morphologies such as distinctive textures and a series of large concentric structural rings cutting impact-feature-related materials. Impact simulations suggest that the distinctive morphologies would not be produced by impact into a solid ice target, but may be explained by impact into an ice layer approximately 10 to 15 km thick overlying a low-viscosity material such as water. The very wide (near antipodal) separation of Callanish

  1. Prelaunch checkout of the IUS Redundant IMU in the Magellan and Galileo missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Robert A.; Morrison, Gerald E. S.; Hoskins, J. K.

    An overview is presented of the Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit (RIMU) used in the Redundant INS of the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) developed for the NASA Space Shuttle and the USAF Titan space booster. The strapdown RIMU comprises five accelerometers and five gyros, and electronics, arranged in a redundant configuration such that no single component failure compromises system inertial performance. Failure detection and isolation algorithms in the navigation computers automatically eliminate a failed sensor's data from the navigation computations, and the mission navigation operation continues without interruption.

  2. Silicon germanium (SiGe) radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) program for space missions. Nineteenth technical progress report, December 1980-January 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, C. W.; Silverman, G.

    1981-01-01

    Work accomplished during the reporting period on the DOE Silicon Germanium RTG Program, Contract DE-AC01-79ET-32043 is described. This program consists of the following three tasks: multi-hundred watt RTG for the Galileo probe mission; reestablishment of silicon germanium unicouple capability; and general purpose heat source RTG for the international solar polar and Galileo orbiter missions. Details of program progress for each task, including a milestone schedule and a discussion of current problem areas (if any) are presented.

  3. STS-34 Galileo PCR at Pad & Galileo in Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-34 mission was the deployment of the Galileo spacecraft and the attached Inertial Upper Stage. This videotape shows the Galileo in the Payload Clean Room in preparation for the six year trip to Jupiter. There are also views of the spacecraft in the Atlantis Payload Bay.

  4. The IRIS Mission: A Colorful EPO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Deborah K.

    2012-05-01

    We will overview NASA’s IRIS mission EPO program, which includes a nationwide spectroscopy contest, K-12 resources, a summer program for undergraduates, informal outreach elements, and a dynamic social media program based on the highly successful Camilla/Little SDO program for NASA’s SDO mission.

  5. Galileo perceptionist.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The present paper focuses on Galileo's conception of perception. I take as my starting point the interpretation of the Galilean text by Piccolino and Wade (2008, Perception 37 1312-1340): Galileo's eye: a new vision of the senses in the work of Galileo Galilei. Three points are discussed: the criticism of naive realism, the theoretical role of perceptual laws, and the distinction between different qualities of experience. The conclusions support an alternative interpretation which underscores the crucial role of phenomenology of perception in Galileo's epistemology. PMID:22896920

  6. Galileo quartz clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, M.; Meirs, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Garriga, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    A quartz oscillator for use in the Galileo experiment (orbiter and Probe) for Jupiter mission 1982 are described. This oscillator has achieved significant performance breakthroughs by the use of an SC cut, double rotated, crystal in a titanium dewar flask. Some of the performance parameters as well as the design feature of the oscillator are presented.

  7. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  8. Astronomy Missions In The Esa Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    2011-09-01

    I will present an overview of the Science Programme of the European Space Agency, focusing on the astronomy missions. I will give a brief overview of missions currently in operation and under implementation, and then present the portfolio of missions currently under study as candidates for future implementation in the program. The planning and selection process will be illustrated, as well as the prospective building blocks for the future program. Missions falling under the remit of HEAD, e.g. X-ray, gamma-ray and gravitational wave missions, will be discussed in detail.

  9. Judging Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Ian; Brandon, David; Ferguson, Ian

    2009-05-01

    In his article "The Galileo affair" (March pp54-57), Maurice A Finocchiaro asserts that the complexities of the affair "can be simplified, without oversimplification". But when he concludes that "the proper defence of Galileo should have the reasoned, critical, open-minded and fairminded character that was also displayed by [Galileo's] own defence of Copernicus", Finocchiaro thereby fails to follow the admirable principles he advocates. Why? Because the evidence shows that it was in large degree Galileo's own boastful arrogance and lack of fair-mindedness that drew upon him the ire of the scholars he so despised, and feared. By putting the Ptolemaic arguments into the mouth of "Simpleton", Galileo won his staged Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems, Ptolemaic and Copernican, but lost far more, notably the former friendship and admiration of Pope Urban VIII.

  10. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, on June 26, 1996, the project scientists and engineers gather with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received and to celebrate the mission. This videotape presents that meeting. Representatives from the various instrument science teams discuss many of the instruments aboard Galileo and show videos and pictures of what they have seen so far. This video is continued on Videotape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036028.

  11. Galileo's Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity in which students speculate about the extent to which Galileo actually performed an experiment to determine that all pendulums of a given length have the same period, independent of amplitude. (WRM)

  12. Program control for mission success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longanecker, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    This article suggests that in order to be able to exercise control over a particular program, the program itself must be controllable. A controllable program therefore, according to the author, is one that has been properly scoped technically, realistically scheduled, and adequately budgeted. The article delves indepth into each of the above aspects of a controllable program and discusses both the pros and cons of each.

  13. Galileo probe relay receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prouty, D. A.; Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1982-01-01

    For the Jovian mission, the data link from the Galileo probe to the orbiter uses suppressed-carrier Manchester encoded BPSK modulation and is protected with R = 1/2, K = 7 convolutional coding. The receiver closes the link by acquiring, tracking, and demodulating the data. It has to operate in a highly stressed environment with severe frequency offset, frequency rate, wind gust, and antenna spin conditions. Salient features are described and breadboard test data presented.

  14. Galileo: exploration of Jupiter's system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.V.; Yeates, C.M.; Colin, L.; Fanale, F.P.; Frank, L.; Hunten, D.M.

    1985-06-01

    The scientific objectives of the Galileo mission to the Jovian system is presented. Topics discussed include the history of the project, our current knowledge of the system, the objectives of interrelated experiments, mission design, spacecraft, and instruments. The management, scientists, and major contractors for the project are also given.

  15. Galileo: Exploration of Jupiter's system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Yeates, C. M.; Colin, L.; Fanale, F. P.; Frank, L.; Hunten, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Galileo mission to the Jovian system is presented. Topics discussed include the history of the project, our current knowledge of the system, the objectives of interrelated experiments, mission design, spacecraft, and instruments. The management, scientists, and major contractors for the project are also given.

  16. Hybrid simulation of the Ganymede's magnetosphere: comparison with the Galileo observations and predictions for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, L.; Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.; Hess, S.; André, N.

    2014-04-01

    Ganymede is a unique object: it is the biggest moon of our solar system, and the only satellite which has its own intrinsic magnetic field leading to the formation of a small magnetosphere. The magnetosphere of Ganymede being embedded in the Jovian magnetosphere, the environment of the Galilean moon presents the only known case of interaction between two magnetospheres (Kivelson et al. 1996). To modelize this peculiar interaction, we developped a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid model based on a CAM-CL algorithm (Mathews et al. 1994) which has been largely used for other magnetized or unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Titan or Mercury. In this model, ions have a kinetic description whereas electrons are considered as an inertialess fluid which ensure the neutrality of the plasma and contribute to the total current and electronic pressure. Maxwell's equations are solved to compute the temporal evolution of electromagnetic field. The Jovian magnetospheric plasma is composed of O+ and H+, and the intrinsic Ganymede's magnetic field is implemented at initialization as a dipolar field with a magnetic moment taken from (Kivelson et al.2002). The planetary plasma included in the simulation is composed of ionospheric O+ and H+. In a first attempt, the ionospheric plasma is loaded at the initialization of the simulation with a total density at the surface and a scale height of 125 km in agreement with Paty and Winglee et al. (2004). In addition, neutral corona of atomic hydrogen and molecular hydrogen is included in the simulation. This neutral environment is partly ionized by solar photons, electron impacts and charge exchange reactions between the magnetospheric ions and the neutral coronae. During different flybys of Ganymede by the spacecraft Galileo in 1996, the Galileo magnetometer measured the magnetic field of the moon. In order to compare the results of our model with the in-situ observations of Galileo, we consider the observations conditions of different flybys

  17. Deployment of Galileo and the IUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft and its Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster were deployed from the cargo bay of STS-34 Atlantis. Deployment occurred at 7:15 P.M. EDT on October 18, 1989. Beginning an hour after deployment, two rocket stages of the IUS fired in succession. Galileo separated from the IUS' second stage at 9:05 P.M. and began its ballistic flight to Venus for the first of three gravity-assisted flybys, which will take Galileo to Jupiter.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA'is Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  18. The Yohkoh Galileo Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, A. R.; Acton, L. W.

    2002-05-01

    The Japan/US/UK Yohkoh mission was launched on 29 August 1991 and ceased acquiring solar observations on 14 December 2001. Over the decade the mission returned a record of energetic solar coronal and activity phenomena of high quality and enduring value. In order to assure the usability of Yohkoh data for generations of future scientists we plan to create a durable and readily accessible archive of Yohkoh data products and descriptive and explanatory documentation. We call the effort to preserve and document the Yohkoh data archive the YOHKOH GALILEO PROJECT in honor of Galileo Galilei, whose 17th-century sunspot observations are still scientifically useful today. The ten years of observations by Yohkoh provide a unique, high-quality, record of the evolution high-energy solar phenomena over an entire sunspot cycle. These data will be mined for decades, if not centuries, for studies of solar activity, its control of space weather and the sun-earth connection, and properties of magnetically active astrophysical objects. The Galileo Project is being undertaken by the same team of U.S., Japanese, and U.K. scientists who cooperatively conducted the observational phase of the mission and the GSFC Solar Data Analysis Center where the primary public archive of Yohkoh data are located.

  19. Galileo's Dagger.

    PubMed

    Anstis, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Galileo found that fine lines on a balance scale dazzled his eyes and were unreadable. So he used a grid of fine wires instead and ran his dagger across it, counting the number of auditory clicks. This is the first known experiment on sensory substitution. PMID:26562849

  20. Galileo's First Image of Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Galileo's first view of Amalthea, a small inner moon of Jupiter, showing the end of the elongated satellite that faces permanently toward the giant planet. North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The circular feature that dominates the upper-right portion of the disk is Pan, the largest crater on Amalthea. This crater is about 90 kilometers wide. The bright spot at the south pole is associated with another, slightly smaller crater named Gaea. The Universal Time is 8 hours, 18 minutes, 0 seconds on the 7th of September, 1996.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  1. Two Galileo Views of Thebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These two images of the Jovian moon Thebe were taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system in November 1996 and June 1997, respectively. North is approximately up in both cases. Thebe, whose longest dimension is approximately 116 kilometers (72 miles) across, is tidally locked so that the same side of the satellite always points towards Jupiter, similar to how the nearside of our own Moon always points toward Earth. In such a tidally locked state, one side of Thebe always points in the direction in which Thebe moves as it orbits about Jupiter. This is called the 'leading side' of the moon and is shown at the left. The image on the right emphasizes the side of Thebe that faces away from Jupiter (the 'anti-Jupiter' side). Note that there appear to be at least three or four very large impact craters on the satellite--very large in the sense that each of these craters is roughly comparable in size to the radius of Thebe.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  2. Mound Supports Galileo

    SciTech Connect

    Monsanto Research Corporation

    1986-01-01

    This video describes the invention of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at Mound Laboratory, and radioisotope heat source production from 1 watt-thermal to 2400 watts-thermal. RTGs have been used in many space vehicles, but the RTG built for the Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter is the largest. This RTG unit will produce 4400 watts-thermal and convert to 300 watts-electric. The plutonium-238 heat source assembly and test at Mound is described. The RTGs are tested under simulated mission conditions. The RTG leakage radiation is carefully measured for background compensation for on-board radiation monitoring instruments.

  3. Galileo probe parachute test program: Wake properties of the Galileo probe at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, Thomas N.; Edwards, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of surveys of the near and far wake of the Galileo Probe are presented for Mach numbers from 0.25 tp 0.95. The trends in the data resulting from changes in Mach number, radial and axial distance, angle of attack, and a small change in model shape are shown in crossplots based on the data. A rationale for selecting an operating volume suitable for parachute inflation based on low Mach number flight results is outlined.

  4. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10) budget introduced a new strategic plan that placed renewed emphasis on advanced missions beyond Earth orbit. This supports NASA s 2011 strategic goal to create innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future. As a result of this focus on undertaking many and more complex missions, NASA placed its attention on a greater investment in technology development, and this shift resulted in the establishment of the Technology Demonstrations Missions (TDM) Program. The TDM Program, within the newly formed NASA Office of the Chief Technologist, supports NASA s grand challenges by providing a steady cadence of advanced space technology demonstrations (Figure 1), allowing the infusion of flexible path capabilities for future exploration. The TDM Program's goal is to mature crosscutting capabilities to flight readiness in support of multiple future space missions, including flight test projects where demonstration is needed before the capability can transition to direct mission The TDM Program has several unique criteria that set it apart from other NASA program offices. For instance, the TDM Office matures a small number of technologies that are of benefit to multiple customers to flight technology readiness level (TRL) 6 through relevant environment testing on a 3-year development schedule. These technologies must be crosscutting, which is defined as technology with potential to benefit multiple mission directorates, other government agencies, or the aerospace industry, and they must capture significant public interest and awareness. These projects will rely heavily on industry partner collaboration, and funding is capped for all elements of the flight test demonstration including planning, hardware development, software development, launch costs, ground operations, and post-test assessments. In order to inspire collaboration across government and industry

  5. Building Technologies Program Vision, Mission, and Goals

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-15

    The Vision, Mission, and Goals of the Building Technologies Program (BTP) focus on short term energy efficiency outcomes such as improved economic environment, enhanced comfort, and affordability that collectively benefit our nation. Long-term goals focus on helping secure our nation's energy independence.

  6. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The STS 41-C National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the eleventh Shuttle flight and fifth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Also summarized are the significant problems that occurred during STS 41-C, and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight. The major objectives of flight STS 41-C were to successfully deploy the LDEF (long duration exposure facility) and retrieve, repair and redeploy the SMM (Solar Maximum Mission) spacecraft, and perform functions of IMAX and Cinema 360 cameras.

  7. Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. Stephen

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor 2001 mission to Mars was initially a key element in the Mars sample return sequence of missions. A capable rover, carrying the Cornell Athena instruments would be placed on Mars to roam over several kilometers, select samples, and place them in a cache for return by a subsequent mission. Inevitably, budget constraints forced descopes. At one critical point, the landed payload consisted only of the HEDS (Human Exploration and Development of Space) payloads selected for testing environmental properties of the surface for future human exploration. Then Congress intervened and put back some of the funding that had been deleted. NASA next redefined the payload to include as many of the Athena instruments as possible, to be distributed between the lander deck and a Sojourner class rover. This payload would then be placed on a modified version of the Mars Polar Lander rather than on the much larger, and more expensive, lander that had been originally designed for the mission. With this functionality restored the '01 mission remains an important and pivotal element of the Mars Surveyor program. It completes the Mars Observer objectives with the gamma ray spectrometer mapping. This mission will largely complete the global characterization phase of Mars exploration and mark the beginning of focused surface exploration leading to return of the first samples and the search for evidence of past Martian life. MSP'01 also is the first mission in the combined Mars exploration strategy of the HEDS and Space Science Enterprises of NASA. This mission, and those to follow, will demonstrate technologies and collect environmental data that will provide the basis for a decision to send humans to Mars. The NASA exploration strategy for Mars includes orbiters, landers and rovers launched in 2001 and 2003 and a sample return mission to be launched in 2005, returning a sample by 2008. The purpose of the rovers is to explore and characterize sites on Mars. The 2003 and 2005

  8. Stereo View of Ganymede's Galileo Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Topographic detail is seen in this stereoscopic view of the Galileo Regio region of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. The picture is a computer reconstruction from two images taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft this summer. One image of the Galileo Regio region was taken June 27, 1996, at a range of 9,515 kilometers (about 5,685 miles) with a resolution of 76 meters. The other was taken September 6, 1996 at a range of 10,220 kilometers (about 6,350 miles) with a resolution of 86 meters. The topographic nature of the deep furrows and impact craters that cover this portion of Ganymede is apparent. The blue-sky horizon is artificial.

    The Galileo mission is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. Uruk Sulcus Mosaic - Galileo over Voyager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo images of the Uruk Sulcus region on Ganymede (Latitude 11 N, Longitude: 170 W) is shown overlayed on the data obtained by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1979. North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left, nearly overhead. The area shown is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent and the smallest features that can be discerned are 74 meters (243 feet) in size in the Galileo images and 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) in the Voyager data. The higher resolution Galileo images unveil the details of parallel ridges and troughs that are principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. High photometric activity (large light contrast at high spatial frequencies) of this ice-rich surface was such that the Galileo camera's hardware data compressor was pushed into truncating lines. The north-south running gap between the left and right halves of the mosaic is a result of line truncation from the normal 800 samples per line to about 540. The images were taken on 27 June, 1996 Universal Time at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles) through the clear filter of the Galileo spacecraft's imaging system.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. Galileo: Challenges enroute to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft is now on its three-year direct Earth-to-Jupiter transfer trajectory. Jupiter arrived (Probe entry) is scheduled for 2:05 pm PST, December 7, 1995. The Galileo Probe will be the first human-made object to enter the atmosphere of an outer planet, while the Orbiter will be the first artificial satellite of an outer planet. A two-year Jupiter orbital mission is planned. Following launch on October 18, 1989, Galileo spent just over three years executing its Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA) mission phase to achieve the heliocentric energy necessary to reach Jupiter. Midway through its Earth-to-Earth leg, on October 29, 1991, Galileo became the first spacecraft to encounter an asteroid. Six months earlier in April 1991, the spacecraft's high-gain antenna (HGA) failed to deploy properly. The special guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) problems associated with a 20-month campaign of maneuvers to free the stuck antenna and successfully perform the asteroid encounter without it are described. The overall mission and spacecraft status are also reported.

  11. The Galileo Spacecraft: A Telecommunications Legacy for Future Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo mission to Jupiter has implemented a wide range of telecommunication inprovements in response to the loss of its high gain antenna. While necessity dictated the use of these new techniques for Galileo, now that they have been proven in flight, they are available for use on future deep space missions. This telecommunications legacy of Galileo will aid in our ability to conduct a meaningful exploration of the solar system, and beyond, at a reasonable cost.

  12. The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's Galileo safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.C.; Gray, L.B.; Huff, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The safety evaluation report (SER) for Galileo was prepared by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) coordinators in accordance with Presidential directive/National Security Council memorandum 25. The INSRP consists of three coordinators appointed by their respective agencies, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). These individuals are independent of the program being evaluated and depend on independent experts drawn from the national technical community to serve on the five INSRP subpanels. The Galileo SER is based on input provided by the NASA Galileo Program Office, review and assessment of the final safety analysis report prepared by the Office of Special Applications of the DOE under a memorandum of understanding between NASA and the DOE, as well as other related data and analyses. The SER was prepared for use by the agencies and the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the Present for use in their launch decision-making process. Although more than 20 nuclear-powered space missions have been previously reviewed via the INSRP process, the Galileo review constituted the first review of a nuclear power source associated with launch aboard the Space Transportation System.

  13. Dawn Mission's Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Lucy-Ann A.; Wise, J.; Ristvey, J.; Warner, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    NASA's Dawn mission, the 9th Discovery mission, is the first to orbit two solar system bodies: Vesta (Oct 2011-Apr 2012), then Ceres (Feb-Jul 2015), the most massive Main Belt asteroids. The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) goals are to inspire the next generation of explorers; motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); to enhance the quality of STEM education at the K-13 level and engage the public in exploration and discovery. Dawn's website (dawn.jpl.nasa.gov) is central to the dissemination of products and activities. The Dawn E-Newsletter, with 2,301 subscribers, is produced on a quarterly basis. Leonard Nimoy narrated the mission video available on Google videos. Dawn Young Engineers build a paper model of the Dawn spacecraft and submit photos with their constructions. 366,050 names were collected to send to the asteroids. Speaker's kits for the Solar System Ambassadors are online and a poster can be printed via web at a local Office Max. Educational materials about dwarf planets, history and discovery of asteroids, ion propulsion and finding meteorites have been developed. In addition, numerous activities including an interactive activity on ion propulsion, identifying craters (ClickWorkers) and observing asteroids (Telescopes in Education and Amateur Observers' Program) appeal to formal and informal educational audiences. Educators from over 20 states convened in Florida for a workshop in June with the opportunity to meet mission scientists, learn about the modules and activities, observe Vesta through a telescope and tour KSFC. Plans for the coming years include developing modules on instrumentation, theories of the origin of the solar system and data analysis. A planetarium show, museum displays, a video field trip to the asteroid belt and additional educator workshops are planned. This work is funded by NASA's Discovery Program.

  14. Evaluating Mission Drift in Microfinance: Lessons for Programs with Social Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hishigsuren, Gaamaa

    2007-01-01

    The article contributes to a better understanding of implications of scaling up on the social mission of microfinance programs. It proposes a methodology to measure the extent, if any, to which a microfinance program with a poverty alleviation mission drifts away from its mission during rapid scaling up and presents findings from a field research…

  15. EUVE Io Plasma Torus Observations: Galileo Support and Variability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    We propose a Large Observing Program (1000 ksec) to monitor and investigate EUV emissions from the Io plasma torus and Jupiter during the last four Galileo Europa Mission encounters. These encounters all occur in the last half of 1999 (on Aug. 12, Sept. 14, Oct. 11, and Nov. 26), and will provide a perhaps never-to-be-repeated opportunity for acquiring ground truth (i.e., in situ) measurements with which to calibrate remote sensing observations of the torus. With these new data, we will 1) monitor the global properties of the torus during the Galileo observation epoch, 2) resolve two important but closely spaced torus periodicities, 3) determine the torus stability time constants, 4) search for very faint localized emissions from the Galilean satellites, and 5) continue monitoring the Jovian dayglow. We feel that such a program will make excellent use of EUVEs capabilities, and will allow for a much deeper understanding of the physics of the Jovian system.

  16. Changes around Marduk between Voyager, and Galileo's first two orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Detail of changes around Marduk on Jupiter's moon Io as seen by Voyager 1 in 1979 (upper left) and NASA's Galileo spacecraft between June 1996 (lower left) and September 1996 (upper and lower right). The new dark red linear feature extending southeast from Marduk is about 250 kilometers long and may be a volcanic fissure. The flow-like feature at the bottom of the images is distinct in the Voyager data, indistinct in the June Galileo data, but distinct again in the September Galileo data. This may be due to the different lighting conditions rather than volcanic activity. The Voyager 1 image uses the green, blue, and violet filters. The upper right September 1996 image from Galileo uses the violet and green filters of the solid state imaging system aboard the Galileo spacecraft and a synthetic blue to simulate Voyager colors. The lower June and September, 1996 Galileo images use the imaging system's near-infrared (756 nm), green, and violet filters. North is to the top in all frames.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. The GalileoMobile Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pilar Becerra, A.&ída; Bhatt, Megha; Kobel, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    GalileoMobile is a traveling science education project by an international team of PhD students and recent graduates (partnering with the Universe Awareness program) that brings astronomy to young people in remote regions of developing countries. Our primary project goals are: (1) to stimulate students' curiosity and interest in learning, (2) to exchange different visions of the cosmos and cultures, and (3) to inspire a feeling of unity "under the same sky" between people from different parts of the world. In 2009, GalileoMobile traveled to 30 schools in Chile, Bolivia and Peru, bringing hands-on activities and Galileoscopes; the team also produced a documentary movie to share the experiences and culture with the world. In 2012, GalileoMobile plans an expedition to India from the 2nd to the 13th of July in villages between Bangalore and Mysore. We will again bring hands-on astronomy activities and telescopes to the schools, and share our experiences with the world via internet resources. GalileoMobile is also collaborating with the Galileo Teacher Training Program to provide workshops for local teachers, to encourage continuation of astronomy education beyond our visit. In this way, we expect to spark sustainable interest in astronomy in remote areas that have little access to science outreach, and to share the culture of these areas with the world -- "under the same sky."

  18. Galileo Science Writers' Briefing. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy video production presents Part 1 of a press conference held at JPL on August 8, 1989. The briefing in its entirety covers the Galileo Project's mission design from launch to completion in 1997 and is moderated by JPL Public Information Mgr. Robert Macmillan. Part 1 of the 3 part video series includes presentations by Richard J. Spehalski (Galileo Project Manager) and Clayne M. Yeates (Acting Science Mission Design Manager). Mr. Spehalski's presentation includes actual footage of spacecraft preparations at Kennedy Space Center and slides of mission timelines. Dr. Yeates discusses the Galileo mission in chronological order and includes slides of the interplanetary trajectory, encounter geometry, propellant margins vs. launch date, and planned earth images.

  19. Galileo: Earth avoidance study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    The 1989 Galileo mission to Jupiter is based on a VEEGA (Venus Earth Earth-Gravity Assist) trajectory which uses two flybys of Earth and one of Venus to achieve the necessary energy and shaping to reach Jupiter. These encounters are needed because the Centaur upper stage is not now being used on this mission. Since the Galileo spacecraft uses radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) for electrical power, the question arises as to whether there is any chance of an inadvertent atmospheric entry of the spacecraft during either of the two Earth flybys. A study was performed which determined the necessary actions, in both spacecraft and trajectory design as well as in operations, to insure that the probability of such reentry is made very small, and to provide a quantitative assessment of the probability of reentry.

  20. Four Galileo Views of Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These four images of Jupiter's moon, Amalthea, were taken by Galileo's solid state imaging system at various times between February and June 1997. North is approximately up in all cases. Amalthea, whose longest dimension is approximately 247 kilometers (154 miles) across, is tidally locked so that the same side of the satellite always points towards Jupiter, similar to how the nearside of our own Moon always points toward Earth. In such a tidally locked state, one side of Amalthea always points in the direction in which Amalthea moves as it orbits about Jupiter. This is called the 'leading side' of the moon and is shown in the top two images. The opposite side of Amalthea, the 'trailing side,' is shown in the bottom pair of images. The Sun illuminates the surface from the left in the top left image and from the right in the bottom left image. Such lighting geometries, similar to taking a picture from a high altitude at sunrise or sunset, are excellent for viewing the topography of the satellite's surface such as impact craters and hills. In the two images on the right, however, the Sun is almost directly behind the spacecraft. This latter geometry, similar to taking a picture from a high altitude at noon, washes out topographic features and emphasizes Amalthea's albedo (light/dark) patterns. It emphasizes the presence of surface materials that are intrinsically brighter or darker than their surroundings. The bright albedo spot that dominates the top right image is located inside a large south polar crater named Gaea.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  1. The Galileo Affair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Presented is background material on Galileo and his views on astronomy, religion, and Copernicus. The history of theory development related to the science of astronomy and a review of Galileo's writings are included. (KR)

  2. Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office Status and Support Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest; Webb, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office (CxP MOP) at Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas is preparing to support the CxP mission operations objectives for the CEV/Orion flights, the Lunar Lander, and and Lunar surface operations. Initially the CEV will provide access to the International Space Station, then progress to the Lunar missions. Initial CEV mission operations support will be conceptually similar to the Apollo missions, and we have set a challenge to support the CEV mission with 50% of the mission operations support currently required for Shuttle missions. Therefore, we are assessing more efficient way to organize the support and new technologies which will enhance our operations support. This paper will address the status of our preparation for these CxP missions, our philosophical approach to CxP operations support, and some of the technologies we are assessing to streamline our mission operations infrastructure.

  3. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-10

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

  4. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Stereo View of Ganymede's Galileo Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    New topographic detail is seen in a stereoscopic view of this part of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. The newly processed picture is a computer reconstruction from two images taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft this summer. One image of the Galileo Regio region was taken June 27, 1996, at a range of 9,515 kilometers (about 5,685 miles) and the other was taken at a range of 10,220 kilometers (about 6,350 miles) on September 6, 1996. The topographic nature of the deep furrows and impact craters that cover this portion of Ganymede is apparent. The blue-sky horizon is artificial.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  6. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  7. Modern Exploration of Galileo's New Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred years ago Galileo turned his telescope to the heavens and changed the way we view the cosmos forever. Among his discoveries in January of 1610 were four new 'stars', following Jupiter in the sky but changing their positions with respect to the giant planet every night. Galileo showed that these 'Medicean stars', as he named them, were moons orbiting Jupiter in the same manner that the Earth and planets revolve about the Sun in the Copernican theory of the solar system. Over the next three centuries these moons, now collectively named the Galilean satellites after their discoverer, remained tiny dots of light in astronomers' telescopes. In the latter portion of the twentieth century Galileo's new worlds became important targets of exploration by robotic spacecraft. This paper reviews the history of this exploration through the discoveries made by the Galileo mission from 1995 to 2003, setting the stage for on-going exploration in the new century.

  8. View of Callisto from Voyager and Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    View of Callisto, most distant of the four large moons of Jupiter. This mosaic was prepared from images obtained by three spacecraft: Voyager 1 (left side), Galileo (middle), and Voyager 2 data (right side). The Voyager data were taken in 1979 but left a 'gap' centered at longitude 290 degrees in the trailing hemisphere of Callisto. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging system photographed this area on its second orbit around Jupiter on 9 September, 1996 Universal Time. The resolution of the Galileo data is 4.3 kilometers/pixel (2.7 miles), meaning that the smallest visible feature is about 12 kilometers (7 miles) across. North is to the top of the picture.

    Features of interest in the new Galileo data include a dark, smooth area in the northern latitudes (upper third) which appears to mantle older terrain. This could be dark ejecta from a small impact crater. Also visible is a fresh, sharp-rimmed crater some 90 km (56 miles) across named Igaluk (center left third of picture), and a bright zone in the south polar area (bottom of image) which could be an impact scar.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The 515-41B National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the sixth operational Shuttle flight and fourth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Since this flight was the first to land at Kennedy Space Center, the vehicle was towed directly to the OPF (Orbiter Processing Facility) where preparations for flight STS-41C, scheduled for early April 1984, began immediately. The significant problems that occurred during STS-41B are summarized and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight is given. None of the problems will affect the STS 41C flight. The major objectives of flight STS-41B were to successfully deploy the Westar satellite and the Indonesian Communications Satellite-B2 (PALAPA-B2); to evaluate the MMU (Manned Maneuvering Unit) support for EVA (Extravehicular Activities); to exercise the MFR (Manipulator Foot Restraint); to demonstrate a closed loop rendezvous; and to operate the M.R (Monodisperse Latex Reactor), the ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) and the IEF (Isoelectric Focusing) in cabin experiments; and to obtain photographs with the Cinema 360 Cameras.

  10. Flight performance of Galileo and Ulysses RTGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemler, Richard J.; Kelly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Flight performance data of the GPHS-RTGs (General Purpose Heat Source—Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators) on the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft are reported. Comparison of the flight data with analytical predictions is preformed. Differences between actual flight telemetry data and analytical predictions are addressed including the degree of uncertainty associated with the telemetry data. End of mission power level predictions are included for both missions with an overall assessment of RTG mission performances.

  11. Flight performance of Galileo and Ulysses RTGs

    SciTech Connect

    Hemler, R.J.; Kelly, C.E. )

    1993-01-10

    Flight performance data of the GPHS-RTGs (General Purpose Heat Source---Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators) on the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft are reported. Comparison of the flight data with analytical predictions is preformed. Differences between actual flight telemetry data and analytical predictions are addressed including the degree of uncertainty associated with the telemetry data. End of mission power level predictions are included for both missions with an overall assessment of RTG mission performances.

  12. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  13. Galileo and the Movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivotto, Cristina; Testa, Antonella

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the character of Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), one of the most famous scientists of all time, as portrayed in three significant movies: Luigi Maggi's Galileo Galilei (1909), Liliana Cavani's Galileo (1968), and Joseph Losey's Galileo (1975), the last one of which was based upon Bertolt Brecht's drama, Das Leben des Galilei (1947). We investigate the relationships between the main characteristics of these fictional Galileos and the most important twentieth-century Galilean historiographic models. We also analyze the veracity of the plots of these three movies and the role that historical and scientific consultants played in producing them. We conclude that connections between these three movies and Galilean historiographic models are far from evident, that other factors deeply influenced the representation of Galileo on the screen.

  14. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  15. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The major activities and accomplishments of this first Spacelab mission using Orbiter vehicle 102. The significant configuration differences incorporated prior to STS-9 include the first use of the 3 substack fuel cells, the use of 5 cryo tanks sets and the addition of a galley and crew sleep stations. These differences combined with the Spacelab payload resulted in the heaviest landing weight yet flown. The problems that occurred are cited and a problem tracking list of all significant anomalies tht occurred during the mission is included. Scientific results of experiments conducted are highlighted.

  16. Galileo's Exploration of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence

    The Galileo mission to the Jupiter system afforded the opportunity to make the first ever flyby observations of main belt asteroids. The first encounter with 951 Gaspra revealed an irregular cratered surface that shows evidence of regolith optical space weatering processes. The second encounter with 243 Ida resulted in the discovery of the first confirmed satellite of an asteroid Dactyl. Measruements of Dactyl's orbit also allowed a useful determination of mass and density for Ida. In addition to these pioneering asteroid observations Galileo also made observations of Jupiter's small inner moons and found that they were the major source for material in Jupiter's tenuous ring system. During it's final data taking orbit in 2002 Galileo passed within about 250 km of the irregularly shaped satellite Amalthea. Determination of Amalthea's mass from tracking data yields a bulk density for this small body of less than 1 gm/cc suggesting a body of relatively high porosity. This is consistent with the growing body of data on small asteroid densities and estimates of their porosity

  17. Galileo's Exploration of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence

    2005-01-01

    The Galileo mission to the Jupiter system afforded the opportunity to make the first ever flyby observations of main belt asteroids. The first encounter with 951 Gaspra revealed an irregular cratered surface that shows evidence of regolith optical space weatering processes. The second encounter with 243 Ida resulted in the discovery of the first confirmed satellite of an asteroid Dactyl. Measruements of Dactyl's orbit also allowed a useful determination of mass and density for Ida. In addition to these pioneering asteroid observations Galileo also made observations of Jupiter's small inner moons and found that they were the major source for material in Jupiter's tenuous ring system. During it's final data taking orbit in 2002 Galileo passed within about 250 km of the irregularly shaped satellite Amalthea. Determination of Amalthea's mass from tracking data yields a bulk density for this small body of less than 1 gm/cc suggesting a body of relatively high porosity. This is consistent with the growing body of data on small asteroid densities and estimates of their porosity.

  18. [Galileo and his telescope].

    PubMed

    Strebel, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Galileo's publication of observations made with his newly reinvented telescope provoked a fierce debate. In April 1610 Martinus Horky, a young Bohemian astronomer, had an opportunity to make his own observations with Galileo's telescope in the presence of Antonio Magini and other astronomers. Horky and the other witnesses denied the adequacy of Galileo's telescope and therefore the bona fides of his discoveries. Kepler conjectured Horky as well as all his witnesses to be myopic. But Kepler's objection could not stop the publication of Horky's Peregrinatio contra nuncium sidereum (Modena, 1610), the first printed refutation of Galileo's Sidereus nuncius. In his treatise, Horky adresses four questions: 1) Do the four newly observed heavenly bodies actually exist? Horky denies their existence on various grounds: a) God, as every astronomer teaches, has created only seven moveable heavenly bodies and astronomical knowledge originates in God, too. b) Heavenly bodies are either stars or planets. Galileo's moveable heavenly bodies fit into neither category. c) If they do exist, why have they not already been observed by other scholars? Horky concludes that there are no such heavenly bodies. 2) What are these phenomena? They are purely artefactual, and produced by Galileo's telescope. 3) How are they like? Galileo's "stars" are so small as to be almost invisible. Galileo claims that he has measured their distances from each other. This however is impossible due to their diminutive size and other observational problems. Hence, Galileo's claim is a further proof that he is a fraud. 4) Why are they? For Galileo they are a chance to earn money but for astronomers like Horky they are a reason to offer thanks and honour to God. Horky's treatise was favourably received by the enemies of Galileo. But Kepler's critique was devastating. After calling on Kepler in Prague, Horky had to revoke the contents of his book. PMID:16929794

  19. Galileo Space Probe News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 1 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. Among these panelists, William J. O'Neil (Jet Propulsion Lab.) begins the video praising all of the scientists that worked on the orbiter mission. He then presents a visual overview of Galileo's overall mission trajectory and schedule. Marcie Smith (NASA Ames Research Center) then describes the Galileo Probe mission and the overall engineering and data acquisition aspects of the Probe's Jupiter atmospheric entry. Dr. Richard Young (NASA Ames Research Center) follows with a brief scientific overview, describing the measurements of the atmospheric composition as well as the instruments that were used to gather the data. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, density, and radiation levels of Jupiter were among the most important parameters measured. It is explained that these measurements would be helpful in determining among other things, the overall dynamic meteorology of Jupiter. A question and answer period follows the individual presentations. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. Parts 2 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  20. "Galileo Calling Earth..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide presents an activity for helping students understand how data from the Galileo spacecraft is sent to scientists on earth. Students are asked to learn about the concepts of bit-rate and resolution and apply them to the interpretation of images from the Galileo Orbiter. (WRM)

  1. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azbell, James A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA s other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. MOD s focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  2. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azbell, Jim

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA's other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. MOD's focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  3. Galileo's tidal theory.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ron

    2007-03-01

    The aim of Galileo's tidal theory was to show that the tides were produced entirely by the earth's motion and thereby to demonstrate the physical truth of Copernicanism. However, in the Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems Galileo did not explain some of the most significant aspects of the theory completely. As a consequence, the way the theory works has long been disputed. Though there exist a number of interpretations in the literature, the most widely accepted are based on ideas that are not explicitly articulated by Galileo in the Dialogue. This essay attempts to understand the way the theory functions in terms of Galilean physics. It is an interpretation of the theory based solely on Galileo's arguments--and one that reveals it to have had some unrecognized consequences. This interpretation indicates that Galileo's theory would not have worked in the manner he described in the Dialogue. PMID:17539198

  4. Planetary exploration through year 2000, a core program: Mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    In 1980 the NASA Advisory Council created the Solar System Exploratory Committee (SSEC) to formulate a long-range program of planetary missions that was consistent with likely fiscal constraints on total program cost. The SSEC had as its primary goal the establishment of a scientifically valid, affordable program that would preserve the nation's leading role in solar system exploration, capitalize on two decades of investment, and be consistent with the coordinated set of scientific stategies developed earlier by the Committe on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). The result of the SSEC effort was the design of a Core Program of planetary missions to be launched by the year 2000, together with a realistic and responsible funding plan. The Core Program Missions, subcommittee activities, science issues, transition period assumptions, and recommendations are discussed.

  5. The Galileo Teacher Training Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    The Galileo Teacher Training Program is a global effort to empower teachers all over the world to embark on a new trend in science teaching, using new technologies and real research meth-ods to teach curriculum content. The GTTP goal is to create a worldwide network of "Galileo Ambassadors", promoters of GTTP training session, and a legion of "Galileo Teachers", edu-cators engaged on the use of innovative resources and sharing experiences and supporting its pears worldwide. Through workshops, online training tools and resources, the products and techniques promoted by this program can be adapted to reach locations with few resources of their own, as well as network-connected areas that can take advantage of access to robotic, optical and radio telescopes, webcams, astronomy exercises, cross-disciplinary resources, image processing and digital universes (web and desktop planetariums). Promoters of GTTP are expert astronomy educators connected to Universities or EPO institutions that facilitate the consolidation of an active support to newcomers and act as a 24 hour helpdesk to teachers all over the world. GTTP will also engage in the creation of a repository of astronomy education resources and science research projects, ViRoS (Virtual Repository of resources and Science Projects), in order to simplify the task of educators willing to enrich classroom activities.

  6. Detail of Ganymede's Uruk Sulcus Region as Viewed by Galileo and Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    View of the region of Ganymede's Uruk Sulcus placed on a lower resolution Voyager view taken 17 years earlier. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from almost overhead in the Galileo view. The finest details that can be discerned in the Galileo picture are about 80 meters across. The four boxes outlined in white show the extent of Galileo's initial look at this area. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. (abstract) The Galileo Spacecraft: A Telecommunications Legacy for Future Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo mission to Jupiter has implemented a wide range of telecommunication improvements in response to the loss of its high gain antenna. While necessity dictated the use of these new techniques for Galileo, now that they have been proven in flight, they are available for use on future deep space missions. This telecommunications legacy of Galileo will aid in our ability to conduct a meaningful exploration of the solar system, and beyond, at a reasonable cost.

  8. Ganymede - Comparison of Voyager and Galileo Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images demonstrate the dramatic improvement in the resolution of pictures that NASA's Galileo spacecraft is returning compared to previous images of the Jupiter system. The frame at left was taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft when it flew by in 1979, with a resolution of about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) per pixel. The frame at right showing the same area was captured by Galileo during its first flyby of Ganymede on June 27, 1996; it has a resolution of about 74 meters (243 feet) per pixel, more than 17 times better than that of the Voyager image. In the Voyager frame, line-like bright and dark bands can be seen but their detailed structure and origin are not clear. In the Galileo image, each band is now seen to be composed of many smaller ridges. The structure and shape of the ridges permit scientists to determine their origin and their relation to other terrains, helping to unravel the complex history of the planet-sized moon. In each of these frames, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead (about 77 degrees above the horizon). The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, 167 degrees west, is about 35 by 55 kilometers (25 by 34 miles). The image was taken June 27 when Galileo was 7,448 kilometers (4.628 miles) away from Ganymede. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  9. Optimal low thrust geocentric transfer. [mission analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelbaum, T. N.; Sackett, L. L.; Malchow, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    A computer code which will rapidly calculate time-optimal low thrust transfers is being developed as a mission analysis tool. The final program will apply to NEP or SEP missions and will include a variety of environmental effects. The current program assumes constant acceleration. The oblateness effect and shadowing may be included. Detailed state and costate equations are given for the thrust effect, oblateness effect, and shadowing. A simple but adequate model yields analytical formulas for power degradation due to the Van Allen radiation belts for SEP missions. The program avoids the classical singularities by the use of equinoctial orbital elements. Kryloff-Bogoliuboff averaging is used to facilitate rapid calculation. Results for selected cases using the current program are given.

  10. The Living with a Star Program Mission Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Day, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    LWS (Living With a Star) is research science focused to facilitate enabling science for spacecraft design (specifically environment specification models) and spacecraft operations (specifically Space Weather research). The following topics are discussed: LWS goals and program, program architecture, the solar dynamic observer, the geospace plan, the space environment testbed concept, and the heliosphere missions.

  11. 45 CFR 1388.3 - Program criteria-mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program criteria-mission. 1388.3 Section 1388.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM THE...

  12. Galileo probe battery system -- An update

    SciTech Connect

    Dagarin, B.P.; Taenaka, R.K.; Stofel, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    NASA`s Galileo 6-year trip to Jupiter is in its final phase. The mission consists of a Jovian Orbiter and an atmospheric entry Probe. The Probe is designed to coast autonomously for up to 190 days and turn itself on 6 hours prior to entry. It will then descend through the upper atmosphere for 50 to 75 minutes with the aid of an 8-foot parachute. This paper discusses sources of electrical power for the Probe and battery testing at the systems level. Described are the final production phase, qualification, and systems testing prior to and following launch, as well as decisions made regarding the Probe separation Li/SO{sub 2} battery configuration. In addition, the paper briefly describes the thermal battery verification program. The main power source comprises three Li/SO{sub 2} battery modules containing 13 D-sized cell strings per module. These modules are required to retain capacity for 7.5 years and support a 150-day clock, ending with a 7-hour mission sequence of increasing loads from 0.15 A to 9.5 A during the last 30 minutes. The main power source is supplemented by two thermal batteries (CaCrO{sub 4}-Ca), which will be used for firing the pyrotechnic initiators during the atmospheric entry.

  13. Lessons Learned from NASA UAV Science Demonstration Program Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steven S.; Schoenung, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, two airborne missions were flown as part of a NASA Earth Science Enterprise program to demonstrate the use of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) to perform earth science. One mission, the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES), successfully measured lightning storms in the vicinity of Key West, Florida, during storm season using a high-altitude Altus(TM) UAV. In the other, a solar-powered UAV, the Pathfinder Plus, flew a high-resolution imaging mission over coffee fields in Kauai, Hawaii, to help guide the harvest.

  14. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  15. Music in Galileo's Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrobelli, P.

    2011-06-01

    Claudio Monteverdi appears as the key personality of the music in Galileo's time. His revolution in format and function of the musical language-from an essentially edonistic creation of purely sonorous images to a musical language consciously "expressive" of the content of the words on which it is based-is similar in character to the influential innovations in scientific thinking operated by Galileo.

  16. Galileo and Bellarmine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyne, G. V.

    2011-06-01

    This paper aims to delineate two of the many tensions which bring to light the contrasting views of Galileo Galilei and of Cardinal Robert Bellarmine with respect to the Copernican-Ptolemaic controversies of the 16th and 17th centuries: their respective positions on Aristotle's natural philosophy and on the interpretation of Sacred Scripture. Galileo's telescopic observations, reported in his Sidereus Nuncius, were bringing about the collapse of Aristotle's natural philosophy and he taught that there was no science in Scripture.

  17. Exploration System Mission Directorate and Constellation Program Support for Analogue Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Voels, Stephen A.; Gerty, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    Vision: To create a cross-cutting Earth-based program to minimize cost and risk while maximizing the productivity of planetary exploration missions, by supporting precursor system development and carrying out system integration, testing, training, and public engagement as an integral part of the Vision for Space Exploration.

  18. New Public Analysis Environment for Galileo EPD Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Paranicas, C.; Mauk, B. H.; Decker, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    We will describe newly available Web-based software for accessing and analyzing the Galileo Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) data. The Galileo spacecraft made extensive measurements of the Jovian system beginning in 1995 and ending with Jupiter impact in 2003. EPD detected ions and electrons from the tens of keV to tens of MeV energy range, all with excellent pitch angle sampling. Ion composition was measured over a portion of the full energy range. EPD had two sampling modes: the so-called real time mode used for most of the mission and the record mode. This latter mode was used almost exclusively to obtain high time resolution data near the inner satellites of Jupiter. EPD data analysis and publications have covered a wide range of topics including the structure and dynamics of Jupiter’s magnetosphere, aurora, satellites, etc. These data will be highly relevant in preparation for NASA’s future flagship mission to Europa and ESA’s possible mission to Ganymede. Previously EPD data were available almost exclusively through the Planetary Data System (PDS) and to the instrument team through IDL-based software. We believe these modes have functioned very satisfactorily for users. However, at the same time, we have been developing a Web-based system that is very flexible for users and performs some functions, including pitch angle and quartile filtering and time weighting and binning, that are not available in the PDS. We have adapted this new Web-based software, MIDL, for the Galileo EPD data. MIDL allows the user to render the data in many different formats. For example, the user can look at color spectrograms of particle intensity as a function of the spacecraft position (in time, planetary radius, L, local time, etc.) and energy. The program allows the user to obtain ASCII versions of the plots as well for easy transfer to other analysis environments. While this tool is extremely easy to use, instructions are also provided. In this presentation, we will

  19. Environmental Assurance Program for the Phoenix Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin F.; Natour, Maher C.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars mission involves delivering a stationary science lander on to the surface of Mars in the polar region within the latitude band 65 deg N to 72 deg N. Its primary objective is to perform in-situ and remote sensing investigations that will characterize the chemistry of the materials at the local surface, subsurface, and atmosphere. The Phoenix spacecraft was launched on August 4, 2007 and will arrive at Mars in May 2008. The lander includes a suite of seven (7) science instruments. This mission is baselined for up to 90 sols (Martian days) of digging, sampling, and analysis. Operating at the Mars polar region creates a challenging environment for the Phoenix landed subsystems and instruments with Mars surface temperature extremes between -120 deg C to 25 deg C and diurnal thermal cycling in excess of 145 deg C. Some engineering and science hardware inside the lander were qualification tested up to 80 deg C to account for self heating. Furthermore, many of the hardware for this mission were inherited from earlier missions: the lander from the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 (MSP'01) and instruments from the MSP'01 and the Mars Polar Lander. Ensuring all the hardware was properly qualified and flight acceptance tested to meet the environments for this mission required defining and implementing an environmental assurance program that included a detailed heritage review coupled with tailored flight acceptance testing. A heritage review process with defined acceptance success criteria was developed and is presented in this paper together with the lessons learned in its implementation. This paper also provides a detailed description of the environmental assurance program of the Phoenix Mars mission. This program includes assembly/subsystem and system level testing in the areas of dynamics, thermal, and electromagnetic compatibility, as well as venting/pressure, dust, radiation, and meteoroid analyses to meet the challenging environment of this mission.

  20. GPHS-RTG launch accident analysis for Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, C.T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the safety program conducted to determine the response of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to potential launch accidents of the Space Shuttle for the Galileo and Ulysses missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided definition of the Shuttle potential accidents and characterized the environments. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program (LASEP) was developed by GE to analyze the RTG response to these accidents. RTG detailed response to Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragment impacts, as well as to other types of impact, was obtained from an extensive series of hydrocode analyses. A comprehensive test program was conducted also to determine RTG response to the accident environments. The hydrocode response analyses coupled with the test data base provided the broad range response capability which was implemented in LASEP.

  1. Ganymede Galileo Regio High Resolution Mosaic Shown in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Ancient impact craters shown in this image of Jupiter's moon Ganymede taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft testify to the great age of the terrain, dating back several billion years. At the margin at the left, half of a 19-kilometer-diameter (12-mile) crater is visible. The dark and bright lines running from lower right to upper left and from top to bottom are deep furrows in the ancient crust of dirty water ice. The origin of the dark material is unknown, but it may be accumulated dark fragments from many meteorites that hit Ganymede. In this view, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left about 58 degrees above the horizon. The area shown is part of Ganymede's Galileo Regio region at latitude 18 degrees north, longitude 147 degrees west; it is about 46 by 64 kilometers (29 by 38 miles) in extent. Resolution is about 80 meters (262 feet) per pixel. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7.563 kilometers (4,700 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http:// www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  2. Changes east of Pele between Galileo's first two orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Detail of changes east of Pele on Jupiter's moon Io as seen by NASA's Galileo spacecraft between June (left) and September (right) 1996. The caldera at the center of the images that changes from bright to dark is approximately 80 kilometers in diameter. Some scientists speculate that this brightness (albedo) change might be due to flooding of the crater floor by lava. The left frame was reprojected and stretched to match the geometry and average colors of the right frame. Before this stretch, the earlier image (left) was significantly redder than the later image (right); this may be due to variations in lighting. Both frames were created with images from the Galileo Solid State Imaging system's near-infrared (756 nm), green, and violet filters. North is to the top of both frames.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  3. NASA selects asteroid mission for New Frontiers Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-06-01

    NASA has selected an unmanned mission to study and return samples from a carbonaceous asteroid as the third mission in its New Frontiers Program, the agency announced on 25 May. The Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) is scheduled for a 2016 launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., and a 2023 return to Utah's Test and Training Range. It will be the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth and the first to return asteroid samples that could help scientists understand organics on Earth. The mission aims to sample the approximately 1900-foot-diameter asteroid, 1999 RQ36, which is named for the year it was discovered. This asteroid is “kind of a time capsule from 4.5 billion years ago, when the solar system formed,” according to OSIRIS-REx principal investigator Michael Drake, director of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona, Tucson, which NASA selected to lead the mission. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., is managing the mission, and Lockheed Martin will build the spacecraft. The mission is expected to cost $800 million, excluding the $1 billion launch vehicle.

  4. A Participating Scientist Program for the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Geldazhler, B. G.

    2003-01-01

    It is the Policy of NASA s Office of Space Science to emphasize and encourage the addition of Participating Scientist Programs (PSP s) to broaden the scientific impact of missions. A Participating Scientist Program for the STARDUST Mission: STARDUST is the fourth Discovery mission, and it is the first sample return mission selected within the Discovery Program. The STARDUST Spacecraft will fly through the coma of comet PIwildt-2 in early January 2004, and return the samples to the Earth in January 2006. The Principal Investigator of the STARDUST mission, Dr. Donald Brownlee, has generously requested the implementation of a PSP for STARDUST in order to provide more community participation in the initial characterization and analysis of the samples from PIwildt-2. In particular participating scientists will fill out the membership of the Preliminary Examination Team (PET) called for in the original 1994 STARDUST proposal accepted by NASA in 1995. The work of the PET will be organized around major subdiscipline areas such as mineralogy and petrology, isotopic abundances, and elemental composition. There will be leaders for each of these areas, and also a number of team members within each. Support will be commensurate with the level of participation.

  5. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  6. Development and Use of the Galileo and Ulysses Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Gary L; Hemler, Richard J; Schock, Alfred

    1994-10-01

    Paper presented at the 45th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, October 1994. The Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Ulysses mission to explore the polar regions of the Sun required a new power source: the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generator (GPHS-RTG), the most powerful RTG yet flow. Four flight-qualified GPHS-RTGs were fabricated with one that is being used on Ulysses, two that are being used on Galileo and one that was a common spare (and is now available for the Cassini mission to Saturn). In addition, and Engineering Unit and a Qualification Unit were fabricated to qualify the design for space through rigorous ground tests. This paper summarizes the ground testing and performance predictions showing that the GPHS-RTGs have met and will continue to meet or exceed the performance requirements of the ongoing Galileo and Ulysses missions. There are two copies in the file.

  7. Bridging the Divide: Mission and Revenue in Museum Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Margaret W.

    2010-01-01

    At a time of economic recession, museums are called upon more than ever to demonstrate their public value while simultaneously finding funding for their work. This series of case studies examines how three museums balance mission-based programming with generating revenue for their organizations. The Newseum, in Washington, DC, has repurposed…

  8. Galileo's Observations of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standish, E. M.

    2001-11-01

    In 1979, Stillman Drake and Charles Kowal found that the astronomer Galileo actually observed the planet Neptune in the years 1612 and 1613. Galileo's observing notebooks still exist and are preserved in the National Central Library in Florence, Italy. In them, one can see the discovery of the four large moons of Jupiter, and one can follow the subsequent work of Galileo as he improved his telescopes, charted the nightly positions of the satellites, and refined his ability to predict their future configurations. One sees his observing innovations and improving accuracies which seem to reach a crescendo just at the time of his observations of Neptune. Further scrutiny of Galileo's notebooks has revealed other intriguing observations. One is a probable fourth observation of Neptune which has a direct bearing upon present-day ephemerides. There are also observations of two other objects which, to this day, despite some effort, remain unidentified - possibly asteroids, comets, novae, or supernovae. More than of just historical interest, Galileo's work still has important implications for present-day astronomy. The research described in this talk was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Optimizing the Galileo space communication link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statman, J. I.

    1994-02-01

    The Galileo mission was originally designed to investigate Jupiter and its moons utilizing a high-rate, X-band (8415 MHz) communication downlink with a maximum rate of 134.4 kb/sec. However, following the failure of the high-gain antenna (HGA) to fully deploy, a completely new communication link design was established that is based on Galileo's S-band (2295 MHz), low-gain antenna (LGA). The new link relies on data compression, local and intercontinental arraying of antennas, a (14,1/4) convolutional code, a (255,M) variable-redundancy Reed-Solomon code, decoding feedback, and techniques to reprocess recorded data to greatly reduce data losses during signal acquisition. The combination of these techniques will enable return of significant science data from the mission.

  10. Optimizing the Galileo Space Communication Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statman, J. I.

    1993-10-01

    The Galileo mission was originally designed to investigate Jupiter and its moons utilizing a high-rate, X-band (8415 MHz) communication downlink with a maximum rate of 134.4 kb/sec. However, following the failure of the high-gain antenna. (HGA) to fully deploy, a completely new communication link design was established that is based on Galileo's S-band (2295 MHz), low-gain antenna (LGA). The new link relies on data compression, local and intercontinental arraying of antennas, a (14,1/4) convolutional code, a (255,M) variable-redundancy Reed-Solomon code, decoding feedback, and techniques to reprocess recorded data to greatly reduce data losses during signal acquisition. The combination of these techniques will enable return of significant science data from the mission.

  11. Optimizing the Galileo space communication link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo mission was originally designed to investigate Jupiter and its moons utilizing a high-rate, X-band (8415 MHz) communication downlink with a maximum rate of 134.4 kb/sec. However, following the failure of the high-gain antenna (HGA) to fully deploy, a completely new communication link design was established that is based on Galileo's S-band (2295 MHz), low-gain antenna (LGA). The new link relies on data compression, local and intercontinental arraying of antennas, a (14,1/4) convolutional code, a (255,M) variable-redundancy Reed-Solomon code, decoding feedback, and techniques to reprocess recorded data to greatly reduce data losses during signal acquisition. The combination of these techniques will enable return of significant science data from the mission.

  12. Astrotech 21: A technology program for future astrophysics missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Newton, George P.

    1991-01-01

    The Astrotech 21 technology program is being formulated to enable a program of advanced astrophysical observatories in the first decade of the 21st century. This paper describes the objectives of Astrotech 21 and the process that NASA is using to plan and implement it. It also describes the future astrophysical mission concepts that have been defined for the twenty-first century and discusses some of the requirements that they will impose on information systems for space astrophysics.

  13. Orbital rendezvous mission planning using mixed integer nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Guo-jin; Luo, Ya-Zhong; Li, Hai-yang

    2011-04-01

    The rendezvous and docking mission is usually divided into several phases, and the mission planning is performed phase by phase. A new planning method using mixed integer nonlinear programming, which investigates single phase parameters and phase connecting parameters simultaneously, is proposed to improve the rendezvous mission's overall performance. The design variables are composed of integers and continuous-valued numbers. The integer part consists of the parameters for station-keeping and sensor-switching, the number of maneuvers in each rendezvous phase and the number of repeating periods to start the rendezvous mission. The continuous part consists of the orbital transfer time and the station-keeping duration. The objective function is a combination of the propellant consumed, the sun angle which represents the power available, and the terminal precision of each rendezvous phase. The operational requirements for the spacecraft-ground communication, sun illumination and the sensor transition are considered. The simple genetic algorithm, which is a combination of the integer-coded and real-coded genetic algorithm, is chosen to obtain the optimal solution. A practical rendezvous mission planning problem is solved by the proposed method. The results show that the method proposed can solve the integral rendezvous mission planning problem effectively, and the solution obtained can satisfy the operational constraints and has a good overall performance.

  14. MIRACAL: A mission radiation calculation program for analysis of lunar and interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Striepe, Scott A.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1992-01-01

    A computational procedure and data base are developed for manned space exploration missions for which estimates are made for the energetic particle fluences encountered and the resulting dose equivalent incurred. The data base includes the following options: statistical or continuum model for ordinary solar proton events, selection of up to six large proton flare spectra, and galactic cosmic ray fluxes for elemental nuclei of charge numbers 1 through 92. The program requires an input trajectory definition information and specifications of optional parameters, which include desired spectral data and nominal shield thickness. The procedure may be implemented as an independent program or as a subroutine in trajectory codes. This code should be most useful in mission optimization and selection studies for which radiation exposure is of special importance.

  15. Changes on Io between Voyager 1 and Galileo's second orbit around an unnamed vent North of

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Detail of changes around a probable vent about 650 kilometers north of Prometheus on Jupiter's moon Io as seen in images obtained by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in April 1979 (left) and the imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 7th, 1996 (right). The re-arranging of dark and light radial surface patterns may be a result of plume fallout. North is to the top of both images which are approximately 400 kilometers square.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  16. Postflight analysis for Delta Program Mission no. 113: COS-B Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    On 8 August 1975, the COS-B spacecraft was launched successfully from the Western Test Range (Delta Program Mission No. 113). The launch vehicle was a three stage Extended Long Tank Delta DSV-3P-11B vehicle. Postflight analyses performed in connection with flight are presented. Vehicle trajectory, stage performance, vehicle reliability and the propulsion, guidance, flight control, electronics, mechanical and structural systems are evaluated.

  17. Galileo: A Reverie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C.

    2011-06-01

    One day, I'm musing about the vast progress in astronomy in 400 years since Galileo first used the telescope. How would he react to mirrors as large as a small house and telescopes in space and observatories that detect waves billions of times larger and millions of times smaller than the eye can see? In the reverie, Galileo is beside me, in the flesh and in his prime. He looks at me quizzically and asks what we've learned and how our methods have evolved since he published his first telescopic observations.

  18. Popular perceptions of Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Dava

    2010-01-01

    Among the most persistent popular misperceptions of Galileo is the image of an irreligious scientist who opposed the Catholic Church and was therefore convicted of heresy-was even excommunicated, according to some accounts, and denied Christian burial. In fact, Galileo considered himself a good Catholic. He accepted the Bible as the true word of God on matters pertaining to salvation, but insisted Scripture did not teach astronomy. Emboldened by his discovery of the Medicean Moons, he took a stand on Biblical exegesis that has since become the official Church position.

  19. The New Millenium Program ST-5 Mission: Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program has recently selected the Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer (NCT) as its fifth mission (ST-5). NCT will consist of 3 small, very capable and highly autonomous satellites which will be operated as a single "constellation" with minimal ground operations support. Each spacecraft will be approximately 40 cm in diameter by 20 cm in height and weigh only 20 kg. These small satellites will incorporate 8 new technologies essential to the further miniaturization of space science spacecraft which need space flight validation. In this talk we will describe in greater detail the NCT mission concept and goals, the exciting new technologies it will validate, and the role of miniaturized particles and fields sensors in this project. Finally, NCT's pathfinder function for such future NASA missions as Magnetotail Constellation and Inner Magnetosphere Constellation will be discussed.

  20. Learning To Lead: The Galileo Leadership Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloosterhouse, Vicki

    2003-01-01

    Describes Michigan's Galileo Leadership Academy, a collaboration between K-12 and community college educators that develops leadership skills. Explains that 11 organizations participate in the program, and every two years each organization chooses five to nine leaders (primarily classroom educators) to be part of a new cohort. Asserts that the…

  1. Reassessing the Crater Distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: Results from Voyager and Galileo, and an Outlook to ESA's JUICE Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Neukum, Gerhard; Werner, Stephanie C.; Ivanov, Boris A.; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Crater distributions and origin of potential impactors on the Galilean satellites has been an issue of controversial debate. In this work, we review the current knowledge of the cratering record on Ganymede and Callisto and present strategies for further studies using images from ESA’s JUICE mission to Jupiter. Crater distributions in densely cratered units on these two satellites show a complex shape between 20 m and 200 km crater diameter, similar to lunar highland distributions implying impacts of members of a collisionally evolved projectile family. Also, the complex shape predominantly indicates production distributions. No evidence for apex-antapex asymmetries in crater frequency was found, therefore the majority of projectiles (a) preferentially impacted from planetocentric orbits, or (b) the satellites were rotating non-synchronously during a time of heavy bombardment. The currently available imaging data are insufficient to investigate in detail significant changes in the shape of crater distributions with time. Clusters of secondary craters are well mappable and excluded from crater counts, lack of sufficient image coverage at high resolution, however, in many cases impedes the identification of source craters. ESA’s future JUICE mission will study Ganymede as the first icy satellite in the outer Solar system from an orbit under stable viewing conditions. Measurements of crater distributions can be carried out based on global geologic mapping at highest spatial resolutions (10s of meters down to 3 m/pxl).

  2. NASA's Living with a Star Program: The Geospace Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Giles, Barbara; Zanetti, Lawrence; Spann, James; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living with a Star Program (LWS) to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. This will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. Three program elements are the Science Missions; a Theory, Modeling, and Data Analysis program; and a Space Environment Testbeds program. Because many of the effects of solar variability on humanity are observed in Geospace regions of space, the science research for all three elements of the LWS Program have significant components in Geospace regions.

  3. The NASA Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Mission Assurance Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, NASA established the Commercial Crew Program in order to provide human access to the International Space Station and low earth orbit via the commercial (non-governmental) sector. A particular challenge to NASA has been how to determine the commercial providers transportation system complies with Programmatic safety requirements. The process used in this determination is the Safety Technical Review Board which reviews and approves provider submitted Hazard Reports. One significant product of the review is a set of hazard control verifications. In past NASA programs, 100 percent of these safety critical verifications were typically confirmed by NASA. The traditional Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) model does not support the nature of the Commercial Crew Program. To that end, NASA SMA is implementing a Risk Based Assurance (RBA) process to determine which hazard control verifications require NASA authentication. Additionally, a Shared Assurance Model is also being developed to efficiently use the available resources to execute the verifications. This paper will describe the evolution of the CCP Mission Assurance process from the beginning of the Program to its current incarnation. Topics to be covered include a short history of the CCP; the development of the Programmatic mission assurance requirements; the current safety review process; a description of the RBA process and its products and ending with a description of the Shared Assurance Model.

  4. Galileo Station Keeping Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Cambriles, Antonio; Bejar-Romero, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Taboada, Daniel; Perez-Lopez, Fernando; Navarro, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents analyses done for the design and implementation of the Maneuver Planning software of the Galileo Flight Dynamics Facility. The station keeping requirements of the constellation have been analyzed in order to identify the key parameters to be taken into account in the design and implementation of the software.

  5. Exploring Galileo's Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, Samuele; Terzuoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    In the first months of 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, the authors developed an educational project for middle-level students connected with the first astronomical discoveries that Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) made 400 years ago. The project included the construction of a basic telescope and the observation of the Moon. The project, if…

  6. Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies is an excerpt from Galileo 1610. Galileo 1610 is a dramatic, musical and intellectual odyssey back to the life and times of Galileo Galilei, the famous 17th century Italian scientist and philosopher. It commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's discoveries with his telescope in 1610. Dressed in authentic Renaissance attire as Galileo, the author-- a cantorial soloist and amateur astronomer-- tells the fascinating story of "The Father of Modern Science,” drawing from the actual correspondence and writings of Galileo, as well as those of his many biographers. Through his dialogue with the audience on a wide range of discoveries and opinions, "Galileo” shares his wisdom and his life experiences with pathos, wit and humor, lacing his narration with entertaining lute songs from the late Renaissance period, some of which were actually composed by Galileo's father, Vincenzo. Bridging the past to the present, the author breathes life into "Galileo” as he once again frolics and struggles among us. In bringing forth some of life's great issues, we learn something about our own inquisitive nature, as well as that of science and music. The author has appeared as Galileo for over a decade on radio, at community theatres and libraries, public schools, colleges and universities throughout the country. He has performed for civic organizations, astronomy association conventions, marketing and outreach programs as well as private events and parties. Galileo 1610 is suitable for a variety of educational and entertainment programs, for both children and adults. All presentations are tailored to fit the interest, experience and size of the audience.

  7. Comet and Asteroid Missions in NASA's New Millennium Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) is designed to develop, test, and flight validate new, advanced technologies for planetary and Earth exploration missions, using a series of low cost spacecraft. Two of NMP's current missions include encounters with comets and asteroids. The Deep Space 1 mission was launched on October 24, 1998 and will fly by asteroid 1992 KD on July 29, 1999, and possibly Comet Wilson-Harrington and/or Comet Borrelly in 2001. The Space Technology 4/Champollion mission will be launched in April, 2003 and will rendezvous with, orbit and land on periodic Comet Tempel 1 in 2006. ST-4/Champollion is a joint project with CNES, the French space agency. The DS-1 mission is going well since launch and has already validated several major technologies, including solar electric propulsion (SEP), solar concentrator arrays, a small deep space transponder, and autonomous navigation. The spacecraft carries two scientific instruments: MICAS, a combined visible camera and UV and IR spectrometers, and PEPE, an ion and electron spectrometer. Testing of the science instruments is ongoing. Following the asteroid encounter in July, 1999, DS-1 will go on to encounters with one or both comets if NASA approves funding for an extended mission. The ST-4/Champollion mission will use an advanced, multi-engine SEP system to effect a rendezvous with Comet P/Tempel 1 in February, 2006, after a flight time of 2.8 years. After orbiting the comet for several months in order to map its surface and determine its gravity field, ST-4/Chainpollion will descend to the comet's surface and will anchor itself with a 3-meter long harpoon. Scientific experiments include narrow and wide angle cameras for orbital mapping, panoramic and near-field cameras for landing site mapping, a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, a combined microscope and infrared spectrometer, and physical properties probes. Cometary samples will be obtained from depths up to 1.4 meters. The spacecraft is solar powered

  8. Gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations with Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Armstrong, J. W.; Campbell, J. K.; Estabrook, F. B.; Krisher, T. P.; Lau, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    The gravitation and celestial mechanics investigations that are to be conducted during the cruise and Orbiter phases of the Galileo Mission cover four investigation categories: (1) the gravity fields of Jupiter and its four major satellites; (2) a search for gravitational radiation; (3) mathematical modeling of general relativistic effects on Doppler ranging data; and (4) improvements of the Jupiter ephemeris via Orbiter ranging. Also noted are two secondary objectives, involving a range fix during Venus flyby and the determination of the earth's mass on the bases of the two earth gravity assists used by the mission.

  9. Mission design applications of QUICK. [software for interactive trajectory calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, David L.; Bass, Laura E.; Byrnes, Dennis V.; Cheng, Jeannie T.; Fordyce, Jess E.; Knocke, Philip C.; Lyons, Daniel T.; Pojman, Joan L.; Stetson, Douglas S.; Wolf, Aron A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of an interactive software environment for space mission design termed QUICK is presented. This stand-alone program provides a programmable FORTRAN-like calculator interface to a wide range of both built-in and user defined functions. QUICK has evolved into a general-purpose software environment that can be intrinsically and dynamically customized for a wide range of mission design applications. Specific applications are described for some space programs, e.g., the earth-Venus-Mars mission, the Cassini mission to Saturn, the Mars Observer, the Galileo Project, and the Magellan Spacecraft.

  10. Galilean satellite ephemeris improvement using Galileo tour encounter information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, D. W.; Jacobson, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate navigation of the satellite tour portion of the Galileo mission requires an accurate ephemeris of the Galilean satellites. The ephemeris is updated using radiometric and optical tracking data acquired during the satellite tour. The improved accuracy of the satellite ephemeris leads to improved targeting accuracy at subsequent encounters. The Galileo mission will benefit from improved targeting accuracy through reduced propellant costs and improved pointing accuracy. The predicted error in the updated ephemeris can be less than approximations inherent in the analytical theory used for the ephemeris, so an alternate numerical representation is applied. This alternate description shows promise but also raises questions of numerical stability.

  11. Galileo NIMS Observations of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, J. H.; Ocampo, A. C.; Carlson, R. W.

    2000-10-01

    The Galileo spacecraft began its tour of the Jovian system in December, 1995. The Galileo Millenium Mission (GMM) is scheduled to end in January, 2003. The opportunities to observe Europa in the remaining orbits are severely limited. Thus the catalog of NIMS observations of Europa is virtually complete. We summarize and describe this extraordinary dataset, which consists of 77 observations. The observations may be grouped in three categories, based on the scale of the data (km/pixel). The highest-resolution observations, with projected scales of 1-9 km/pixel, comprise one important subset of the catalog. These 29 observations sample both leading and trailing hemispheres at low and high latitudes. They have been employed in studies exploring the chemical composition of the non-ice surface materials on Europa (McCord et al., 1999, JGR 104, 11,827; Carlson et al., 1999, Science 286, 97). A second category consists of regional observations at moderate resolution. These 15 observations image Europa's surface at scales of 15-50 km/pixel, appropriate for construction of regional and global mosaics. A gap in coverage for longitudes 270-359 W may be partially filled during the 34th orbit of GMM. The final category consists of 33 global observations with scales ranging upward from 150 km/pixel. The noise levels are typically much reduced in comparison to observations taken deep within Jupiter's magnetosphere. Distant observations obtained during the 11th orbit revealed the presence of hydrogen peroxide on Europa's surface (Carlson et al., 1999b, Science 283, 2062). NIMS observations are archived in ISIS-format "cubes," which are available to researchers through the Planetary Data System (http://www-pdsimage.jpl.nasa.gov/PDS/Public/Atlas/Atlas.html). Detailed guides to every NIMS observation may be downloaded from the NIMS web site (http://jumpy.igpp.ucla.edu/ nims/).

  12. The New Millennium Program Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Evan H.; Carlisle, Candace C.; Slavin, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project is part of NASA's New Millennium Program. ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three 25kg microsatellites. The mission goals are to demonstrate the research-quality science capability of the ST-5 spacecraft; to operate the three spacecraft as a constellation; and to design, develop and flight-validate three capable microsatellites with new technologies. ST-5 will be launched by a Pegasus XL into an elliptical polar (sun-synchronous) orbit. The three-month flight demonstration phase, beginning in March 2006, will validate the ability to perform science measurements, as well as the technologies and constellation operations. ST-5's technologies and concepts will enable future microsatellite science missions.

  13. The cryogenics analysis program for Apollo mission planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W.; Williams, J.

    1971-01-01

    The cryogenics analysis program was developed as a simplified tool for use in premission planning operations for the Apollo command service module. Through a dynamic development effort, the program has been extended to include real time and postflight analysis capabilities with nominal and contingency planning features. The technical aspects of the program and a comparison of ground test and mission data with data generated by using the cryogenics analysis program are presented. The results of the program capability to predict flight requirements also are presented. Comparisons of data from the program with data from flight results, from a tank qualifications program, and from various system anomalies that have been encountered are discussed. Future plans and additional considerations for the program also are included. Among these plans are a three tank management scheme for hydrogen, venting profile generation for Skylab, and a capability for handling two gas atmospheres. The plan for two gas atmospheres will involve the addition of the capability to handle nitrogen as well as oxygen and hydrogen.

  14. Galileo's wondrous telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2008-06-01

    If you need reminding of just how wrong the great and the good can be, take a trip to the Museum of the History of Science in Florence, Italy. The museum is staging an exhibition entitled "Galileo's telescope - the instrument that changed the world" to mark the 400th anniversary this year of Galileo Galilei's revolutionary astronomical discoveries, which were made possible by the invention of the telescope. At the start of the 17th century, astronomers assumed that all the planets and the stars in the heavens had been identified and that there was nothing new for them to discover, as the exhibition's curator, Giorgio Strano, points out. "No-one could have imagined what wondrous new things were about to be revealed by an instrument created by inserting two eyeglass lenses into the ends of a tube," he adds.

  15. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This videotape is a continuation of tape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036029. When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, the project scientist and engineers gather together with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received. This videotape presents the last part of that meeting, which culminates in the announcement of the confirmation of the fly-by, and a review of the current trajectory status.

  16. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  17. Galileo as a Patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiene, G.; Basso, C.

    2011-06-01

    The clinical history of Galileo, as it turns out from hundred letters he wrote and received, is so informative as to make it possible to delineate the natural history of his body. It is well known that he suffered from recurrent episodes of fever (terzana) since 1606, when he was in Florence as guest of Cristina Lorena for education of the future granduke Cosimo II. By reading signs and symptoms he reported several times, it is clear that he had various diseases (rheumatism, haemorroids, kidney stones, arrhythmias). When in December 1632, at the age of 68, Galileo delayed his journey to Rome claiming sickness, Pope Urban VIII committed 3 physicians to examine him. They reported that Galileo was affected by "pulsus intermittens" (most probably atrial fibrillation), large hernia at risk of rupture, dizziness, diffuse pain, hypochondriacal melancholy as a consequence of the "declining age". It was in February 1637 that he started to have eye disease with lacrimation and progressive loss of sight, which in 10 months led to loose at first the right eye and then also the left one. According to the consultation, asked at distance to Giovanni Trullio on February 1538 in Rome, the diagnosis of blindness due to bilateral uveitis came out. Keeping with the current medicine, the illnes might have been explained in the setting of an immune rheumatic disease (Reiter's syndrome). The cause of Galileo's death, which occurred on 8 January 1642 at the age of 78, is not known since it was not submitted to autopsy. We can speculate cardiac death due to pneumonia complicating congestive heart failure.

  18. Project Galileo: completing Europa, preparing for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. K.; Cox, Z. N.; Paczkowski, B. G.; Sible, R. W.; Theilig, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo has completed the Europa leg of the Galileo Europa Mission, and is now pumping down the apojove in each succeeding orbit in preparation for the Io phase. Including three encounters earlier in the primary mission, the total of ten close passes by Europa have provided a wealth of interesting and provocative information about this intriguing body. The results presented include new and exciting information about Europa's interactions with Jupiter's magnetosphere, its interior structure, and its tantalizing surface features, which strongly hint at a watery subsurface layer. Additional data concerning Callisto, and its own outlook for a subsurface ocean are also presented. In addition the engineering aspects of operating the spacecraft during the past year are explored, as well as a brief examination of what will be the challenges to prepare for the Io encounters. The steadily increasing radiation dosage that the spacecraft is experiencing is well beyond the original design parameters, and is contributing to a number of spacecraft problems and concerns. The ability of the flight team to analyze and solve these problems, even at the reduced staffing levels of an extended mission, is a testament to their tenacity and loyalty to the mission. The engineering data being generated by these continuing radiation-induced anomalies will prove invaluable to designers of future spacecraft to Jupiter and its satellites. The lessons learned during this arduous process are presented. c 2000 International Astronautical Federation. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Shuttle Atlantis to deploy Galileo probe toward Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of Space Shuttle Mission STS-34 are described along with major flight activities, prelaunch and launch operations, trajectory sequence of events, and landing and post-landing operations. The primary objective of STS-34 is to deploy the Galileo planetary exploration spacecraft into low earth orbit. Following deployment, Galileo will be propelled on a trajectory, known as Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA), by an inertial upper stage (IUS). The objectives of the Galileo mission are to study the chemical composition, state, and dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere and satellites, and investigate the structure and physical dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere. Secondary STS-34 payloads include the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) instrument; the Mesoscale Lightning Experiment (MLE); and various other payloads involving polymer morphology, the effects of microgravity on plant growth hormone, and the growth of ice crystals.

  20. Scientific returns from a program of space missions to comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of cometary missions is proposed. The nature and size of interstellar dust, its origin and evolution; identification of new interstellar molecules; clarification of interstellar chemistry; accretion of grains into protosolar cometesimals; role of a T Tauri wind in the dissipation of the protosolar nebula; record of isotopic anomalies, better preserved in comets than in meteorites; cosmogenic and radiogenic dating of comets; cosmochronology and mineralogy of meteorites, as compared with that of cometary samples; origin of the earth's biosphere, and the origin of life are topics discussed in relation to comet exploration.

  1. Status of Validation Program for Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is in its sixth year of operation. This successful research mission, a joint U.S./Japan effort, has become-a key element in the routine monitoring of global precipitation. The package of rain measuring instrumentation, including the first meteorological radar in space, continues to function perfectly, and with the increase in orbital altitude (from 350 km to 400 km) the mission will hopefully continue for a number of years. The validation effort has been a combination of routine use of 1) ground-based radar and raingauge measurements for comparison with the satellite-based estimates, 2) the use of field experiment data for evaluation of the satellite data products and investigation of some of the assumptions in the satellite retrievals, and 3) use of other comparison data sets, including atoll and buoy gauges over ocean and research and operational gauge data sets over land. The status of the program will be described along with "lessons learned". Near term plans for improved validation products and new thrusts related to validation of TRMM-based multi-satellite products that extend into middle latitudes will be outlined.

  2. Brecht's Galileo: A revisionist view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeer, Dietrich

    1980-02-01

    Galileo is often claimed by scientists to be the first modern physicist, and because of his conflict with the Catholic Church is seen as a heroic figure fighting for the independence of pure science. Brecht, in his play Galileo, has presented a revisionist view of Galileo. This view developed over several versions of the play, and finally used him as a symbol for all scientists who reject social responsibility for their work. Is this revisionist view of Galileo any more distorted than the portrayal of him as the patron saint of modern science?

  3. Mission Preparation Program for Exobiological Experiments in Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Horneck, Gerda; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra

    The ESA facilities EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-E on board of the the International Space Station ISS provide the technology for exposing chemical and biological samples in a controlled manner to outer space parameters, such as high vacuum, intense radiation of galactic and solar origin and microgravity. EXPOSE-E has been attached to the outer balcony of the European Columbus module of the ISS in Febraury 2008 and will stay for about 1 year in space, EXPOSE-R will be attached to the Russian Svezda module of the ISS in fall 2008. The EXPOSE facilities are a further step in the study of the Responses of Organisms to Space Environment (ROSE concortium). The results from the EXPOSE missions will give new insights into the survivability of terrestrial organisms in space and will contribute to the understanding of the organic chemistry processes in space, the biological adaptation strategies to extreme conditions, e.g. on early Earth and Mars, and the distribution of life beyond its planet of origin.To test the compatibility of the different biological and chemical systems and their adaptation to the opportunities and constraints of space conditions a profound ground support program has been developed. It resulted in several experiment verification tests EVTs and an experiment sequence test EST that were conducted in the carefully equipped and monitored planetary and space simulation facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Cologne, Germany. These ground based pre-flight studies allow the investigation of a much wider variety of samples and the selection of the most promising organisms for the flight experiment. The procedure and results of these EVT tests and EST will be presented. These results are an essential prerequisite for the success of the EXPOSE missions and have been done in parallel with the development and construction of the final hardware design of the facility. The results gained during the simulation experiments demonstrated mission

  4. Ganymede - Ancient Impact Craters in Galileo Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ancient impact craters shown in this image of Jupiter's moon Ganymede taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft testify to the great age of the terrain, dating back several billion years. At the margin at the left, half of a 19-kilometer-diameter (12-mile) crater is visible. The dark and bright lines running from lower right to upper left and from top to bottom are deep furrows in the ancient crust of dirty water ice. The origin of the dark material is unknown, but it may be accumulated dark fragments from many meteorites that hit Ganymede. In this view, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left about 58 degrees above the horizon. The area shown is part of Ganymede's Galileo Regio region at latitude 18 degrees north, longitude 147 degrees west; it is about 46 by 64 kilometers (29 by 38 miles) in extent. Resolution is about 80 meters (262 feet) per pixel. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7.563 kilometers (4,700 miles). The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  5. Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

    1993-03-01

    A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

  6. Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

    1993-01-01

    A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

  7. A Physical Validation Program for the GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2003-01-01

    of the lack of suitable error modeling systems incorporated into the validation programs and data distribution systems. An overview of how NASA intends to overcome this problem for the GPM mission using a physically-based error modeling approach within a multi-faceted validation program is described. The solution is to first identify specific user requirements and then determine the most stringent of these requirements that embodies all essential error characterization information needed by the entire user community. In the context of NASA s scientific agenda for the GPM mission, the most stringent user requirement is found within the data assimilation community. The fundamental theory of data assimilation vis-a-vis ingesting satellite precipitation information into the pre-forecast initializations is based on quantifying the conditional bias and precision errors of individual rain retrievals, and the space-time structure of the precision error (i.e., the spatial-temporal error covariance). By generating the hardware and software capability to produce this information in a near real-time fashion, and to couple the derived quantitative error properties to the actual retrieved rainrates, all key validation users can be satisfied. The talk will describe the essential components of the hardware and software systems needed to generate such near real-time error properties, as well as the various paradigm shifts needed within the validation community to produce a validation program relevant to the precipitation user community.

  8. In Galileo's footsteps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-03-01

    Astronomy can lay rightful claim to being the oldest science, with its foundations dating back even further than those of mathematics. From the ancient Babylonians who observed the regular motions of Venus to medieval Islamic scholars who had the first inklings of heliocentrism, the study of the skies has fascinated humankind. But 2009 - the International Year of Astronomy - commemorates an event central to the development of Western science: Galileo Galilei's first observations with a telescope in 1609. This year also marks the 400th anniversary of Johannes Kepler's Astronomia Nova, in which he outlined his laws of planetary motion.

  9. Integer cosine transform compression for Galileo at Jupiter: A preliminary look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekroot, L.; Dolinar, S.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo low-gain antenna mission has a severely rate-constrained channel over which we wish to send large amounts of information. Because of this link pressure, compression techniques for image and other data are being selected. The compression technique that will be used for images is the integer cosine transform (ICT). This article investigates the compression performance of Galileo's ICT algorithm as applied to Galileo images taken during the early portion of the mission and to images that simulate those expected from the encounter at Jupiter.

  10. Galileo probe relay receiver - Acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1983-01-01

    The probe-to-orbiter data link for the Jovian mission uses a Manchester encoded BPSK waveform which is demodulated by the Galileo probe relay receiver. Signal acquisition and tracking consists of a sequential probability ratio signal search, frequency acquisition with a least-squares estimator, wide-band phase lock acquisition, and a self-regulating mode control. A discrete Fourier transform serves as the basic mechanism to generate the algorithms that provide this orderly transition to phase tracking. Acquisition and tracking is addressed in this paper with emphasis on key algorithms, rationale, and theoretical/measured performance.

  11. Galileo spacecraft modeling for orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, Bruce A.; Nilsen, Erik N.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Jupiter orbital mission using the Low Gain Antenna (LGA) requires a higher degree of spacecraft state knowledge than was originally anticipated. Key elements of the revised design include onboard buffering of science and engineering data and extensive processing of data prior to downlink. In order to prevent loss of data resulting from overflow of the buffers and to allow efficient use of the spacecraft resources, ground based models of the spacecraft processes will be implemented. These models will be integral tools in the development of satellite encounter sequences and the cruise/playback sequences where recorded data is retrieved.

  12. The Galileo Energetic Particles Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Mcentire, R. W.; Jaskulek, S.; Wilken, B.

    1992-01-01

    Amongst its complement of particles and fields instruments, the Galileo spacecraft carries an Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) designed to measure the characteristics of particle populations important in determining the size, shape, and dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere. To do this the EPD provides 4pi angular coverage and spectral measurements for Z greater than or equal to 1 ions from 20 keV to 55 MeV, for electrons from 15 keV to greater than 11 MeV, and for the elemental species helium through iron from approximately 10 keV/nucl to 15 MeV/nucl. Two bidirectional telescopes, mounted on a stepping platform, employ magnetic deflection, energy loss versus energy, and time-of-flight techniques to provide 64 rate channels and pulse height analysis of priority selected events. The EPD data system provides a large number of possible operational modes from which a small number will be selected to optimize data collection during the many encounter and cruise phases of the mission. The EPD employs a number of safeing algorithms that are to be used in the event that its self-checking procedures indicate a problem. The instrument and its operation are described.

  13. Science investigation options with a NASA New Frontiers Program Saturn entry probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Atkinson, D. H.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.

    2012-09-01

    In 2011 the Space Studies Board of the US National Research Council released its report, "Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013- 2022" [1] (PSDS). This document is intended to be the guiding document for NASA's planetary science and space flight mission priorities for that decade. The PSDS treats three classes of flight missions: small, medium, and large. Small missions are ones that could be flown within the resource constraints of NASA's Discovery Program, a program of PI-led, competed missions, including a US 500 million (FY 2015) recommended cost cap, excluding the launch vehicle. The PSDS makes no specific recommendations for science objectives or destinations for small missions. Medium missions could be flown under NASA's New Frontiers Program, also a program of PI-led, competed missions, with a recommended cost cap of US 1 billion excluding the launch vehicle. Both of these competed mission programs have been highly successful, with multiple spacecraft currently in flight and more either under development or in the final steps of competition. Large missions, generally called flagship missions, would have total mission costs exceeding US $1 billion and would be directed by NASA, not PI-led. Unlike Small class missions, the PSDS recommends specific science objectives for Medium class missions. Four Medium class mission concepts and their science objectives carry over from the previous PSDS [2]: • Comet Surface Sample Return • Lunar South-Pole Aitken Basin Sample Return • Trojan Tour and Rendezvous • Venus In Situ Explorer The current PSDS adds a fifth mission concept to the list for the next New Frontiers Program AO ("NF-4"), currently anticipated in 2016: a Saturn probe mission. This mission would deliver an atmospheric entry probe into Saturn's atmosphere to make composition and atmospheric structure measurements critical to understanding the materials, processes, and time scales of Saturn's formation, and by comparison to

  14. Tracking the Galileo spacecraft with the DSCC Galileo Telemetry prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Shambayati, S.; Hardi, D. E.; Finley, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    On day of the year 062, 1994, a prototype of the Deep Space Communications Complex Galileo Telemetry subsystem successfully tracked and processed signals from the Galileo spacecraft, under fully suppressed-carrier modulation. The demonstration took place at Goldstone, employing the 70-m antenna and the 34-m high-efficiency antenna. This article presents the findings from that demonstration. Specific issues are the system performance in terms of signal-to-noise (SNR) degradation and the arraying gain. Validation of the test results is via symbol-error-rate measurement and the standard symbol SNR. The analysis is also extended to include characterization of the signal received from Galileo.

  15. Mission Analysis Program for Solar Electric Propulsion (MAPSEP). Volume 3: Program manual for earth orbital MAPSEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A revised user's manual for the computer program MAPSEP is presented. Major changes from the interplanetary version of MAPSEP are summarized. The changes are intended to provide a basic capability to analyze anticipated solar electric missions, and a foundation for future more complex, modifications. For Vol. III, N75-16589.

  16. Generalizing Galileo's Passe-Dix Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hombas, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    This article shows a generalization of Galileo's "passe-dix" game. The game was born following one of Galileo's [G. Galileo, "Sopra le Scoperte dei Dadi" (Galileo, Opere, Firenze, Barbera, Vol. 8). Translated by E.H. Thorne, 1898, pp. 591-594] explanations on a paradox that occurred in the experiment of tossing three fair "six-sided" dice.…

  17. Becoming Galileo in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    Galileo's contributions are so familiar as to be taken for granted, obscuring the exploratory process by which his discoveries arose. The wonder that Galileo experienced comes alive for undergraduates and teachers that I teach, when they find themselves taking Galileo's role by means of their own explorations. These classroom journeys include: sighting through picture frames to understand perspective, watching the night sky, experimenting with lenses and motion, and responding to Galileo's story. In teaching, I use critical exploration, the research pedagogy developed by Eleanor Duckworth that arose historically from both the clinical interviewing of Jean Piaget and B"arbel Inhelder and the Elementary Science Study of the 1960s. During critical explorations, the teacher supports students' investigations by posing provocative experiences while interactively following students' emergent understandings. In the context of Galileo, students learned to observe carefully, trust their observations, notice things they had never noticed before, and extend their understanding in the midst of pervasive confusion. Personal investment moved students to question assumptions that they had never critically evaluated. By becoming Galileo in today's classroom, we found the ordinary world no less intriguing and unsettling to explore, as the historical world of protagonists in Galileo's Dialogue.

  18. Trajectory optimization software for planetary mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amario, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development history and characteristics of the interactive trajectory-optimization programs MOSES (D'Amario et al., 1981) and PLATO (D'Amario et al., 1982) are briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on their application to the Galileo mission. The requirements imposed by a mission involving flybys of several planetary satellites or planets are discussed; the formulation of the parameter-optimization problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to the use of multiconic methods to model the gravitational attraction of Jupiter in MOSES. Diagrams and tables of numerical data are included.

  19. Science mentor program at Mission Hill Junior High School

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlquist, K.

    1994-12-31

    Science graduate students from the University of California at Santa Cruz mentor a class of 7th graders from the Mission Hill Junior High School. The program`s purpose is: (1) to create a scientific learning community where scientists interact at different levels of the educational hierarchy; (2) to have fun in order to spark interest in science; and (3) to support girls and minority students in science. A total of seven mentors met with the students at least once a week after school for one quarter to tutor and assist with science fair projects. Other activities included a field trip to a university earth science lab, judging the science fair, and assisting during laboratory exercises. Graduate students run the program with minimal organization and funding, communicating by electronic mail. An informal evaluation of the program by the mentors has concluded that the most valuable and effective activities have been the field trip and assisting with labs. The actual {open_quotes}mentor meetings{close_quotes} after school did not work effectively because they had a vaguely defined purpose and the kids did not show up regularly to participate. Future directions include redefining ourselves as mentors for the entire school instead of just one class and better coordinating our activities with the teachers` curriculum. We will continue to assist with the labs and organize formal tutoring for students having problems with math and science. Finally, we will arrange more activities and field trips such as an amateur astronomy night. We will especially target girls who attended the {open_quotes}Expanding Your Horizons{trademark} in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering{close_quotes} career day for those activities.

  20. IMPaCT - Integration of Missions, Programs, and Core Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balacuit, Carlos P.; Cutts, James A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Jones, Susan K.; Hang, Winnie N.; Dastur, Shahin D.

    2013-01-01

    IMPaCT enables comprehensive information on current NASA missions, prospective future missions, and the technologies that NASA is investing in, or considering investing in, to be accessed from a common Web-based interface. It allows dependencies to be established between missions and technology, and from this, the benefits of investing in individual technologies can be determined. The software also allows various scenarios for future missions to be explored against resource constraints, and the nominal cost and schedule of each mission to be modified in an effort to fit within a prescribed budget.

  1. Galileo radio science investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.; Kliore, A. J.; Lindal, G. F.; Woo, R.; Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Edenhoffer, P.; Paetzold, M.

    1992-01-01

    Galileo radio-propagation experiments are based on measurements of absolute and differential propagation time delay, differential phase delay, Doppler shift, signal strength, and polarization. These measurements can be used to study: the atmospheric and ionospheric structure, constituents, and dynamics of Jupiter; the magnetic field of Jupiter; the diameter of Io, its ionospheric structure, and the distribution of plasma in the Io torus; the diameters of the other Galilean satellites, certain properties of their surfaces, and possibly their atmospheres and ionospheres; and the plasma dynamics and magnetic field of the solar corona. The spacecraft system provides linear rather than circular polarization on the S-band downlink signal, the capability to receive X-band uplink signals, and a differential downlink ranging mode. A highly-stable, dual-frequency, spacecraft radio system is developed that is suitable for simultaneous measurements of all the parameters normally attributed to radio waves.

  2. GPM Mission, its Scientific Agenda, and its Ground Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    The GPM mission is currently planned for start in the late 2010 time frame. From the perspective of NASA s Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and within the framework of ESE's global water and energy cycle (GWEC) research program, its main scientific goal is to help answer pressing scientific problems concerning how global and regional water cycle processes and precipitation fluctuations and trends influence the variability intrinsic to climate, weather, and hydrology. These problems cut across a hierarchy of space-time scales and include improving understanding of climate-water cycle interactions, developing better techniques for incorporating satellite precipitation measurements into weather and climate predictions, and demonstrating that more accurate, more complete, and better sampled observations of precipitation and other water budget variables used as inputs can improve the ability of prognostic hydrometeorological models in the prediction of hazardous flood-producing storms, seasonal flood/draught conditions, and fresh water resource stores. The GPM mission will expand the scope of precipitation measurement through the use of a constellation of some 9 satellites, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like core satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band precipitation radar (DPR) and an advanced, multifrequency passive microwave radiometer with vertical-horizontal polarization discrimination (GMI). The other constellation members will include a combination of new dedicated satellites and co-existing operational/research satellites carrying similar (but not identical) passive microwave radiometers. The goal of the constellation is to achieve 3-hour sampling at any spot on the globe -- continuously. The constellation s orbit architecture will consist of a mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous satellites with the core satellite providing measurements of calibration-quality rainrates, plus cloud-precipitation microphysical processes, to be used in

  3. The Keys to Successful Extended Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, David A.; Manor-Chapman, Emily A.

    2012-01-01

    Many of NASA's successful missions of robotic exploration have gone on to highly productive mission extensions, from Voyager, Magellan, Ulysses, and Galileo, to the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, a variety of Mars orbiters, Spitzer, Deep Impact / EPOXI, and Cassini. These missions delivered not only a high science return during their prime science phase, but a wealth of opportunities during their extensions at a low incremental cost to the program. The success of such mission extensions can be traced to demonstration of new and unique science achievable during the extension; reduction in cost without significant increase in risk to spacecraft health; close inclusion of the science community and approval authorities in planning; intelligent design during the development and prime operations phase; and well crafted and conveyed extension proposals. This paper discusses lessons learned collected from a variety of project leaders which can be applied by current and future missions to maximize their chances of approval and success.

  4. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  5. Galileo multispectral imaging of Earth.

    PubMed

    Geissler, P; Thompson, W R; Greenberg, R; Moersch, J; McEwen, A; Sagan, C

    1995-08-25

    Nearly 6000 multispectral images of Earth were acquired by the Galileo spacecraft during its two flybys. The Galileo images offer a unique perspective on our home planet through the spectral capability made possible by four narrowband near-infrared filters, intended for observations of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere, which are not incorporated in any of the currently operating Earth orbital remote sensing systems. Spectral variations due to mineralogy, vegetative cover, and condensed water are effectively mapped by the visible and near-infrared multispectral imagery, showing a wide variety of biological, meteorological, and geological phenomena. Global tectonic and volcanic processes are clearly illustrated by these images, providing a useful basis for comparative planetary geology. Differences between plant species are detected through the narrowband IR filters on Galileo, allowing regional measurements of variation in the "red edge" of chlorophyll and the depth of the 1-micrometer water band, which is diagnostic of leaf moisture content. Although evidence of life is widespread in the Galileo data set, only a single image (at approximately 2 km/pixel) shows geometrization plausibly attributable to our technical civilization. Water vapor can be uniquely imaged in the Galileo 0.73-micrometer band, permitting spectral discrimination of moist and dry clouds with otherwise similar albedo. Surface snow and ice can be readily distinguished from cloud cover by narrowband imaging within the sensitivity range of Galileo's silicon CCD camera. Ice grain size variations can be mapped using the weak H2O absorption at 1 micrometer, a technique which may find important applications in the exploration of the moons of Jupiter. The Galileo images have the potential to make unique contributions to Earth science in the areas of geological, meteorological and biological remote sensing, due to the inclusion of previously untried narrowband IR filters. The vast scale and near global

  6. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  7. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  8. Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  9. Space Missions for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliffone, D. L.; Lum, H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is currently considering the establishment of a Space Mission for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program to define, develop, integrate, test, and operate a spaceborne national research facility for the validation of advanced automation and robotics technologies. Initially, the concept is envisioned to be implemented through a series of shuttle based flight experiments which will utilize telepresence technologies and real time operation concepts. However, eventually the facility will be capable of a more autonomous role and will be supported by either the shuttle or the space station. To ensure incorporation of leading edge technology in the facility, performance capability will periodically and systematically be upgraded by the solicitation of recommendations from a user advisory group. The facility will be managed by NASA, but will be available to all potential investigators. Experiments for each flight will be selected by a peer review group. Detailed definition and design is proposed to take place during FY 86, with the first SMART flight projected for FY 89.

  10. The effect of nitric acid exposure on Galileo spacecraft titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Tim; Yavrouian, Andre

    1990-01-01

    The Ti-6Al-4V-constructed retropropulsion-module tanks of the Galileo spacecraft were purged with nitrogen tetroxide in order to wait out a major launch rescheduling; nitric acid is among the residual products of such an operation. A test program was conducted on representative samples to ascertain the fracture toughness and stress corrosion threshold of the tanks' material, in view of Space Shuttle safety and mission-reliability requirements. It was found that the tanks' structural integrity was not degraded by nitric acid exposure.

  11. Thermo-optical vacuum testing of Galileo In-Orbit Validation laser retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnello, S.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Ciocci, E.; Contessa, S.; Delle Monache, G.; Lops, C.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Salvatori, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Intaglietta, N.; Tuscano, P.; Mondaini, C.; Maiello, M.; Doyle, D.; García-Prieto, R.; Navarro-Reyes, D.

    2016-06-01

    The Galileo constellation is a space research and development program of the European Union to help navigate users all over the world. The Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) are the first test satellites of the Galileo constellation and carry satellite laser retroreflectors as part of their payload systems for precision orbit determination and performance assessment. INFN-LNF SCF_Lab (Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and Cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory) has been performing tests on a sample of the laser array segment under the Thermo-optical vacuum testing of Galileo IOV laser retro-reflectors of Galileo IOV LRA project, as defined in ESA-INFN Contract No. 4000108617/13/NL/PA. We will present the results of FFDP (Far Field Diffraction Pattern) and thermal relaxation times measurements in relevant space conditions of Galileo IOV CCRs (Cube Corner Retroreflectors) provided by ESA-ESTEC. A reference for the performance of laser ranging on Galileo satellites is the FFDP of a retroreflector in its design specifications and a Galileo retroreflector, in air and isothermal conditions, should have a minimum return intensity within the range [ 0.55 ×106m2- 2.14 ×106m2 ] (ESA-INFN, 2013). Measurements, performed in SCF_Lab facility, demonstrated that the 7 Galileo IOV laser retroreflectors under test were compliant with design performance expectations (Porcelli et al., 2015). The kind of tests carried out for this activity are the first performed on spare Galileo IOV hardware, made available after the launch of the four Galileo IOV satellites (2011 and 2012), which were the operational core of the constellation. The characterisation of the retroreflectors against their design requirements is important because LRAs (Laser Retroreflector Arrays) will be flown on all Galileo satellites.

  12. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  13. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the eighth in an ongoing series addressing current topics and lessons learned in NASA program and project management. Articles in this volume cover the following topics: (1) power sources for the Galileo and Ulysses Missions; (2) managing requirements; (3) program control of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission; (4) project management method; (5) career development for project managers; and (6) resources for NASA managers.

  14. Galileo Earth Moon Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This video has five sections. The first is a live discussion of the information that scientists hope to gain by the Galileo flyby of the Moon. This section has no introduction. There is a great deal of the discussion about the lunar craters and lunar volcanism. There is also some discussion of the composition of the far side of the moon. The second section is a short animation that shows the final step to Jupiter with particular emphasis on the gravitational assisted velocity boost, which was planned to give the spacecraft the requisite velocity to make the trip to Jupiter. The next section is an update of the status of the flyby of the Moon, and the Earth, with an explanation of the trajectory around the earth, and the moon. A photograph of the tracking station in Canberra, Australia is included. The next section is a tour of a full-scale model of the spacecraft. The last section is a discussion with the person charged with the procurement of the instrumentation aboard the spacecraft; the importance of the lunar flyby to assist in the calibration of the instruments is discussed.

  15. Galileo's Encounter with Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Anderson, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Galileo's last science periapsis encounter with Jupiter before impact was on orbit 34. One of the main scientific goals of this encounter was a close, targeted flyby of the satellite Amalthea. Although two-way Doppler tracking was lost near closest approach, one-way data were obtained throughout the encounter. Together with solid two-way data before and after the encounter period, there is enough information to constrain the mass of the satellite. Together with previously determined shape and volume information these data yield a useful value for the density of this highly non-spherical moon. Preliminary analyses have been presented indicating a bulk density near 1 gm/cc, considerably lower than was expected from the satellite's dark albedo and anticipated rocky composition. Low-density rock or rock/ice mixtures combined with a high porosity, similar to that inferred from recent small asteroid data, are suggested as the most likely explanation. Refined estimates of mass and density as well as uncertainties will be presented and the implications for Amalthea's composition and porosity discussed.

  16. Products from NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program Applicable to Low-Cost Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David; Pencil, Eric J.; Glabb, Louis J.; Falck, Robert D.; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASAs In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing technologies for lowering the cost of planetary science missions. The technology areas include electric propulsion technologies, spacecraft bus technologies, entry vehicle technologies, and design tools for systems analysis and mission trajectories. The electric propulsion technologies include critical components of both gridded and non-gridded ion propulsion systems. The spacecraft bus technologies under development include an ultra-lightweight tank (ULTT) and advanced xenon feed system (AXFS). The entry vehicle technologies include the development of a multi-mission entry vehicle, mission design tools and aerocapture. The design tools under development include system analysis tools and mission trajectory design tools.

  17. Ganymede - Dark Terrain in Galileo Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This view of a part of the Galileo Regio region on Jupiter's moon Ganymede shows fine details of the dark terrain that makes up about half of the surface of the planet-sized moon. One of many ancient impact craters in the region is visible at the middle left. The crater is cut by numerous fractures, showing that the ancient crust was highly deformed early in Ganymede's history. Dark areas may have originated from dark material thrown off by dark meteorites hitting the surface in thousands of impact events. In this view, north is to the top and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left about 58 degrees above the horizon. The area shown, at latitude 19 degrees north, longitude 149 degrees west, is about 19 by 26 kilometers (12 by 16 miles); resolution is about 80 meters (262 feet) per pixel. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7.652 kilometers (4,755 miles). The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  18. The Galileo dust detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Fechtig, H.; Hanner, M. S.; Kissel, J.; Lindblad, B. A.; Linkert, D.; Maas, D.; Morfill, G. E.; Zook, H. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Galileo Dust Detector is intended to provide direct observations of dust grains with masses between 10(sup -19) kg and 10(sup -9) kg in interplanetary space and in the Jovian system, to investigate their physical and dynamical properties as functions of the distances to the Sun, to Jupiter and to its satellites, to study its interaction with the Galilean satellites and the Jovian magnetosphere. Surface phenomena of the satellites (like albedo variations), which might be effects of meteoroid impacts will be compared with the dust environment. Electric charges of particulate matter in the magnetosphere and its consequences will be studied; e.g. the effects of the magnetic field on the trajectories of dust particles and fragmentation of particles due to electrostatic disruption. The investigation is performed with an instrument that measures the mass, speed, flight direction and electric charge of individual dust particles. It is a multi-coincidence detector with a mass sensitivity 10(sup 6) times higher than that of previous in-situ experiments which measured dust in the outer solar system. The instrument weighs 4.2 kg, consumes 2.4 W, and has a normal data transmission rate of 24 bits/s in nominal spacecraft tracking mode. On December 29, 1989 the instrument was switched-on. After the instrument had been configured to flight conditions cruise science data collection started immediately. In the period to May 18, 1990 at least 168 dust impacts have been recorded. For 81 of these dust grains, masses and impact speeds have been determined. First flux values are also given.

  19. Astronomy sortie missions definition study. Volume 2, book 1: Astronomy sortie program technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work performed to arrive at a baseline astronomy sortie mission concept is summarized. The material includes: (1) definition of the telescopes and arrays; (2) preliminary definition of mission and systems; (3) identification, definition, and evaluation of alternative sortie programs; (4) the recommended astronomy sortie program; and (5) the astronomy sortie program concept that was approved as a baseline for the remainder of the project.

  20. Galileo, telescopic astronomy, and the Copernican system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, A.

    Contents: 1. Introduction. 2. Telescopic discoveries. 3. Sunspots, Copernicanism, and theology. 4. The decree of 1616. 5. The Dialogue. 6. The trial of Galileo. 7. The aftermath of the trial. 8. Telescopic astronomy after Galileo.

  1. Sea-Ice Mission Requirements for the US FIREX and Canada RADARSAT programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Ramseier, R. O.; Weeks, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A bilateral synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite program is defined. The studies include addressing the requirements supporting a SAR mission posed by a number of disciplines including science and operations in sea ice covered waters. Sea ice research problems such as ice information and total mission requirements, the mission components, the radar engineering parameters, and an approach to the transition of spacecraft SAR from a research to an operational tool were investigated.

  2. Electron environment specification models for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, Didier; Bourdarie, Sebastien; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Nieminen, Petteri

    The MEO radiation hazard is becoming an increasingly important consideration with an ever rising number of satellites missions spending most of their time in this environment. This region lies in the heart of the highly dynamic electron radiation belt, where very large radiation doses can be encountered unless proper shielding to critical systems and components is applied. Significant internal charging hazards also arise in the MEO regime. For electron environment specification at Galileo altitude, new models have been developed and implemented: long term effects model for dose evaluation, statistical model for internal charging analysis and latitudinal model for ELDRS analysis. Models outputs, tools and validation with observations (Giove-A data) and existing models (such as FLUMIC) are presented . "Energetic Electron Environment Models for MEO" Co 21403/08/NL/JD in consortium with ONERA, QinetiQ, SSTL and CNES .

  3. H-IIA: Concept, missions, program status, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.

    1997-01-01

    In addition to earth orbiting satellite missions, cargo supply to the International Space Station/Japanese Experiment Module (ISS/JEM), lunar and planetary probes, technology verifications for the H-II Orbiting Plane (HOPE), and other missions are under study for early in the new century. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) is developing the H-IIA rocket to meet these diversifying missions and to conduct them efficiently and economically. This paper presents the purposes, concept, and philosophy of system planning of the H-IIA rocket, the combinations of the H-IIA and a transfer vehicle to the ISS/JEM and an experimental winged re-entry vehicle, HOPE-X. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Galileo and the Interpretation of the Bible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, William E.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that, contrary to the common view, Galileo and the theologians of the Inquisition share the same fundamental principles of biblical interpretation. Contends that Galileo and these theologians thought that the Bible contained truths about nature, but Galileo denied what the theologians accepted as scientifically true. Contains 93 references.…

  5. Ultraviolet Studies of Jupiter's Hydrocarbons and Aerosols from Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for this project. The purpose of this project was to support PI Wayne Pryor's effort to reduce and analyze Galileo UVS (Ultraviolet Spectrometer) data under the JSDAP program. The spectral observations made by the Galileo UVS were to be analyzed to determine mixing ratios for important hydrocarbon species (and aerosols) in Jupiter's stratosphere as a function of location on Jupiter. Much of this work is still ongoing. To date, we have concentrated on analyzing the variability of the auroral emissions rather than the absorption signatures of hydrocarbons, although we have done some work in this area with related HST-STIS data.

  6. Galileo attitude and articulation control subsystem closed loop testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lembeck, M. F.; Pignatano, N. D.

    1983-01-01

    In order to ensure the reliable operation of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) which will guide the Galileo spacecraft on its two and one-half year journey to Jupiter, the AACS is being rigorously tested. The primary objectives of the test program are the verification of the AACS's form, fit, and function, especially with regard to subsystem external interfaces and the functional operation of the flight software. Attention is presently given to the Galileo Closed Loop Test System, which simulates the dynamic and 'visual' flight environment for AACS components in the laboratory.

  7. Galileo Resolutions: Ganymede and the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These frames demonstrate the dramatic improvement in the resolution of pictures that NASA's Galileo spacecraft is returning compared to previous images of the Jupiter system. The spacecraft's many orbits allow numerous close flyby's of Jupiter and its moons. The top left frame shows the best resolution (1.3 kilometers per picture element or pixel) data of the Uruk Sulcus region on Jupiter's moon Ganymede which was available after the 1979 flyby of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The top right frame shows the same area as captured by Galileo during its closer flyby of Ganymede on June 27, 1996 at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4.628 miles). For comparison, the bottom frames show images of the San Francisco Bay area trimmed to the size of the Ganymede images and adjusted to similar resolutions.

    The Galileo image of Uruk Sulcus has a resolution of about 74 meters per pixel. The area shown is about 35 by 55 kilometers (25 by 34 miles). North is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left. The image taken by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system reveals details of the structure and shape of the ridges which permit scientists to determine their origin and their relation to other terrains. These new views are helping to unravel the complex history of this planet-sized moon.

    The left SF Bay area image is from an image obtained by an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer aboard an NOAA satellite. The right SF Bay area image is from a LandSat Thematic Mapper. Golden Gate Park is clearly visible as a narrow dark rectangle towards the middle of this image. Both images were trimmed and adjusted to resolutions similar to the Ganymede images.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and

  8. Geopotential research mission, science, engineering and program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, T. (Editor); Taylor, P. (Editor); Kahn, W. (Editor); Lerch, F. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This report is based upon the accumulated scientific and engineering studies pertaining to the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM). The scientific need and justification for the measurement of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon the studies and conclusions of scientific organizations and NASA advisory groups. The engineering design and investigations performed over the last 4 years are described, and a spacecraft design capable of fulfilling all scientific objectives is presented. In addition, critical features of the scientific requirements and state-of-the-art limitations of spacecraft design, mission flight performance, and data processing are discussed.

  9. Mission X in Japan, an Education Outreach Program Featuring Astronautical Specialties and Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihori, Maki; Yamada, Shin; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Nakao, Reiko; Nakazawa, Takashi; Kamiyama, Yoshito; Takeoka, Hajime; Matsumoto, Akiko; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    In the science field, disseminating new information to the public is becoming increasingly important, since it can aid a deeper understanding of scientific significance and increase the number of future scientists. As part of our activities, we at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Space Biomedical Research Office, started work to focus on education outreach featuring space biomedical research. In 2010, we launched the Mission X education program in Japan, named after “Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut” (hereinafter called “Mission X”), mainly led by NASA and European Space Agency (ESA). Mission X is an international public outreach program designed to encourage proper nutrition and exercise and teaching young people to live and eat like astronauts. We adopted Mission X's standpoint, and modified the program based on the originals to suit Japanese culture and the students' grade. Using astronauts as examples, this mission can motivate and educate students to instill and adopt good nutrition and physical fitness as life-long practices.Here we introduce our pilot mission of the “Mission X in Japan” education program, which was held in early 2011. We are continuing the education/public outreach to promote the public understanding of science and contribute to science education through lectures on astronautical specialties and knowledge.

  10. The NASA Galileo Educator Network: Using Astronomy to Engage Teachers in Science Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, B.; Bass, K. M.; Schultz, G.

    2015-11-01

    With funding from a NASA EPOESS grant, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific developed the NASA Galileo Educator Network (GEN), a train-the-trainer teacher professional development program based in part on the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Formal evaluation of the program demonstrates that both teacher trainers and teacher participants grew in their ability to utilize astronomy investigations focusing on science practices as described in the Next Generation Science Standards.

  11. Remote manipulator system flexibility analysis program: Mission planning, mission analysis, and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is described for calculating the flexibility coefficients as arm design changes are made for the remote manipulator system. The coefficients obtained are required as input for a second program which reduces the number of payload deployment and retrieval system simulation runs required to simulate the various remote manipulator system maneuvers. The second program calculates end effector flexibility and joint flexibility terms for the torque model of each joint for any arbitrary configurations. The listing of both programs is included in the appendix.

  12. Thermal protection system technology and facility needs for demanding future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laub, B.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2004-02-01

    NASA has successfully launched numerous science missions to inner and outer planets in our solar system of which the most challenging were to Venus and Jupiter and the knowledge gained from those missions have been invaluable yet incomplete. Future missions will be built on what we have learned from the past missions but they will be more demanding from both the science as well as the mission design and engineering perspectives. The Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey (SSEDS) produced for NASA by the National Research Council identified a broad range of science objectives many of which can only be satisfied with atmospheric entry probes. The SSEDS recommended new probe/lander missions to both Venus and Jupiter. The Pioneer-Venus probe mission was launched in August 1978 and four probes successfully entered the Venusian atmosphere in December 1978. The Galileo mission was launched in October 1989 and one probe successfully entered the Jovian atmosphere in December 1995. The thermal protection system requirements for these two missions were unlike any other planetary probes and required fully dense carbon phenolic for the forebody heat shield. Developing thermal protection systems to accomplish future missions outlined in the Decadal Survey presents a technology challenge since they will be more demanding than these past missions. Unlike Galileo, carbon phenolic may not be an adequate TPS for a future Jupiter multiprobe mission since non-equatorial probes will enter at significantly higher velocity than the Galileo equatorial probe and the entry heating scales approximately with the cube of the entry velocity. At such heating rates the TPS mass fraction for a carbon phenolic heat shield would be prohibitive. A new, robust and efficient TPS is required for such probes. The Giant Planet Facility (GPF), developed and employed during the development of the TPS for the Galileo probe was dismantled after completion of the program. Furthermore, flight data from the

  13. Mission to Planet Earth: A program to understand global environmental change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A description of Mission to Planet Earth, a program to understand global environmental change, is presented. Topics discussed include: changes in the environment; global warming; ozone depletion; deforestation; and NASA's role in global change research.

  14. Mission to Planet Earth: A program to understand global environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    A description of Mission to Planet Earth, a program to understand global environmental change, is presented. Topics discussed include: changes in the environment; global warming; ozone depletion; deforestation; and NASA's role in global change research.

  15. The New Galileo Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    ave been developed to get as much data as possible from the Galileo spacecraft even without the high gain antenna. These methods include extensive data compression, a new packetized telemetry format, new error-correcting codes, new modulation, new ground receivers, and antenna arraying. (abstract only).

  16. Pathfinder technologies for bold new missions. [U.S. research and development program for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Rosen, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Project Pathfinder is a proposed U.S. Space Research and Technology program intended to enable bold new missions of space exploration. Pathfinder continues the advancement of technological capabilities and extends the foundation established under the Civil Space Technology Initiative, CSTI. By filling critical technological gaps, CSTI enhances access to Earth orbit and supports effective operations and science missions therein. Pathfinder, with a longer-term horizon, looks to a future that builds on Shuttle and Space Station and addresses technologies that support a range of exploration missions including: a return to the Moon to build an outpost; piloted missions to Mars; and continued scientific exploration of Earth and the other planets. The program's objective is to develop, within reasonable time frames, those emerging and innovative technologies that will make possible both new and enhanced missions and system concepts.

  17. Mentoring mission leaders of the future. Program prepares laity for ministry leadership.

    PubMed

    Cullen, M E; Richardt, S; Hume, R

    1997-01-01

    As religious sponsors increasingly relinquished their CEO positions throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, they established mission integration positions-staffed primarily by women religious-to help ensure the Catholic identity of their facilities. Now that role, too, is undergoing change as sponsors seek to empower the laity in their organizations with responsibility for carrying on the Church's healing mission. At St. Vincent Hospitals and Health Services in Indianapolis, the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, the organization's sponsor, has developed a mentoring program to train the laity in the roles and responsibilities involved in mission. The year-long program has 11 modules that present theory on such topics as ethics, spirituality, the sponsor's history and charism, and the relationship of the healthcare organization to the Church. Participants also attend committee meetings, complete a mission integration project, and gain practical experience in mission-related activities. PMID:10173540

  18. Program control on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, Dorothy J.; Majerowicw, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), an integral part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, is the first satellite dedicated to measuring tropical rainfall. TRMM will contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms through which tropical rainfall influences global circulation and climate. Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Projects Directorate is responsible for establishing a Project Office for the TRMM to manage, coordinate, and integrate the various organizations involved in the development and operation of this complex satellite. The TRMM observatory, the largest ever developed and built inhouse at GSFC, includes state-of-the-art hardware. It will carry five scientific instruments designed to determine the rate of rainfall and the total rainfall occurring between the north and south latitudes of 35 deg. As a secondary science objective, TRMM will also measure the Earth's radiant energy budget and lightning.

  19. Green Propellant Infusion Mission Program Development and Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Christopher H.; Deininger, William D.; Joniatis, John; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Spores, Ronald A.; Deans, Matthew; Yim, John T.; Bury, Kristen; Martinez, Jonathan; Cardiff, Eric H.; Bacha, Caitlin E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) is comprised of a cross-cutting team of domestic spacecraft propulsion and storable green propellant technology experts. This TDM is led by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC), who will use their BCP- 100 spacecraft to carry a propulsion system payload consisting of one 22 N thruster for primary divert (DeltaV) maneuvers and four 1 N thrusters for attitude control, in a flight demonstration of the AF-M315E technology. The GPIM project has technology infusion team members from all three major market sectors: Industry, NASA, and the Department of Defense (DoD). The GPIM project team includes BATC, includes Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR), Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, Edwards AFB (AFRL), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). STMD programmatic and technology oversight is provided by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The GPIM project shall fly an operational AF-M315E green propulsion subsystem on a Ball-built BCP-100 spacecraft.

  20. Planetary protection program for Mars 94/96 mission.

    PubMed

    Rogovski, G; Bogomolov, V; Ivanov, M; Runavot, J; Debus, A; Victorov, A; Darbord, J C

    1996-01-01

    Mars surface in-situ exploration started in 1975 with the American VIKING mission. Two probes landed on the northern hemisphere and provided, for the first time, detailed information on the martian terrain, atmosphere and meteorology. The current goal is to undertake larger surface investigations and many projects are being planned by the major Space Agencies with this objective. Among these projects, the Mars 94/96 mission will make a major contributor toward generating significant information about the martian surface on a large scale. Since the beginning of the Solar System exploration, planets where life could exist have been subject to planetary protection requirements. Those requirements accord with the COSPAR Policy and have two main goals: the protection of the planetary environment from influence or contamination by terrestrial microorganisms, the protection of life science, and particularly of life detection experiments searching extra-terrestrial life, and not life carried by probes and spacecrafts. As the conditions for life and survival for terrestrial microorganisms in the Mars environment became known, COSPAR recommendations were updated. This paper will describe the decontamination requirements which will be applied for the MARS 94/96 mission, the techniques and the procedures which are and will be used to realize and control the decontamination of probes and spacecrafts. PMID:11538980

  1. Student Planetary Investigators: A Program to Engage Students in Authentic Research Using NASA Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K.; Turney, D.; Beisser, K.; Edmonds, J.; Grigsby, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Student Planetary Investigator (PI) Program engages students in authentic scientific research using NASA mission data. This student-focused STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program combines problem-based learning modules, Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned curriculum, and live interactive webinars with mission scientists to create authentic research opportunities and career-ready experiences that prepare and inspire students to pursue STEM occupations. Primarily for high school students, the program employs distance-learning technologies to stream live presentations from mission scientists, archive those presentations to accommodate varied schedules, and collaborate with other student teams and scientists. Like its predecessor, the Mars Exploration Student Data Team (MESDT) program, the Student PI is free and open to teams across the country. To date, students have drafted research-based reports using data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mini-RF instrument and the MESSENGER Mercury orbiter, with plans to offer similar programs aligned with additional NASA missions in the future pending available funding. Overall, the program has reached about 600 students and their educators. Assessments based on qualitative and quantitative data gathered for each Student PI program have shown that students gain new understanding about the scientific process used by real-world scientists as well as gaining enthusiasm for STEM. Additionally, it is highly adaptable to other disciplines and fields. The Student PI program was created by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) Space Department Education and Public Outreach office with support from NASA mission and instrument science and engineering teams.

  2. Scientific program of the Phobos-Soil mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander; Zelenyi, Lev

    Phobos-Soil is a robotics mission to study a Martian moon Phobos under development now in Russia. The main goal of the mission is to deliver samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies. Other goals are studies of Phobos in situ and remote sensing during the spacecraft orbital motion, some experiments devoted studies of the Martian environment. Remote sensing of the Phobos from the spacecraft orbiting at a very close to Phobos synchronous orbit will be directed to study global parameters of this body and to select a landing site for the spacecraft. After landing of the spacecraft at the Phobos surface and take off the returned spacecraft with samples loaded in the returned capsule in situ science experiments will study chemical and mineralogy composition of the regolith near the landing place, study internal structure of this body, peculiarities of orbital and proper rotation. The drive for Phobos investigation is strongly supported by the need to understand the basic scientific issues related to the Martian moons both as the representatives of the family of the small bodies in the Solar system and as principal components of the Martian environment: primordial matter of the Solar system (what many believe they are). The main goals of the mission are: (a) study physical and chemical characteristics of the Phobos regolith in situ and under laboratory conditions -these data can provide information on properties of primordial matter of the Solar system; (b) study of the origin of the Martian satellites and their relation to Mars -these data can help in our understanding of their evolution and the origin of satellite systems near other planets; (c) study of peculiarities of orbital and proper motion of Phobos, what is important for understanding their origin, internal structure, celestial mechanics applications; (d) study physical conditions of the Martian environment (dust, gas, plasma components) what is important to study of treatment

  3. Scientific program of the Phobos-Soil mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Zakharov, A.; Project Science Team And

    A robotics mission to study a Martian moon Phobos is under development in Russia now. The main goal of the mission is to deliver samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies. Other goals are studies of Phobos in situ and remote sensing during the spacecraft orbital motion, studies of the Martian environment. During operation at several different orbits (elliptical and circular) around Mars a number of experiments will be implemented to study the Martian environment (dust, plasma, fields) and monitoring the Martian atmosphere. Remote sensing of the Phobos from the spacecraft orbiting at a very close to Phobos synchronous orbit will be directed to study global parameters of this body and to select a landing site for the spacecraft. After landing of the spacecraft at the Phobos surface and take off the returned spacecraft with samples loaded in the returned capsule in situ science experiments will study chemical and mineralogy composition of the regolith near the landing place, study internal structure of this body, peculiarities of orbital and proper rotation. The drive for Phobos investigation is strongly supported by the need to understand the basic scientific issues related to the Martian moons both as the representatives of the family of the small bodies in the Solar system and as principal components of the Martian environment: primordial matter of the Solar system (what many believe they are). The main goals of the mission are: (a) study physical and chemical characteristics of the Phobos regolith in situ and under laboratory conditions - these data can provide information on properties of primordial matter of the Solar system; (b) study of the origin of the Martian satellites and their relation to Mars - these data can help in our understanding of their evolution and the origin of satellite systems near other planets; (c) search of possible trace of life or paleolife; (d) study of peculiarities of orbital and proper motion of

  4. Volcanic resurfacing of Io between Galileo and New Horizons Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coman, E.; Phillips, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Io is the most geologically active object in our solar system. Due to its tumultuous volcanism, determining Io's resurfacing rate will allow better characterization of the subsurface structure, thermal state, and history of tidal heating of this small moon. Numerous active volcanic centers were documented during the Galileo mission in the late 1990's and early 2000's, and the opportunity to discover more of these centers was presented with the flyby of New Horizons in 2007. Previous authors (i.e. Spencer et al. 2007) have compared Galileo SSI and New Horizons LORRI images with similar viewing geometry, and have found multiple new potential features such as dark lava flows and bright plume deposits emplaced between the two flybys. The purpose of this study was to measure the extent of these changes on Io. Because an ISIS camera model does not yet exist for LORRI, a direct ratio image for comparison with the Galileo SSI images could not be created. By changing the stretch of the Galileo SSI images to match those of New Horizons as closely as possible, we were able to create a rough ratio image for the active center locations. We used these ratio images to measure the areal extent of the new deposits, taking careful precautions to measure more changes in shape than brightness, as brightness variations can be caused by certain surface materials being viewed at different phase angles between the Galileo and New Horizons flybys. This presentation will report our measurement findings. We then are able to use our measurements of the total area covered by new volcanic features to make estimates of the resurfacing rate of Io. Spencer, J.R. et al. (2007), Io Volcanism Seen by New Horizons: A Major Eruption of the Tvashtar Volcano, Science, 318, 240, DOI:10.1126/science.1147621.

  5. Programmer's manual for the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations program (MAESTRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutzky, D.; Bjorkman, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations program known as MAESTRO is described. MAESTRO is an all FORTRAN, block style, computer program designed to perform various mission control tasks. This manual is a guide to MAESTRO, providing individuals the capability of modifying the program to suit their needs. Descriptions are presented of each of the subroutines descriptions consist of input/output description, theory, subroutine description, and a flow chart where applicable. The programmer's manual also contains a detailed description of the common blocks, a subroutine cross reference map, and a general description of the program structure.

  6. NASA Selects Mars Exploration Program Rover for 2003 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In 2003, NASA plans to launch a relative of the now-famous 1997 Mars Pathfinder rover. Using drop, bounce and roll technology, this larger cousin is expected to reach the surface of the red planet in January 2004 and begin the longest journey of scientific exploration ever undertaken across the surface of that alien world. The rover will weigh about nearly 150 kilograms (about 300 pounds) and has a range of up to about 100 meters (110 yards) per sol, or Martian day. Surface operations will last for at least 90 sols, extending to late April 2004, but could continue longer, depending on the health of the rover. One aspect of the Mars rover's mission is to determine history of climate and water at a site or sites on Mars where conditions may once have been warmer and wetter and thus potentially favorable to life as we know it here on Earth. The exact landing site has not yet been chosen, but is likely to be a location such as a former lakebed or channel deposit -- a place where scientists believe there was once water. A site will be selected on the basis of intensive study of orbital data collected by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, as well as the Mars 2001 orbiter and other missions.

  7. Mapping Europa's Thermophysical Properties from Galileo PPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Rodriguez, N. J.; Spencer, J. R.

    2009-09-01

    The Galileo Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) instrument mapped thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter and the Galilean satellites. We use the resulting brightness temperatures at a range of local times to map the thermal properties of Europa's surface, namely bolometric albedo and thermal inertia. Ten high-quality PPR observations were identified based on their coverage and lack of noise. We divided the surface of Europa into 10 degree bins and searched the high-quality data for points in each of those bins. We sorted through the bins to find those with observations near noon and at night, as comparison of these times provides the most robust constraint on thermal properties. For each of these bins, we fit a thermal model to determine the thermal inertia and bolometeric albedo of that bin. Our resulting maps of these quantities cover only the subset of the surface where sufficient data was obtained: a band near the anti-Jovian point and a thinner band near 310 W longitude. Allowing for the low resolution of our maps, our thermally-derived albedos appear to correlate with the albedo features observed in the Galileo SSI basemap. The thermal inertia maps provide a unique probe of the cm-scale properties of Europa's surface, and thus constrain surface processes. Knowledge of diurnal temperatures also allows estimation of the detectability of endogenic hot spots. The improved knowledge of Europa's surface temperature distribution provided by these temperature maps and derived thermophysical properties will also aid in the design of thermal instrumentation to search for endogenic activity on future Europa missions.

  8. Advancing the university mission through partnerships with state Medicaid programs.

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, Jay; Bindman, Andrew B

    2013-11-01

    State Medicaid programs are playing an increasingly important role in the U.S. health care system and represent a major expenditure as well as a major source of revenue for state budgets. The size and complexity of these programs will only increase with the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Yet, many state Medicaid programs lack the resources and breadth of expertise to maximize the value of their programs not only for their beneficiaries but also for all those served by the health care system.Universities, especially those with medical schools and other health science programs, can serve as valuable partners in helping state Medicaid programs achieve higher levels of performance, including designing and implementing new approaches for monitoring the effectiveness and outcomes of health services and developing and sharing knowledge about program outcomes. In turn, universities can expand their role in public policy decision making while taking advantage of opportunities for additional research, training, and funding. As of 2013, approximately a dozen universities have developed formal agreements to provide faculty and care delivery resources to support their state Medicaid programs. These examples offer a road map for how others might approach developing similar, mutually beneficial partnerships. PMID:24072113

  9. An engineering research and technology program for an evolving, multi-decade Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1991-01-01

    A study is presented that examines the technological needs of future systems, surveys current and planned activities and highlights significant accomplishments in the research and technology program of the multidecade Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE). Consideration is given to recent program redirection in MTPE, the initiation of the high performance computing and communications program and the potential impact on the technology programs. The technology set is divided into three subsets covering information, observation, and infrastructure technologies.

  10. Ganymede crater dimensions from Galileo-based DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, V. J.; Schenk, P.; Melosh, H. J.; McEwen, A. S.; Morgan, J. V.; Collins, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Images returned from the Voyager mission have allowed the analysis of crater morphology on the icy satellites and the construction of both diameter and depth-related scaling laws. Higher resolution Galileo data has since been used to update the diameter-related scaling trends, and also crater depths on the basis of shadow measurements. Our work adds to this wealth of data with new depth and slope information extracted from digital elevation models (DEMs) created from Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) images, with the use of the stereo scene-recognition algorithm developed by Schenk et al. (2004), and from photoclinometry incorporating the combined lunar-Lambert photometric function as defined by McEwen et al. (1991). We profiled ~80 craters, ranging from 4 km to 100 km in diameter. Once each DEM of a crater was obtained, spurious patterns or shape distortions created by radiation noise or data compression artifacts were removed through the use of standard image noise filters, and manually by visual inspection of the DEM and original image(s). Terrain type was noted during profile collection so that any differences in crater trends on bright and dark terrains could be documented. Up to 16 cross-sectional profiles were taken across each crater so that the natural variation of crater dimensions with azimuth could be included in the measurement error. This already incorporates a systematic error on depth measurements of ~ 5%, an improvement from Voyager depth uncertainties of 10-30%. The crater diameter, depth, wall slope, rim height, central uplift height, diameter and slope, and central pit depth, diameter and slope were measured from each profile. Our measurements of feature diameters and of crater depth are consistent with already published results based on measurement from images and shadow lengths. We will present example topographic profiles and scaling trends, specifically highlighting the new depth and slope information for different crater types on Ganymede

  11. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  12. Products from NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program Applicable to Low-Cost Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Vento, Daniel; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Hahne, David; Munk, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Since September 2001 NASA s In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing technologies for lowering the cost of planetary science missions. Recently completed is the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost. Two other cost saving technologies nearing completion are the NEXT ion thruster and the Aerocapture technology project. Also under development are several technologies for low cost sample return missions. These include a low cost Hall effect thruster (HIVHAC) which will be completed in 2011, light weight propellant tanks, and a Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV). This paper will discuss the status of the technology development, the cost savings or performance benefits, and applicability of these in-space propulsion technologies to NASA s future Discovery, and New Frontiers missions, as well as their relevance for sample return missions.

  13. Products from NASA's in-space propulsion technology program applicable to low-cost planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Vento, Daniel; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Hahne, David; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Since September 2001, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing technologies for lowering the cost of planetary science missions. Recently completed is the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost. Two other cost saving technologies nearing completion are the NEXT ion thruster and the Aerocapture technology project. Under development are several technologies for low-cost sample return missions. These include a low-cost Hall-effect thruster (HIVHAC) which will be completed in 2011, light-weight propellant tanks, and a Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV). This paper will discuss the status of the technology development, the cost savings or performance benefits, and applicability of these in-space propulsion technologies to NASA's future Discovery, and New Frontiers missions, as well as their relevance for sample return missions.

  14. Understanding Our Changing Planet: NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, 1995 Catalog of Education Programs and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is an integrated, sustainable environmental education program that focuses on the concept of Earth system science which integrates fields like meteorology, oceanography, atmospheric science, geology, and biology. The program has the following objectives: training the next generation of scientists to use an…

  15. Large deployable antenna program. Phase 1: Technology assessment and mission architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Craig A.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1991-01-01

    The program was initiated to investigate the availability of critical large deployable antenna technologies which would enable microwave remote sensing missions from geostationary orbits as required for Mission to Planet Earth. Program goals for the large antenna were: 40-meter diameter, offset-fed paraboloid, and surface precision of 0.1 mm rms. Phase 1 goals were: to review the state-of-the-art for large, precise, wide-scanning radiometers up to 60 GHz; to assess critical technologies necessary for selected concepts; to develop mission architecture for these concepts; and to evaluate generic technologies to support the large deployable reflectors necessary for these missions. Selected results of the study show that deployable reflectors using furlable segments are limited by surface precision goals to 12 meters in diameter, current launch vehicles can place in geostationary only a 20-meter class antenna, and conceptual designs using stiff reflectors are possible with areal densities of 2.4 deg/sq m.

  16. Li/SO2 Cell for Galileo. [process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagdon, L. J.; Marcoux, L.

    1981-01-01

    Some information on the special process controls for lithium sulfur dioxide (Li/SO2) batteries is presented with reference to how those controls affected the Galileo probe program and the instrument test vehicle program. The general considerations that go into any application for basically any type of battery system are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to some of the design tradeoffs which resulted because of the addition of the safety characteristics of the Li/SO2 system.

  17. Space missions for automation and robotics technologies (SMART) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciffone, D. L.; Lum, H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The motivations, features and expected benefits and applications of the NASA SMART program are summarized. SMART is intended to push the state of the art in automation and robotics, a goal that Public Law 98-371 mandated be an inherent part of the Space Station program. The effort would first require tests of sensors, manipulators, computers and other subsystems as seeds for the evolution of flight-qualified subsystems. Consideration is currently being given to robotics systems as add-ons to the RMS, MMU and OMV and a self-contained automation and robotics module which would be tended by astronaut visits. Probable experimentation and development paths that would be pursued with the equipment are discussed, along with the management structure and procedures for the program. The first hardware flight is projected for 1989.

  18. Lifetime assessment analysis of Galileo Li/SO2 cells: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Jaeger, C.D.; Bouchard, D.A.

    1988-12-01

    Galileo Li/SO2 cells from five lots and five storage temperatures were studied to establish a database from which the performance of flight modules may be predicted. Nondestructive tests consisting of complex impedance analysis and a 15-s pulse were performed on all cells. Chemical analysis was performed on one cell from each lot/storage group, and the remaining cells were discharged at Galileo mission loads. An additional number of cells were placed on high-temperature accelerated aging storage for 6 months and then discharged. All data were statistically analyzed. Results indicate that the present Galileo design Li/SO2 cell will satisfy electrical requirements for a 10-year mission. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Mission, Goals and Programs of the Midwestern Higher Education Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midwestern Higher Education Commission, Minneapolis, MN.

    This publication describes the Midwestern Higher Education Commission and its programs, lists its commissioners and reproduces the compact that established it. A description of the commission notes that its member states are Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin; and that it is an instrument of the…

  20. Propulsion Technology Development for Sample Return Missions Under NASA's ISPT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric J.; Vento, Daniel; Dankanich, John W.; Munk, Michelle M.; Hahne, David

    2011-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program was tasked in 2009 to start development of propulsion technologies that would enable future sample return missions. Sample return missions could be quite varied, from collecting and bringing back samples of comets or asteroids, to soil, rocks, or atmosphere from planets or moons. The paper will describe the ISPT Program s propulsion technology development activities relevant to future sample return missions. The sample return propulsion technology development areas for ISPT are: 1) Sample Return Propulsion (SRP), 2) Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV), 3) Entry Vehicle Technologies (EVT), and 4) Systems/mission analysis and tools that focuses on sample return propulsion. The Sample Return Propulsion area is subdivided into: a) Electric propulsion for sample return and low cost Discovery-class missions, b) Propulsion systems for Earth Return Vehicles (ERV) including transfer stages to the destination, and c) Low TRL advanced propulsion technologies. The SRP effort will continue work on HIVHAC thruster development in FY2011 and then transitions into developing a HIVHAC system under future Electric Propulsion for sample return (ERV and transfer stages) and low-cost missions. Previous work on the lightweight propellant-tanks will continue under advanced propulsion technologies for sample return with direct applicability to a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission and with general applicability to all future planetary spacecraft. A major effort under the EVT area is multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV), which will leverage and build upon previous work related to Earth Entry Vehicles (EEV). The major effort under the PAV area is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The MAV is a new development area to ISPT, and builds upon and leverages the past MAV analysis and technology developments from the Mars Technology Program (MTP) and previous MSR studies.

  1. Operationalizing the 21st Century Learning Skills Framework for the NASA Mission to Mars Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Burgess; Research, MSI; Evaluation Team; Interactive Videoconferences Teamlt/p>, MSI

    2013-06-01

    Internal evaluators working with the NASA Mission to Mars program, an out-of-school collaborative videoconferencing program at the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago (MSI), developed an observation protocol to collect evidence about the collaborative learning opportunities offered by the program’s unique technology. Details about the protocol’s development are discussed, along with results of the pilot observations of the program.

  2. Project GALILEO: Farewell to the Major Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilig, E.

    2002-01-01

    After a six year odyssey, Galileo has completed its survey of the large moons of Jupiter. In the four years since the end of the primary mission, Galileo provided new insights into the fundamental questions concerning Jupiter and its moons and magnetosphere. Longevity, changing orbital geometry, and multiple flybys afforded the opportunity to distinguish intrinsic versus induced magnetic fields on the Galilean moons, to characterize the dusk side of the magnetosphere, to acquire high resolution observations supporting the possibility of subsurface water within Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and to monitor the highly dynamic volcanic activity of Io. In January 2002, a final gravity assist placed the spacecraft on a two-orbit trajectory culminating in a Jupiter impact in September 2003. With the successful completion of the Io encounters, plans are being made for the final encounter of the mission. In November 2002, the spacecraft will fly one Jupiter radius above the planet's cloud-tops, sampling the inner magnetosphere and the gossamer rings. The trajectory will take Galileo close enough to Amalthea, (a small inner moon) to obtain the first gravity data for this body. Because a radiation dose of 73 krads is expected on this encounter, which will bring the total radiation dose to greater than four times the spacecraft design limits, the command sequence has to account for the possibility of subsystem failure and the loss of spacecraft control after this perijove passage. One of the primary objectives this year has been to place the spacecraft on a trajectory to impact Jupiter on orbit 35. Galileo's discovery of water beneath the frozen surface of Europa raised concerns about forward contamination by inadvertently impacting that moon and resulted in an end of mission requirement to dispose of the spacecraft. A risk assessment of the final two Io encounters was performed to manage the project's ability to meet this requirement. Radiation affected the extended mission

  3. Quaternions for Galileo scan platform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, W. G.; Man, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    The application of quaternions for the articulation control of the Galileo scan platform is presented in this paper. The purpose of selecting quaternions is to minimize onboard computation time and program size. Attention has been focused on performing inertial pointing while the spacecraft is in a dual spin configuration. Target quaternion and relative target quaternion are introduced and used to specify the target position of the scan platform for point-to-point absolute slews and mosaic relative slews, respectively. The pointing error of the platform is represented by an error quaternion which is converted into gimbal angular errors defining the attitude change. For path control, a moving target quaternion is generated; the corresponding tracking error quaternion and the related spacecraft motion compensation capability are also addressed. A sample slew case is used to demonstrate the implementation of these concepts.

  4. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  5. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  6. Mission Analysis Program for Solar Electric Propulsion (MAPSEP). Volume 1: Analytical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Boain, R. J.; Huling, K. R.; Wilson, T.

    1974-01-01

    The mission analysis program for solar electric propulsion (MAPSEP) is comprised of the basic modes: TOPSEP (trajectory generation), GODSEP (linear error analysis), and SIMSEP (simulation). The program is designed to analyze any low thrust mission with respect to trajectory performance, guidance and navigation, and to provide system related requirements for the purpose of vehicle design. The MAPSEP organization is described along with all models and algorithms. Topics discussed include: trajectory and error covariance propagation methods, orbit determination processes, thrust modeling, and trajectory correction (guidance) schemes.

  7. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere After the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure. winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be supersolar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammonium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  8. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere after the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor); Young, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure, winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. Discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be super-solar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammomium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  9. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The Intelligent Control and Autonomy Branch (ICA) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet the goals of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Programs. These efforts are primarily under the various projects under the Advanced Air Vehicles Program (AAVP), Airspace Operations and Safety Program (AOSP) and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program (TAC). The ICA Branch is focused on advancing the state-of-the-art of aero-engine control and diagnostics technologies to help improve aviation safety, increase efficiency, and enable operation with reduced emissions. This paper describes the various ICA research efforts under the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs with a summary of motivation, background, technical approach, and recent accomplishments for each of the research tasks.

  10. Space Trajectory Error Analysis Program (STEAP) for halo orbit missions. Volume 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, D. V.; Carney, P. C.; Underwood, J. W.; Vogt, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    The six month effort was responsible for the development, test, conversion, and documentation of computer software for the mission analysis of missions to halo orbits about libration points in the earth-sun system. The software consisting of two programs called NOMNAL and ERRAN is part of the Space Trajectories Error Analysis Programs. The program NOMNAL targets a transfer trajectory from earth on a given launch date to a specified halo orbit on a required arrival date. Either impulsive or finite thrust insertion maneuvers into halo orbit are permitted by the program. The transfer trajectory is consistent with a realistic launch profile input by the user. The second program ERRAN conducts error analyses of the targeted transfer trajectory. Measurements including range, doppler, star-planet angles, and apparent planet diameter are processed in a Kalman-Schmidt filter to determine the trajectory knowledge uncertainty.

  11. User's guide to the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations program (MAESTRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutzky, D.; Schafer, J.

    1973-01-01

    The MAESTRO system is a mission analysis tool designed to present to the user information necessary to make the various decisions required in the design and execution of a spaceflight mission. The system was designed so that it can be used in both the pre-launch mission planning phase of a mission and during the flight as an in-flight decision making tool. A description of each of the following modes is presented: (1) trajectory propagation mode; (2) retro-fire determination mode; (3) midcourse analysis determination mode; (4) Monte Carlo mode; (5) verification mode; (6) orbit stability mode; and (7) post injection trim mode. A description of the inputs necessary to run the program mode is given along with a sample case.

  12. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM): Bringing NASA's Earth System Science Program to the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall using a variety of remote sensing instrumentation, including the first spaceborne rain-measuring radar. Since the energy released when tropical rainfall occurs is a primary "fuel" supply for the weather and climate "engine"; improvements in computer models which predict future weather and climate states may depend on better measurements of global tropical rainfall and its energy. In support of the STANYS conference theme of Education and Space, this presentation focuses on one aspect of NASA's Earth Systems Science Program. We seek to present an overview of the TRMM mission. This overview will discuss the scientific motivation for TRMM, the TRMM instrument package, and recent images from tropical rainfall systems and hurricanes. The presentation also targets educational components of the TRMM mission in the areas of weather, mathematics, technology, and geography that can be used by secondary school/high school educators in the classroom.

  13. Time Variations in Jupiter's Near-IR Cloud Albedo During the Galileo Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofton, D.; Chanover, N. J.; Beebe, R. F.; Vincent, M.; Orton, G. S.; Fisher, B.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2001-11-01

    A monitoring program of Jupiter in support of NASA's Galileo mission began at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) in 1995 and continues to the present time. Through this observing program, images of Jupiter are obtained at several near-infrared wavelengths with NSFCAM, the facility near-infrared imager, each time it is used on the telescope. The filters utilized include a 1.58-micron continuum band, a 2.3-micron filter centered on a strong methane absorption, an L' filter, a Circular Variable Filter setting of 3.55 microns used for monitoring H3+ emission, and a 4.78-micron filter sensitive to thermal radiation escaping through low-opacity regions of Jupiter's atmosphere. The entire data set, which is comprised of more than 72,000 files, has been deposited at the Planetary Data System (PDS) Atmospheres Discipline Node and is currently undergoing final validation and peer review. A subset of the 1.58 micron continuum images of Jupiter has been analyzed with the objective of characterizing the temporal variation of the physical properties of the ammonia cloud deck. An understanding of the long-term behavior of Jupiter's uppermost cloud will aid in the interpretation of the Galileo data set. The IRTF images with the highest spatial resolution were selected for reduction, and these data were geometrically navigated to determine Jupiter's north orientation. The Jupiter images were photometrically calibrated using standard star data, and measurements of Jupiter's center-to-limb reflectivity were obtained across several different latitudes. These scans were modeled using an adding-doubling radiative transfer code, which iteratively fits for the ammonia cloud deck single scattering albedo. Preliminary results of this modeling effort will be discussed. Support for this work comes from the PDS (JPL Contract Number 1224513) and NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  14. Lunar Missions and Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    There are two slide presentations contained in this document. The first reviews the lunar missions from Surveyor, Galileo, Clementine, the Lunar Prospector, to upcoming lunar missions, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Lunar Crater Observation & Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS), Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), Lunar Atmosphere, Dust and Environment Explorer (LADEE), ILN and a possible Robotic sample return mission. The information that the missions about the moon is reviewed. The second set of slides reviews the lunar meteorites, and the importance of lunar meteorites to adding to our understanding of the moon.

  15. Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel: Biomedical and Environmental Effects Subpanel report for Galileo

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R. ); Blanton, J.O. ); Bollinger, L.J.; Nelson, R.C. ); Cuddihy, R.G.; Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Cutshall, N.H. (Oak Ridge Natio

    1989-10-01

    This report of the Biomedical and Environmental Effects Subpanel (BEES) of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP), for the Galileo space mission addresses the possible radiological consequences of postulated accidents that release radioactivity into the environment. This report presents estimates of the consequences and uncertainties given that the source term is released into the environment. 10 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Building a Sustained University-Built Spacecraft Program: Current and Future Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartwout, Michael; Jayaram, Sanjay

    2012-07-01

    Hands-on engineering training is considered to be an important part of modern engineering education. This goal has proven to be elusive for spacecraft engineering, however; with the exception of large, government-sponsored "flagship" schools, very few universities have successfully launched and operated their own spacecraft, and the schools that have launched more than one mission can be counted on two hands. The invention and adoption of the CubeSat standard is changing this dynamic; 1-kg, 10-cm CubeSats can be designed, built and launched within the four-year student academic lifetime. But, even if a school could build a series of CubeSats, the question remained as to whether there were any missions worth flying on a CubeSat. The Space Systems Research Laboratory at Saint Louis University (SLU) has embarked on an ambitious program of building a new spacecraft to validate several technical and earth-science payloads. This program is established to sustain the growth of small satellite projects in SLU. To fulfill this mission, SLU is partnering with Vanderbilt University and George Mason University. In addition, as these three universities develop their own payload and bus capabilities, respectively, each school can broaden their partnerships to other organizations to support new missions and new spacecraft. This paper will outline current and future spacecraft missions, the practices adopted by SLU to enable a campaign of student-built spacecraft, and the challenges associated with creating a undergraduate-focused, sustained spacecraft program. The first two Argus spacecraft (COPPER and Argus-High) will be detailed, including the plans for NASA-sponsored launches in 2013. Other two missions, Argus-GTO and the mission proposal currently being developed with George Mason University will also be detailed.

  17. Galileo and the Rhetoric of Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machamer, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Galileo fit in well with the neo-Protagorian, person-relative framework that was emerging around him in the late 16th and early 17th centuries in Western Europe. For Galileo, all knowledge depended crucially and essentially on first person experience, and at the same time this knowledge was objective, not subjective. Comments on the educational…

  18. The University System of Georgia's GALILEO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penson, Merryll

    1998-01-01

    The University System of Georgia and the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) built the innovative electronic library GALILEO (GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online system). This article describes the cooperation, leadership, and technology that made GALILEO possible; the proposal; planning and implementation; governance; current status; and future…

  19. The Galileo Legend as Scientific Folklore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessl, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the various ways in which the legend of Galileo's persecution by the Roman Catholic Church diverges from scholarly readings of the Galileo affair. Finds five distinct themes of scientific ideology in the 40 accounts examined. Assesses the part that folklore plays in building and sustaining a professional ideology for the modern scientific…

  20. Recreating Galileo's 1609 Discovery of Lunar Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Needham, Paul S.; Wright, Ernest T.; Gingerich, Owen

    2014-11-01

    The question of exactly which lunar features persuaded Galileo that there were mountains on the moon has not yet been definitively answered; Galileo was famously more interested in the concepts rather than the topographic mapping in his drawings and the eventual engravings. Since the pioneering work of Ewen Whitaker on trying to identify which specific lunar-terminator features were those that Galileo identified as mountains on the moon in his 1609 observations reported in his Sidereus Nuncius (Venice, 1610), and since the important work on the sequence of Galileo's observations by Owen Gingerich (see "The Mystery of the Missing 2" in Galilaeana IX, 2010, in which he concludes that "the Florentine bifolium sheet [with Galileo's watercolor images] is Galileo's source for the reworked lunar diagrams in Sidereus Nuncius"), there have been advances in lunar topographical measurements that should advance the discussion. In particular, one of us (E.T.W.) at the Scientific Visualization Studio of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has used laser-topography from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to recreate what Galileo would have seen over a sequence of dates in late November and early December 1609, and provided animations both at native resolution and at the degraded resolution that Galileo would have observed with his telescope. The Japanese Kaguya spacecraft also provides modern laser-mapped topographical maps.

  1. Classroom Explorations: Pendulums, Mirrors, and Galileo's Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What do you see in a mirror when not looking at yourself? What goes on as a pendulum swings? Undergraduates in a science class supposed that these behaviors were obvious until their explorations exposed questions with no quick answers. While exploring materials, students researched Galileo, his trial, and its aftermath. Galileo came to life both…

  2. Galileo battery testing and the impact of test automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pertuch, W. T.; Dils, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Test complexity, changes of test specifications, and the demand for tight control of tests led to the development of automated testing used for Galileo and other projects. The use of standardized interfacing, i.e., IEEE-488, with desktop computers and test instruments, resulted in greater reliability, repeatability, and accuracy of both control and data reporting. Increased flexibility of test programming has reduced costs by permitting a wide spectrum of test requirements at one station rather than many stations.

  3. Scientific program construction principles and time allocation scheme for the World Space Observatory—Ultraviolet mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Oleg; Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris; Kaigorodov, Pavel; Yáñez, Francisco Javier; Gómez de Castro, Ana Ines

    2011-09-01

    We present scientific program construction principles and a time allocation scheme developed for the World Space Observatory—Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) mission, which is an international space observatory for observation in UV spectral range 100-300 nm. The WSO-UV consists of a 1.7 m aperture telescope with instrumentation designed to carry out high resolution spectroscopy, long-slit low resolution spectroscopy and direct sky imaging. The WSO-UV Ground Segment is under development by Spain and Russia. They will coordinate the Mission and Science Operations and provide the satellite tracking stations for the project. The WSO-UV will work as a targeted scientific observatory. Three scientific programs will be carried out at the observatory. Core Program of scientific observations, which deserves large amounts of observing time, will be defined by the WSO-UV Science Committee to allow the conduction of high impact or legacy scientific projects. Funding Bodies Program is the guaranteed time granted to each one of the national bodies funding the WSO-UV project. Guest observer program for everyone, or Open Program, consists of astronomical observations obtained with the WSO-UV by astronomers who may or may not belong to the WSO-UV international consortium. It is open to excellent scientific projects from the world-wide community and occupies up to 40% of total observational time. Apart from the particularities associated to a science mission, this new mission will be affected by a new concept of observations management, trying to maximize the scientific return of this mission, and the shared operations between the two sites located in Spain and Russia. A brief summary of the algorithmic strategies analyzed for scheduling optimization is also given in the paper.

  4. Galileo 243 Ida System Spectral Observations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2001-11-01

    On August 28, 1993 the Galileo spacecraft encountered the asteroid 243 Ida and its moon Dactyl. A variety of observations of this asteroid system were collected including visible wavelength (0.4-1.0 microns) imagery with the Solid State Imager (SSI) instrument and infrared wavelength (0.7-5.2 microns) with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS). A new analysis of these observations has been conducted using band area analysis, band center measurement, and spectral similarity value measurement using the BAE SYSTEMS Hyperspectral Tool Kit. This abstract reports the initial results of this research effort. These data indicate that 243 Ida has an orthopyroxene/(orthopyroxene + olivine) ratio of about 0.28, a value consistent with that of LL chondrites. The ratio does not vary significantly for the portions of 243 Ida observed by the Galileo NIMS instrument. 243 Ida is a SIV subtype of the S type asteroid population. At least two spectral units were identified in a combined SSI and NIMS spectral data set. The primary difference is the amount of red slope present in the two spectral units. A larger red slope corresponds to regions of 243 Ida where ejecta from the crater Azurra are present. This evidence suggests that impacts enhance the red components of the 243 Ida spectrum, perhaps enhancing the NiFe content. Dactyl has a relatively deep absorption centered approximately at 0.97 microns with no significant two micron absorption features. This is a possible indicator of clinopyroxene and suggests partial melting or fractional crystallization processes occurred on Dactyl. Dactyl appears to be an SII subtype S type asteroid and is spectrally different from 243 Ida. Dactyl may have been produced by partial melting within the Koronis parent body while the 243 Ida region escaped such igneous processing. This study was made possible through support from NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program.

  5. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The Intelligent Control and Autonomy Branch (ICA) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet the goals of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Programs. These efforts are primarily under the various projects under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) and the Aviation Safety Program (ASP). The ICA Branch is focused on advancing the state-of-the-art of aero-engine control and diagnostics technologies to help improve aviation safety, increase efficiency, and enable operation with reduced emissions. This paper describes the various ICA research efforts under the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs with a summary of motivation, background, technical approach, and recent accomplishments for each of the research tasks.

  6. Practical Application of Model-based Programming and State-based Architecture to Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Gregory; Ingham, Michel; Chung, Seung; Martin, Oliver; Williams, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation to develop models from systems engineers that accomplish mission objectives and manage the health of the system is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview; 2) Motivation; 3) Objective/Vision; 4) Approach; 5) Background: The Mission Data System; 6) Background: State-based Control Architecture System; 7) Background: State Analysis; 8) Overview of State Analysis; 9) Background: MDS Software Frameworks; 10) Background: Model-based Programming; 10) Background: Titan Model-based Executive; 11) Model-based Execution Architecture; 12) Compatibility Analysis of MDS and Titan Architectures; 13) Integrating Model-based Programming and Execution into the Architecture; 14) State Analysis and Modeling; 15) IMU Subsystem State Effects Diagram; 16) Titan Subsystem Model: IMU Health; 17) Integrating Model-based Programming and Execution into the Software IMU; 18) Testing Program; 19) Computationally Tractable State Estimation & Fault Diagnosis; 20) Diagnostic Algorithm Performance; 21) Integration and Test Issues; 22) Demonstrated Benefits; and 23) Next Steps

  7. 48 CFR 1852.246-70 - Mission Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Personnel Reliability Program, described in 14 CFR 1214.5, the Government shall identify personnel positions... performance of their assigned duties in accordance with the screening requirements 14 CFR 1214.5. If the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mission Critical...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.246-70 - Mission Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Personnel Reliability Program, described in 14 CFR 1214.5, the Government shall identify personnel positions... performance of their assigned duties in accordance with the screening requirements 14 CFR 1214.5. If the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Mission Critical...

  9. 48 CFR 1852.246-70 - Mission Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Personnel Reliability Program, described in 14 CFR 1214.5, the Government shall identify personnel positions... performance of their assigned duties in accordance with the screening requirements 14 CFR 1214.5. If the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mission Critical...

  10. 48 CFR 1852.246-70 - Mission Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Personnel Reliability Program, described in 14 CFR 1214.5, the Government shall identify personnel positions... performance of their assigned duties in accordance with the screening requirements 14 CFR 1214.5. If the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mission Critical...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.246-70 - Mission Critical Space System Personnel Reliability Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Personnel Reliability Program, described in 14 CFR 1214.5, the Government shall identify personnel positions... performance of their assigned duties in accordance with the screening requirements 14 CFR 1214.5. If the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mission Critical...

  12. Galileo and Music: A Family Affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, D.

    2011-06-01

    According to Viviani, Galileo's first biographer, the scientist was an excellent keyboard and lute player. In turn Vincenzo Galilei, father of the illustrious scientist, had been one of the most influential music theorist of his age and also a great composer and virtuoso of the lute. Galileo and his brother Michelangelo, born in 1575, inherited Vincenzo's duel skills, both in theory and practical music: Galileo's correspondences show indeed his competence in the music and in the lute playing; Michelagnolo, after being educated in part in Galileo's house in Padua, transferred to Germany in Munich, where he became a court lute player. Nevertheless, Galileo helped for the rest of his life not only his brother but also his nephews, as documented in dozen of family letters quite important to establish the central role of the music in Galileo's everyday life, a fact almost ignored by most modern biographers. The importance of music in Galileo's output and life has been first outlined by the historian of sciences Stillman Drake and by the musicologist Claude Palisca. After their studies starting in the 1960s there is a great belief that Vincenzo influenced his son Galileo, directing him towards experimentation. The aim of this paper, following the reconstruction of Galileo's soundscape proposed by Pierluigi Petrobelli, is to reexamine the surviving historical accounts on the musical passion and talent of Galileo and his family in the several houses where they performed music (in Florence, Padua, Munich, etc.) in particular on the lute, the instrument that was an important experimental tool for the scientist.

  13. Life sciences flight experiments program mission science requirements document. The first life sciences dedicated Spacelab mission, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Mission Science Requirements Document (MSRD) for the First Dedicated Life Sciences Mission (LS-1) represents the culmination of thousands of hours of experiment selection, and science requirement definition activities. NASA life sciences has never before attempted to integrate, both scientifically and operationally, a single mission dedicated to life sciences research, and the complexity of the planning required for such an endeavor should be apparent. This set of requirements completes the first phase of a continual process which will attempt to optimize (within available programmatic and mission resources) the science accomplished on this mission.

  14. Galileo's Telescopy and Jupiter's Tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    2003-12-01

    A previous paper (BAAS 33:4, 1363, 2001) reported on the dramatic scene in Shakespeare's Cymbeline that features the descent of the deity Jupiter. The paper suggested that the four ghosts circling the sleeping Posthumus denote the four Galilean moons of Jupiter. The god Jupiter commands the ghosts to lay a tablet upon the prone Posthumus, but says that its value should not be overestimated. When Posthumus wakens he notices the tablet, which he calls a "book." Not only has the deity's "tablet" become the earthling's "book," but it appears that the book has covers which Posthumus evidently recognizes because without even opening the book he ascribes two further properties to it: rarity, and the very property that Jupiter had earlier attributed, viz. that one must not read too much into it. The mystery deepens when the Jovian gift undergoes a second metamorphosis, to "label." With the help of the OED, the potentially disparate terms "tablet," "book," and "label," may be explained by terms appropriate either to supernatural or worldly beings. "Tablet" may recognize the Mosaic artifact, whereas "book" and "label" are probably mundane references to Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius which appeared shortly before Cymbeline. The message of the Olympian god indicates therefore that the book is unique even as its contents have limited value. The first property celebrates the fact that Galileo's book is the first of its kind, and the second advises that all results except the discovery of Jupiter's moons have been reported earlier, in Hamlet.

  15. Grid2: A Program for Rapid Estimation of the Jovian Radiation Environment: A Numeric Implementation of the GIRE2 Jovian Radiation Model for Estimating Trapped Radiation for Mission Concept Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.; Brinza, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Grid2 is a program that utilizes the Galileo Interim Radiation Electron model 2 (GIRE2) Jovian radiation model to compute fluences and doses for Jupiter missions. (Note: The iterations of these two softwares have been GIRE and GIRE2; likewise Grid and Grid2.) While GIRE2 is an important improvement over the original GIRE radiation model, the GIRE2 model can take as long as a day or more to compute these quantities for a complete mission. Grid2 fits the results of the detailed GIRE2 code with a set of grids in local time and position thereby greatly speeding up the execution of the model--minutes as opposed to days. The Grid2 model covers the time period from 1971 to 2050and distances of 1.03 to 30 Jovian diameters (Rj). It is available as a direct-access database through a FORTRAN interface program. The new database is only slightly larger than the original grid version: 1.5 gigabytes (GB) versus 1.2 GB.

  16. Terrestrial cometary tail and lunar corona induced by small comets: Predictions for Galileo

    SciTech Connect

    Dessler, A.J. ); Sandel, B.R. ); Vasyliunas, V.M. )

    1990-11-01

    A search for small comets near 1 AU is an objective of the Galileo mission. If small comets are as numerous and behave as has been proposed, two near-Earth signatures of small comets should be observable by the UVS experiment on the Earth flybys of Galileo; (1) a comet-like tail of Earth created by small comets that come close to Earth, break up and vaporize, but just miss the atmosphere and proceed back into interplanetary space, and (2) a corona surrounding the Moon induced by lunar impact of small comets.

  17. Shuttle sortie simulation using a Lear jet aircraft: Mission no. 1 (assess program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Nell, C. B., Jr.; Mason, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The shuttle sortie simulation mission of the Airborne Science/Shuttle Experiments System Simulation Program which was conducted using the CV-990 aircraft is reported. The seven flight, five day mission obtained data on experiment preparation, type of experiment components, operation and maintenance, data acquisition, crew functions, timelines and interfaces, use of support equipment and spare parts, power consumption, work cycles, influence of constraints, and schedule impacts. This report describes the experiment, the facilities, the operation, and the results analyzed from the standpoint of their possible use in aiding the planning for experiments in the Shuttle Sortie Laboratory.

  18. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems; lunar module mission programer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the concept, operational requirements, design, and development of the lunar module mission programer is presented, followed by a review of component and subsystem performance during design-feasibility, design-verification, and qualification tests performed in the laboratory. The system was further proved on the unmanned Apollo 5 mission. Several anomalies were detected, and satisfactory solutions were found. These problems are defined and examined, and the corrective action taken is discussed. Suggestions are given for procedural changes to be used if future guidance and control systems of this type are to be developed.

  19. Recommendation of a More Effective Alternative to the NASA Launch Services Program Mission Integration Reporting System (MIRS) and Implementation of Updates to the Mission Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of my internship in the Flight Projects Office of NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP), I worked on two major projects, both of which dealt with updating current systems to make them more accurate and to allow them to operate more efficiently. The first project dealt with the Mission Integration Reporting System (MIRS), a web-accessible database application used to manage and provide mission status reporting for the LSP portfolio of awarded missions. MIRS had not gone through any major updates since its implementation in 2005, and it was my job to formulate a recommendation for the improvement of the system. The second project I worked on dealt with the Mission Plan, a document that contains an overview of the general life cycle that is followed by every LSP mission. My job on this project was to update the information currently in the mission plan and to add certain features in order to increase the accuracy and thoroughness of the document. The outcomes of these projects have implications in the orderly and efficient operation of the Flight Projects Office, and the process of Mission Management in the Launch Services Program as a whole.

  20. Advanced space power requirements and techniques. Task 1: Mission projections and requirements. Volume 3: Appendices. [cost estimates and computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Contents: (1) general study guidelines and assumptions; (2) launch vehicle performance and cost assumptions; (3) satellite programs 1959 to 1979; (4) initiative mission and design characteristics; (5) satellite listing; (6) spacecraft design model; (7) spacecraft cost model; (8) mission cost model; and (9) nominal and optimistic budget program cost summaries.

  1. High Spatial Resolution Europa Coverage by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NIMS instrument on the Galileo spacecraft, which is being used to map the mineral and ice properties over the surfaces of the Jovian moons, produces global spectral images at modest spatial resolution and high resolution spectral images for small selected regions on the satellites. This map illustrates the high resolution coverage of Europa obtained by NIMS through the April 1997 G7 orbit.

    The areas covered are displayed on a Voyager-derived map. A good sampling of the dark trailing-side material (180 to 360 degrees) has been obtained, with less coverage of Europa's leading side.

    The false-color composites use red, green and blue to represent the infrared brightnesses at 0.7, 1.51 and 1.82 microns respectively. Considerable variations are evident and are related to the composition and sizes of the surface grains.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  2. Galileo's Courage to Create New Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Paul H.

    2009-10-01

    The trial of Galileo was a confrontation between the creativity of new science and the traditions of ``the religious establishment.''Galileo challenged ancient cosmology, where heavenly bodies were thoughtto be perfect spheres made of ``ether.'' His trail might have been avoided if Galileo had been more diplomatic. Paradoxically, the Roman Catholic Church was scientifically correct: Galileo had no proof the earth rotated about its axis as it orbited around the sun. His assertion that the tides arise from the earth's rotation later turned out to be correct, but at that time no one knew enough about gravitational and centrifugal forces. Galileo courageously argued, ``The Bible tells us how to go to heaven, not how the heavens go [1].'' He was nevertheless convicted at age 69, Galileo, although deeply hurt, did not withdraw from the Church. He believed himself to be a good Catholic who had sought to keep his church, for its own good, from making a mistake. In 1992, Pope John Paul said the Church had erred in condemning Galileo. [4pt] [1] Carr, P. H. (2006). ``The Courage to Create Beauty,'' Chap 10 of ``Beauty in Science & Spirit,'' Beech River Books, Center Ossipee, NH.

  3. Combined GPS and GALILEO instantaneous precise positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, P.; Paziewski, J.; Stepniak, K.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation provides results of the research aimed at precise positioning using single-epoch GPS and Galileo observations. The main goal was to develop algorithms that allow obtaining reliable centimeter-level position when using just a single epoch of pseudorange and carrier phase GPS and Galileo data in a single functional model. The presented algorithms are based on relative precise positioning using double-differenced observations in both single baseline and network mode. Fast and reliable ambiguity resolution is the key for rapid and single-epoch precise positioning. In order to support ambiguity resolution using small amount of data, special emphasis was put on mitigation of ionospheric and tropospheric delays. The functional model was based on constrained least squares estimation. The LAMBDA method was applied for ambiguity resolution and a multi-criteria statistical tests are used for ambiguity validation. These algorithms were implemented in GINPOS software developed at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn. The results of combined GPS+Galileo processing were compared to the solutions obtained using GPS-only and Galileo-only data. Since there are just two test Galileo satellites on orbit, Spirent multi-GNSS simulator was used to obtain Galileo and GPS signals. The processed baselines reached up to 35-70 km. The results based on the simulated data show that even though single-epoch precise positioning is possible with GPS only, adding Galileo data increases availability and reliability of the user position.

  4. Covenant model of corporate compliance. "Corporate integrity" program meets mission, not just legal, requirements.

    PubMed

    Tuohey, J F

    1998-01-01

    Catholic healthcare should establish comprehensive compliance strategies, beyond following Medicare reimbursement laws, that reflect mission and ethics. A covenant model of business ethics--rather than a self-interest emphasis on contracts--can help organizations develop a creed to focus on obligations and trust in their relationships. The corporate integrity program (CIP) of Mercy Health System Oklahoma promotes its mission and interests, educates and motivates its employees, provides assurance of systemwide commitment, and enforces CIP policies and procedures. Mercy's creed, based on its mission statement and core values, articulates responsibilities regarding patients and providers, business partners, society and the environment, and internal relationships. The CIP is carried out through an integrated network of committees, advocacy teams, and an expanded institutional review board. Two documents set standards for how Mercy conducts external affairs and clarify employee codes of conduct. PMID:10181597

  5. Outward to the Beginning: the CRAF and Cassini Missions of the Mariner Mark 2 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Two successive journeys will soon offer a perspective on the origin of the solar system and perhaps provide clues on the origin of life as well. The missions, the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) and Cassini (the Saturn orbiter/Titan probe), combine to form the first initiative of the Mariner Mark 2 program, a series of planetary missions whose common objective is to explore primitive bodies and the outer solar system, toward the ultimate goal of understanding the nature of our origins. Cassini and CRAF are exciting planetary missions. The objectives that they share, the region of the solar system in which comets, asteroids, and the Saturnian system have evolved and now reside, and the spacecraft that will carry both sets of experiments to their targets in the outer solar system are described.

  6. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to develop those Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies with significant development heritage: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nuclear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities.

  7. Trajectory design for the Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE) mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, D.; Carrico, J.; Jen, J.; Roberts, C.; Seacord, A.; Sharer, P.; Newman, L.; Richon, K.; Kaufman, B.; Middour, J.

    1993-01-01

    In 1994, the Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE) spacecraft will become the first spacecraft to perform, in succession, both a lunar orbiting mission and a deep-space asteroid encounter mission. The primary mission objective is to perform a long-duration flight-test of various new-technology lightweight components, such as sensors, in a deep-space environment. The mission has two secondary science objectives: to provide high-resolution imaging of the entire lunar surface for mapping purposes and flyby imaging of the asteroid 1620 Geographos. The DSPSE mission is sponsored by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). As prime contractor, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is building the spacecraft and will conduct mission operations. The Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division is supporting NRL in the areas of The Deep Space Network (DSN) will provide tracking support. The DSPSE mission will begin with a launch from the Western Test Range in late January 1994. Following a minimum 1.5-day stay in a low-Earth parking orbit, a solid kick motor burn will boost DSPSE into an 18-day, 2.5-revolution phasing orbit transfer trajectory to the Moon. Two burns to insert DSPSE into a lunar polar orbit suitable for the mapping mission will be followed by mapping orbit maintenance and adjustment operations over a period of 2 sidereal months. In May 1994, a lunar orbit departure maneuver, in conjunction with a lunar swingby 26 days later, will propel DSPSE onto a heliocentric transfer that will intercept Geographos on September 1, 1994. This paper presents the characteristics, deterministic delta-Vs, and design details of each trajectory phase of this unique mission, together with the requirements, constraints, and design considerations to which each phase is subject. Numerous trajectory plots and tables of significant trajectory events are included. Following a discussion of the results of a preliminary launch window analysis, a

  8. Trajectory design for the Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, D.; Carrico, J.; Jen, J.; Roberts, C.; Seacord, A.; Sharer, P.; Newman, L.; Richon, K.; Kaufman, B.; Middour, J.

    In 1994, the Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE) spacecraft will become the first spacecraft to perform, in succession, both a lunar orbiting mission and a deep-space asteroid encounter mission. The primary mission objective is to perform a long-duration flight-test of various new-technology lightweight components, such as sensors, in a deep-space environment. The mission has two secondary science objectives: to provide high-resolution imaging of the entire lunar surface for mapping purposes and flyby imaging of the asteroid 1620 Geographos. The DSPSE mission is sponsored by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). As prime contractor, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is building the spacecraft and will conduct mission operations. The Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division is supporting NRL in the areas of The Deep Space Network (DSN) will provide tracking support. The DSPSE mission will begin with a launch from the Western Test Range in late January 1994. Following a minimum 1.5-day stay in a low-Earth parking orbit, a solid kick motor burn will boost DSPSE into an 18-day, 2.5-revolution phasing orbit transfer trajectory to the Moon. Two burns to insert DSPSE into a lunar polar orbit suitable for the mapping mission will be followed by mapping orbit maintenance and adjustment operations over a period of 2 sidereal months. In May 1994, a lunar orbit departure maneuver, in conjunction with a lunar swingby 26 days later, will propel DSPSE onto a heliocentric transfer that will intercept Geographos on September 1, 1994. This paper presents the characteristics, deterministic delta-Vs, and design details of each trajectory phase of this unique mission, together with the requirements, constraints, and design considerations to which each phase is subject. Numerous trajectory plots and tables of significant trajectory events are included. Following a discussion of the results of a preliminary launch window analysis, a

  9. The program plan: An overview of the development and implementation of the International Asteroid Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The program plan presents an overview of the development and implementation of the International Asteroid Mission. The final mission scenario was determined following an examination of over 20 different possibilities. Criteria, including delta V costs, round-trip mission opportunities, mass requirements, and cargo delivery requirements were compared. The candidate asteroid is 3361 Orpheus (1982 HR). Orpheus is believed to be carbonaceous and hydrous, and is 800 meters in diameter. The asteroid lies in an orbit inclined 2.69 degrees to the ecliptic with a semi-major axis of 1.21 astronomical units. The synodic period of the orbit is four years, assuming constant orbital elements. However, reasonable round-trip mission opportunities occur every 3.4 years, on the average. This feature of the orbit permits the crew and cargo vehicles to be cycled, thus extending the economic return time for the deliverable products. The time-table for the nominal first mission is shown and the delta V costs associated with the trips to and from Orpheus are presented.

  10. Callisto: New insights from Galileo disk-resolved UV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Johnson, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Callisto is an interesting end member among the Galilean satellites, in that the leading hemisphere (centered on 90 W) is darker than the trailing hemisphere (centered on 270 W) in the visible and near-UV. The surface alteration processes considered to contribute to its spectral reflectance are micrometeoroid bombardment, radiation-induced chemistry and sputtering, and implantation of neutrals from Io. Callisto's heavily cratered surface exhibits relatively dark and reddish spectra throughout the UV and infrared; micrometeoroid bombardment may play a dominant important alteration role at this icy moon (Buratti, Icarus 92, 312, 1991). Callisto's distance from Jupiter calls into question the importance of radiation in affecting its albedo and surface chemistry. Its relatively thick atmosphere (Liang et al., JGR 110, 2005) could shield the surface from both neutrals and slow ions. We present results from an investigation of the full set of Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) data of Callisto, in the 210-320 nm wavelength range. We are interested in understanding how UV spectra can contribute to answering questions about Callisto's composition and effects of radiation and micrometeoroid bombardment. The nature of Callisto's dark, red UV reflectance spectra is investigated. Analyses of UVS Callisto data during the Galileo mission suggested the presence of H2O2 (Hendrix et al., LPSC XXX, 1999), similar to that detected on Europa. We describe the spatial distribution of the absorbing species in the UV and investigate whether the red shape of the Callisto UV spectrum is due to H2O2 or whether other species, such as carbonaceous or meteoritic materials, are involved. Pre-Galileo disk-integrated HST (Noll et al., GRL 24, 1139, 1997) and IUE (Lane and Domingue, GRL 24, 1143, 1997) observations showed a broad absorption feature superimposed on the general red spectrum, attributed to SO2, on the leading hemisphere relative to the trailing hemisphere. The Galileo UVS data

  11. Galileo's Heritage:. Planets, Arts and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignami, Giovanni F.

    Everyone knows Galileo Galilei as an astronomer, physicist and writer of books that changed our perception of the world. Few people know that Galileo also wrote poetry in elegant XVI century Italian. In 1590, aged 26, Galileo was a lecturer of mathematics at the University of Pisa, the poorest paid of the faculty. He dutifully taught Euclid, but quickly ran into trouble: he despised and openly challenged Pisa's strict academic traditions. Especially the rule by which all professors had to wear their gown at all times, under penalty of a stiff fine. To chastise and mock such rule, he wrote his longest poem, the 301-line Capitolo "Against the Donning of the Gown".

  12. Europa: Initial Galileo Geological Observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, R.; Sullivan, R.; Klemaszewski, J.; Homan, K.; Head, J. W., III; Pappalardo, R.T.; Veverka, J.; Clark, B.E.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Belton, M.; Moore, J.; Asphaug, E.; Carr, M.H.; Neukum, G.; Denk, T.; Chapman, C.R.; Pilcher, C.B.; Geissler, P.E.; Greenberg, R.; Tufts, R.

    1998-01-01

    Images of Europa from the Galileo spacecraft show a surface with a complex history involving tectonic deformation, impact cratering, and possible emplacement of ice-rich materials and perhaps liquids on the surface. Differences in impact crater distributions suggest that some areas have been resurfaced more recently than others; Europa could experience current cryovolcanic and tectonic activity. Global-scale patterns of tectonic features suggest deformation resulting from non-synchronous rotation of Europa around Jupiter. Some regions of the lithosphere have been fractured, with icy plates separated and rotated into new positions. The dimensions of these plates suggest that the depth to liquid or mobile ice was only a few kilometers at the time of disruption. Some surfaces have also been upwarped, possibly by diapirs, cryomagmatic intrusions, or convective upwelling. In some places, this deformation has led to the development of chaotic terrain in which surface material has collapsed and/or been eroded. ?? 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Galileo Probe forebody thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Davy, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Material response solutions for the forebody heat shield on the candidate 310-kg Galileo Probe are presented. A charring material ablation analysis predicts thermochemical surface recession, insulation thickness, and total required heat shield mass. Benchmark shock layer solutions provide the imposed entry heating environments on the ablating surface. Heat shield sizing results are given for a nominal entry into modeled nominal and cool-heavy Jovian atmospheres, and for two heat-shield property models. The nominally designed heat shield requires a mass of at least 126 kg and would require an additional 13 kg to survive entry into the less probable cool-heavy atmosphere. The material-property model with a 30% surface reflectance reduces these mass requirements by as much as 16%.

  14. Optimal selection of space transportation fleet to meet multi-mission space program needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Montoya, Alex J.

    1989-01-01

    A space program that spans several decades will be comprised of a collection of missions such as low earth orbital space station, a polar platform, geosynchronous space station, lunar base, Mars astronaut mission, and Mars base. The optimal selection of a fleet of several recoverable and expendable launch vehicles, upper stages, and interplanetary spacecraft necessary to logistically establish and support these space missions can be examined by means of a linear integer programming optimization model. Such a selection must be made because the economies of scale which comes from producing large quantities of a few standard vehicle types, rather than many, will be needed to provide learning curve effects to reduce the overall cost of space transportation if these future missions are to be affordable. Optimization model inputs come from data and from vehicle designs. Each launch vehicle currently in existence has a launch history, giving rise to statistical estimates of launch reliability. For future, not-yet-developed launch vehicles, theoretical reliabilities corresponding to the maturity of the launch vehicles' technology and the degree of design redundancy must be estimated. Also, each such launch vehicle has a certain historical or estimated development cost, tooling cost, and a variable cost. The cost of a launch used in this paper includes the variable cost plus an amortized portion of the fixed and development costs. The integer linear programming model will have several constraint equations based on assumptions of mission mass requirements, volume requirements, and number of astronauts needed. The model will minimize launch vehicle logistic support cost and will select the most desirable launch vehicle fleet.

  15. Technical Excellence and Communication: The Cornerstones for Successful Safety and Mission Assurance Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W.; Livingston, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the role of technical excellence and communication in the development and maintenance of safety and mission assurance programs. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) organization is used to illustrate philosophies and techniques that strengthen safety and mission assurance efforts and that contribute to healthy and effective organizational cultures. The events and conditions leading to the development of the MSFC S&MA organization are reviewed. Historic issues and concerns are identified. The adverse effects of resource limitations and risk assessment roles are discussed. The structure and functions of the core safety, reliability, and quality assurance functions are presented. The current organization s mission and vision commitments serve as the starting points for the description of the current organization. The goals and objectives are presented that address the criticisms of the predecessor organizations. Additional improvements are presented that address the development of technical excellence and the steps taken to improve communication within the Center, with program customers, and with other Agency S&MA organizations.

  16. Technical Excellence and Communication, the Cornerstones for Successful Safety and Mission Assurance Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Roy W.; Livingston, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The paper describes the role of technical excellence and communication in the development and maintenance of safety and mission assurance programs. The Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC) Safety and Mission Assurance(S&MA) organization is used to illustrate philosophies and techniques that strengthen safety and mission assurance efforts and that contribute to healthy and effective organizational cultures. The events and conditions leading to the development of the MSFC S&MA organization are reviewed. Historic issues and concerns are identified. The adverse effects of resource limitations and risk assessment roles are discussed. The structure and functions of the core safety, reliability, and quality assurance functions are presented. The current organization’s mission and vision commitments serve as the starting points for the description of the current organization. The goals and objectives are presented that address the criticisms of the predecessor organizations. Additional improvements are presented that address the development of technical excellence and the steps taken to improve communication within the Center, with program customers, and with other Agency S&MA organizations.

  17. Deep Impact Extended Mission Challenges for the Validation and Verification Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanez, Leticia; Holshouser, David

    2008-01-01

    The Deep Impact Spacecraft was launched on January 12, 2005 as part of NASA's Discovery Program as a radical mission to excavate the interior of a comet. The Spacecraft consisted of two separate entities known as the Flyby and the Impactor, which were commanded to separate prior to comet rendezvous with comet 9P/Tempel 1. The overall mission was deemed a success on July 4, 2005, as the 370-kg Impactor collided with the comet at 10.2 km/s. This event was captured using the camera and infrared spectrometer on the Flyby spacecraft, along with ground-based observatories. Since this event, the Flyby spacecraft has been in hibernation mode and has received only a small amount of maintenance. The Deep Impact Program was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), led by Dr. Michael A'Hearn from the University of Maryland in College Park, and built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado.

  18. Correlating hotspots on Io with surface features using Galileo eclipse images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    During the early Galileo mission (1996-1998), the SSI visible to near-IR camera obtained global eclipse images of Jupiter's moon Io, in which hotspot emissions from active volcanoes appeared as sub-pixel source smear ellipsoids [1,2]. We reprojected these images onto high-resolution global Voyager and Galileo basemaps of Io to determine the locations of all hotspots with respect to surface features. We used known volcanic centers as tiepoints; e.g., Pele's hotspot position is known because thermal emission was detected in illuminated images. Correlating global Galileo eclipse images with underlying geography has enabled us to more precisely determine the locations of the hottest areas within flow fields (e.g., Gish Bar, Loki, Amirani, Isum). Many active hotspots (e.g., Zal, Marduk) are accompanied by diffuse red deposits related to ephemeral short-chain sulfur, typical of volcanically active regions on Io [1]. Some hotspots maintained consistently bright emissions from observation to observation, separated by months (e.g., Pele, Janus, Kanehekili), also seen later by groundbased [3,4]. Others were active during some observations and relatively inactive (no SSI signal) during others (e.g., Gish Bar, Pillan, Camaxtli). This indicates some volcanic centers have long-lived, steady eruptions, perhaps typical of insulated lava flows or lava lakes, while others erupt in bursts of energy and then fade [2,5,6]. A cluster of hotspots near the sub-Jovian point is likely related to concentration of tidal heating. Most of these hotspots are confined to small paterae (volcano-tectonic depressions); this corroborates the work of [7,8] that 79% of all hotspot eruptions occur within paterae. The authors acknowledge support of NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program. References: [1] McEwen e.a. Icarus 1998; [2] Keszthelyi e.a. JGR 2001; [3] dePater e.a. Icarus 2004; [4] Marchis e.a. Icarus 2005; [5] Davies e.a. JGR 2001; [6] Lopes e.a. Icarus 2004; [7] Radebaugh e.a. LPSC

  19. Mysteries Of The Farside Of The Moon: What Galileo Couldn't See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, Carlé M.

    When Galileo first turned his improved spyglass to view the Moon from Padua, he was astounded at what he saw: ``And it is like the face of the Earth itself … which is marked here and there with chains of mountains and depths of valleys'' (Galilei, 1610). His remarks about his new discoveries captured the joy which ultimately drives every planetary explorer: ``I render infinite thanks to God for being so kind as to make me alone the first observer of marvels kept hidden in obscurity for all previous centuries'' (Galilei, 1610). Four centuries later his intellectual heirs have expanded human understanding of our place in the universe with an elegant symmetry. The Apollo and Luna programs demonstrated that the origin and history of the Earth and the Moon are intimately linked. Two decades later the Galileo spacecraft swung by the Moon to obtain a gravity-assist from Earth in order to complete its exploration journey to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites. The Galileo spacecraft was the first to return to the Moon with modern sensors, and its brief passage provided dramatic evidence that the farside of the Moon held secrets unimagined from study of the nearside. Subsequent missions, Clementine and Lunar Prospector, provided the first global assessment of lunar topography and composition, and placed the farside in context. There are few of the extensive plains of basaltic lava on the farside of the Moon. This fact is clearly a product of the earliest history of the Moon (the first 500 My), the details of which are being investigated from clues that remain on the Moon today. The dominant feature on the lunar farside is the enormous South Pole-Aitken Basin, which extends from the south pole to the crater Aitken, just 15° south of the equator. This basin includes the deepest area on the Moon and appears as a slightly darker circular region encompassing the lower half of the lunar farside. The composition of the interior is uniquely enriched with iron-bearing minerals

  20. Volcanism on Io: The Galileo NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.

    2011-12-01

    In order to determine the magnitude of thermal emission from Io's volcanoes and variability with time at local, regional and global scales, we have calculated the 4.7 or 5 μm radiant flux for every hot spot in every Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observation obtained during the Galileo mission between June 1996 and October 2001. The resulting database contains over 1000 measurements of radiant flux, corrected for emission angle, range to target, and, where necessary, incident sunlight. Io's volcanoes produce the most voluminous and most powerful eruptions in the Solar System [1] and NIMS was the ideal instrument for measuring thermal emission from these volcanoes (see [1, 2]). NIMS covered the infrared from 0.7 to 5.2 μm, so measurement of hot spot thermal emission at ~5 μm was possible even in daytime observations. As part of a campaign to quantify magnitude and variability of volcanic thermal emission [1, 3-5] we examined the entire NIMS dataset (196 observations). The resulting NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED) allows the charting of 5-μm thermal emission at individual volcanoes, identifying individual eruption episodes, and enabling the comparison of activity at different hot spots [e.g., 6] and different regions of Io. Some ionian hot spots were detected only once or twice by NIMS (e.g., Ah Peku Patera, seen during I32), but most were detected many times (e.g., Culann, Tupan and Zamama, [6]). For example, the database contains over 40 observations of Loki Patera (some at high emission angle, and two partial observations). There are 55 observations of Pele. The 27 nighttime observations of Pele show a remarkably steady 5-μm radiant flux of 35 ± 12 GW/μm. There are 34 observations of Pillan, which erupted violently in 1997. Although in many observations low spatial resolution makes it difficult to separate hot spot pairs such as Susanoo Patera and Mulungu Patera; Tawhaki Patera and Hi'iaka Patera; and Janus Patera and Kanehekili

  1. Reuniting the Solar System: Integrated Education and Public Outreach Projects for Solar System Exploration Missions and Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, Leslie; Lindstrom, Marilyn; Stockman, Stephanie; Scalice, Daniela; Klug, Sheri

    2003-01-01

    The Solar System Exploration Education Forum has worked for five years to foster Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) cooperation among missions and programs in order to leverage resources and better meet the needs of educators and the public. These efforts are coming together in a number of programs and products and in '2004 - The Year of the Solar System.' NASA's practice of having independent E/PO programs for each mission and its public affairs emphasis on uniqueness has led to a public perception of a fragmented solar system exploration program. By working to integrate solar system E/PO, the breadth and depth of the solar system exploration program is revealed. When emphasis is put on what missions have in common, as well as their differences, each mission is seen in the context of the whole program.

  2. Space Trajectory Error Analysis Program (STEAP) for halo orbit missions. Volume 1: Analytic and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, D. V.; Carney, P. C.; Underwood, J. W.; Vogt, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    Development, test, conversion, and documentation of computer software for the mission analysis of missions to halo orbits about libration points in the earth-sun system is reported. The software consisting of two programs called NOMNAL and ERRAN is part of the Space Trajectories Error Analysis Programs (STEAP). The program NOMNAL targets a transfer trajectory from Earth on a given launch date to a specified halo orbit on a required arrival date. Either impulsive or finite thrust insertion maneuvers into halo orbit are permitted by the program. The transfer trajectory is consistent with a realistic launch profile input by the user. The second program ERRAN conducts error analyses of the targeted transfer trajectory. Measurements including range, doppler, star-planet angles, and apparent planet diameter are processed in a Kalman-Schmidt filter to determine the trajectory knowledge uncertainty. Execution errors at injection, midcourse correction and orbit insertion maneuvers are analyzed along with the navigation uncertainty to determine trajectory control uncertainties and fuel-sizing requirements. The program is also capable of generalized covariance analyses.

  3. Europa's Thermal Surface from Galileo PPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, N. J.; Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present Galileo Photopolarimeter-Radiometer data of Europa and, from these, model the thermal inertia and bolometric albedo of the surface. We also derive an upper limit for detection of endogenic activity.

  4. Assessment of Galileo modal test results for mathematical model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M.

    1984-01-01

    The modal test program for the Galileo Spacecraft was completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the summer of 1983. The multiple sine dwell method was used for the baseline test. The Galileo Spacecraft is a rather complex 2433 kg structure made of a central core on which seven major appendages representing 30 percent of the total mass are attached, resulting in a high modal density structure. The test revealed a strong nonlinearity in several major modes. This nonlinearity discovered in the course of the test necessitated running additional tests at the unusually high response levels of up to about 21 g. The high levels of response were required to obtain a model verification valid at the level of loads for which the spacecraft was designed. Because of the high modal density and the nonlinearity, correlation between the dynamic mathematical model and the test results becomes a difficult task. Significant changes in the pre-test analytical model are necessary to establish confidence in the upgraded analytical model used for the final load verification. This verification, using a test verified model, is required by NASA to fly the Galileo Spacecraft on the Shuttle/Centaur launch vehicle in 1986.

  5. The New Millennium Program: Validating Advanced Technologies for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minning, Charles P.; Luers, Philip

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the activities of the New Millennium Program (NMP) in validating advanced technologies for space missions. The focus of these breakthrough technologies are to enable new capabilities to fulfill the science needs, while reducing costs of future missions. There is a broad spectrum of NMP partners, including government agencies, universities and private industry. The DS-1 was launched on October 24, 1998. Amongst the technologies validated by the NMP on DS-1 are: a Low Power Electronics Experiment, the Power Activation and Switching Module, Multi-Functional Structures. The first two of these technologies are operational and the data analysis is still ongoing. The third program is also operational, and its performance parameters have been verified. The second program, DS-2, was launched January 3 1999. It is expected to impact near Mars southern polar region on 3 December 1999. The technologies used on this mission awaiting validation are an advanced microcontroller, a power microelectronics unit, an evolved water experiment and soil thermal conductivity experiment, Lithium-Thionyl Chloride batteries, the flexible cable interconnect, aeroshell/entry system, and a compact telecom system. EO-1 on schedule for launch in December 1999 carries several technologies to be validated. Amongst these are: a Carbon-Carbon Radiator, an X-band Phased Array Antenna, a pulsed plasma thruster, a wideband advanced recorder processor, an atmospheric corrector, lightweight flexible solar arrays, Advanced Land Imager and the Hyperion instrument

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A.; Azarbarzin, A.; Kakar, R.; Neeck, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors to provide next-generation precipitation data products for scientific research and societal applications. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and calibration reference for constellation radiometers. NASA will deploy the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms, and JAXA will contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Partnerships are under development to include additional conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. In addition, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is expected to (1) provide new measurement standards for precipitation estimation from space, (2) improve understanding of precipitation physics, the global water cycle variability, and freshwater availability, and (3) advance weather/climate/hydrological prediction capabilities to directly benefit the society. An overview of the GPM mission concept, program

  7. Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) a Novel Approach to Meet NASA's Most Demanding Reentry Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead

    2014-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions to Venus and outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of current mid-density ablators (PICA or Avcoat). Therefore mission planners assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust Thermal Protection System (TPS) however its high density and thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, high heat fluxes, pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose certification challenges in existing ground based test facilities. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This presentation will summarize maturation of the WTPS project.

  8. Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) a Novel Approach to Meet Nasa's Most Demanding Reentry Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Ellerby, Donald T.; Gasch, Matt; Ventkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beerman, Adam; Boghozian, Tane; Gonzales, Gregory; Feldman, Jay; Peterson, Keith; Prabhu, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions to Venus and other planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of current mid density ablators (PICA or Avcoat). Therefore mission planners assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heatshield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic is a robust TPS, however, its high density and thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, high fluxes, pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose certification challenges in existing ground based test facilities. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This presentation will summarize the maturation of the WTPS project.

  9. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W., III; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the Galileo Orbiter spacecraft utilizes a high-resolution (1500 mm focal length) television camera with an 800 ?? 800 pixel virtual-phase, charge-coupled detector. It is designed to return images of Jupiter and its satellites that are characterized by a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolution, geometric fiedelity, and spectral range unmatched by imaging data obtained previously. The spectral range extends from approximately 375 to 1100 nm and only in the near ultra-violet region (??? 350 nm) is the spectral coverage reduced from previous missions. The camera is approximately 100 times more sensitive than those used in the Voyager mission, and, because of the nature of the satellite encounters, will produce images with approximately 100 times the ground resolution (i.e., ??? 50 m lp-1) on the Galilean satellites. We describe aspects of the detector including its sensitivity to energetic particle radiation and how the requirements for a large full-well capacity and long-term stability in operating voltages led to the choice of the virtual phase chip. The F/8.5 camera system can reach point sources of V(mag) ??? 11 with S/N ??? 10 and extended sources with surface brightness as low as 20 kR in its highest gain state and longest exposure mode. We describe the performance of the system as determined by ground calibration and the improvements that have been made to the telescope (same basic catadioptric design that was used in Mariner 10 and the Voyager high-resolution cameras) to reduce the scattered light reaching the detector. The images are linearly digitized 8-bits deep and, after flat-fielding, are cosmetically clean. Information 'preserving' and 'non-preserving' on-board data compression capabilities are outlined. A special "summation" mode, designed for use deep in the Jovian radiation belts, near Io, is also described. The detector is 'preflashed' before each exposure to ensure the photometric linearity

  10. Galileo and the Interpretation of the Bible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, William E.

    Galileo's understanding of the relationship between science and the Bible has frequently been celebrated as anticipating a modern distinction between the essentially religious nature of scripture and the claims of the natural sciences. Galileo's reference to the remarks of Cardinal Baronius, that the Bible teaches one how to go to heaven and not how the heavens go, has been seem as emblematic of his commitment to the distinction between the Book of Nature and the Book of Scripture. This essay argues that, contrary to the common view, Galileo shares with the theologians of the Inquisition the same fundamental principles of biblical interpretation: principles which include traditional scriptural hermeneutics enunciated by Augustine and Aquinas, as well as those characteristic of Counter-Reformation Catholicism. Although Galileo argues that one should not begin with biblical passages in order to discover truths about nature, he does think that the Bible contains scientific truths and that it is the function of wise interpreters to discover these truths. The dispute with the theologians of the Inquisition occurred because they thought that it was obviously true scientifically that the earth did not move and, on the basis of this view, they read the Bible as revealing the same thing. They reached this conclusion because, like Galileo, they thought that the Bible contained truths about nature. Of course, what these theologians accepted as scientifically true, Galileo denied.

  11. Combined constellations GPS and Galileo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    As for the users of satellite navigation systems the actual slogan is GPS and Galileo the advantages and disadvantages of different combined constellations of these systems must be taken into account. The distributions (in per cent) of the numbers of satellites visible by the observer at different latitudes situated in open and restricted (urban canyon) area for different masking elevation angles (Hmin) for two combined constellations GPS + Galileo systems (I - 29 GPS satellites + 27 Galileo satellites, II - 29 GPS + 30 Galileo) are presented in this paper. In addition to it the detailed distributions for the observer at latitudes 50-60° for other constellations & elevation angles are demonstrated. For the first constellation the difference between the number of GPS satellites visible by the observer above horizon (Hmin = 0°) at latitudes 50-60° and the number of Galileo satellites visible by the same observer at the same time can be equal each number between plus 7 and minus 7. This fact must be taken into account in the production and the determination of the number of channel of GPS-Galileo integrated receivers.

  12. International solar-terrestrial physics program: A plan for the core spaceflight missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This brochure has been prepared by NASA on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA), the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan) (ISAS), and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to describe the scope of the science problems to be investigated and the mission plan for the core International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. This information is intended to stimulate discussions and plans for the comprehensive worldwide ISTP Program. The plan for the study of the solar - terrestrial system is included. The Sun, geospace, and Sun-Earth interaction is discussed as is solar dynamics and the origins of solar winds.

  13. Spacelab simulation using a Lear Jet aircraft: Mission no. 4 (ASSESS program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Mason, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The fourth ASSESS Spacelab simulation mission utilizing a Lear Jet aircraft featured trained experiment operators (EOs) in place of the participating scientists, to simulate the role and functions of payload specialists in Spacelab who may conduct experiments developed by other scientists. The experiment was a broadband infrared photometer coupled to a 30-cm, open port, IR telescope. No compromises in equipment design or target selection were made to simplify operator tasks; the science goals of the mission were selected to advance the mainline research program of the principle investigator (PI). Training of the EOs was the responsibility of the PI team and consisted of laboratory sessions, on-site training during experiment integration, and integrated mission training using the aircraft as a high-fidelity simulator. The EO permission experience in these several disciplines proved adequate for normal experiment operations, but marginal for the identification and remedy of equipment malfunctions. During the mission, the PI utilized a TV communication system to assist the EOs to overcome equipment difficulties; both science and operations were successfully implemented.

  14. Education and Public Outreach Programs for RHESSI and STEREO/IMPACT Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Mendez, B. J.; Peticolas, L.

    2003-05-01

    We will present inquiry-based classroom activities for grades 8-12, as well as public outreach web-based resources featuring solar data, mathematics, and solar scientist interviews. The classroom activities are well aligned with National Science Education Standards. The inquiry-based resources "X-ray Candles: Solar Flares on Your Birthday," "SUNSPOTS" and "Discover Solar Cycle" will be highlighted. These activities allow students to discover the solar cycle by analyzing x-ray flare data and graphing the percentage of high energy flares over time. The RHESSI satellite mission scientists and a RHESSI EPO developed this activity. It was featured in the "Having a Solar Blast" episode of NASA Connect that was broadcast on NASA TV and PBS stations last spring. We will also present the various ways scientists from NASA's STEREO mission are contributing to the EPO program--through interviews incorporated in the high-visibility Eclipse 2001 webcast event, and through a STEREO website hosted by the Exploratorium. Measuring Magnetism, another inquiry-based classroom activity explaining the background science for STEREO, will be highlighted. We will also feature an exciting prototype program that involves converting the science results of solar energetic particle data to sound, and then a musician ultimately creates a composition inspired by these sounds as well as related solar images. Data from an earlier twin-spacecraft Mission, Helios1/2 (courtesy of D. Reames, GSFC and the Helios mission investigators) are used as a testbed for creating the stereo sounds from the future STEREO data. These resources are supported by RHESSI and STEREO EPO and the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) Project, a NASA SR&T (Supporting Research and Technology) Program.

  15. Development of a multi-media crew-training program for the terminal configured vehicle mission simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhouck, J. A.; Markos, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the work being done at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center on the development of a multi-media crew-training program for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) Mission Simulator. Brief descriptions of the goals and objectives of the TCV Program and of the TCV Mission Simulator are presented. A detailed description of the training program is provided along with a description of the performance of the first group of four commercial pilots to be qualified in the TCV Mission Simulator.

  16. Development of a multi-media crew-training program for the Terminal Configured Vehicle Mission Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.; Markos, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the work being done at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center on the development of a multi-media crew-training program for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) Mission Simulator. Brief descriptions of the goals and objectives of the TCV Program and of the TCV Mission Simulator are presented. A detailed description of the training program is provided along with a description of the performance of the first group of four commercial pilots to be qualified in the TCV Mission Simulator.

  17. Copernicus, Epicurus, Galileo, and Gassendi.

    PubMed

    LoLordo, Antonia

    2015-06-01

    In his Letters on the motion impressed by a moving mover, the theory of the motion of composite bodies put forth by Gassendi is strikingly similar to Galileo's. In other of his writings, however, his description of the motion of individual atoms is understood very differently. In those places, he holds (1) that individual atoms are always in motion, even when the body that contains them is at rest, (2) that atomic motion is discontinuous although the motion of composite bodies is at least apparently continuous, and (3) that atomic motion is grounded in an intrinsic vis motrix, motive power. In contrast, composite bodies simply persist in their state of motion or rest in the absence of outside interference. Unfortunately, Gassendi neglects to explain how his accounts of atomic and composite motion fit together, and it is difficult to see how they could possibly be integrated. My goal is to explain, given this difficulty, why he accepted both the Galilean theory of the motion of composite bodies and the Epicurean theory of atomic motion. PMID:26227235

  18. The Galileo plasma wave investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Shaw, R. R.; Roux, A.; Gendrin, R.; Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Galileo plasma wave investigation is to study plasma waves and radio emissions in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The plasma wave instrument uses an electric dipole antenna to detect electric fields, and two search coil magnetic antennas to detect magnetic fields. The frequency range covered is 5 Hz to 5.6 MHz for electric fields and 5 Hz to 160 kHz for magnetic fields. Low time-resolution survey spectrums are provided by three on-board spectrum analyzers. In the normal mode of operation the frequency resolution is about 10 percent, and the time resolution for a complete set of electric and magnetic field measurements is 37.33 s. High time-resolution spectrums are provided by a wideband receiver. The wideband receiver provides waveform measurements over bandwidths of 1, 10, and 80 kHz. Compared to previous measurements at Jupiter this instrument has several new capabilities. These new capabilities include (1) both electric and magnetic field measurements to distinguish electrostatic and electromagnetic waves, (2) direction finding measurements to determine source locations, and (3) increased bandwidth for the wideband measurements.

  19. Galileo Photopolarimeter/Radiometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Brown, F. G.; Chandos, R. A.; Fincher, W. C.; Kubel, L. F.; Lacis, A. A.; Travis, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Photopolarimeter/Radiometer (PPR) is a remote sensing instrument on the Galileo Orbiter designed to measure the degree of linear polarization and the intensity of reflected sunlight in ten spectral channels between 410 and 945 nm to determine the physical properties of Jovian clouds and aerosols, and to characterize the texture and microstructure of satellite surfaces. The PPR also measures thermal radiation in five spectral bands between 15 and 100 microns to sense the upper tropospheric temperature structure. Two additional channels which measure spectrally integrated solar and solar plus thermal radiation are used to determine the planetary radiation budget components. The PPR photopolarimetric measurements utilize previously flown technology for high-precision polarimetry using a calcite Wollaston prism and two silicon photodiodes to enable simultaneous detection of the two orthogonal polarization components. The PPR radiometry measurements are made with a lithium tantalate pyroelectric detector utilizing a unique arrangement of radiometric stops and a scene/space chopper blade to enable a warm instrument to sense accurately the much colder scene temperatures.

  20. Mission Analysis Program for Solar Electric Propulsion (MAPSEP). Volume 1: Analytical manual for earth orbital MAPSEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An introduction to the MAPSEP organization and a detailed analytical description of all models and algorithms are given. These include trajectory and error covariance propagation methods, orbit determination processes, thrust modeling, and trajectory correction (guidance) schemes. Earth orbital MAPSEP contains the capability of analyzing almost any currently projected low thrust mission from low earth orbit to super synchronous altitudes. Furthermore, MAPSEP is sufficiently flexible to incorporate extended dynamic models, alternate mission strategies, and almost any other system requirement imposed by the user. As in the interplanetary version, earth orbital MAPSEP represents a trade-off between precision modeling and computational speed consistent with defining necessary system requirements. It can be used in feasibility studies as well as in flight operational support. Pertinent operational constraints are available both implicitly and explicitly. However, the reader should be warned that because of program complexity, MAPSEP is only as good as the user and will quickly succumb to faulty user inputs.

  1. NSEG: A segmented mission analysis program for low and high speed aircraft. Volume 3: Demonstration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Rozendaal, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Program NSEG is a rapid mission analysis code based on the use of approximate flight path equations of motion. Equation form varies with the segment type, for example, accelerations, climbs, cruises, descents, and decelerations. Realistic and detailed vehicle characteristics are specified in tabular form. In addition to its mission performance calculation capabilities, the code also contains extensive flight envelope performance mapping capabilities. For example, rate-of-climb, turn rates, and energy maneuverability parameter values may be mapped in the Mach-altitude plane. Approximate take off and landing analyses are also performed. At high speeds, centrifugal lift effects are accounted for. Extensive turbojet and ramjet engine scaling procedures are incorporated in the code.

  2. ASSESS program: Shuttle Spacelab simulation using a Lear jet aircraft (mission no. 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Mason, R. H.; Pappas, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    The second shuttle Spacelab simulation mission of the ASSESS program was conducted at Ames Research Center by the Airborne Science Office (ASO) using a Lear jet aircraft based at a site remote from normal flight operations. Two experimenters and the copilot were confined to quarters on the site during the mission, departing only to do in-flight research in infrared astronomy. A total of seven flights were made in a period of 4 days. Results show that experimenters with relatively little flight experience can plan and carry out a successful research effort under isolated and physically rigorous conditions, much as would more experienced scientists. Perhaps the margin of success is not as great, but the primary goal of sustained acquisition of significant data over a 5-day period can be achieved.

  3. Practical Application of Model-based Programming and State-based Architecture to Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Gregory A.; Ingham, Michel D.; Chung, Seung; Martin, Oliver; Williams, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Innovative systems and software engineering solutions are required to meet the increasingly challenging demands of deep-space robotic missions. While recent advances in the development of an integrated systems and software engineering approach have begun to address some of these issues, they are still at the core highly manual and, therefore, error-prone. This paper describes a task aimed at infusing MIT's model-based executive, Titan, into JPL's Mission Data System (MDS), a unified state-based architecture, systems engineering process, and supporting software framework. Results of the task are presented, including a discussion of the benefits and challenges associated with integrating mature model-based programming techniques and technologies into a rigorously-defined domain specific architecture.

  4. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Kakar, Ramesh; Neeck, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. In addition, NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Currently, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more

  5. How Nasa's Independent Verification and Validation (IVandV) Program Builds Reliability into a Space Mission Software System (SMSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Marcus S.; Northey, Jeffrey; Stanton, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to outline how the NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Program helps to build reliability into the Space Mission Software Systems (SMSSs) that its customers develop.

  6. Mission and status of the US Department of Energy's battery energy storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. E.; Hurwitch, J. W.; Landgrebe, A. R.; Hauser, S. G.

    1985-05-01

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's battery research program has evolved to reflect the changing conditions of the world energy economy and the national energy policy. The battery energy storage program supports the goals of the National Energy Policy Plan (FY 1984). The goals are to provide an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs, minimize federal control and involvement in the energy marketplace, promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system, and facilitate technology transfer from the public to the private sector. This paper describes the history of the battery energy storage program and its relevance to the national interest. Potential market applications for battery energy storage are reviewed, and each technology, its goals, and its current technical status are described. The paper concludes by describing the strategy developed to ensure effective technology transfer to the private sector and reviewing past significant accomplishments.

  7. The Galileo IOV Dispenser System- Design, Development & Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Andersson, G.; Davies, W.; Plaza, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    On October 21st, 2011, lifting off from the ELS launch site in French Guiana, a Soyuz ST-B and FREGAT upper stage, carried the first two Galileo IOV spacecraft on a 3-hour 49-minute flight and successfully injected the 2 Galileo Navigation spacecraft into a circular medium-Earth orbit. The Dispenser System, the subject of this paper, is the equipped launch vehicle hardware mated directly to the FREGAT upper stage and built specifically to carry 2 Galileo IOV spacecraft during all ground and flight operations up to the moment of separation. The Dispenser System was purposely built for the Galileo IOV missions under European Space Agency and Arianespace contract. The prime contractor was selected to be RUAG Space in Sweden (Linköping) for all Dispenser “System and Management” activities and with subcontracts placed to RUAG Space in Switzerland (Zurich) for the Dispenser “Structure” and EADS CASA Spain (Madrid) for the “Hold Down and Release System” (HRS) hardware. The “Structure” is designed to transfer ground and flight loads between the spacecraft and the Launch Vehicle. The upper part, an aluminium sandwich box-type structure, interfaces with the satellites, whereas the lower part transitions to a lower frame, via a CFRP strut arrangement, to interface with the FREGA T upper stage. The spacecraft separation sub-system is composed of two sets of four low- shock “HRS” units and four “pushers” enabling to firmly hold the satellites during ground and flight operations and to release them when ordered by the Launch Vehicle. The Dispenser System also comprises an electrical sub-system and MLI. This paper summarises the overall Design, Development and Verification activities leading to the Qualification of the Dispenser System hardware. This will include the Structure and HRS contribution to the overall System Qualification. An overview of the System hardware will be described along with DDV logic, some key analysis performed and several of the

  8. Space certification and qualification programs for laser diode modules on the NASA ICESat-2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawruk, Nicholas W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Bruce, Kevin; Eltringham, Thomas F.; Nash, Franklin R.; Piccirilli, Alfonso B.; Slusark, Walter J.; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2013-09-01

    A laser diode module (LDM) space certification and qualification program was developed for NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2, ICESat-2 mission. The ICESat-2 laser transmitter is a high performance diode-pumped solid state laser that requires high reliability, high efficiency and high brightness fiber coupled LDMs, capable of supporting a 27,000 hour mission life. The test centric LDM space certification and qualification programs consisted of several key phases including a technology plausibility study, laser diode and LDM pedigree reviews, environmental acceptance and qualification testing, and extensive life testing. The intent of the plausibility study was to analytically and experimentally demonstrate that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) LDM design was capable of being space-certified. A pedigree review of the laser diode population was conducted to reject out-of-family laser diodes from the population. The laser diode pedigree review was a statistical analysis of several laser diode performance metrics (efficiency, operating current, etc.) with outliers being rejected. All LDMs underwent environmental acceptance testing including vibration, thermal cycling and an extended burn-in. The primary purpose of the acceptance testing was to highlight internal workmanship issues. The pedigree review of the acceptance tested LDMs was conducted to reject out-of-family LDMs in statistical analysis of several performance metrics (operating current, coupling efficiency, etc.). A sub-set of the flight-certified LDMs will be exposed to environmental qualification testing and will subsequently be tested to failure to determine the LDM capability. Multiple LDMs are being life tested under flight-like conditions and show no signs of degradation with run times of 22,000 hours, which is over 80% of the mission life. Details of the LDMs space certification and qualification programs are presented.

  9. Computer predictions of ground storage effects on performance of Galileo and ISPM generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) that will supply electrical power to the Galileo and International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) spacecraft are exposed to several degradation mechanisms during the prolonged ground storage before launch. To assess the effect of storage on the RTG flight performance, a computer code has been developed which simulates all known degradation mechanisms that occur in an RTG during storage and flight. The modeling of these mechanisms and their impact on the RTG performance are discussed.

  10. Using Galileo's Own Words in the Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Gary

    2009-10-01

    After years of discussing Galileo using secondary sources, I decided to have my students use Galileo's writings as a primary source of information in their lab reports. The advancements of Google Books and the internet has made it possible for all students to read Aristotle, Galileo, and Newton when exploring the nature of free fall kinematics. I will present links and suggested passages from several sources including Galileo's Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences.

  11. APOLLO 15 Galileo's Gravity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 15: A demonstration of a classic experiment. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 15 'The mountains of the Moon''', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 15: Fourth manned lunar landing with David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden, and James B. Irwin. Landed at Hadley rilleon July 30, 1971;performed EVA with Lunar Roving Vehicle; deployed experiments. P& F Subsattelite spring-launched from SM in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 295 hrs 11 min 53sec

  12. The icy Jovian satellites after the Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The icy satellites of Jupiter, Callisto, Ganymede, Europa and Amalthea have diverse and remarkable characteristics. Their initial compositions were determined by conditions in the circum-Jovian nebula, just as the planets' initial properties were governed by their formation within the circumsolar nebula. The satellites subsequently evolved under the complex interplay of orbital and geophysical processes, especially the effects of orbital resonances, tides, internal differentiation and heat. The history and character of the satellites can be inferred from consideration of the formation of planets and the satellites, from studies of their plausible orbital evolution, from measurements of geophysical properties, especially gravitational and magnetic fields, from observations of the compositions and geological structure of their surfaces and from theoretical modeling of the processes that connect these lines of evidence. The three large icy satellites probably contain significant liquid water: Europa has a deep liquid water ocean under a thin surface layer of ice; Ganymede and Callisto likely have relatively thin liquid water layers deep below their surfaces. Models of formation are challenged by the surprising properties of the outermost and innermost of the group: Callisto is partially differentiated, with rock and ice mixed through much of its interior; and tiny Amalthea also appears to be largely composed of ice. Each of the four moons is fascinating in its own right, and the ensemble provides a powerful set of constraints on the processes that led to their formation and evolution.

  13. Gaining Momentum: Re-Creating Galileo's Inclined Plane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an excerpt of Galileo's description of his inclined plane experiment. Describes the replication of Galileo's inclined plane experiment by students at Rice University (Texas) using an Internet site called the Galileo Project; then describes the authors' replication of the Project. (AEF)

  14. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research in Support of NASA Aeronautics and Exploration Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. This paper provides a brief overview of the various CDB tasks in support of the NASA programs. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  15. AUTOMATED CLASSIFICATION OF VARIABLE STARS IN THE ASTEROSEISMOLOGY PROGRAM OF THE KEPLER SPACE MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Blomme, J.; Debosscher, J.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Gilliland, R. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Brown, T. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Stello, D.; Derekas, A.; Stevens, I. R.; Suran, M. D.

    2010-04-20

    We present the first results of the application of supervised classification methods to the Kepler Q1 long-cadence light curves of a subsample of 2288 stars measured in the asteroseismology program of the mission. The methods, originally developed in the framework of the CoRoT and Gaia space missions, are capable of identifying the most common types of stellar variability in a reliable way. Many new variables have been discovered, among which a large fraction are eclipsing/ellipsoidal binaries unknown prior to launch. A comparison is made between our classification from the Kepler data and the pre-launch class based on data from the ground, showing that the latter needs significant improvement. The noise properties of the Kepler data are compared to those of the exoplanet program of the CoRoT satellite. We find that Kepler improves on CoRoT by a factor of 2-2.3 in point-to-point scatter.

  16. Ganymede - Galileo Mosaic Overlayed on Voyager Data in Uruk Sulcus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A mosaic of four Galileo high-resolution images of the Uruk Sulcus region of Jupiter's moon Ganymede is shown within the context of an image of the region taken by Voyager 2 in 1979. The image shows details of parallel ridges and troughs that are the principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. The Galileo frames unveil the fine-scale topography of Ganymede's ice-rich surface, permitting scientists to develop a detailed understanding of the processes that have shaped Ganymede. Resolution of the Galileo images is 74 meters (243 feet) per pixel, while resolution of the Voyager image is 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) per pixel. In this view, north is to the top, and the sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead. The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, longitude 168 degrees west, is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles). The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. Long Term Monitoring of the Io Plasma Torus During the Galileo Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    In the fall of 1999, the Galileo spacecraft made four passes into the Io plasma torus, obtaining the best in situ measurements ever of the particle and field environment in this densest region of the Jovian magnetosphere. Supporting observations from the ground are vital for understanding the global and temporal context of the in situ observations. We conducted a three-month-long Io plasma torus monitoring campaign centered on the time of the Galileo plasma torus passes to support this aspect of the Galileo mission. The almost-daily plasma density and temperature measurements obtained from our campaign allow the much more sparse but also much more detailed Galileo data to be used to address the issues of the structure of the Io plasma torus, the stability mechanism of the Jovian magnetosphere, the transport of material from the source region near Io, and the nature and source of persistent longitudinal variations. Combining the ground-based monitoring data with the detailed in situ data offers the only possibility for answering some of the most fundamental questions about the nature of the Io plasma torus.

  18. Galileo, Cassini, Giotto. Raumsonden erforschen unser Planetensystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    Großartige Bilder und andere wichtige Informationen von den Planeten Merkur bis Neptun sowie von Asteroiden und Kometen haben zahlreiche amerikanische und russische, europäische und japanische Raumsonden seit 1960 zur Erde gefunkt. Die interplanetare Raumfahrt bewährt sich als verlängertes Teleskop der Astronomen, und die Ergebnisse sind nicht nur für Wissenschaftler interessant, sie erweitern auch den menschlichen Erkenntnishorizont insgesamt. Die Raketentechnik und moderne Elektronik bzw. Sensorik haben sich zu einem fantastischen Instrument der Astronomie und Planetenforschung verbunden. Allgemeinverständlich werden in diesem Buch die historische, erdgebundene Entwicklung der Planetenforschung und die Ergebnisse der seit 45 Jahren startenden automatischen Raumsonden, die natürlich viel näher an die fernen Himmelskörper herankommen, vor dem Leser ausgebreitet. So wissen wir heute sehr gut über das Aussehen und die Beschaffenheit der meisten kleinen und großen Planeten, ihrer Oberflächen und Atmosphären, die verschiedenartigen Monde und Ringsysteme, Magnetfelder und Strahlengürtel Bescheid. Den zweiten Schwerpunkt des Buches bildet die Beschreibung der vielen Raumsonden und ihrer oft jahrelangen, aufregenden Missionen zur Erforschung von Sonne, Merkur, Venus, Erde und Mond, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus und Neptun sowie diverser Kometen und Asteroiden. Dabei wird die Konstruktion der Elektronikroboter mit allen Anlagen zur Energieversorgung, Temperaturkontrolle, Funkverbindung und Lagekontrolle ebenso erläutert wie die Multispektralinstrumente und die Beobachtungsstrategien beim Erreichen der fernen Reiseziele. Unvergessen sind die fantastischen Ergebnisse der amerikanischen Mariner- und Viking-Sonden von Mars die großartigen Bilder und Messungen der Voyager-Späher von den großen äußeren Gasplaneten. Auch die neuesten Resultate der Galileo-Sonde von Jupiter und seinen vier großen Monden sowie des Cassini-Orbiters von Saturn und seinem

  19. STS-34 Cargo Configuration drawing with payload bay location of Galileo/IUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Visual aid entitled NATIONAL STS PROGRAM STS-34 CARGO CONFIGURATION is a line drawing of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, orbiting the Earth with its payload bay doors (PLBDs) open. A label identifies the Galileo spacecraft on an inertial upper stage (IUS) and its location in the payload bay (PLB).

  20. Magnetospheric Interaction at Jupiter's Galilean Moons Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto: Galileo in-Situ Measurements Compared with Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, N.; Jia, X.; Roussos, E.; Fraenz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Between 1995 and 2003 the Galileo spacecraft orbited Jupiter and flew-by multiple times at the Galilean satellites Io (7), Europa (12), Ganymede (5), and Callisto (8). The wealth of new unprecedented data from Galileo in-situ measurements in comparison to hybrid- and MHD simulation results enhanced our view of the understanding of the interaction between the moons (or in the case of Ganymede's own magnetosphere) and the surrounding highly dynamic Jovian magnetosphere. In this paper the in-situ particles and fields measurements are reviewed in the context of the future ESA-mission JUICE to arrive in the Jovian system in 2030.

  1. Dawn Mission to Vesta and Ceres: Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Lucy-Ann A.; Wise, J.; Ristvey, J. D.; Counley, J.; Warner, E. M.; Crow, C. A.

    2008-09-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft, launched September, 2007, is traveling to the asteroid belt to study two of the largest protoplanets, asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres, to study the early solar system and planetary evolution. The mission is an eight-year journey to Vesta in 2011 (orbiting 9 months) and to Ceres in 2015 (orbiting 6 months). At each body a suite of instruments will be used for scientific observation and data collection. Dawn's education and public outreach (E/PO) program offers a wide variety of resources, activities, and programs for teachers, informal leaders, and independent learners. The content modules include teacher guides, activities, texts, and PowerPoints that are aligned with the National Science Education Standards (NSES). The modules address multiple learning styles, and encompass several subject areas. Activities range from history of science to current issues in space science (i.e., the debate on the definition of a planet and dwarf planet). An ion propulsion interactive simulation and module provides a real-life example of basic science concepts and resulting technology used to propel the Dawn spacecraft. Clickworkers is an on-line activity that allows students to analyze real data (crater density) to infer the age of asteroids. The Dawn website provides opportunities for students to learn about careers, become a Dawn Young Engineer, and learn the difference between meteorites and Earth rocks (Find a Meteorite). The multimedia page includes spectacular imagery, a feature video, informative podcasts, and radio interviews. The Dawn E/PO team is currently developing a module about the spacecraft's scientific instruments that directly aligns to the "interaction of matter and energy” standards in the NSES. Both formal and informal educators can contribute to the evaluation of the Dawn mission E/PO program by field-testing emerging educational materials. To learn more visit the Dawn website: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/index.asp.

  2. Parameter estimation supplement to the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations program (MAESTRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    This Parameter Estimation Supplement describes the PEST computer program and gives instructions for its use in determination of lunar gravitation field coefficients. PEST was developed for use in the RAE-B lunar orbiting mission as a means of lunar field recovery. The observations processed by PEST are short-arc osculating orbital elements. These observations are the end product of an orbit determination process obtained with another program. PEST's end product it a set of harmonic coefficients to be used in long-term prediction of the lunar orbit. PEST employs some novel techniques in its estimation process, notably a square batch estimator and linear variational equations in the orbital elements (both osculating and mean) for measurement sensitivities. The program's capabilities are described, and operating instructions and input/output examples are given. PEST utilizes MAESTRO routines for its trajectory propagation. PEST's program structure and subroutines which are not common to MAESTRO are described. Some of the theoretical background information for the estimation process, and a derivation of linear variational equations for the Method 7 elements are included.

  3. [An expert system for controlling the physical training program of crews on long-term space missions].

    PubMed

    Son'kin, V D; Egorov, A D; Zaĭtseva, V V; Son'kin, V V; Stepantsov, V I

    2003-01-01

    The concept of in-flight expert system for controlling (ESC) the physical training program during extended, including Martian, space missions has been developed based on the literature dedicated to the microgravity countermeasures and a retrospective analysis of effectiveness of the known ESC methods. This concept and the principle of crew autonomy were used as prime assumptions for defining the structure of ESC-based training in long-duration and planetary missions. PMID:14730732

  4. Status of Galileo interim radiation electron model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EDP) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii.

  5. Galileo, Gauss, and the Green Monster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Dan; Teague, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Galileo dropped cannonballs from the leaning tower of Pisa to demonstrate something about falling bodies. Gauss was a giant of mathematics and physics who made unparalleled contributions to both fields. More contemporary (and not a person), the Green Monster is the left-field wall at the home of the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park. Measuring 37 feet…

  6. The Galileo arrival date selection process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwinski, Jan M.; Gershman, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Galileo arrival date selection process has culminated in the selection of December 7,1995. This arrival date will provide excellent science opportunities at Jupiter as well as the first spacecraft reconnaissance ever of not one, but two asteroids during the cruise to Jupiter.

  7. Scaling Laws in Galileo: An Educational Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.

    2011-01-01

    In his "Two New Sciences" Galileo Galilei deals with the strength of objects, discussing how it changes with size. Our daily life offers many examples of effects due to change of dimensions and sometimes the consequences are unintuitive. This subject is really interesting for secondary school students and it can be presented through simple…

  8. The New Millennium Program: Positioning NASA for ambitious space and earth science missions for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Casani, E.K.; Wilson, B.; Ridenoure, R.

    1996-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the New Millennium Program (NMP) to enable space and Earth science missions to be carried out far more cost-effectively in the 21st century than they are today. NMP will develop and flight validate the revolutionary technologies that will be needed to carry out NASA{close_quote}s 21st-century missions, and will also demonstrate methods to drastically reduce mission costs. Advances in technology will enable the reduction of spacecraft and instrument size, an increase in autonomy and reduction of operations costs, and innovation in measurement techniques and mission architectures: all needed for the high-return missions of the future. Because the design space of the technology-validation flights exceeds the available money and scheduling resources, the approach will be to first exhaustively explore mission design space, and then evaluate missions for such factors as technological value, scientific capability, cost, and level of public interest. The oversubscribed mission set can then be reduced to a maximum-value set for implementation. Anticipated societal benefits from NMP include stimulated development of advanced technologies and creation of new U.S. industry to meet the demand for capable microspacecraft. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Galileo and the Problems of Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Wallace Edd

    Galileo's science of motion changed natural philosophy. His results initiated a broad human awakening to the intricate new world of physical order found in the midst of familiar operations of nature. His thinking was always based squarely on the academic traditions of the spiritual old world. He advanced physics by new standards of judgment drawn from mechanics and geometry, and disciplined observation of the world. My study first determines the order of composition of the earliest essays on motion and physics, ca. 1588 -1592, from internal evidence, and bibliographic evidence. There are clear signs of a Platonist critique of Aristotle, supported by Archimedes, in the Ten Section Version of On Motion, written ca. 1588, and probably the earliest of his treatises on motion or physics. He expanded upon his opening Platonic -Archimedean position by investigating the ideas of scholastic critics of Aristotle, including the Doctores Parisienses, found in his readings of the Jesuit Professors at the Collegio Romano. Their influences surfaced clearly in Galileo's Memoranda on Motion and the Dialogue on Motion, and in On Motion, which followed, ca. 1590-1592. At the end of his sojourn in Pisa, Galileo opened the road to the new physics by solving an important problem in the mechanics of Pappus, concerning motion along inclined planes. My study investigates why Galileo gave up attempts to establish a ratio between speed and weight, and why he began to seek the ratios of time and distance and speed, by 1602. It also reconstructs Galileo's development of the 1604 principle, seeking to outline its invention, elaboration, and abandonment. Then, I try to show that we have a record of Galileo's moment of recognition of the direct relation between the time of fall and the accumulated speed of motion--that great affinity between time and motion and the key to the new science of motion established before 1610. Evidence also ties the discovery of the time affinity directly to Galileo

  10. Balancing innovation with commercialization in NASA's Science Mission Directorate SBIR Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrile, R. J.; Jackson, B. L.

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) administers a portion of the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program. One of the challenges of administrating this program is to balance the need to foster innovation in small businesses and the need to demonstrate commercialization by infusion into NASA. Because of the often risky nature of innovation, SBIR programs will tend to drift into a status that rewards proposals that promise to deliver a product that is exactly what was specified in the call. This often will satisfy the metric of providing a clear demonstration of infusion and thus also providing a publishable success story. However, another goal of the SBIR program is to foster innovation as a national asset. Even though data from commercially successful SMD SBIR tasks indicate a higher value for less innovative efforts, there are programmatic and national reasons to balance the program toward risking a portion of the portfolio on higher innovation tasks. Establishing this balance is made difficult because there is a reward metric for successful infusion and commercialization, but none for successful innovation. In general, the ultimate infusion and commercialization of innovative solutions has a lower probability than implementation of established ideas, but they can also have a much higher return on investment. If innovative ideas are valued and solicited in the SBIR program, then NASA technology requirements need to be specified in a way that defines the problem and possible solution, but will also allow for different approaches and unconventional methods. It may also be necessary to establish a guideline to risk a percentage of awards on these innovations.

  11. SPECKLE CAMERA OBSERVATIONS FOR THE NASA KEPLER MISSION FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Ciardi, David R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the first results from a speckle imaging survey of stars classified as candidate exoplanet host stars discovered by the Kepler mission. We use speckle imaging to search for faint companions or closely aligned background stars that could contribute flux to the Kepler light curves of their brighter neighbors. Background stars are expected to contribute significantly to the pool of false positive candidate transiting exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission, especially in the case that the faint neighbors are eclipsing binary stars. Here, we describe our Kepler follow-up observing program, the speckle imaging camera used, our data reduction, and astrometric and photometric performance. Kepler stars range from R = 8 to 16 and our observations attempt to provide background non-detection limits 5-6 mag fainter and binary separations of {approx}0.05-2.0 arcsec. We present data describing the relative brightness, separation, and position angles for secondary sources, as well as relative plate limits for non-detection of faint nearby stars around each of 156 target stars. Faint neighbors were found near 10 of the stars.

  12. The new millennium program EO-1 mission and spacecraft design concept.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, D.; Hestnes, P.; Perry, M.; Stabnow, B.

    Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) is the first in a series of Earth Orbiter spacecraft for NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). Government, academia and industry have been teamed together to develop the EO-1 spacecraft. The mission, instruments, NMP technologies, and spacecraft subsystems are discussed. The remote sensing science instruments which will be flown on the EO-1 spacecraft are the Advanced Land Imager and the Atmospheric Corrector. The NMP technologies planned for spaceflight validation by EO-1 include an X-band phased array antenna, a pulsed plasma thruster, a high-rate fiber optic data bus, a lightweight flexible solar array, formation flight with Landsat-7, and carbon-carbon thermal radiators. The data subsystem contains several new technologies. Other subsystems include attitude control, power, RF communications, structure and mechanisms, and thermal subsystem. The EO-1 mission is a good example of the faster-better-cheaper philosophy that NASA has adopted for its spacecraft, and paves the way for constructing future spacecraft in the new millennium.

  13. Engaging the Public in the Discovery of Other Worlds: The Kepler Discovery Mission Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, E. K.; Gould, A. D.; Harman, P. K.; Koch, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    Are we alone? Are there other worlds like our own? Astronomers are discovering large planets, but can smaller planets - new Earths - be found? These are powerful and exciting questions that motivate student learning and public interest in NASA's Kepler Discovery Mission's search for planets. Continual discoveries of extrasolar planets have sparked broad public interest, and Kepler will expand this search to discover planets like our own. The Kepler Mission Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program focuses on the excitement of discovering Earth-size planets in the habitable zone to enhance student learning and public interest in astronomy and physics. Kepler will launch in 2008, to begin searching for extrasolar Earths. During the first year, we expect Kepler to rapidly detect large planets similar to 51 Peg and smaller Earth-size planets in Mercury-like orbits. By the fourth year, we anticipate the discovery Earth-size planets in habitable zones. The Kepler EPO program began October 2002 and will continue through at least 2012, and our goals and plans are presented in this poster. The EPO program is scoped to build public interest during development, and to engage students and the public throughout the initial four-year, on-orbit mission and beyond if an extended mission is conducted. The EPO goals are to increase public awareness and understanding of the Kepler Mission by embodying key principles of NASA's ``Partners in Education" and ``Implementing the OSS Education/ Public Outreach Strategy:" involve scientists and contractors in EPO efforts, establish collaborations with planetariums and science museums, and build on existing programs and networks that maximize the leverage of NASA EPO funding in this project. The Kepler EPO plan is designed to take advantage of existing collaborations, networks, experience, and relationships to optimize the impact of EPO. Kepler EPO is funded by NASA's Discovery Mission Program, Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program (Overview of the Evolution and Success Stories from MOD During the Space Shuttle program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azbell, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA's other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. This paper provides specific examples that illustrate how MOD's focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. This paper will discuss specific examples for the Plan, Train, Fly, and Facilities aspects within MOD. This paper also provides a discussion of the joint civil servant/contractor environment and the relative badge-less society within MOD. Several Shuttle mission related examples have also been included that encompass all of the aforementioned MOD elements and attributes, and are used to show significant MOD successes within the Shuttle Program. These examples include the STS-49 Intelsat recovery and repair, the (post-Columbia accident) TPS inspection process and the associated R-Bar Pitch Maneuver for ISS missions, and the STS-400 rescue mission preparation efforts for the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  15. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  16. The final Galileo SSI observations of Io: Orbits G28-I33

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turtle, E.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Radebaugh, J.; Milazzo, M.; Simonelli, D.P.; Geissler, P.; Williams, D.A.; Perry, J.; Jaeger, W.L.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Denk, T.; Phillips, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    We present the observations of Io acquired by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment during the Galileo Millennium Mission (GMM) and the strategy we used to plan the exploration of Io. Despite Galileo's tight restrictions on data volume and downlink capability and several spacecraft and camera anomalies due to the intense radiation close to Jupiter, there were many successful SSI observations during GMM. Four giant, high-latitude plumes, including the largest plume ever observed on Io, were documented over a period of eight months; only faint evidence of such plumes had been seen since the Voyager 2 encounter, despite monitoring by Galileo during the previous five years. Moreover, the source of one of the plumes was Tvashtar Catena, demonstrating that a single site can exhibit remarkably diverse eruption styles - from a curtain of lava fountains, to extensive surface flows, and finally a ??? 400 km high plume - over a relatively short period of time (??? 13 months between orbits 125 and G29). Despite this substantial activity, no evidence of any truly new volcanic center was seen during the six years of Galileo observations. The recent observations also revealed details of mass wasting processes acting on Io. Slumping and landsliding dominate and occur in close proximity to each other, demonstrating spatial variation in material properties over distances of several kilometers. However, despite the ubiquitous evidence for mass wasting, the rate of volcanic resurfacing seems to dominate; the floors of paterae in proximity to mountains are generally free of debris. Finally, the highest resolution observations obtained during Galileo's final encounters with Io provided further evidence for a wide diversity of surface processes at work on Io. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IMP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program requirements and operations requirements for the IMP mission are presented. The satellite configuration is described and the missions are analyzed. The support equipment, logistics, range facilities, and responsibilities of the launching organizations are defined. The systems for telemetry, communications, satellite tracking, and satellite control are identified.

  18. Kepler Mission Website: Portal to the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; DeVore, E.; Gould, A.; Koch, D.

    2008-05-01

    The 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope is an opportunity to turn the public's eyes skyward and to the universe beyond the solar system. The Kepler Mission, launching in 2009, the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) will is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to detect and characterize hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone, using the transit method of detection. The habitable zone encompasses the distances from a star where liquid water can exist on a planet's surface. Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Program Mission. The Kepler Mission website http://www.kepler.arc.nasa.gov/ offers classroom activity lesson plans Detecting Planet Transits, The Human Orrery, and Morning Star and Evening Star. The activities are suitable for the informal science education realm. The spacecraft paper model and LEGO model orrerey can be used in the classroom by teachers or at home by families. The mission simulation and animation, as well as lessons and models highlight the science concepts critical to employing the transit method of detection, Kepler's Laws. The Send Your Name to Space on Kepler Spacecraft provides a certificate of participation for all individuals that submit there name to be listed on a DVD placed on the spacecraft. This poster will provide details on each of the items described.

  19. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Geissler, Paul; Simonelli, Damon P.; Carr, Michael H.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Breneman, H. Herbert; Jones, Todd J.; Kaufman, James M.; Magee, Kari P.; Senske, David A.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Schubert, Gerald

    1998-09-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  20. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  1. Preparing to Live the Institutional Mission: An Evaluation of a Pilot Program with Engaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temperato, John R.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated how a select group of mission-engaged, upper division students (n = 7) compared to a random sample of junior- (n = 20) and senior- (n = 20) year students in their perception of an urban, Catholic, and religious-order-sponsored university's identity. Across two years, we assessed mission identity and mission-driven…

  2. NASA's New Millennium Program : The Space Technology 8 (ST8) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abakians, Henry; Chmielewski, Art; Franklin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planning for the mission of Space Technology 8 (ST8). ST8 is a low-cost mission that will demonstrate 4 technology experiments: the SAILMAST, Ultraflex 175, Thermal Loop and a Dependable Multiprocessor. These technologies are described. The development and demonstration of these technologies will enable future missions.

  3. Space Station Engineering and Technology Development. Proceedings of the Panel on Program Performance and Onboard Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ad-hoc committee was asked to review the following questions relevant to the space station program: (1) onboard maintainability and repair; (2) in-space research and technology program and facility plans; (3) solar thermodynamic research and technology development program planning; (4) program performance (cost estimating, management, and cost avoidance); (5) onboard versus ground-based mission control; and (6) technology development road maps from IOC to the growth station. The objective of these new assignments is to provide NASA with advice on ways and means for improving the content, performance, and/or effectiveness of these elements of the space station program.

  4. Hot Spots on Io: Initial Results From Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly; Davies, A. G.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W.; Kamp, L.; Soderblom, L.; Leader, F. E.; Mehlman, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on Galileo has monitored the volcanic activity on Io since June 28, 1996. This paper presents preliminary analysis of NIMS thermal data for the first four orbits of the Galileo mission. NIMS has detected 18 new hot spots and 12 others which were previously known to be active. The distribution of the hot spots on Io's surface may not be random, as hot spots surround the two bright, SO2-rich regions of Bosphorus Regio and Colchis Regio. Most hot spots scan to be persistently active from orbit to orbit and 10 of those detected were active in 1979 during the Voyager encounters. We report the distribution of hot spot temperatures and find that they are consistent with silicate volcanism.

  5. Subjective evaluations of integer cosine transform compressed Galileo solid state imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Gold, Yaron; Grant, Terry; Chuang, Sherry

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, using 15 evaluators from 12 institutions involved in the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of integer cosine transform (ICT) compression using specially formulated quantization (q) tables and compression ratios on acceptability of the 800 x 800 x 8 monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated visually by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were evaluated. Each evaluator viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high-resolution monitor; each was compressed using a different q level. First the evaluators selected the image with the highest overall quality to support them in their visual evaluations of image content. Next they rated each image using a scale from one to five indicating its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four preselected types of images with and without noise were presented to each evaluator.

  6. Hot spots on Io: Initial results from Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; Davies, A.G.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W.; Kamp, L.; Soderblom, L.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on Galileo has monitored the volcanic activity on Io since June 28, 1996. This paper presents preliminary analysis of NIMS thermal data for the first four orbits of the Galileo mission. NIMS has detected 18 new hot spots and 12 others which were previously known to be active. The distribution of the hot spots on Io's surface may not be random, as hot spots surround the two bright, SO2-rich regions of Bosphorus Regio and Colchis Regio. Most hot spots seem to be persistently active from orbit to orbit and 10 of those detected were active in 1979 during the Voyager encounters. We report the distribution of hot spot temperatures and find that they are consistent with silicate volcanism. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Galileo Earth/Moon News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release (Part 1 of 2) begins with a presentation given by William J. O'Neil (Galileo Project Manager) describing the status and position of the Galileo spacecraft 7 days prior to the Galileo Earth-2 flyby. Slides are presented including diagrams of the Galileo spacecraft trajectory, trajectory correction maneuvers, and the Venus and asteroid flybys. Torrence Johnson (Galileo Project Scientist) follows Mr. O'Neil with an explanation of the Earth/Moon science activities that will be undertaken during the second Galileo/Earth encounter. These activities include remote sensing, magnetospheric and plasma measurements, and images taken directly from Galileo of the Earth and Moon. Dr. Joseph Veverka (Galileo Imaging Team, Cornell University) then gives a brief presentation of the data collected by the first Galileo/Gaspra asteroid flyby. Images sampled from the 57 photographs taken of Gaspra are presented along with discussions of Gaspra's morphology, shape and size, and surface features. These presentations are followed by a question and answer period given for the benefit of scientific journalists whose subjects include overall Galileo spacecraft health, verification of the Gaspra images timeframe, and the condition of certain scientific spacecraft instruments. Part 2 of this video can be retrieved by using Report No. NONP-NASA-VT-2000001078.

  8. Time variable gravity retrieval and treatment of temporal aliasing using optical two-way links between GALILEO and LEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauk, Markus; Pail, Roland; Murböck, Michael; Schlicht, Anja

    2016-04-01

    For the determination of temporal gravity fields satellite missions such as GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) or CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) were used in the last decade. These missions improved the knowledge of atmospheric, oceanic and tidal mass variations. The most limiting factor of temporal gravity retrieval quality is temporal aliasing due to the undersampling of high frequency signals, especially in the atmosphere and oceans. This kind of error causes the typical stripes in spatial representations of global gravity fields such as from GRACE. As part of the GETRIS (Geodesy and Time Reference in Space) mission, that aims to establish a geodetic reference station and precise time- and frequency reference in space by using optical two-way communication links between geostationary (GEO) and low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, a possible future gravity field mission can be set up. By expanding the GETRIS space segment to the global satellite navigation systems (GNSS) the optical two-way links also connect the GALILEO satellites among themselves and to LEO satellites. From these links between GALILEO and LEO satellites gravitational information can be extracted. In our simulations inter-satellite links between GALILEO and LEO satellites are used to determine temporal changes in the Earth's gravitational field. One of the main goals of this work is to find a suitable constellation together with the best analysis method to reduce temporal aliasing errors. Concerning non-tidal aliasing, it could be shown that the co-estimation of short-period long-wavelength gravity field signals, the so-called Wiese approach, is a powerful method for aliasing reduction (Wiese et al. 2013). By means of a closed loop mission simulator using inter-satellite observations as acceleration differences along the line-of-sight, different mission scenarios for GALILEO-LEO inter-satellite links and different functional models like the Wiese approach are analysed.

  9. Evaluation of “The Space Place,” a NASA Integrated, Multi-mission Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Space Place is an integrated NASA education and public outreach program, so far representing over 40 different NASA missions. It combines Web-based, printed, and externally published media to reach underserved audiences across the nation. Its primary mission is to develop and provide a highly desirable suite of attractive and educational products designed to appeal to and immerse the general public in space exploration. Its primary target audience is elementary school age kids. The program has developed an extensive network of partnerships with museums and libraries in rural areas, English and Spanish language newspapers, astronomy societies, rocketry clubs, and national youth organizations. Materials are distributed monthly through all these channels. Originally a New Millennium Program (NMP) outreach effort only, it is open to all NASA missions. NMP (a NASA-level program managed out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) continues to provide the base of support to build and maintain the outreach program’s infrastructure. Obtaining independent evaluation and reporting of the effectiveness of the program is one of NASA’s requirements for education and public outreach efforts. The Program Evaluation and Research Group (PERG) at Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, was retained to perform this service for The Space Place. PERG is also evaluating education and public outreach programs for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. PERG recently delivered a report evaluating The Space Place program. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, PERG surveyed representative samples of Space Place partner museums, astronomy clubs, and newspapers. The survey included questions about all the products the program provides. The report concludes that The Space Place fills a niche by serving small institutions, giving them a personal alliance with NASA that they would otherwise not have. By providing free, quality materials, The Space Place program provides these under

  10. Mars mission program for primary students: Building student and teacher skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, Naomi; Pakakis, Michael; Christie, Ian

    2011-09-01

    The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) scenario-based programs, including the Mission to Mars and Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory, utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring. The use of a scenario provides a real-life context and purpose to what students might otherwise consider disjointed information. These programs engage students in the areas of maths and science, and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The introduction of a scenario-based program for primary students engages students in maths and science at a younger age, addressing the issues of basic numeracy and science literacy, thus laying the foundation for stronger senior science initiatives. Primary students absorb more information within the context of the scenario, and presenting information they can see, hear, touch and smell creates a memorable learning and sensory experience. The mission also supports development of teacher skills in the delivery of hands-on science and helps build their confidence to teach science. The Primary Mission to the Mars Base gives primary school students access to an environment and equipment not available in schools. Students wear flight suits for the duration of the program to immerse them in the experience of being an astronaut. Astronauts work in the VSSEC Space Laboratory, which is transformed into a Mars base for the primary program, to conduct experiments in areas such as robotics, human physiology, microbiology, nanotechnology and environmental science. Specialist mission control software has been developed by La Trobe University Centre for Games Technology to provide age appropriate Information and Communication Technology (ICT) based problem solving and support the concept of a mission. Students in Mission Control observe the astronauts working in the space laboratory and talk to them via the AV system. This interactive

  11. NASA's J-2X Engine Builds on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jimmy R.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA streamlined its U.S. Vision for Space Exploration hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. The revised CLV upper stage will use the J-2X engine, a derivative of NASA s Apollo Program Saturn V s S-II and S-IVB main propulsion, which will also serve as the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) engine. This paper gives details of how the J- 2X engine effort mitigates risk by building on the Apollo Program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. It is well documented that propulsion is historically a high-risk area. NASA s risk reduction strategy for the J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development efforts. In addition, NASA and its industry partner, Rocketdyne, which originally built the J-2, have tapped into their extensive databases and are applying lessons conveyed firsthand by Apollo-era veterans of America s first round of Moon missions in the 1960s and 1970s. NASA s development approach for the J-2X engine includes early requirements definition and management; designing-in lessons learned from the 5-2 heritage programs; initiating long-lead procurement items before Preliminary Desi& Review; incorporating design features for anticipated EDS requirements; identifying facilities for sea-level and altitude testing; and starting ground support equipment and logistics planning at an early stage. Other risk reduction strategies include utilizing a proven gas generator cycle with recent development experience; utilizing existing turbomachinery ; applying current and recent main combustion chamber (Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator) and channel wall nozzle (COBRA) advances; and performing rigorous development, qualification, and certification testing of the engine system

  12. The Evolution of the NASA Commercial Crew Program Mission Assurance Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) established the Commercial Crew Program (CCP) in order to provide human access to the International Space Station and low Earth orbit via the commercial (non-governmental) sector. A particular challenge to NASA has been how to determine that the Commercial Provider's transportation system complies with programmatic safety requirements. The process used in this determination is the Safety Technical Review Board which reviews and approves provider submitted hazard reports. One significant product of the review is a set of hazard control verifications. In past NASA programs, 100% of these safety critical verifications were typically confirmed by NASA. The traditional Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) model does not support the nature of the CCP. To that end, NASA S&MA is implementing a Risk Based Assurance process to determine which hazard control verifications require NASA authentication. Additionally, a Shared Assurance Model is also being developed to efficiently use the available resources to execute the verifications.

  13. Mission-driven, Manageable and Meaningful Assessment of an Undergraduate Neuroscience Program.

    PubMed

    Muir, Gary M

    2015-01-01

    Academia has recently been under mounting pressure to increase accountability and intentionality in instruction through development of student "intended learning outcomes" (ILOs) developed at multiple levels (e.g., course, program, major, and even institution). Once these learning goals have been determined, then classroom instruction can be purposefully designed to map onto those intended outcomes in a "backward design" process (Wiggins and McTighe, 2005). The ongoing challenge with any such process, however, is in determining one's effectiveness in achieving these intended learning goals, so it is critical that efficient tools can be developed that enable these goals to be assessed. In addition, an important requirement of any ILOs is that they are mission-driven, meaningful and parsed in such a way that they can be used to obtain evidence in a manageable way. So how can we effectively assess these outcomes in our students? This paper describes key factors to consider in the planning and implementation of assessment for an undergraduate neuroscience program. PMID:26240530

  14. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Laub, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients.The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated.Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries ("Plan B"), approaches 100%.The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries.Furthermore, the academic visiting professor ("Plan A": hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model ("Plan C": to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance.The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  15. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Laub, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients. The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated. Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries (“Plan B”), approaches 100%. The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries. Furthermore, the academic visiting professor (“Plan A”: hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model (“Plan C”: to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance. The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  16. Mission-driven, Manageable and Meaningful Assessment of an Undergraduate Neuroscience Program

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Academia has recently been under mounting pressure to increase accountability and intentionality in instruction through development of student “intended learning outcomes” (ILOs) developed at multiple levels (e.g., course, program, major, and even institution). Once these learning goals have been determined, then classroom instruction can be purposefully designed to map onto those intended outcomes in a “backward design” process (Wiggins and McTighe, 2005). The ongoing challenge with any such process, however, is in determining one’s effectiveness in achieving these intended learning goals, so it is critical that efficient tools can be developed that enable these goals to be assessed. In addition, an important requirement of any ILOs is that they are mission-driven, meaningful and parsed in such a way that they can be used to obtain evidence in a manageable way. So how can we effectively assess these outcomes in our students? This paper describes key factors to consider in the planning and implementation of assessment for an undergraduate neuroscience program. PMID:26240530

  17. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  18. OGO program summary, supplement 1. [updated bibliography for all OGO missions and scientific results from OGO 5 and 6 missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Scientific results from OGO-5 and OGO-6 experiments are summarized and approximately 200 citations are included to update the 1975 OGO bibliography. Personal author, subject, and corporate source indexes are included. The supplement follows the same format as that of the OGO Program Summary; it does not repeat the finalized information in the original publication, which should be consulted for indexes of experiments, experimenters, institutions, and the glossary of abbreviations and acronyms.

  19. The Galileo star scanner observations at Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Paul D.; Adams, Olen W.; Vandermey, Nancy; Theilig, E. E.; Schimmels, Kathryn A.; Lewis, George D.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Alexander, Claudia J.

    2004-06-01

    In November of 2002, the Galileo spacecraft passed within 250 km of Jupiter's moon Amalthea. An onboard telescope, the star scanner, observed a series of bright flashes near the moon. It is believed that these flashes represent sunlight reflected from 7 to 9 small moonlets located within about 3000 km of Amalthea. From star scanner geometry considerations and other arguments, we can constrain the diameter of the observed bodies to be between 0.5 m to several tens of kilometers. In September of 2003, while crossing Amalthea's orbit just prior to Galileo's destruction in the jovian atmosphere, a single additional body seems to have been observed. It is suspected that these bodies are part of a discrete rocky ring embedded within Jupiter's Gossamer ring system.

  20. Tectonics of the Galileo Regio on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. G.; Masson, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    The surface of Ganymede consists of dark cratered terrain, and groved terrain. The dark cratered terrains form polygonal units, the largest of which is Galileo Regio, the surface of which is transected by furrows, smooth floored valleys bounded by relatively sharp parallel ridges. The most apparent of them are grouped together and form an apparently arcuate system of subparallel furrows which was mapped using Voyager pictures and plotted on a map using a stereographic projection. With this kind of projection, the main furrow system is not arcuate, but rectilinear. Observations strongly suggest that the Galileo Regio furrow systems are not of impact origin and appear to be irrelevant to discussions about the basins' morphology or evolution of planetary lithosphere determined from multiring structures.

  1. Galileo high-resolution encoder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Dario; Cascone, Enrico; Schipani, Pietro

    1997-09-01

    The Galileo National Telescope (TNG) is a 3.6 meter Alt-Az telescope installed at the Astronomical Observatory of the Roque de Los Muchachos in La Palma, Canary Islands (Spain). The TNG motion control system, designed and realized by the Technology Working Group (TWG), is completely digital because of the versatility of this system topology. In a digital control system using an encoder as transducer means to have a digital feedback signal, therefore directly comparable with the reference without any conversion that is essential with other kinds of transducers. In the following the Galileo telescope (TNG) encoder system with its control electronics and the management software are described. It has been realized by a collaboration between the Heidenhain Company and the TWG. The TNG encoder system, at the state of the art, has one of the highest performances in the telescopes field, in terms of resolution, accuracy, readout time, reliability.

  2. The Galileo high gain antenna deployment anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    On April 11, 1991, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence that would open the spacecraft's High Gain Antenna. The Antenna's launch restraint had been released just after deployment sequence, the antenna, which opens like an umbrella, never reached the fully deployed position. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the likely failure mechanisms and pointed to some strategies to use for recovery of the high gain antenna.

  3. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Report 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, Martin G.

    1997-01-01

    On 7 December 1995, the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. The Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) on board the probe, measured upward and downward fluxes in the visible and infrared. At the University of Arizona, we have analyzed the data from the two visible-light channels, as well as the solar contributions to the thermal channels. The results are being prepared for submission to JGR in early September.

  4. Jupiter's Plasmasheet: Voyager and Galileo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Richardson, J. D.; Paterson, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    We have collated and, in some cases, re-analyzed the plasma data obtained by the Voyager 1 & 2 and Galileo spacecraft in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. We present the derived spatial and temporal variations in plasma density, temperature and velocity throughout the plasmasheet. We also use a simple model for density distribution with latitude to produce 3-D maps of plasmasheet properties and derive the flow of mass and energy in the magnetosphere.

  5. Mission Control Operations: Employing a New High Performance Design for Communications Links Supporting Exploration Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dan E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exploration programs demand a totally new examination of data multiplexing, digital communications protocols and data transmission principles for both ground and spacecraft operations. Highly adaptive communications devices on-board and on the ground must provide the greatest possible transmitted data density between deployed crew personnel, spacecraft and ground control teams. Regarding these requirements, this proposal borrows from research into quantum mechanical computing by applying the concept of a qubit, a single bit that represents 16 states, to radio frequency (RF) communications link design for exploration programs. This concept of placing multiple character values into a single data bit can easily make the evolutionary steps needed to meet exploration mission demands. To move the qubit from the quantum mechanical research laboratory into long distance RF data transmission, this proposal utilizes polarization modulation of the RF carrier signal to represent numbers from zero to fifteen. It introduces the concept of a binary-to-hexadecimal converter that quickly chops any data stream into 16-bit words and connects variously polarized feedhorns to a single-frequency radio transmitter. Further, the concept relies on development of a receiver that uses low-noise amplifiers and an antenna array to quickly assess carrier polarity and perform hexadecimal to binary conversion. Early testbed experiments using the International Space Station (ISS) as an operations laboratory can be implemented to provide the most cost-effective return for research investment. The improvement in signal-to-noise ratio while supporting greater baseband data rates that could be achieved through this concept justifies its consideration for long-distance exploration programs.

  6. Calibration of Galileo signals for time metrology.

    PubMed

    Defraigne, Pascale; Aerts, Wim; Cerretto, Giancarlo; Cantoni, Elena; Sleewaegen, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals for accurate timing and time transfer requires the knowledge of all electric delays of the signals inside the receiving system. GNSS stations dedicated to timing or time transfer are classically calibrated only for Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. This paper proposes a procedure to determine the hardware delays of a GNSS receiving station for Galileo signals, once the delays of the GPS signals are known. This approach makes use of the broadcast satellite inter-signal biases, and is based on the ionospheric delay measured from dual-frequency combinations of GPS and Galileo signals. The uncertainty on the so-determined hardware delays is estimated to 3.7 ns for each isolated code in the L5 frequency band, and 4.2 ns for the ionosphere-free combination of E1 with a code of the L5 frequency band. For the calibration of a time transfer link between two stations, another approach can be used, based on the difference between the common-view time transfer results obtained with calibrated GPS data and with uncalibrated Galileo data. It is shown that the results obtained with this approach or with the ionospheric method are equivalent. PMID:25474773

  7. GalileoMobile: Astronomical activities in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Vasquez, Mayte; Kobel, Philippe

    GalileoMobile is an itinerant science education initiative run on a voluntary basis by an international team of astronomers, educators, and science communicators. Our team's main goal is to make astronomy accessible to schools and communities around the globe that have little or no access to outreach actions. We do this by performing teacher workshops, activities with students, and donating educational material. Since the creation of GalileoMobile in 2008, we have travelled to Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, and Uganda, and worked with 56 schools in total. Our activities are centred on the GalileoMobile Handbook of Activities that comprises around 20 astronomical activities which we adapted from many different sources, and translated into 4 languages. The experience we gained in Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, and Uganda taught us that (1) bringing experts from other countries was very stimulating for children as they are naturally curious about other cultures and encourages a collaboration beyond borders; (2) high-school students who were already interested in science were always very eager to interact with real astronomers doing research to ask for career advice; (3) inquiry-based methods are important to make the learning process more effective and we have therefore, re-adapted the activities in our Handbook according to these; (4) local teachers and university students involved in our activities have the potential to carry out follow-up activities, and examples are those from Uganda and India.

  8. Guidance system operations plan for manned cm earth orbital and lunar missions using program Colossus 3. Section 2: Data links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    The data links for use with the guidance system operations plan for manned command module earth orbital and lunar missions using program Colossus 3 are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) digital uplink to CMC, (2) command module contiguous block update, (3) CMC retrofire external data update, (4) CMC digital downlink, and (5) CMC entry update.

  9. Guidance system operations plan for manned CM earth orbital missions using program Skylark 1. Section 2: Data links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program to define the digital uplink and downlink for use in manned command module orbital missions is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) digital uplink to command module, (2) CMC digital downlink, (3) downlist formats, (4) description of telemetered qualities, (5) flagbits, and (6) effects of Fresh Start (V36) and Hardware Restart on flagword and channel bits.

  10. Developing and Evaluating a Student Scholars Program to Engage Students with the University's Public Service and Outreach Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    A "student scholars" program was developed to engage undergraduates at a large, public, land-grant research university with its public service and outreach mission, through cohort meetings, supervised internships, and site visits. Qualitative and pre-/post-participation quantitative data from the first cohort of 10 students show that participants…

  11. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox - Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) Program Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Lucas, Bruno; Dinardo, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage pioneered by ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the Sentinel-3 series is planned for launch in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, the French Space Agency), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as net

  12. (abstract) Galileo PPR Observations of Shoemaker-Levy 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Tamppari, L.; Orton, G. S.; Claypool, I.; Travis, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR), a hybrid visual/thermal IR instrument designed primarily to measure properties of the Jovian atmosphere, was employed for SL9 as a staring high-speed photometer at 945 and 678 nm, taking advantage of Galileo's direct view of the impact point.The PPR was able to acquire data at times when no other Galileo optical instruments could operate.

  13. From Galileo's telescope to the Galileo spacecraft: our changing views of the Jupiter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    In four centuries, we have gone from the discovery of the four large moons of Jupiter - Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto - to important discoveries about these four very different worlds. Galileo's telescopic discovery was a major turning point in the understanding of science. His observations of the moons' motion around Jupiter challenged the notion of an Earth-centric Universe. A few months later, Galileo discovered the phases of Venus, which had been predicted by the heliocentric model of the Solar System. Galileo also observed the rings of Saturn (which he mistook for planets) and sunspots, and was the first person to report mountains and craters on the Moon, whose existence he deduced from the patterns of light and shadow on the Moon's surface, concluding that the surface was topographically rough. Centuries later, the Galileo spacecraft's discoveries challenged our understanding of outer planet satellites. Results included the discovery of an icy ocean underneath Europa's surface, the possibility of life on Europa, the widespread volcanism on Io, and the detection of a magnetic field around Ganymede. All four of these satellites revealed how the major geologic processes - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering and erosion - operate in these different bodies, from the total lack of impact craters on Io to the heavily cratered, ancient surface of Callisto. The Galileo spacecraft's journey also took it to Venus and the Moon, making important scientific observations about these bodies. The spacecraft discovered the first moon orbiting around an asteroid which, had Galileo the man observed, would have been another major blow for the geocentric model of our Solar System.

  14. A dialogue in paradise: John Milton's visit with Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2001-03-01

    According to his 1644 speech, ``Areopagitica,'' the English poet John Milton visited Galileo in his villa in Arcetri in 1638 while Galileo was under house arrest for offending the Church authorities. This article explores the influences Galileo may have had on Milton's writing as a result of the presumed meeting between the two, and discusses some similarities between Galileo's Starry Messenger (1610) and Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632) and Milton's Paradise Lost (1667). Teachers and students of physics, astronomy, and li!!terature can benefit from studying connections such as these between science and the arts.

  15. Shuttle spacelab simulation using a Lear jet aircraft: Mission no. 3 (ASSESS program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Mason, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The third ASSESS mission using a Lear Jet aircraft conducted to continue the study of scientific experiment operations in a simulated Spacelab environment. Prior to the mission, research planning and equipment preparation were observed and documented. A flight readiness review for the experiment was conducted. Nine of the ten scheduled flights were completed during simulation mission and all major science objectives were accomplished. The equipment was well qualified for flight and gave little trouble; telescope malfunctions occurred early in the mission and were corrected. Both real-time and post-observation data evaluation were used to assess research progress and to plan subsequent flight observations for maximum effectiveness.

  16. Welding isotopic heat sources for the cassini mission to Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; George, T.G.

    1994-12-31

    In 1997 NASA will launch the Cassini scientific probe to the planet Saturn. Electric power for this probe will be provided by radioisotope thermoelecric generators thermally driven by general-purpose heat source modules. Each module contains four, 150-g pellets of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}, individually encapsulated within a thin wall iridium-alloy shell. For the Galileo/Ulysses missions, assembly and welding took an average of 90 min per capsule. the work was done in a hot cell and the potential for personnel radiation exposure was not unduly high. The iridium alloy, from which the clad cups are made, contains a small amount of thorium to improve ductility and minimize grain growth. It has been shown that the thorium contributes to hot shortness which caused significant weld cracking during Galileo/Ulysses production. program requirements dictated that all operations provide high levels of process quality assurance. As a result, the welding system was configured to acquire copious amounts of digitized QA information. Early production operation of the welding systems has proven the ability to meet all program goals. For example, in the course of making approximately 60 girth welds during procedure qualification and safety impact testing, no rejectable weld defects have been found.

  17. [Experimental studies with mice on the program of the biosatellite BION-M1 mission].

    PubMed

    Andreev-Andrievsky, A A; Shenkman, B S; Popova, A S; Dolguikh, O N; Anokhin, K V; Soldatov, P E; Ilyin, E A; Sychev, V N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the BION-M1 project was laying the evidence and technological basis for addressing the medical issues of future remote space exploration missions by humans. The program of researches with the use of mice was focused on elicitation of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the muscular, cardiovascular and immune reactions to extended exposure in microgravity. The comprehensive studies combined lifetime measurements with investigations of mice tissues and cells by dint of the cutting-edge morphological, biochemical and molecular biology techniques. Males of mice C57/BL6 aged 4 to 5 months were chosen as the object of studies. They were distributed into the flight, ground control and two vivarium (laboratory control) groups and investigated immediately on return and after 7 days of readaptation. Some of the physiological functions were recorded throughout the flight. To ensure wellbeing of the animals in the experiments and to enhance data quality, prior to launch the mice were specially trained so as to accommodate to the group living, eating space food, and in-flight stress factors. Those of the mice that were designated for lifetime investigations were tested and received training pre-launch. PMID:25033610

  18. The Zamama-Thor region of Io: Insights from a synthesis of mapping, topography, and Galileo spacecraft data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Schenk, P.M.; Milazzo, M.P.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Rathbun, J.A.; Greeley, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied data from the Galileo spacecraft's three remote sensing instruments (Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR)) covering the Zamama - Thor region of Io's antijovian hemisphere, and produced a geomorphological map of this region. This is the third of three regional maps we are producing from the Galileo spacecraft data. Our goal is to assess the variety of volcanic and tectonic materials and their interrelationships on Io using planetary mapping techniques, supplemented with all available Galileo remote sensing data. Based on the Galileo data analysis and our mapping, we have determined that the most recent geologic activity in the Zamama - Thor region has been dominated by two sites of large-scale volcanic surface changes. The Zamama Eruptive Center is a site of both explosive and effusive eruptions, which emanate from two relatively steep edifices (Zamama Tholi A and B) that appear to be built by both silicate and sulfur volcanism. A ???100-km long flow field formed sometime after the 1979 Voyager flybys, which appears to be a site of promethean-style compound flows, flow-front SO2 plumes, and adjacent sulfur flows. Larger, possibly stealthy, plumes have on at least one occasion during the Galileo mission tapped a source that probably includes S and/or Cl to produce a red pyroclastic deposit from the same vent from which silicate lavas were erupted. The Thor Eruptive Center, which may have been active prior to Voyager, became active again during the Galileo mission between May and August 2001. A pillanian-style eruption at Thor included the tallest plume observed to date on Io (at least 500 km high) and new dark lava flows. The plume produced a central dark pyroclastic deposit (probably silicate-rich) and an outlying white diffuse ring that is SO2-rich. Mapping shows that several of th000e new dark lava flows around the plume vent have reoccupied sites of earlier flows. Unlike most of

  19. The Zamama Thor region of Io: Insights from a synthesis of mapping, topography, and Galileo spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Schenk, Paul M.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Rathbun, Julie A.; Greeley, Ronald

    2005-09-01

    We have studied data from the Galileo spacecraft's three remote sensing instruments (Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR)) covering the Zamama-Thor region of Io's antijovian hemisphere, and produced a geomorphological map of this region. This is the third of three regional maps we are producing from the Galileo spacecraft data. Our goal is to assess the variety of volcanic and tectonic materials and their interrelationships on Io using planetary mapping techniques, supplemented with all available Galileo remote sensing data. Based on the Galileo data analysis and our mapping, we have determined that the most recent geologic activity in the Zamama-Thor region has been dominated by two sites of large-scale volcanic surface changes. The Zamama Eruptive Center is a site of both explosive and effusive eruptions, which emanate from two relatively steep edifices (Zamama Tholi A and B) that appear to be built by both silicate and sulfur volcanism. A ˜100-km long flow field formed sometime after the 1979 Voyager flybys, which appears to be a site of promethean-style compound flows, flow-front SO 2 plumes, and adjacent sulfur flows. Larger, possibly stealthy, plumes have on at least one occasion during the Galileo mission tapped a source that probably includes S and/or Cl to produce a red pyroclastic deposit from the same vent from which silicate lavas were erupted. The Thor Eruptive Center, which may have been active prior to Voyager, became active again during the Galileo mission between May and August 2001. A pillanian-style eruption at Thor included the tallest plume observed to date on Io (at least 500 km high) and new dark lava flows. The plume produced a central dark pyroclastic deposit (probably silicate-rich) and an outlying white diffuse ring that is SO 2-rich. Mapping shows that several of the new dark lava flows around the plume vent have reoccupied sites of earlier flows. Unlike most of the

  20. Development of a prototype interactive learning system using multi-media technology for mission independent training program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Jack E.

    1992-01-01

    The Spacelab Mission Independent Training Program provides an overview of payload operations. Most of the training material is currently presented in workbook form with some lecture sessions to supplement selected topics. The goal of this project was to develop a prototype interactive learning system for one of the Mission Independent Training topics to demonstrate how the learning process can be improved by incorporating multi-media technology into an interactive system. This report documents the development process and some of the problems encountered during the analysis, design, and production phases of this system.

  1. Apollo guidance, navigation and control: Guidance system operations plan for manned CM earth orbital and lunar missions using Program COLOSSUS 3. Section 3: Digital autopilots (revision 14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Digital autopilots for the manned command module earth orbital and lunar missions using program COLOSSUS 3 are discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) reaction control system digital autopilot, (2) thrust vector control autopilot, (3) entry autopilot and mission control programs, (4) takeover of Saturn steering, and (5) coasting flight attitude maneuver routine.

  2. Interview with Julie Viveros, RN, Director of Nursing, Charlotte Rescue Mission, Rebound men's program. Interview by Joan Kub.

    PubMed

    Viveros, Julie; Kub, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The Charlotte Rescue Mission is a 90-day residential program that serves approximately 530 men and 365 women experiencing the disease of addiction annually. It has a long rich history and has been serving the Charlotte community for over 75 years for men and almost 25 years for women. "The men's program provides a five-fold, client-centered treatment approach addressing spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational needs to battle addiction. The objective is to help individuals fighting addiction and homelessness to accomplish spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational goals and be free of addiction." "Dove's Nest, Charlotte Rescue Mission's women's recovery program, opened its doors in 1992. The program provides a structured, yet loving and stable living environment, with a dedicated staff aimed at helping women understand and deal with the core issues of addiction as a disease". (Web site: http:// charlotterescuemission.org/). I had the privilege of interviewing Julie Viveros, RN, the Director of Nursing for the Rebound men's program, about her unique role at the Rescue Mission. PMID:25514693

  3. Orbit determination covariance analysis for the Deep Space Program Science Experiment mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, M.; Yee, C.; Lee, T.; Hoppe, M.; Oza, D.

    1993-01-01

    To define an appropriate orbit support procedure for the DSPSE mission, detailed permission orbit determination covariance analyses have been performed for the translunar and trans-Geographos mission phases. Preliminary analyses were also performed for the lunar mapping mission phase. These analyses are designed to assess the tracking patterns and the amount of tracking data needed to obtain orbit solutions of required accuracy for each mission phase and before and after each major orbit perturbation, such as orbit maneuvers and flybys of the Earth and Moon. In addition to operational orbit determination procedures, these analyses identify major error sources, estimate their contribution to orbital errors, and address possible strategies to reduce orbit determination error. For the lunar orbit phase, several lunar gravity error modeling approaches have been investigated. The covariance analysis results presented in this paper will serve as a guide for providing orbit determination support for the DSPSE mission.

  4. The Galileo System of Measurement: Preliminary Evidence for Precision, Stability, and Equivalance to Traditional Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, James; Woelfel, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Galileo system of measurement operations including reliability and validity data. Illustrations of some of the relations between Galileo measures and traditional procedures are provided. (MH)

  5. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox - Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) Program Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jérôme; Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno Manuel

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage pioneered by ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the Sentinel-3 series is planned for launch in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission’s data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, the French Space Agency), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as

  6. Inter-system biases estimation in multi-GNSS relative positioning with GPS and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, Cecile; Warnant, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The recent increase in the number of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) opens new perspectives in the field of high precision positioning. Particularly, the European Galileo program has experienced major progress in 2015 with the launch of 6 satellites belonging to the new Full Operational Capability (FOC) generation. Associated with the ongoing GPS modernization, many more frequencies and satellites are now available. Therefore, multi-GNSS relative positioning based on GPS and Galileo overlapping frequencies should entail better accuracy and reliability in position estimations. However, the differences between satellite systems induce inter-system biases (ISBs) inside the multi-GNSS equations of observation. Once these biases estimated and removed from the model, a solution involving a unique pivot satellite for the two considered constellations can be obtained. Such an approach implies that the addition of even one single Galileo satellite to the GPS-only model will strengthen it. The combined use of L1 and L5 from GPS with E1 and E5a from Galileo in zero baseline double differences (ZB DD) based on a unique pivot satellite is employed to resolve ISBs. This model removes all the satellite- and receiver-dependant error sources by differentiating and the zero baseline configuration allows atmospheric and multipath effects elimination. An analysis of the long-term stability of ISBs is conducted on various pairs of receivers over large time spans. The possible influence of temperature variations inside the receivers over ISB values is also investigated. Our study is based on the 5 multi-GNSS receivers (2 Septentrio PolaRx4, 1 Septentrio PolaRxS and 2 Trimble NetR9) installed on the roof of our building in Liege. The estimated ISBs are then used as corrections in the multi-GNSS observation model and the resulting accuracy of multi-GNSS positioning is compared to GPS and Galileo standalone solutions.

  7. Galilean Satellite Surface Non-Ice Constituents: New Results from the Cassini/Huygens VIMS Jupiter Flyby in the Context of the Galileo NIMS Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCord, T. B.; Brown, R.; Baines, K.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.; Coradini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Cassini mission Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) is currently returning data for the Galilean satellites. Examples of the new satellite data and the initial interpretations will be presented in the context of the Galileo NIMS data and results. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Galileo's eye: a new vision of the senses in the work of Galileo Galilei.

    PubMed

    Piccolino, Marco; Wade, Nicholas J

    2008-01-01

    Reflections on the senses, and particularly on vision, permeate the writings of Galileo Galilei, one of the main protagonists of the scientific revolution. This aspect of his work has received scant attention by historians, in spite of its importance for his achievements in astronomy, and also for the significance in the innovative scientific methodology he fostered. Galileo's vision pursued a different path from the main stream of the then contemporary studies in the field; these were concerned with the dioptrics and anatomy of the eye, as elaborated mainly by Johannes Kepler and Christoph Scheiner. Galileo was more concerned with the phenomenology rather than with the mechanisms of the visual process. His general interest in the senses was psychological and philosophical; it reflected the fallacies and limits of the senses and the ways in which scientific knowledge of the world could be gathered from potentially deceptive appearances. Galileo's innovative conception of the relation between the senses and external reality contrasted with the classical tradition dominated by Aristotle; it paved the way for the modern understanding of sensory processing, culminating two centuries later in Johannes Müller's elaboration of the doctrine of specific nerve energies and in Helmholtz's general theory of perception. PMID:18986060

  9. Representing the heavens: Galileo and visual astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M. G.; van Helden, A.

    1992-06-01

    The authors present the following conclusion. Galileo was not alone in his ambivalent attitude toward visual communication in astronomy. His attitude was shared by his contemporaries. In fact, the use of visual evidence is surprisingly rare until after 1640. And when astronomers finally began using pictorial evidence, they did so with an explicit commitment to representing the heavens faithfully and accurately. Although Francesco Fontana was the first to publish an astronomical book in which pictorial information was central, it is in the work of Johannes Hevelius (1611 - 1687), a university trained brewer in the Polish city of Gdansk, that we see the new visual dimension of telescopic astronomy best exemplified. Hevelius's Selenographia sive lunae descriptio of 1647 contained figures of forty different lunar phases, four views of the full moon, eighty-three diagrams, and several illustrations of his equipment and the appearances of other heavenly bodies. What is even more interesting, Hevelius made his own telescopes and, he himself engraved virtually every illustration - diagram or picture - in the book, thus combining the roles of the natural philosopher and the lowly artisan. Hevelius's approach to representing the heavens was so different from Galileo's that he utterly misunderstood the purpose behind the views of the moon shown in Sidereus nuncius. Such a completely wrongheaded judgment of Galileo's instruments and his ability as an observer and draftsman shows just how different the worlds of these two men were. When, within the range of media available to them, Hevelius and others chose to make the visual component central in communicating their observations, astronomy became a visual science.

  10. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P. E.; McMillan, M. T.

    2008-10-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO 2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained "ash" particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 10 6 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous "snowflakes" as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  11. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  12. Advanced radioisotope power sources for future deep space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Erik N.

    2001-02-01

    The use of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) has been well established for deep space mission applications. The success of the Voyager, Galileo, Cassini and numerous other missions proved the efficacy of these technologies in deep space. Future deep space missions may also require Advanced Radioisotope Power System (ARPS) technologies to accomplish their goals. In the Exploration of the Solar System (ESS) theme, several missions are in the planning stages or under study that would be enabled by ARPS technology. Two ESS missions in the planning stage may employ ARPS. Currently planned for launch in 2006, the Europa Orbiter mission (EO) will perform a detailed orbital exploration of Jupiter's moon Europa to determine the presence of liquid water under the icy surface. An ARPS based upon Stirling engine technology is currently baselined for this mission. The Pluto Kuiper Express mission (PKE), planned for launch in 2004 to study Pluto, its moon Charon, and the Kuiper belt, is baselined to use a new RTG (F-8) assembled from parts remaining from the Cassini spare RTG. However, if this unit is unavailable, the Cassini spare RTG (F-5) or ARPS technologies would be required. Future missions under study may also require ARPS technologies. Mission studies are now underway for a detailed exploration program for Europa, with multiple mission concepts for landers and future surface and subsurface explorers. For the orbital phase of these missions, ARPS technologies may provide the necessary power for the spacecraft and orbital telecommunications relay capability for landed assets. For extended surface and subsurface operations, ARPS may provide the power for lander operations and for drilling. Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) will perform a detailed study of Saturn's rings and ring dynamics. The Neptune Orbiter (NO) mission will perform a detailed multi disciplinary study of Neptune. Titan Explorer (TE) will perform in-situ exploration of Saturn's moon Titan, with both

  13. A General Mission Independent Simulator (GMIS) and Simulator Control Program (SCP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul L.; Moore, J. Michael; Rosenberger, John

    1994-01-01

    GMIS is a general-purpose simulator for testing ground system software. GMIS can be adapted to any mission to simulate changes in the data state maintained by the mission's computers. GMIS was developed in Code 522 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The acronym GMIS stands for GOTT Mission Independent Simulator, where GOTT is the Ground Operations Technology Testbed. Within GOTT, GMIS is used to provide simulated data to an installation of TPOCC - the Transportable Payload Operations Control Center. TPOCC was developed by Code 510 as a reusable control center. GOTT uses GMIS and TPOCC to test new technology and new operator procedures.

  14. First Galileo image of asteroid 243 Ida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Belton, M. J. S.; Veverka, J.; Neukum, G.; Head, J.; Greeley, Ronald; Klaasen, K.; Morrison, D.

    1994-01-01

    The second spacecraft encounter with an asteroid has yielded an unprecedentedly high resolution portrait of 243 Ida. On 28 Aug. 1993, Galileo obtained an extensive data set on this small member of the Koronis family. Most of the data recorded on the tape recorder will be returned to Earth in spring 1994. A five-frame mosaic of Ida was acquired with good illumination geometry a few minutes before closest approach; it has a resolution of 31 to 38 m/pixel amd was played back during Sept. 1993. Preliminary analyses of this single view of Ida are summarized.

  15. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  16. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Baines, K H; Encrenaz, T; Taylor, F W; Drossart, P; Kamp, L W; Pollack, J B; Lellouch, E; Collard, A D; Calcutt, S B; Grinspoon, D; Weissman, P R; Smythe, W D; Ocampo, A C; Danielson, G E; Fanale, F P; Johnson, T V; Kieffer, H H; Matson, D L; McCord, T B; Soderblom, L A

    1991-09-27

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infaied Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substanmial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species. PMID:17784099

  17. Galileo imaging of atmospheric emissions from Io.

    PubMed

    Geissler, P E; McEwen, A S; Ip, W; Belton, M J; Johnson, T V; Smyth, W H; Ingersoll, A P

    1999-08-01

    The Galileo spacecraft has detected diffuse optical emissions from Io in high-resolution images acquired while the satellite was eclipsed by Jupiter. Three distinct components make up Io's visible emissions. Bright blue glows of more than 300 kilorayleighs emanate from volcanic plumes, probably due to electron impact on molecular sulfur dioxide. Weaker red emissions, possibly due to atomic oxygen, are seen along the limbs, brighter on the pole closest to the plasma torus. A faint green glow appears concentrated on the night side of Io, possibly produced by atomic sodium. Io's disk-averaged emission diminishes with time after entering eclipse, whereas the localized blue glows brighten instead. PMID:10436151

  18. A Galilean Approach to the Galileo Affair, 1609-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finocchiaro, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    Galileo's telescopic discoveries of 1609-1612 provided a crucial, although not conclusive, confirmation of the Copernican hypothesis of the earth's motion. In Galileo's approach, the Copernican Revolution required that the geokinetic hypothesis be supported not only with new theoretical arguments but also with new observational evidence; that it…

  19. Idealisation and Galileo's Pendulum Discoveries: Historical, Philosophical and Pedagogical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's discovery of the properties of pendulum motion depended on his adoption of the novel methodology of idealisation. Galileo's laws of pendulum motion could not be accepted until the empiricist methodological constraints placed on science by Aristotle, and by common sense, were overturned. As long as scientific claims were judged by how the…

  20. Galileo's Treatment for the Centre of Gravity of Solids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, C. H.; Iommi-Amunategui, G.

    2007-01-01

    The appendix on the centres of gravity that appears at the end of Galileo's book, "Two New Sciences", is analysed. It is shown that the method used by Galileo in this work has an interesting reasoning and also shows preliminary ideas about scaling and advances some ideas about series convergence. In addition, we note that the geometrical language…

  1. The Long View: Light, Vision, and Visual Culture After Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, G. N.

    2011-06-01

    This paper concerns the impact of Galileo's astronomical observations and the influence of the telescope upon visual culture after the early 17th century. The timely coincidence of Galileo's astronomical telescopic observations with the artistic reevaluation of light and vision motivated a remarkable series of developments in art, which was redefined and mediated by the presence, if not the actual use, of optical instruments.

  2. The Feasibility of a Galileo-Style Tour of the Uranian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Longuski, James M.; Vanhooser, Teresa B. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity-assist trajectories have been a key to outer Solar System exploration. In particular, the gravity-assist tour of the Jovian satellites has contributed significantly to the success of the Galileo mission. A comparison of the Jovian system to the Uranian system reveals that the two possess similar satellite/planet mass ratios. Tisserand graphs of the Uranian system also indicate the potential for tours at Uranus. In this paper. We devise tour strategies and design a prototypical tour of the Uranian satellites, proving that tours at Uranus are feasible.

  3. Earth-Based Radio Tracking of the Galileo Probe for Jupiter Wind Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Border, J. S.; Navarro, J.; Wilson, W. E.; Oestreich, M.

    1997-01-01

    Although the Galileo probe was designed to communicate only to the orbiter, the probe radio signal was detected at two Earth-based radio observatories where the signal was a billion times weaker. The measured signal frequency was used to derive a vertical profile of the jovian zonal wind speed. Due to the mission geometry, the Earth-based wind estimates are less sensitive to descent trajectory errors than estimates based on probe-orbiter Doppler measurements. The two estimates of wind profiles agree qualitatively; both show high wind speeds at all depths sampled.

  4. Earth-Based Radio Tracking of the Galileo Probe for Jupiter Wind Estimation

    PubMed

    Folkner; Preston; Border; Navarro; Wilson; Oestreich

    1997-01-31

    Although the Galileo probe was designed to communicate only to the orbiter, the probe radio signal was detected at two Earth-based radio observatories where the signal was a billion times weaker. The measured signal frequency was used to derive a vertical profile of the jovian zonal wind speed. Due to the mission geometry, the Earth-based wind estimates are less sensitive to descent trajectory errors than estimates based on probe-orbiter Doppler measurements. The two estimates of wind profiles agree qualitatively; both show high wind speeds at all depths sampled. PMID:9005845

  5. High and low thrust mission analysis for a Mars exploration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Kyle M.; Horsewood, Jerry; Suskin, Mark

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify limits, trends, and sensitivities of Mars Transportation System performance over several Mars mission opportunities. Two Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) configurations utilizing different propulsion systems (Chemical/Aerobrake and NEP - Nuclear Electric Propulsion) are outlined. The trades involved in comparing two MTS candidate designs are assessed. Mission analysis for mission opportunities beginning in around 2010 and continuing past 2030 is performed, and a Mars mission model is covered, along with orbit selection and NEP and Chemical/Aerobrake performance. The results of several sensitivity studies are given in order to allow for contingency planning in design and performance. It is concluded that the low-thrust system perform best, its vehicle mass is lower and its trip times are more stable.

  6. Imaging and Spectroscopy of Jupiter from Mcdonald Observatory and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWoody, B. A.; Pryor, W. R.; Barker, E. S.; West, R. A.; Na, C. Y.; Colwell, W. E.; Tobiska, W. K.

    2001-11-01

    During Galileo Jupiter flyby C10 we imaged Jupiter using the Mcdonald Observatory 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope for spectroscopy and the 0.9-m telescope for imaging. Approximately 500 images were taken of Jupiter and a few of Saturn through an 8900A methane filter from 9/18/1997 through 9/21/1997. These images have been made into a short movie showing an interesting haze oval in the north polar region that rotates with Jupiter's system III at longitude 170 with a width of approximately 30 degrees. Simultaneous ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope WFPC-2 images obtained by West showed a large, UV-dark feature rotating with the planet in the north polar regions at the same location. The spectra of the haze oval obtained at Mcdonald Observatory range from about 3000A to 10000A and show enhanced continuum absorption and diminished absorption in the strong methane bands when compared to spectra at a time when the feature would not have been present. This is especially so for the 8900A band. Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer polar spectra ranging from 2000 to 3000A also show enhanced absorption at the haze oval. The oval may represent "fresh" haze formed by auroral precipitation. We present preliminary models for the spectrum. We acknowledge support from the NASA Jupiter System Data Analysis program. References: [1]Vincent, M.,et al. (2000) Icarus, 143, 205-222. [2] West, R.A., et al. (2001) Jupiter:Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere conference, 123

  7. Possible portrait of Galileo Galilei as a young scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.

    2012-02-01

    We describe here the possible discovery of a portrait of Galileo Galilei in his youth. The painting is not signed and the identification is mainly physiognomic. In fact, the face reveals clear resemblance to Domenico Tintoretto's portrait and to Giuseppe Calendi's engraving derived from a lost portrait made by Santi di Tito in 1601. Along with the portraits by Tintoretto, Furini, Leoni, Passignano, and Sustermans this could be another portrait of Galileo made al naturale, but, unlike the others, it depicts the scientist before he reached fame. Galileo looks rather young, at age of about 20-25 years. His eyes in the portrait are clear and the expression intense and appealing. From Galileo's correspondence we know of a portrait made by his friend Ludovico Cigoli. Rather interesting, though admittedly quite improbable, is the possibility of a self-portrait whose existence is mentioned in the first biography of Galileo by Salusbury in 1664.

  8. A reassessment of Galileo radiation exposures in the Jupiter magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Atwell, William; Townsend, Lawrence; Miller, Thomas; Campbell, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Earlier particle experiments in the 1970s on Pioneer-10 and -11 and Voyager-1 and -2 provided Jupiter flyby particle data, which were used by Divine and Garrett to develop the first Jupiter trapped radiation environment model. This model was used to establish a baseline radiation effects design limit for the Galileo onboard electronics. Recently, Garrett et al. have developed an updated Galileo Interim Radiation Environment (GIRE) model based on Galileo electron data. In this paper, we have used the GIRE model to reassess the computed radiation exposures and dose effects for Galileo. The 34-orbit 'as flown' Galileo trajectory data and the updated GIRE model were used to compute the electron and proton spectra for each of the 34 orbits. The total ionisation doses of electrons and protons have been computed based on a parametric shielding configuration, and these results are compared with previously published results. PMID:16604631

  9. Definitional-mission report: A national ethanol program for motor-fuel blending in Uganda. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The U.S. Trade and Development Program (TDP) formed a definitional mission team to evaluate the prospects of TDP funding a study for the National Ethanol Program for Motor Fuel Blending in Uganda. The definitional mission team recommends that TDP provide a grant to the Ministry of Energy to finance the cost of (1) a feasibility study for the project, and (2) an orientation visit for several Ugandan officials to visit sugar estates and ethanol plants in the U.S. U.S. technology in this sector is competitive and Ugandans will need to import 60-70 percent of plant equipment and training and construction management services. This will undoubtedly provide opportunities to U.S. suppliers to participate in the expansion of the ethanol industry in Uganda.

  10. Activities conducted during the definition phase of the outer planets missions program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The activities are described of the Meteoroid Science Team for the definition phase of the outer planet missions. Studies reported include: (1) combined zodiacal experiment for the Grand Tour Missions of the outer planets, (2) optical transmission of a honeycomb panel and its effectiveness as a particle impact surface, (3) element identification data from the combined zodiacal OPGT experiment and (4) development of lightweight thermally stable mirrors.

  11. The Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 3A Contamination Control Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    After nearly 10 years on-orbit, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) external thermal control materials and paint have degraded due to exposure to the low Earth orbit environment. This presented a potentially large on-orbit contamination source (particles and/or debris). Contamination mitigation techniques were developed to augment existing on-orbit servicing contamination controls. They encompassed mission management, crew training, and crew aids and tools. These techniques were successfully employed during the HST Servicing Mission 3A, December 1999.

  12. Apollo program flight summary report: Apollo missions AS-201 through Apollo 16, revision 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the Apollo flights from AS-201 through Apollo 16 is presented. The following subjects are discussed for each flight: (1) mission primary objectives, (2) principle objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (3) secondary objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (4) unusual features of the mission, (5) general information on the spacecraft and launch vehicle, (6) space vehicle and pre-launch data, and (7) recovery data.

  13. The GalileoMobile Project: sharing astronomy with students and teachers around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Herrera, Sandra; Del Sordo, Fabio; Spinelli, Patricia; Ntormousi, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy is an inspiring tool that can be used to motivate children to learn more about the world, to encourage critical thinking, and engage them in different scientific disciplines. Although many outreach programs bring astronomy to the classroom, most of them act in developed countries and rely heavily on internet connection. This leaves pupils and teachers in remote areas with little access to the latest space missions and the modern astronomical advances. GalileoMobile is an itinerant astronomy education initiative aiming to bridge this gap by donating educational material and organizing activities, experiments and teacher workshops at schools in rural areas. The initiative is run on a voluntary basis by an international team of astronomers, educators, and science communicators, working together to stimulate curiosity and interest in learning, to exchange different visions of the cosmos and to inspire a feeling of unity "under the same sky" between people from different cultures. Since the creation of the project in 2008, we have travelled to Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, Uganda, Brazil and Colombia, and worked with about 70 schools. From our experiences, we learnt that 1) bringing experts from other countries is very stimulating for children and encourages a collaboration beyond borders; 2) inquiry-based methods are important for making the learning process more effective; 3) involving local educators in our activities helps the longstanding continuation of the project. We are incorporating these lessons learned into a new concept of the project. Constellation 2015, aims to establish a South American network of schools committed to the long-term organisation of astronomical outreach activities amongst their pupils and local communities. Constellation was declared Cosmic Light Project by the International Year of Light 2015 and awarded funding by the OAD. At this Focus Meeting, we will present the outcomes from our latest expeditions in Brazil and Colombia in

  14. SMAP Mission Applications; Post Launch Research and the Early Adopter Program Socioeconomic Impact Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission, launched January 31, 2015, has grown an Early Adopter (EA) community since 2010. Over the next two years, the mission Applications Team will conduct socioeconomic impact analyses on thematic EA research in an effort to demonstrate the value of SMAP products in societally relevant, decision support applications. The SMAP mission provides global observations of the Earth's surface soil moisture, providing high accuracy, resolution and continuous global coverage. The SMAP Applications Team will document and evaluate the use of SMAP science products in applications related to weather forecasting, drought, agriculture productivity, floods, human health and national security. SMAP EA research in applied science cases such as sea ice and sea surface winds will also be evaluated. SMAP EAs provide a thematically scaled perspective on the use and impact of SMAP data. This analysis will demonstrate how the investments in pre-launch applications and early adopter efforts contributed to the mission value, product impact and fueled new research that contributes to the use of mission products, thereby enhancing mission success. This paper presents a set of Early Adopter case studies that show how EAs plan to use SMAP science products to enhance decision support systems, and about how the SMAP data stream affects these users. Detailed tracking of this comprehensive set of case studies will enable quantification and monetization of the benefits of an application by the end of the first two years after launch.

  15. Landform Degradation and Slope Processes on Io: The Galileo View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Chuang, Frank C.; Head, James W., III; McEwen, Alfred S.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Nixon, Brian E.; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Schenk, Paul M.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo mission has revealed remarkable evidence of mass movement and landform degradation on Io. We recognize four major slope types observed on a number of intermediate resolution (250 m/pixel) images and several additional textures on very high resolution (10 m/pixel) images. Slopes and scarps on Io often show evidence of erosion, seen in the simplest form as alcove-carving slumps and slides at all scales. Many of the mass movement deposits on Io are probably mostly the consequence of block release and brittle slope failure. Sputtering plays no significant role. Sapping as envisioned by McCauley et al. remains viable. We speculate that alcove-lined canyons seen in one observation and lobed deposits seen along the bases of scarps in several locations may reflect the plastic deformation and 'glacial' flow of interstitial volatiles (e.g., SO2) heated by locally high geothermal energy to mobilize the volatile. The appearance of some slopes and near-slope surface textures seen in very high resolution images is consistent with erosion from sublimation-degradation. However, a suitable volatile (e.g., H2S) that can sublimate fast enough to alter Io's youthful surface has not been identified. Disaggregation from chemical decomposition of solid S2O and other polysulfur oxides may conceivably operate on Io. This mechanism could degrade landforms in a manner that resembles degradation from sublimation, and at a rate that can compete with resurfacing.

  16. Galileo photometry of asteroid 243 Ida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Fanale, F.; Granahan, J.; McEwen, A.S.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.

    1996-01-01

    Galileo imaging observations over phase angles 19.5?? to 109.8?? are combined with near-opposition Earth-based data to derive the photometric properties of Ida. To first order these properties are uniform over the surface and well modeled at ?? = 0.55 ??m by Hapke parameters ????0 = 0.22, h = 0.020, B0 = 1.5, g = -0.33, and ?? = 18?? with corresponding geometric albedo p = 0.21??0.030.01 and Bond albedo AB = 0.081??0.0170.008. Ida's photometric properties are more similar to those of "average S-asteroids" (P. Helfenstein and J. Veverka 1989, Asteroids II, Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson) than are those of 951 Gaspra. Two primary color units are identified on Ida: Terrain A exhibits a spectrum with relatively shallower 1-??m absorption and a relatively steeper red spectral slope than average Ida, while Terrain B has a deeper 1-??m absorption and a less steep red slope. The average photometric properties of Ida and Terrain A are similar while those of Terrain B differ mostly in having a slightly higher value of ????0 (0.22 versus 0.21), suggesting that Terrain B consists of slightly brighter, more transparent regolith particles. Galileo observations of Ida's satellite Dactyl over phase angles 19.5?? to 47.6?? suggest photometric characteristics similar to those of Ida, the major difference being Dactyl's slightly lower albedo (0.20 compared to 0.21). ?? 1990 Academic Press, Inc.

  17. Thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics (TIMED). The TIMED mission and science program report of the science definition team. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A Science Definition Team was established in December 1990 by the Space Physics Division, NASA, to develop a satellite program to conduct research on the energetics, dynamics, and chemistry of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere/ionosphere. This two-volume publication describes the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics) mission and associated science program. The report outlines the scientific objectives of the mission, the program requirements, and the approach towards meeting these requirements.

  18. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  19. Guidance system operations plan for manned CM earth orbital missions using program SKYLARK 1. Section 4: Operational modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The operational modes for the guidance system operations plan for Program SKYLARK 1 are presented. The procedures control the guidance and navigation system interfaces with the flight crew and the mission control center. The guidance operational concept is designed to comprise a set of manually initiated programs and functions which may be arranged by the flight crew to implement a large class of flight plans. This concept will permit both a late flight plan definition and a capability for real time flight plan changes.

  20. GALILEO Precise Orbit and Clock Determinaiton using GPS and GALILEO Combined Processing Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongzheng; Tang, Geshi; Song, Baiyan; Liu, Huicui; Han, Chao; Ge, Maorong

    2014-05-01

    The GALILEO system-still in its development phase-will be Europe's GNSS, and the in-orbit validation (IOV) phase has begun with launch of two IOV satellites, IOV-1 (E11) and IOV-2 (E12). High precise data processing is the precondition for upgrading navigation precision, monitoring and assessment of GNSS Open services, and expanding the application region for satellite navigation system. BACC is doing the work about operation and maintenance the iGMAS (international GNSS Monitoring and Assessment Service) Analysis Center (BAC), and producing the precision products to the users with equivalent accuracy to well-known institutes, such as IGS and CODE including precise satellite orbit and clock, tracking station coordinate and receiver clock, Zenith Total Delay (ZTD), Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) parameters, global and statistical integrity and Ionospheric map, and this study just focuses on the combined orbit and clock. For GALILEO in the initial deployment phase, in order to take advantage of GPS observation and mature models to do joint orbit determination in a unified time and space frame to improve the orbit of other systems, and use the GPS orbit and clock from joint solution as the external check, we adopt combined orbit determination of GPS and GALILEO fixing firstly the coordinate of station, receiver clock and tropospheric parameters using GPS precise ephemeris and clock, and seting inter-system bias (ISB) between GPS and GALILEO as a parameter to be estimated. The observation data from a network of multi-GNSS capable receivers from the MGEX tracking network and a regional multi-GNSS network operated by China from day 321 to 334 in 2013, and the satellite force models and GFZ standard observation modeling except Yaw-control model are used in three day solution. For impact analysis, we compare the GPS orbit and clock to IGS final orbit and clock products to evaluate the accuracy, and the accuracy of GALILEO orbit and clock and can be validated by checking

  1. GAUDI: A Preparatory Archive for the COROT Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.; Catala, C.; Garrido, R.; Poretti, E.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Gutiérrez, R.; González, R.; Mantegazza, L.; Neiner, C.; Fremat, Y.; Charpinet, S.; Weiss, W.; Amado, P. J.; Rainer, M.; Tsymbal, V.; Lyashko, D.; Ballereau, D.; Bouret, J. C.; Hua, T.; Katz, D.; Lignières, F.; Lüftinger, T.; Mittermayer, P.; Nesvacil, N.; Soubiran, C.; van't Veer-Menneret, C.; Goupil, M. J.; Costa, V.; Rolland, A.; Antonello, E.; Bossi, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Rodrigo, C.; Aerts, C.; Butler, C. J.; Guenther, E.; Hatzes, A.

    2005-01-01

    The GAUDI database (Ground-based Asteroseismology Uniform Database Interface) is a preparatory archive for the COROT (Convection, Rotation, and Planetary Transits) mission developed at the Laboratorio de Astrofísica Espacial y Física Fundamental (Laboratory for Space Astrophysics and Theoretical Physics, Spain). Its intention is to make the ground-based observations obtained in preparation of the asteroseismology program available in a simple and efficient way. It contains spectroscopic and photometric data together with inferred physical parameters for more than 1500 objects gathered since 1998 January 1998 in 6 years of observational campaigns. In this paper, the main functions and characteristics of the system are described. Based on observations collected at La Silla (ESO proposals 67.D-0169, 69.D-0166, and 70.D-0110), Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (proposal 6-20-068), Observatoire de Haute-Provence, the South African Astronomical Observatory, Tautenburg Observatory, and Sierra Nevada Observatory.

  2. Autonomous optical navigation for interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Riedel, Joseph E.; Synnott, Stephen P.

    1996-10-01

    The automation of interplanetary spacecraft is becoming increasingly desirable to meet various mission requirements. A prototype autonomous spacecraft which will flyby an asteroid and comet is slated for flight in mid-1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program. This spacecraft will navigate by using optical data taken by the onboard camera to determine its orbit, and use this information to predict its future trajectory and make necessary course corrections. The basic navigation data available from the camera are star-relative astrometric observations of solar system bodies which can be used to determine line-of-sight vectors to those objects. The directional sightings are obtained by determining the precise centers of the object and stars in the image. During interplanetary cruise, centerfinding is performed by using two pattern matching techniques inherited from the Galileo mission. Near-encounter images are processed with a separate algorithm employing image modeling and brightness centroiding. This paper describes the image processing algorithms, and the results of a ground-based test of the algorithms using real data.

  3. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC - SEPAC program for First Spacelab Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, T.

    The Space Shuttle/Spacelab Mission Space Experiment with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) will carry out interactive experiments on, and in, the earth ionosphere and magnetosphere, and comprises an electron beam accelerator, MPD arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The mission Payload Specialist will be responsible for (1) manual control of scientific instruments, (2) monitoring of experiment displays, (3) restructuring of experiment sequence by means of display system keyboard, (4) safety and emergency operations, and (5) voice communications. Attention is given to the configurational and sequential organization of the SEPAC experiments.

  4. NSEG: A segmented mission analysis program for low and high speed aircraft. Volume 2: Program users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Rozendaal, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    A rapid mission analysis code based on the use of approximate flight path equations of motion is described. Equation form varies with the segment type, for example, accelerations, climbs, cruises, descents, and decelerations. Realistic and detailed vehicle characteristics are specified in tabular form. In addition to its mission performance calculation capabilities, the code also contains extensive flight envelop performance mapping capabilities. Approximate take off and landing analyses can be performed. At high speeds, centrifugal lift effects are taken into account. Extensive turbojet and ramjet engine scaling procedures are incorporated in the code.

  5. Historical trends of participation of women in robotic spacecraft missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Dones, Luke; Gay, Pamela; Cohen, Barbara; Horst, Sarah; Lakdawalla, Emily; Spickard, James; Milazzo, Moses; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Schug, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    For many planetary scientists, being involved in a spacecraft mission is the highlight of a career. Many young scientists hope to one day be involved in such a mission. We will look at the science teams of several flagship-class spacecraft missions to look for trends in the representation of groups that are underrepresented in science. We will start with The Galileo, Cassini, and Europa missions to the outer solar system as representing missions that began in the 1980s, 1990s and 2010s respectively. We would also like to extend our analysis to smaller missions and those to targets other than the outer solar system.

  6. An Overview of Mission 21. A Program Designed To Assist Teachers in Integrating Technology into Their Present Curriculum through a Problem-Solving Approach. Grades 1 through 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusic, Sharon A.; And Others

    This booklet presents an overview of Mission 21, a project that promotes technological literacy in the elementary school classroom. Funded since 1985, Mission 21 has enabled graduate research associates and Virginia teachers to write and field test a technology education program for children in grades 1 through 6. Over 30 elementary teachers in 11…

  7. Earth imaging results from Galileo's second encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, R.; Belton, M.; Dejong, E.; Ingersoll, A.; Klaasen, K.; Geissler, P.; Moersch, J.; Thompson, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flyby of the Galileo spacecraft en route to Jupiter contributes a unique perspective to our view of our home planet. Imaging activities conducted during the second Earth encounter provide an important opportunity to assess new methods and approaches on familiar territory. These include unique multispectral observations, low light-level imaging (searches for aurorae, lightning and artificial lights on the nightside) and experiments with multiple exposure times to extend the effective radiometric resolution and dynamic range of the camera system. Galileo imaging data has the potential to make important contributions to terrestrial remote sensing. This is because the particular set of filters included in the Solid State Imaging system are not presently incorporated in any currently operating Earth-orbiting sensor system. The visible/near-infrared bandpasses of the SSI filters are well suited to remote sensing of geological, glaciological, botanical, and meteorological phenomena. Data from this and the previous Earth encounter may provide an extremely valuable reference point in time for comparison with similar data expected from EOS or other systems in the future, contributing directly to our knowledge of global change. The highest resolution imaging (0.2 km/pixel) during the December, 1992 encounter occurred over the central Andes; a five filter mosaic of visible and near infrared bands displays the remarkable spectral heterogeneity of this geologically diverse region. As Galileo departed the Earth, cooperative imaging with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) instrument targeted Antarctica, Australia, and Indonesia at 1.0 to 2.5 km/pixel resolutions in the early morning local times near the terminator. The Antarctic data are of particular interest, potentially allowing ice grain size mapping using the 889 and 968 nm filters and providing an important means of calibrating the technique for application to the Galilean satellites. As the spacecraft

  8. Galileo photometry of Apollo landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Head, James W.; Pieters, C.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Klaasen, K.; Neukum, G.; Hoffmann, H.; Jaumann, R.

    1993-01-01

    As of December 1992, the Galileo spacecraft performed its second and final flyby (EM2), of the Earth-Moon system, during which it acquired Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera images of the lunar surface suitable for photometric analysis using Hapke's, photometric model. These images, together with those from the first flyby (EM1) in December 1989, provide observations of all of the Apollo landing sites over a wide range of photometric geometries and at eight broadband filter wavelengths ranging from 0.41 micron to 0.99 micron. We have completed a preliminary photometric analysis of Apollo landing sites visible in EM1 images and developed a new strategy for a more complete analysis of the combined EM1 and EM2 data sets in conjunction with telescopic observations and spectrogoniometric measurements of returned lunar samples. No existing single data set, whether from spacecraft flyby, telescopic observation, or laboratory analysis of returned samples, describes completely the light scattering behavior of a particular location on the Moon at all angles of incidence (i), emission (e), and phase angles (a). Earthbased telescopic observations of particular lunar sites provide good coverage of incidence nad phase angles, but their range in emission angle is limited to only a few degrees because of the Moon's synchronous rotation. Spacecraft flyby observations from Galileo are now available for specific lunar features at many photometric geometries unobtainable from Earth; however, this data set lacks coverage at very small phase angles (a less than 13 deg) important for distinguishing the well-known 'opposition effect'. Spectrogoniometric measurements from returned lunar samples can provide photometric coverage at almost any geometry; however, mechanical properties of prepared particulate laboratory samples, such as particle compaction and macroscopic roughness, likely differ from those on the lunar surface. In this study, we have developed methods for the simultaneous

  9. An overview of the Galileo Optical Experiment (GOPEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Uplink optical communication to a deep-space vehicle was demonstrated. In the Galileo Optical Experiment (GOPEX), optical transmissions were beamed to the Galileo spacecraft by Earth-based transmitters at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF), California, and Starfire Optical Range (SOR), New Mexico. The demonstration took place over an eight-day period (9 Dec. through 16 Dec. 1992) as Galileo receded from Earth on its way to Jupiter, and covered ranges from 1-6 million km. At 6 million km (15 times the Earth-Moon distance), the laser beam transmitted from TMF eight days after Earth flyby covered the longest known range for transmission and detection.

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Galileo's Muse: Renaissance Mathematics and the Arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    Galileo's Muse is a book that focuses on the life and thought of Galileo Galilei. The Prologue consists of a first chapter on Galileo the humanist and deals with Galileo's influence on his student Vincenzo Viviani (who wrote a biography of Galileo). This introductory chapter is followed by a very nice chapter that describes the classical legacy: Pythagoreanism and Platonism, Euclid and Archimedes, and Plutarch and Ptolemy. The author explicates the distinction between Greek and Roman contributions to the classical legacy, an explanation that is crucial for understanding Galileo and Renaissance mathematics. The following eleven chapters of this book arranged in a kind of quadrivium, viz., Poetry, Painting, Music, Architecture present arguments to support the author's thesis that the driver for Galileo's genius was not Renaissance science as is generally accepted but Renaissance arts brought forth by poets, painters, musicians, and architects. These four sets of chapters describe the underlying mathematics in poetry, visual arts, music and architecture. Likewise, Peterson stresses the impact of the philosophical overtones present in geometry, but absent in algebra and its equations. Basically, the author writes about Galileo, while trying to ignore the Copernican controversy, which he sees as distracting attention from Galileo's scientific legacy. As such, his story deviates from the standard myth on Galileo. But the book also looks at other eminent characters, such as Galileo's father Vincenzo (who cultivated music and music theory), the painter Piero della Francesca (who featured elaborate perspectives in his work), Dante Alighieri (author of the Divina Commedia), Filippo Brunelleschi (who engineered the dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Johannes Kepler (a strong supporter of Galileo's Copernicanism), etc. This book is very well documented: it offers, for each chapter, a wide selection of excellent biographical notes, and includes a fine

  11. Galileo Galilei's vision of the senses.

    PubMed

    Piccolino, Marco; Wade, Nicholas J

    2008-11-01

    Neuroscientists have become increasingly aware of the complexities and subtleties of sensory processing. This applies particularly to the complex elaborations of nerve signals that occur in the sensory circuits, sometimes at the very initial stages of sensory pathways. Sensory processing is now known to be very different from a simple neural copy of the physical signal present in the external world, and this accounts for the intricacy of neural organization that puzzled great investigators of neuroanatomy such as Santiago Ramón Y Cajal a century ago. It will surprise present-day sensory neuroscientists, applying their many modern methods, that the conceptual basis of the contemporary approach to sensory function had been recognized four centuries ago by Galileo Galilei. PMID:18848364

  12. Galileo support observations of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.; Tholen, David J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hartmann, William K.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of 951 Gaspra in support of the Galileo spacecraft encounter are reported. Photometric observations of the asteroid yield a synodic rotational period of 7.042 46 and a slope parameter G of 0.285 + or - 0.005. It is inferred from data obtained on May 18, 1990, that the subearth latitude was higher at that time than it was earlier in the opposition. This places a limit on the possible pole orientation of the asteroid. A slope parameter of 0.25 is proposed on the basis of a comparison of the present result for the slope parameter with that of Barucci et al. (1990). A low-quality 0.8-2.5-micron spectrum of 951 Gaspra suggests a high olivine/pyroxene ratio, which is indicative of a source region in the lower mantle of a differentiated asteroid, and similarities to 8 Flora and particularly 15 Eunomia.

  13. Europa's Thermal Surface From Galileo PPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Nathaniel; Rathbun, J.; Spencer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Europa, one of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter, may harbor a subsurface ocean beneath its icy crust. We use the thermal data gathered from the Galileo spacecraft's PPR instrument to search for endogenic activity. Evidence of endogenic activity would provide direct support for a subsurface-ocean. We are modeling variations in temperature over the course of a day and then fitting these models to the PPR data. The two key variables that affect surface temperature are bolometric albedo and thermal inertia. We are determining these variables for each point on the surface, which will allow us to create a global model of exogenic activity due to sunlight. This information will allow us to analyze the threshold where endogenic activity becomes great enough to be detectable in the PPR data.

  14. Effect of the Adapted NASA Mission X International Child Fitness Program on Young Children and their Parents in South Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Jungwon; Kim, Gilsook; Lim, Hyunjung; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.; Wang, Youfa; Reeves, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a global epidemic. Childhood obesity is global public health concern including in South Korea where 16.2% of boys and 9.9% of girls are overweight or obese in 2011. Effective and sustainable intervention programs are needed for prevention of childhood obesity. Obesity prevention programs for young children may have a greater intervention effect than in older children. The NASA Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut (MX) program was developed to promote children's exercise and healthy eating by tapping into their excitement for training like an astronaut. This study aimed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of the adapted NASA MX intervention in promoting PA in young children and in improving parents' related perspectives.

  15. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  16. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  17. Mission definition study for Stanford relativity satellite. Volume 1: Systems and program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The objective of the relativity satellite mission is to perform an experiment in which a gyroscope in motion about the earth undergoes precession, presumably relativistic, with respect to the fixed stars. Performance of this experiment would clearly test the general theory of relativity and its various modifications. This is the only experiment suggested to date which would confirm the existence of motional drift as well. A mission is defined in which the measurement of the geodetic effect term to 0.2 arc sec/yr is achievable and the measurement of both geodetic and motional drift terms to an accuracy of 0.001 arc sec/yr may be possible. The design of the flying dewar satellite needed to maintain the experiment at cryogenic temperatures is discussed. The gyroscopes, magnetometer, and optical contacting method for dimensional stability of the experimental assembly are considered.

  18. NASA's New Laser Risk Reduction Program For Future Space Lidar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Heaps, William S.; Cazeau, Tony

    2002-01-01

    NASA has been performing ground, airborne, and space-based scientific measurements since it was formed in 1958. Initial ground and airborne measurements were made with in situ instruments. By necessity, initial earth observation space-based missions were accomplished with passive remote sensing. Active microwave radar was added to the sensor repertoire in the late 1970s. A few key measurements important to NASA remain unaccomplished, however, despite the passive and radar successes. These critical measurements include space-based altimetry; and high spatial resolution profiling of aerosol properties, wind velocity, clouds, and molecular concentrations. Fortunately, a new technology, active optical radar or laser radar or lidar, has matured to the point that the last decade has seen a growing consideration of lidar for space missions. Part of the surge in consideration of lidar has been the tremendous progress in solid-state lasers fueled by advances in crystal growth quality and pump laser diode technology.

  19. NSEG, a segmented mission analysis program for low and high speed aircraft. Volume 1: Theoretical development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Rozendaal, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    A rapid mission analysis code based on the use of approximate flight path equations of motion is presented. Equation form varies with the segment type, for example, accelerations, climbs, cruises, descents, and decelerations. Realistic and detailed characteristics were specified in tabular form. The code also contains extensive flight envelope performance mapping capabilities. Approximate take off and landing analyses were performed. At high speeds, centrifugal lift effects were accounted for. Extensive turbojet and ramjet engine scaling procedures were incorporated in the code.

  20. Labeled line drawing of Galileo spacecraft's atmospheric probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Labeled line drawing entitled GALILEO PROBE identifies the deceleration module aft cover, descent module, and deceleration module aeroshell configurations and dimensions prior to and during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere.

  1. Galileo, sunspots, and the motions of the Earth: redux.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topper, D.

    1999-12-01

    In the Third Day of the Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632), Galileo presents an argument for the motion of the Earth based on the annual motion of sunspots. Presented in a rather obscure and seemingly unorganized manner, this demonstration has been the source of much confusion and debate. Two key writings are Arthur Koestler's attack on Galileo's integrity, based on his reading of the proof as a piece of sophistry, and A. Mark Smith's defense of Galileo, based on a comparison of the Ptolemaic and Copernican explanations of the phenomenon. This essay reexamines the arguments of Galileo and others, uncovering especially a key flaw: that they disregarded, omitted, or trivialized the crucial role played by the precession of the equinoxes.

  2. Io's Diverse Styles of Volcanic Activity: Results from Galileo NIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Doute, S.; Carlson, R.; McEwen, A.; Geissler, P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer were used to map the thermal structure of several of Io's hot spots, revealing different styles of volcanism Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  3. Galileo post-Gaspra cruise and Earth-2 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Andrews, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    This article documents DSN support for the Galileo cruise after the Oct. 1991 encounter with the asteroid Gaspra. This article also details the Earth-2 encounter and the special non-DSN support provided during the Earth-2 closest approach.

  4. Modeling Io's Heat Flow: Constraints from Galileo PPR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to improve on previous Io heat flow estimates by using higher resolution data from Galileo Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) and improved thermophysical models of the surface, including finite thermal inertia, the pedestal effect, and disk-resolved radiance.

  5. Science Program of Lunar Landers of "Luna-Glob" and "Luna-Resource" Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Dolgopolov, V. P.

    2011-03-01

    Program of scientific investigations is presented for two Russian polar landers: Luna Resource and Luna Glob. This program has to address two tasks: studies of composition of lunar polar regolith and studies of lunar exosphere at both poles.

  6. Delving into Alumni Perceptions about the Impact and Effectiveness of Two Certificate Programs: Meeting Their Mission?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tristan E.; Yukselturk, Erman; Top, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze two certificate programs in regard to the impacts on alumni professional career and strengths and weaknesses of certificate programs in the views of their alumni. The sample consisted of 58 participants who completed one of the certificate programs. The results showed that alumni rated self-improvement as…

  7. Asteroid 951 Gaspra - Pre-Galileo physical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, P.; Barucci, M. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Goldader, J. D.; Gonano-Beurer, M.; Harris, A. W.; Michalowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is made to derive from Galileo's 1991 encounter of the S-type asteroid 951 Gaspra general lessons that will be applicable to prospective earth-based observations of other asteroids. Attention is accordingly given to the derivation of spin-vector and shape parameters en route to more detailed physical characterization of a given asteroid. A future encounter of Gaspra by Galileo will be required to verify the present model.

  8. A new analysis of Galileo dust data near Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Altobelli, N.

    2012-09-01

    We present results of our reanalysis of the complete Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS) data set in the Galileo satellite region. By studying the directional information for observed impacts, we investigate the populations that can describe the observed impacts. This involves developing a model of the set of detectable orbits at each impact location. The current data in this region is found to be insufficient to determine the contributing populations.

  9. Effects and mitigation of multipath on GPS/Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Wang, Qing; Pan, Shuguo; He, Jun

    2007-11-01

    A conventional method to mitigate multipath errors in GNSS receivers is the strobe correlator, which achieves discriminator function shaping by combining two different narrow-correlator discriminators [1] [2]. The method performs a good performance when the difference in delays of direct and reflected signal is biggish in GPS scenario. Nevertheless, the performance of the method is not so good for Galileo scenario. The advent of the European navigation system Galileo has made it an exigent requirement to develop the receiver that can track Galileo signals as well as GPS signals. So, a better way should be groped for to mitigate both GPS and Galileo multipath errors. In the paper, a novel multipath mitigation scheme, named Early-Late Strobe Correlator (ELSC), was presented for both GPS and Galileo signals. By the Matlab simulation to the method, multipath errors could be mitigated effectively by using ELSC, especially to Galileo signals. The experiment results show that more excellent performances can be obtained by adopting ELSC presented in the paper with respected to the strobe correlator, although this will result in a more complex structure of discriminators.

  10. A Galilean Approach to the Galileo Affair, 1609-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finocchiaro, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    Galileo's telescopic discoveries of 1609-1612 provided a crucial, although not conclusive, confirmation of the Copernican hypothesis of the earth's motion. In Galileo's approach, the Copernican Revolution required that the geokinetic hypothesis be supported not only with new theoretical arguments but also with new observational evidence; that it be not only supported constructively but also critically defended from objections; and that such objections be not only refuted but also appreciated in all their strength. However, Galileo's defense of Copernicanism triggered a sequence of events that climaxed in 1633, when the Inquisition tried and condemned him as a suspected heretic. In turn, the repercussions of Galileo's condemnation have been a defining theme of modern Western culture for the last four centuries. In particular, the 20th century witnessed a curious spectacle: rehabilitation efforts by the Catholic Church and anti-Galilean critiques by secular-minded left-leaning social critics. The controversy shows no signs of abating to date, as may be seen from the episode of Pope Benedict XVI's attitude toward Paul Feyerabend's critique of Galileo. Nevertheless, I have devised a framework which should pave the way for eventually resolving this controversy, and which is modeled on Galileo's own approach to the Copernican Revolution.

  11. Flight of a UV spectrophotometer aboard Galileo 2, the NASA Convair 990 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, B.; Hunderwadel, J. L.; Hanser, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    An ultraviolet interference-filter spectrophotometer (UVS) fabricated for aircraft-borne use on the DOT Climatic Impact Assessment Program (CIAP) has been successfully tested in a series of flights on the NASA Convair 990, Galileo II. UV flux data and the calculated total ozone above the flight path are reported for several of the flights. Good agreement is obtained with the total ozone as deducted by integration of an ozone sonde vertical profile obtained at Wallops Island, Virginia near the time of a CV-990 underpass. Possible advantages of use of the UVS in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program are discussed.

  12. The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Mission, the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS01) Mission, and the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The NEAR Mission was launched on February 17, 1996 for a three year cruise to the asteroid 433 Eros. During October, November, and December 1998 cruise measurements with the gamma-ray spectrometer were made at three different escape-window-width settings. These were done in order to understand how the count rate and peak width change as the window width settings change. Analysis of these spectra was completed using the latest version of the spectral analysis program, RobWin. Results as a function of energy were combined with the results from the Schlumberger-Doll Research experiments (described below). Laboratory measurements were needed to confirm efficiency calculations above 6 MeV and to understand the relationship between the full energy peak areas and the areas of the first and second escape peaks as a function of the escape peak widths. A week of measurements was made at Schlumberger-Doll Research using their 14-MeV pulsed neutron generator and large soil samples. Data were collected after adding iron and nickel to the sample to increase the emission of high-energy lines. Approximately 24 hours of data were accumulated at each of three escape peak window widths. These data were analyzed with RobWin. Combining results from the cruise measurements and the laboratory measurements indicated that both data sets had similar energy dependence and that this energy dependence was different from that obtained using standard Monte Carlo calculations. Alternate methods of simulating the response of the detector to changes in the escape window widths are being investigated.

  13. A higher density VLBI catalog for navigating Magellan and Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Jacobs, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    The density of radio sources near the ecliptic in the astrometric JPL Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) catalog has been increased by over 50 percent since 1985. This density increase has been driven by the need for more sources for the VLBI navigation of the Magellan and Galileo spacecraft, but the sources also will be usable for Mars Observer and other future missions. Since the last catalog, including observations made through 1985, was published in 1988, a total of 21 radio sources has been added that fulfill the following criteria: (1) they lie within 10 deg of the ecliptic plane; (2) their correlated flux densities are above 0.2 Jy on at least one of the Deep Space Network intercontinental baselines at both 2.3 and 8.4 GHz; and (3) the source positions are known to better than 5 milliarcseconds (25 nanoradians). The density of such sources in the catalog has been increased from 15.6 per steradian to 25.2 per steradian. Ten more sources have been added that fulfill the last two criteria given above and lie between 10 deg and 20 deg from the ecliptic plane. Analysis shows that there may be approx. 70 more sources with correlated flux densities above 0.2Jy that are within approx. 20 deg of the ecliptic. However, VLBI navigation observations of the new and prospective sources with the 250-kHz bandwidth of the current operational system will require the use of two 70-m antennas in most cases. Including both old and new sources, if two 34-m antennas are used, there will be usable navigation sources within 10 deg of a spacecraft in only 30 percent of the ecliptic, and sources within 20 deg of a spacecraft over 70 percent of the ecliptic.

  14. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??̄ = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ??́0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared

  15. Sharing Planetary Exploration: The Education and Public Outreach Program for the NASA MESSENGER Mission to Orbit Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Stockman, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Leary, J. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program of the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury, supported by the NASA Discovery Program, is a full partnership between the project's science and engineering teams and a team of professionals from the EPO community. The Challenger Center for Space Science Education (CCSSE) and the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) are developing sets of MESSENGER Education Modules targeting grade-specific education levels across K-12. These modules are being disseminated through a MESSENGER EPO Website developed at Montana State University, an Educator Fellowship Program managed by CCSSE to train Fellows to conduct educator workshops, additional workshops planned for NASA educators and members of the Minority University - SPace Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN), and existing inner-city science education programs (e.g., the CASE Summer Science Institute in Washington, D.C.). All lessons are mapped to national standards and benchmarks by MESSENGER EPO team members trained by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061, all involve user input and feedback and quality control by the EPO team, and all are thoroughly screened by members of the project science and engineering teams. At the college level, internships in science and engineering are provided to students at minority institutions through a program managed by MU-SPIN, and additional opportunities for student participation across the country are planned as the mission proceeds. Outreach efforts include radio spots (AAAS), museum displays (National Air and Space Museum), posters and traveling exhibits (CASE), general language books (AAAS), programs targeting underserved communities (AAAS, CCSSE, and MU-SPIN), and a documentary highlighting the scientific and technical challenges involved in exploring Mercury and how the MESSENGER team has been meeting these challenges. As with the educational elements, science and engineering team members

  16. Radiation analysis for manned missions to the Jupiter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, G.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis for manned missions targeted to the Jovian system has been performed in the framework of the NASA RASC (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts) program on Human Exploration beyond Mars. The missions were targeted to the Jupiter satellite Callisto. The mission analysis has been divided into three main phases, namely the interplanetary cruise, the Jupiter orbital insertion, and the surface landing and exploration phases. The interplanetary phase is based on departure from the Earth-Moon L1 point. Interplanetary trajectories based on the use of different propulsion systems have been considered, with resulting overall cruise phase duration varying between two and five years. The Jupiter-approach and the orbital insertion trajectories are considered in detail, with the spacecraft crossing the Jupiter radiation belts and staying around the landing target. In the surface exploration phase the stay on the Callisto surface is considered. The satellite surface composition has been modeled based on the most recent results from the GALILEO spacecraft. In the transport computations the surface backscattering has been duly taken into account. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code for hadrons and with an in-house developed transport code for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons. The obtained doses have been compared to dose exposure limits. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation analysis for manned missions to the Jupiter system.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, G; Clowdsley, M S; Nealy, J E; Tripathi, R K; Wilson, J W

    2004-01-01

    An analysis for manned missions targeted to the Jovian system has been performed in the framework of the NASA RASC (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts) program on Human Exploration beyond Mars. The missions were targeted to the Jupiter satellite Callisto. The mission analysis has been divided into three main phases, namely the interplanetary cruise, the Jupiter orbital insertion, and the surface landing and exploration phases. The interplanetary phase is based on departure from the Earth-Moon L1 point. Interplanetary trajectories based on the use of different propulsion systems have been considered, with resulting overall cruise phase duration varying between two and five years. The Jupiter-approach and the orbital insertion trajectories are considered in detail, with the spacecraft crossing the Jupiter radiation belts and staying around the landing target. In the surface exploration phase the stay on the Callisto surface is considered. The satellite surface composition has been modeled based on the most recent results from the GALILEO spacecraft. In the transport computations the surface backscattering has been duly taken into account. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code for hadrons and with an in-house developed transport code for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons. The obtained doses have been compared to dose exposure limits. PMID:15881781

  18. Mission Intentionality and Operational Integrity: The Essential Role of Faculty in Adult Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern University has moved from a distributed model to a centralized model for administration of its adult degree programs. This move involved numerous factors and motivations but one central component in the ultimate success of that move was a significant change in the role of faculty assigned to the program. Once regarded as rather ancillary…

  19. Geometry-free linear combinations for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Global navigation satellites of the European Galileo system transmit code signals on four carriers in the L1, E5a, E5b and E6 band. New geometry-free linear combinations are presented that eliminate the geometry terms (user to satellite ranges and orbital errors), the clock errors of the user and satellites and the tropospheric delay. The remaining parameters of these carrier phase combinations include integer ambiguities, ionospheric delays, carrier phase multipath and phase noise. The weighting coefficients are designed such that the integer nature of ambiguities is maintained. The use of four frequency combinations is highly recommended due to a noise reduction of up to 14.4 dB and an ionospheric reduction of up to 25.6 dB compared to two frequency geometry-free combinations. Moreover, a modified Least-squares Ambiguity Decorrelation Adjustment (LAMBDA) algorithm is suggested, which differs in two points from the traditional approach: the baseline is replaced by the ionospheric delay and the correlation is caused by linear combinations instead of double differences. For correct ambiguity resolution, the ionospheric delay can be determined with millimeter accuracy. This is quite beneficial as the ionosphere represents the largest source of error for absolute positioning.

  20. Galileo - The Serial-Production AIT Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragnit, Ulrike; Brunner, Otto

    2008-01-01

    The Galileo Project is one of the most demanding projects of ESA, being Europe's autarkic navigation system and a constellation composed of 30 satellites. This presentation points out the different phases of the project up to the full operational capability and the corresponding launch options with respect to launch vehicles as well as launch configurations. One of the biggest challenges is to set up a small serial 'production line' for the overall integration and test campaign of satellites. This production line demands an optimization of all relevant tasks, taking into account also backup and recovery actions. A comprehensive AIT concept is required, reflecting a tightly merged facility layout and work flow design. In addition a common data management system is needed to handle all spacecraft related documentation and to have a direct input-out flow for all activities, phases and positions at the same time. Process optimization is a well known field of engineering in all small high tech production lines, nevertheless serial production of satellites are still not the daily task in space business and therefore new concepts have to be put in place. Therefore, and in order to meet the satellites overall system optimization, a thorough interface between unit/subsystem manufacturing and satellite AIT must be realized to ensure a smooth flow and to avoid any process interruption, which would directly lead to a schedule impact.