Sample records for gall stone disease

  1. Pancreatic duct abnormalities in gall stone disease: an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, S P; Gulati, P; Choudhary, V; Anand, B S

    1990-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess pancreatic duct abnormalities in gall stone disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograms of 50 patients with gall stone disease were analysed and the results compared with those obtained in 33 patients investigated for cholestatic jaundice who were found to have a normal biliary tree (control group). Abnormal pancreatograms were obtained in 24 (48%) patients with gall stone disease and in only two (6%) in the control group; the differences were statistically significant (chi 2 = 14.3; p less than 0.001). The patients in the control group showed mild abnormalities as did those in the gall stone group. The frequency of various abnormalities were: mild 16 (32%), moderate five (10%), and severe three (6%). Pancreatic duct abnormalities were more severe and occurred more frequently in patients with gall stones who had stones in the biliary tree than in patients with a normal biliary tree (postcholecystectomy patients, 55% v 25%) but the difference between the two groups just failed to be significant (chi 2 = 3.34). In conclusion, nearly half of all patients with gall stone disease have pancreatic duct abnormalities and in 16% these were severe enough to be labelled as chronic pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2210455

  2. Symptomatic and silent gall stones in the community.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, K W; Braddon, F E; Mountford, R A; Hughes, A O; Emmett, P M

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of gall stone disease in a stratified random sample of 1896 British adults (72.2% of those approached) was established using real time ultrasound. The prevalence rose with age, except in women of 40-49 years, so that at 60-69 years, 22.4% of women and 11.5% of men had gall stones or had undergone cholecystectomy. The cholecystectomy rate of people with gall stone disease was higher in women than in men (43.5% v 24%, p less than 0.05). Very few subjects with gall stones had convincing biliary symptoms. In women, 10.4% had symptoms according to a questionnaire definition of biliary pain and 6.3% according to conventional history taking, while no men at all admitted to biliary pain. Nevertheless, cholecystectomy in men had nearly always been preceded by convincing biliary symptoms. The age at cholecystectomy was, on average, nine years less than the age at detection of silent gall stones in both sexes. It is concluded that either gall stones are especially prone to cause symptoms in younger people or that there are two kinds of cholelithiasis - symptomatic and silent. The lack of symptomatic gall stones in cross sectional surveys is probably due to their rapid diagnosis and treatment. PMID:2013429

  3. What should I do about my patient's gall stones?

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, A. R.; Azoulay, D.; Oakley, N.; Baer, H.; Paraskevopoulos, J. A.; Maddern, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of benign biliary disease is one that causes significant morbidity and social economic strain in the western world. The classical treatment, cholecystectomy, has been challenged by various medical and surgical techniques in a seemingly random nature. The development of the treatment of gall stone disease is reviewed by analysis of published studies over the last 20 years. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed as an overview and summary of the current management of gall stone disease in the light of our knowledge of its malignant potential. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8552535

  4. Insulin and gall stones: a population case control study in southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Misciagna, G; Guerra, V; Di, L; Correale, M; Trevisan, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hyperinsulinaemia has been associated with many common diseases in developed countries, such as ischaemic heart disease and colon cancer. Gall stones are also very prevalent in these countries but little is known about the association between insulin and gall stones.?AIMS—To study the relationships between insulin and the incidence of gall stones in a sample of the general population.?SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Between May 1985 and June 1986, systematic sampling from the electoral register of Castellana, a small town in southern Italy, yielded 2472 subjects who had their gall bladder checked for gall stones by ultrasonography. Between May 1992 and June 1993, 1962 of the 2235 subjects without gall stones at the first examination agreed to a further ultrasound examination. A total of 101 subjects with newly diagnosed gall stones and 303 randomly chosen controls entered the study. Serum insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay, and concentrations of cholesterol, cholesterol high density lipoprotein (HDL), glucose, and triglycerides by standard enzymatic colorimetric methods. Unconditional multiple logistic regression was used to study the association between insulin and gall stones, controlling for the most common confounding factors.?RESULTS—In individuals with no clinical diagnosis of diabetes and serum glucose <7 mmol/l, insulin was associated with gall stones. This association persisted even after controlling for sex, age, body mass index, and serum glucose. The risk of gall stones in the highest quintile of serum insulin was 2.66 (95% confidence interval 1.04-6.72; ?2 test for trend, p=0.03). The association of insulin with gall stones persisted when total and HDL cholesterol were entered in the logistic regression models, and only slightly decreased when serum triglycerides were included in the model.?CONCLUSIONS—The results of the study indicate that hyperinsulinaemia may play an important role in the aetiology of gall stones even in individuals without diabetes and with normal serum glucose levels.???Keywords: gallstones; insulin; epidemiology; case control study PMID:10861277

  5. Composition of gall bladder stones associated with octreotide: response to oral ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, S H; Pereira, S P; Murphy, G M; Kennedy, C; Wass, J A; Besser, G M; Dowling, R H

    1995-01-01

    Octreotide, an effective treatment for acromegaly, induces gall bladder stones in 13-60% of patients. Because knowledge of stone composition is essential for studies of their pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention, this was investigated by direct and indirect methods in 14 octreotide treated acromegalic patients with gall stones. Chemical analysis of gall stones retrieved at cholecystectomy from two patients, showed that they contained 71% and 87% cholesterol by weight. In the remaining 12 patients, localised computed tomography of the gall bladder showed that eight had stones with maximum attenuation scores of < 100 Hounsfield units (values of < 100 HU predict cholesterol rich, dissolvable stones). Gall bladder bile was obtained by ultrasound guided, fine needle puncture from six patients. All six patients had supersaturated bile (mean (SEM) cholesterol saturation index of 1.19 (0.08) (range 1.01-1.53)) and all had abnormally rapid cholesterol microcrystal nucleation times (< 4 days (range 1-4)), whilst in four, the bile contained cholesterol microcrystals immediately after sampling. Of the 12 patients considered for oral ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment, two had a blocked cystic duct and were not started on UDCA while one was lost to follow up. After one year of treatment, five of the remaining nine patients showed either partial (n = 3) or complete (n = 2) gall stone dissolution, suggesting that their stones were cholesterol rich. This corresponds, by actuarial (life table) analysis, to a combined gall stone dissolution rate of 58.3 (15.9%). In conclusion, octreotide induced gall stones are generally small, multiple, and cholesterol rich although, in common with spontaneous gall stone disease, at presentation some patients will have a blocked cystic duct and some gall stones containing calcium. Images Figure 1 PMID:7890216

  6. Roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of octreotide induced gall bladder stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S H Hussaini; S P Pereira; M J Veysey; C Kennedy; P Jenkins; G M Murphy; J A Wass; R H Dowling

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Octreotide treatment of acromegalic patients increases the % deoxycholic acid conjugates and the cholesterol saturation of gall bladder bile, and induces gall stone formation. AIMS--To study the roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in these phenomena. METHODS AND PATIENTS--Gall bladder emptying and mouth to caecum transit was measured in (a) control subjects and acromegalic patients given saline or

  7. Gall stone recurrence and its prevention: the British/Belgian Gall Stone Study Group's post-dissolution trial.

    PubMed Central

    Hood, K A; Gleeson, D; Ruppin, D C; Dowling, R H

    1993-01-01

    The British/Belgian Gall Stone Study Group (BBGSG) post-dissolution trial was a prospective, multicentre, randomised, double blind trial of: (i) low dose ursodeoxycholic acid, (ii) placebo, and (iii) a high fibre, low refined carbohydrate diet in the prevention of gall stone recurrence in patients with complete gall stone dissolution. Further aims included establishing the timing and frequency of recurrence and its association with biliary symptoms, a comparison of the sensitivity of ultrasonography v oral cholecystectography in detecting recurrent stones, and a search for risk factors predicting recurrence. Ninety three patients entered the study, and 82 were followed up for up to five years (mean (SEM) 28 (1.5) months) with six monthly ultrasonography and yearly oral cholecystectography. There were 21 recurrences (26 by oral cholecystectography or ultrasonography, or both), only two of which were symptomatic, which were detected between 12 and 42 months after trial entry. This corresponded to an actuarial recurrence rate of 33.9 (7.0%) by lifetable analysis at 42 months and subsequently. There were four recurrences in the ursodeoxycholic acid, six in the placebo, and 11 in the diet groups, corresponding to 21.9 (9.9)%, 27.4 (10.1)%, and 45.8 (12.4)% respectively at 42 months by lifetable analysis (NS). Variables including age, obesity, menopausal state, pregnancy, and oestrogen containing drugs were not shown to affect recurrence rate. Men had more frequent recurrence than women (NS). Patients who had had multiple stones experienced more recurrences than did those with single stones (NS). Recurrence did not occur in patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (p < 0.02). The stone free interval between stone dissolution and trial entry proved to be important--those stone free > nine months had a recurrence rate of only 12.7 (6.0)% at 42 months compared with 55.4 (12.5)% in those stone free < nine months (p < 0.01). There was imbalance between the ursodeoxycholic acid and placebo groups for this factor, and after applying a statistical correction, the adjusted recurrence rate in the ursodeoxycholic acid group was 15% compared with 30% in both placebo and diet groups (NS). These data suggest that after medical dissolution, the risk of gall stone recurrence is not reduced by a high fibre, low refined carbohydrate diet: it may be lowered, but not abolished, by low dose ursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:8406169

  8. Renal Stone Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Sayer

    2011-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Renal stone disease may be seen as a clinical symptom of an underlying pathological process predisposing to crystallization within the renal tract. Renal stones may be comprised of calcium salts, uric acid, cystine and various other insoluble complexes. Nephrolithiasis may be the manifestation of rare single gene disorders or part of more common idiopathic renal stone-forming diseases. Methods and

  9. Combination therapy with oral ursodeoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids: pretreatment computed tomography of the gall bladder improves gall stone dissolution efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, J R; Hood, K A; Gleeson, D; Ellul, J P; Keightley, A; Murphy, G M; Dowling, R H

    1992-01-01

    In a five year study, 55 patients with radiolucent gall stones were treated with the combination of 7.5 mg chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and 5.0 mg ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)/kg/day--that is, half the monotherapeutic doses. Side effects were few but four patients could not tolerate the prescribed bile acids because of diarrhoea or nausea. Analysis of fasting duodenal bile confirmed that CDCA+UDCA converted supersaturated into unsaturated bile but the saturation indices did not predict the dissolution response. By actuarial analysis, the confirmed (by ultrasound x2) complete gall stone dissolution rates in all 55 patients were mean (SEM) 29 (7)% at 12 and 44 (8)% at 24 months. The advent of routine computed tomography before treatment enabled comparison of dissolution efficacy in those screened by computed tomography (n = 24), whose maximum gall stone attenuation was less than 100 Hounsfield units, with that in those not screened (n = 29). Although stone size and number were comparable, patients screened by computed tomography had significantly better dissolution rates (p less than 0.025) than those not screened in this way. At 12 months, partial or complete gall stone dissolution rates were 93 (7)% in the screened and 55 (11)% in the non-screened patients. At 18 months, complete dissolution rates were 64 (12%) and 20 (9)% respectively. Computed tomography before treatment is cost effective in selecting those patients likely to achieve gall stone dissolution on treatment with UDCA+CDCA. PMID:1568659

  10. [Erythropoietic protoporphyria: porphyrin content of a gall-stone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Goerz, G; Krieg, T; Bolsen, K; Seubert, S; Ippen, H

    1976-10-27

    In the case of a 48 year old woman with characteristic signs of erythropoetic protoporphyria, a solitary gall-stone which had persisted over a period of 10 years was removed. Porphyrin-concentration of this gall-stone was found to be 22.6 mcg/g, which is almost twenty times the concentration of other cholestrol-stones. Besides protoporphyrin, porphyrins with a higher degree of carboxylation were discovered in four different samples by thin layer chromatography. It is postulated that the increased bile-concentration of protoporphyrin in the liver causes the cristallisation of cholestrol and the formation and growth of gall-stones. The biochemical finding of porphyrins with a higher degree of carboxylation indicates that the porphyrins of the gall-stone may not only come from hemolysed erythrocytes but possibly also from metabolites of disturbed hepatic porphyrin biosynthesis. PMID:984880

  11. Hepatic biliary lipid secretion and gall bladder biliary lipid mass in gall stone patients: effect of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lanzini, A; Northfield, T C

    1990-01-01

    We have carried out overnight measurements of hepatic secretion rate and duodenal output of biliary lipids using a duodenal perfusion technique. We correlated these measurements with the fasting state mass of biliary lipids within the gall bladder on the following morning using a combined nasoduodenal intubation and isotope scanning technique. We studied six gall stone subjects before and during treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid 675 mg/day. Lipid mass within the gall bladder correlated with the corresponding overnight hepatic secretion rate for all three biliary lipids. During ursodeoxycholic acid treatment, there was an increase in gall bladder bile acid mass without significant change in cholesterol or phospholipid mass. We conclude that the mass of individual biliary lipids within the fasting gall bladder is influenced by overnight hepatic biliary lipid secretion rate; and that the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (675 mg/day) on cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder bile is mediated via an increase in bile acid mass rather than through a decrease in cholesterol mass within the gall bladder. PMID:2311984

  12. Roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of octreotide induced gall bladder stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, S H; Pereira, S P; Veysey, M J; Kennedy, C; Jenkins, P; Murphy, G M; Wass, J A; Dowling, R H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Octreotide treatment of acromegalic patients increases the % deoxycholic acid conjugates and the cholesterol saturation of gall bladder bile, and induces gall stone formation. AIMS--To study the roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in these phenomena. METHODS AND PATIENTS--Gall bladder emptying and mouth to caecum transit was measured in (a) control subjects and acromegalic patients given saline or 50 micrograms of octreotide, and (b) acromegalic patients taking long term octreotide. In the second group, large bowel transit was also measured. RESULTS--A single dose of octreotide inhibited meal stimulated gall bladder emptying, the ejection fraction falling from mean (SEM) 66.0 (2.3)% to 7.0 (5.3)% in controls (p < 0.001); from 72.5 (2.1) to 16.6 (5.1)% in untreated acromegalic patients (p < 0.001), and to 30.4 (9.5)% in acromegalic patients taking long term octreotide (p < 0.001 v untreated acromegalic group). Octreotide prolonged mouth to caecum transit time, from 112 (15) min to 237 (13) min in controls (p < 0.001), from 170 (13) min to 282 (11) min in untreated acromegalic patients (p < 0.001), and to 247 (10) min in acromegalic patients taking long term octreotide (p < 0.001 v untreated acromegalic patients). The mean large bowel transit in octreotide untreated compared with treated acromegalic patients remained unchanged (40 (6) h v 47 (6) h). CONCLUSIONS--Prolongation of intestinal transit and impaired gall bladder emptying may contribute to lithogenic changes in bile composition and gall stone formation in patients receiving long term octreotide. PMID:8707128

  13. Cost effectiveness of adjuvant bile salt treatment in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of gall bladder stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J P Nicholl; B Ross; P C Milner; J E Brazier; L Westlake; B Kohler; E Frost; B T Williams; A G Johnson

    1994-01-01

    The relative cost effectiveness of adjuvant urso and chenodeoxycholic acid treatment in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been assessed as part of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of ESWL as a treatment of gall bladder stones. Of the first patients with gall stone volume < 4 cm3 randomised to ESWL in the main trial, 24 were randomised to have ESWL

  14. Pharmacology of Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2011-01-01

    Kidney stone disease remains a major health and economic burden on the nation. It has been increasingly recognized that nephrolithiasis can be both a chronic or systemic illness. There have been major limitations in the development of new drugs for the prevention and management of this disease, largely due to our lack of understanding of the complex pathophysiologic mechanisms involving the interaction of three major target organs: the kidney, bone, and intestine. We also do not yet understand the molecular genetic basis of this polygenic disorder. These limitations are coupled with the incorrect perception that kidney stone disease is solely an acute illness, and the lack of reliable tests to assess outcome measures. All of these factors combined have diminished the willingness of the pharmaceutical industry to engage in the development of novel drugs. PMID:19095203

  15. Spilled gall stones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sathesh-Kumar, T; Saklani, A; Vinayagam, R; Blackett, R

    2004-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is associated with spillage of gall stones in 5%–40% of procedures, but complications occur very rarely. There are, however, isolated case reports describing a range of complications occurring both at a distance from and near to the subhepatic area. This review looks into the various modes of presentation, ways to minimise spillage, treating the complications, and the legal implications. PMID:14970293

  16. Dissolution of cholesterol gall stones using methyltertbutyl ether: a safe effective treatment.

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, J; Chua, A; Keating, J; Ah-Kion, S; Weir, D G; Keeling, P W

    1991-01-01

    Methyltertbutyl ether (MTBE) administered by percutaneous transhepatic catheter rapidly dissolves radiolucent cholesterol gall bladder stones. However, complete dissolution and clearance of non-cholesterol debris is essential to prevent recurrence. In this study we analysed 25 consecutive patients with reference to efficacy and recurrence based on the presence or absence of non-cholesterol stone fragments after dissolution. Placement of the catheter was successful in 24 patients, one patient requiring cholecystectomy for bile peritonitis. MTBE was infused and aspirated continuously, four to six cycles per minute, resulting in rapid stone dissolution (median six hours; range 4-23 hours for solitary stones and median seven hours, range 4-30 hours for multiple stones). In 18 patients who had complete dissolution, four (22%) had recurrent stones within six to 18 months. Five patients had residual debris which failed to clear completely despite bile acid treatment. One patient with an incomplete rim of calcium in a large stone did not respond to MTBE treatment. A further patient required cholecystectomy for symptomatic recurrence. There were no serious side effects observed. MTBE treatment is a rapid, safe, and effective treatment for patients who refuse surgery or who for medical reasons cannot undergo cholecystectomy. The results of this study confirm that complete dissolution of all fragments is essential and may prevent recurrence. Images Figure 2 PMID:1773965

  17. Proteomics and kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2008-01-01

    Kidney stone disease (nephrolithiasis) is an ancient and common affliction. It has been recognized for a long time with evidence of stone found in approximately 7,000-year-old mummies and remains a common problem worldwide, indicating ineffective prevention in the past. Precise pathogenic and molecular mechanisms of kidney stone formation are still poorly understood and should be further elucidated. Also, identification of novel therapeutic targets for better therapeutic outcome and successful prevention of the occurrence and recurrence of the stone are crucially required. One of the most promising tools for current and future biomedical research is proteomics, which has been extensively and widely applied to the nephrology field during the past 5 years. Its high-throughput capability holds a great promise also to kidney stone research. This chapter provides a brief overview of proteomic methodologies recently used for the investigation of nephrolithiasis and recent proteomic studies of nephrolithiasis are summarized. PMID:18401167

  18. Dissolution of gall stones with an ursodeoxycholic acid menthol preparation: a controlled prospective double blind trial.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, M; Leuschner, U; Lazarovici, D; Kurtz, W; Hellstern, A

    1988-04-01

    In a controlled prospective double blind trial patients with cholesterol gall bladder stones are treated with ursodeoxy-cholic acid (group A: UDCA 11.1 mg/kg per day; n = 16) and Ursomenth respectively (group B: a mixture of UDCA/menthol: 4.75 mg/kg per day each; n = 17). With same stone number and size (10-12 mm) there is a complete dissolution rate in group A of 38%, and of 53% in group B within 15-16.9 months. The response rate (complete + partial dissolution) amounted to 75% and 76% respectively. In group A there is one case of stone calcification, in group B none. Both preparations are free of unwanted effects. This suggests that the cyclic monoterpene menthol enhances the effect of UDCA and is of comparable effect to a mixture of six different terpenes used in former times. PMID:3286383

  19. Dissolution of gall stones with an ursodeoxycholic acid menthol preparation: a controlled prospective double blind trial.

    PubMed Central

    Leuschner, M; Leuschner, U; Lazarovici, D; Kurtz, W; Hellstern, A

    1988-01-01

    In a controlled prospective double blind trial patients with cholesterol gall bladder stones are treated with ursodeoxy-cholic acid (group A: UDCA 11.1 mg/kg per day; n = 16) and Ursomenth respectively (group B: a mixture of UDCA/menthol: 4.75 mg/kg per day each; n = 17). With same stone number and size (10-12 mm) there is a complete dissolution rate in group A of 38%, and of 53% in group B within 15-16.9 months. The response rate (complete + partial dissolution) amounted to 75% and 76% respectively. In group A there is one case of stone calcification, in group B none. Both preparations are free of unwanted effects. This suggests that the cyclic monoterpene menthol enhances the effect of UDCA and is of comparable effect to a mixture of six different terpenes used in former times. PMID:3286383

  20. Ursocholic acid: bile acid and bile lipid dose response and clinical studies in patients with gall stones.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P J; Gleeson, D; Murphy, G M; Dowling, R H

    1989-01-01

    The biliary bile acid and bile lipid responses to six weeks treatment with approximately 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg/day of ursocholic acid (UCA) were studied in 11 gall stone patients. Maximum enrichment of bile with UCA (24 (SE) 4.9%) occurred with 15 mg UCA/kg/day. The maximum reduction in biliary cholesterol saturation was seen with the 10 mg/kg/day dose when the moles % cholesterol fell from 14 (2.4)% before treatment to 5.6 (0.83)% (p less than 0.02) and the saturation index fell from 1.4 (0.23) to 0.77 (0.13) (p less than 0.05). Clinical studies of the safety and efficacy of UCA in dissolving gall stones were carried out in 13 patients treated for up to two years with a dose of approximately 10 mg/kg/day. Diarrhoea caused withdrawal of treatment in three patients. There were no significant changes in liver function or haematology tests but fasting serum cholesterol tended to rise during treatment. Of nine patients treated for greater than 6 months, only one showed complete gall stone dissolution. As UCA may cause diarrhoea and hypercholesterolaemia, has only a modest effect on biliary cholesterol saturation and low gall stone dissolution efficacy, it is unlikely to replace existing forms of gall stone dissolution therapy. PMID:2920932

  1. Hyaluronan and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselman, Marino

    2008-09-01

    Kidney stones cannot be formed as long as crystals are passed in the urine. However, when crystals are retained it becomes possible for them to aggregate and form a stone. Crystals are expected to be formed not earlier than the distal tubules and collecting ducts. Studies both in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals do not adhere to intact distal epithelium, but only when the epithelium is proliferating or regenerating, so that it possesses dedifferentiated cells expressing hyaluronan, osteopontin (OPN) and their mutual receptor CD44 at the apical cell membrane. The polysaccharide hyaluronan is an excellent crystal binding molecule because of its negative ionic charge. We hypothesized that the risk for crystal retention in the human kidney would be increased when tubular cells express hyaluronan at their apical cell membrane. Two different patient categories in which nephrocalcinosis frequently occurs were studied to test this hypothesis (preterm neonates and kidney transplant patients). Hyaluronan (and OPN) expression at the luminal membrane of tubular cells indeed was observed, which preceded subsequent retention of crystals in the distal tubules. Tubular nephrocalcinosis has been reported to be associated with decline of renal function and thus further studies to extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of retention and accumulation of crystals in the kidney are warranted. Ultimately, this may allow the design of new strategies for the prevention and treatment of both nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis in patients.

  2. Epidemiologic insights into pediatric kidney stone disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian R. Matlaga; Anthony J. Schaeffer; Thomas E. Novak; Bruce J. Trock

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of pediatric kidney stone has not yet been as rigorously defined as that of adult kidney stone disease. Herein,\\u000a we review our recent epidemiologic works characterizing pediatric stone disease using the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID).\\u000a Specifically we investigated the age and gender distribution of pediatric kidney stone disease, changes in disease prevalence\\u000a over time, and medical comorbidities associated

  3. Developing disease resistant stone fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stone fruit (Prunus spp.) (peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, cherry) and almonds are susceptible to a number of pathogens. These pathogens can cause extensive losses in the field, during transport and storage, and in the market. Breeding for disease resistance requires an extensive knowledge of the...

  4. Gastric outflow obstruction caused by gall stones and leading to death by complex metabolic derangement.

    PubMed Central

    Wight, C O; Seed, M; Yeo, W W; McCulloch, T A

    1997-01-01

    A 67 year old woman was admitted with a three week history of vomiting, having become increasingly confused for three days. Investigations revealed deranged serum biochemistry consistent with a combination of a diabetic non-ketotic hyperosmolar state and a metabolic alkalosis consistent with gastric outflow obstruction. She was treated with intravenous saline, intravenous insulin, and subcutaneous heparin, but did not improve clinically and had an asystolic cardiac arrest the following day; she was transferred to the intensive care unit and despite treatment with inotropes she died 40 hours after admission. Necropsy revealed that the stomach was massively dilated with gas and stomach contents, and contained many small black faceted gall stones. In addition a large nonfaceted brown-yellow gall stone was wedged in the pyloric antrum causing total obstruction. The patient had died from a complex metabolic derangement including non-ketotic hyperosmotic diabetic coma and metabolic alkalosis precipitated by the acute gastric outflow obstruction complicated by previously undiagnosed type II diabetes mellitus. Images PMID:9462252

  5. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of gall stones: an in vitro comparison between an electrohydraulic and a piezoceramic device.

    PubMed Central

    Schachler, R; Bird, N C; Sauerbruch, T; Frost, E A; Sackmann, M; Paumgartner, G; Johnson, A G

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of the effectiveness of two types of lithotripter in fragmenting gall bladder stones is reported. The machines used were a Piezolith 2300, which generates shock waves by the piezoceramic principle, and a Dornier MPL 9000, which produces the shock waves by underwater spark discharge. With each machine, corresponding stones of 45 pairs of weight and volume matched calculi (median volume 0.5 cm3, median diameter 10.5 mm) obtained at cholecystectomy were treated. All stones were successfully disintegrated (fragments smaller than 2 mm) with up to 5400 (median 628) shocks with the Piezolith and 3450 (median 428) shocks with the MPL 9000 lithotripters. With the Piezolith, operating at the highest power setting, a 1.65 fold median higher number of shocks was required for stone fragmentation than with the MPL 9000 at a medium power setting. Stone volume seemed to be the only determinant which affected ease of fragmentation; composition and density of the stones as assessed by computed tomography did not seem to be governing factors. Images Figure 5 PMID:2013428

  6. The evolving epidemiology of stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Roudakova, Ksenia; Monga, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of kidney stones is evolving – not only is the prevalence increasing, but also the gender gap has narrowed. What drives these changes? Diet, obesity or environmental factors? This article will review the possible explanations for a shift in the epidemiology, with the hope of gaining a better understanding of the extent to which modifiable risk factors play a role on stone formation and what measures may be undertaken for disease prevention in view of these changing trends. PMID:24497682

  7. Crown Gall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown gall disease occurs on diverse dicotyledonous and gymnospermous plant species worldwide. Reports of crown gall on hop date back to at least 1929, and the disease has been reported from most countries where hop is or has been grown commercially. The epidemiology of the causal bacterium, Agrob...

  8. Effect of blind treatment on stone disease.

    PubMed

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Salim, Abiya; Vijay, Adarsh

    2010-06-01

    Most of the drugs administered to stone patients appear to be inappropriate and doing more harm than good to the patients. The objective of this paper is to identify the prevalence of blind chemotherapy among the stone patients and find out the real indication for the drugs administered. Patients who attended the stone clinic for the first time were interviewed to find out what drugs they had been taking before the attendance at the stone clinic. 350 patients consuming specific drugs relevant to stone formation at least for a period of 15 days were selected for a detailed assessment. The type of drug consumed, the dose, the duration, the side effects, compliance rate and effect on stone disease were assessed. The biochemical profile of the patients was assessed to identify the role of the therapeutic modalities utilised. Conclusions regarding the utility of drugs in the process of stone formation were made. The values were compared with those of patients not on medication and considering laboratory standards. Of the 350 patients studied, 96 patients were consuming potassium citrate in different doses, 50 were consuming allopurinol, 44 cystone, 27 potassium citrate + magnesium, 25 calcury, 24 rowatinex, 21 ayurvedic drugs, 17 dystone, 17 homeopathic medicines and 17 other drugs. The longest duration of compliance was for cystone-2.5 years. All other drugs were stopped by the patients themselves due to recurrence of symptoms. As much as 93% of the patients did not feel that there was any significant relief of symptoms. The side effects which prompted the patients to stop medicine were gastro intestinal upset, particularly with potassium citrate, rowatinex and potassium citrate + magnesium combination. The relevant biochemical changes noted were increased urinary citrate levels in patients consuming potassium citrate alone or in combination with magnesium. Serum uric acid was within normal limits in patients consuming allopurinol. Urine uric acid levels were also lower in patients on allopurinol. It is concluded that most of the drugs administered blindly were neither indicated nor beneficial for the patients. Metabolic correction has to be based on proper metabolic assessment. PMID:19997722

  9. Epidemiologic Insights into Stone Disease as a Systemic Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curhan, Gary C.

    2007-04-01

    Examining the epidemiology of stone disease can provide insight into etiology. There is a growing body of evidence that stone disease is not simply a disorder of the kidney. In fact, nephrolithiasis is clearly a systemic disorder. Conditions associated with stone disease include the classic ones such as inflammatory bowel disease and primary hyperparathyroidism. More recent studies have demonstrated strong associations with obesity, gout, diabetes and hypertension. Future studies will help uncover the underlying common pathophysiologic abnormalities.

  10. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  11. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease.

    PubMed

    Killilea, David W; Westropp, Jodi L; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  12. Metabolic risk factors in children with kidney stone disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco R. Spivacow; Armando L. Negri; Elisa E. del Valle; Irene Calviño; Erich Fradinger; José R. Zanchetta

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of metabolic risk factor in children with renal stone disease is the basis of medical treatment aimed at preventing\\u000a recurrent stone events and the growth of preexisting calculi. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the metabolic risk\\u000a factors and clinical and family histories of 90 children with kidney stone disease who had been referred to our institution\\u000a and

  13. Nutritional Risk Factors in Calcium Stone Disease in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masanori Iguchi; Kiyonori Kataoka; Kenjiro Kohri; Sunao Yachiku; Takashi Kurita

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the nutritional environment affecting calcium stone disease in Japan. The following results were obtained. Renal stone disease in the late 1970s increased by about three times than that of the 1940s. Fats and oils, animal protein and calcium intake increased remarkably after the second World War and milk plus milk products, meat

  14. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment for Kidney Stone Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Dayron; Sacco, Dianne E

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventions for stone disease in the United States are mainly founded on 3 surgical procedures: extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, ureteroscopic lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. With the advancement of technology, treatment has shifted toward less invasive strategies and away from open or laparoscopic surgery. The treatment chosen for a patient with stones is based on the stone and patient characteristics. Each of the minimally invasive techniques uses an imaging source, either fluoroscopy or ultrasound, to localize the stone and an energy source to fragment the stone. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy uses a shock wave energy source generated outside the body to fragment the stone. In contrast, with ureteroscopy, laser energy is placed directly on the stone using a ureteroscope that visualizes the stone. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy requires dilation of a tract through the back into the renal pelvis so that instruments can be inserted directly onto the stone to fragment or pulverize it. The success of the surgical intervention relies on performing the least invasive technique with the highest success of stone removal. PMID:26088070

  15. Evaluation of wild walnut Juglans spp. for resistance to crown gall disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown gall (CG) disease of walnut is caused by the ubiquitous soil-borne bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The most widely used rootstock Paradox, an interspecific hybrid between Juglans hindsii and Juglans regia, is typically highly susceptible to A. tumefaciens. Identification of a durable sou...

  16. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  17. Medical Management of Urinary Stone Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Y. C. Pak

    2004-01-01

    A variety of dietary and metabolic factors may contribute or cause stone formation in idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Dietary factors include a high intake of animal proteins, oxalate and sodium, and a low intake of fluids and potassium-containing citrus products. Some of the metabolic causes of stones are hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, gouty diathesis, hyperoxaluria, and hyperuricosuria. Dietary modification, to be applied

  18. Genetics of hypercalciuric stone forming diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O Devuyst; Y Pirson

    2007-01-01

    With a lifetime incidence of up to 12% in man and 6% in woman, nephrolithiasis is a major health problem worldwide. Approximately, 80% of kidney stones are composed of calcium and hypercalciuria is found in up to 40% of stone-formers. Although the mechanisms resulting in precipitation and growth of calcium crystals in the urinary tract are multiple and not fully

  19. Recent management of urinary stone disease in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Aydogdu, Ozgu; Karakose, Ayhan; Celik, Orcun; Atesci, Yusuf Ziya

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of stone disease has been increasing and the risk of recurrent stone formation is high in a pediatric population. It is crucial to use the most effective method with the primary goal of complete stone removal to prevent recurrence from residual fragments. While extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still considered first line therapy in many clinics for urinary tract stones in children, endoscopic techniques are widely preferred due to miniaturization of instruments and evolution of surgical techniques. The standard procedures to treat urinary stone disease in children are the same as those used in an adult population. These include ESWL, ureterorenoscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (standard PCNL or mini-perc), laparoscopic and open surgery. ESWL is currently the procedure of choice for treating most upper urinary tract calculi in a pediatric population. In recent years, endourological management of pediatric urinary stone disease is preferred in many centers with increasing experience in endourological techniques and decreasing sizes of surgical equipment. The management of pediatric stone disease has evolved with improvements in the technique and a decrease in the size of surgical instruments. Recently, endoscopic methods have been safely and effectively used in children with minor complications. In this review, we aim to summarize the recent management of urolithiasis in children. PMID:25254178

  20. Plant Disease Lesson: Brown rot of stone fruits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David F. Ritchie (North Carolina State University; )

    2000-10-25

    This plant disease lesson on Brown rot of stone fruits (caused by Monilinia fructicola, M. laxa, and M. fructigena) includes information on symptoms and signs, pathogen biology, disease cycle and epidemiology, disease management, and the significance of the disease. Selected references are listed and a glossary is also available for use with this resource.

  1. Metabolic risk factors in children with kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco R; Negri, Armando L; del Valle, Elisa E; Calviño, Irene; Fradinger, Erich; Zanchetta, José R

    2008-07-01

    The evaluation of metabolic risk factor in children with renal stone disease is the basis of medical treatment aimed at preventing recurrent stone events and the growth of preexisting calculi. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the metabolic risk factors and clinical and family histories of 90 children with kidney stone disease who had been referred to our institution and subjected to clinical tests using a standardized protocol. The mean age of our pediatric patients was 10.7 years, and the male:female ratio was 1.14:1.0. Biochemical abnormalities were found in 84.4% of all cases. A single urine metabolic risk factor was present in 52.2% (n = 47) of the patients, and multiple risk factors were present in the remaining 31.1% (n = 28). Idiopathic hypercalciuria (alone or in combination) and hypocitraturia (alone or in combination) were the most frequent risk factors identified in 40 and 37.8% of these patients, respectively. Renal colic or unspecified abdominal pain were the most frequent forms of presentation (76.9%), with 97.5% of stones located in the upper urinary tract. In most patients, stone disease was confirmed by renal ultrasonography (77%). A positive family history in first-degree and second-degree relatives was found in 46.2 and 32.5% of the cases, respectively. We conclude that specific urine metabolic risk factors are found in most children with kidney stones and that hypocitraturia is as frequent as hypercalciuria. Very often there is a positive family history of renal stone disease in first- and second-degree relatives. PMID:18324422

  2. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  3. The emerging role of robotics and laparoscopy in stone disease.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Mitchell R

    2013-02-01

    The surgical management of urolithiasis has undergone a remarkable clinical evolution over the past three decades. The once common practice of open stone surgery has nearly been relegated to historical interest by modern technology. The introduction of minimally invasive techniques, laparoscopy and robot-assisted surgery, have emerged to complete the urologist's armamentarium. The benefits to patients when other endourologic procedures have failed include less pain, shorter hospitalization and convalescence, and improved cosmesis. This chapter explores the historical shift from open to minimally invasive management for stone disease and the unique risks and outcomes associated with these procedures in modern urology. PMID:23177639

  4. A common molecular basis for three inherited kidney stone diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah E. Lloyd; Simon H. S. Pearce; Simon E. Fisher; Klaus Steinmeyer; Blanche Schwappach; Steven J. Scheinman; Brian Harding; Alessandra Bolino; Marcella Devoto; Paul Goodyer; Susan P. A. Rigden; Oliver Wrong; Thomas J. Jentsch; Ian W. Craig; Rajesh V. Thakker

    1996-01-01

    KIDNEY stones (nephrolithiasis), which affect 12% of males and 5% of females in the western world, are familial in 45% of patients1,2 and are most commonly associated with hypercalciuria1. Three disorders of hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis (Dent's disease3, X-linked recessive nephrolithiasis (XRN)4, and X-linked recessive hypophosphataemic rickets (XLRH)5) have been mapped to Xpll.22 (refs 5-7). A microdeletion6 in one Dent's disease kindred

  5. Bone disease in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Szejnfeld, V L; Carvalho, A B; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1994-09-01

    The association between idiopathic hypercalciuria and osteopenia (OP) has been recently recognized. It is not established whether or not calcium intake plays a critical role in the loss of bone mass. Fifty-five calcium stone forming patients with either absorptive hypercalciuria (AH) or fasting hypercalciuria (FH), 29 males and 26 premenopausal females, were submitted to dual photon absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Calcium intake was assessed by a 72 hr dietary record. OP was detected in 20% (11/55) of patients, being more common among men, 9/26 (35%) than in women, 2/29 (7%), p < 0.05. Male FH patients presented lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than sex, weight and age-matched control (1.058 +/- 0.18 vs 1.209 +/- 0.13 g/cm2, X +/- SD, p < 0.05). OP was more frequent in FH patients, 7/20 (35%) than in AH patients 4/35 (11%), albeit the difference was not statistically significant. There was no correlation between calcium intake and BMD measurement. Six osteopenic male FH patients were further submitted to histomorphometric evaluation with tetracycline double labeling. Bone volume was lower than the controls (13.2 +/- 3.0 vs 27.2 +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05). Osteoid surfaces were reduced, although not significantly (10.1 +/- 8.2% vs 15.9 +/- 6.7%). Eroded surfaces were markedly increased (23.9 +/- 13.4 vs 4.2 +/- 1.4%, p < 0.05). The bone formation rate was very low with a complete lack of tetracycline double labeling in 4 patients. These data suggest low bone volume, tendency to low bone formation, increased bone resorption and a severe mineralization defect, consistent with normal or low bone turnover osteoporosis. PMID:7994936

  6. Renal stone formation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Caudarella, R; Rizzoli, E; Pironi, L; Malavolta, N; Martelli, G; Poggioli, G; Gozzetti, G; Miglioli, M

    1993-03-01

    Kidney stones are more common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in the general population. The main lithogenetic risk factors were evaluated in patients affected by Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Our results show the presence of several factors, besides hyperoxaluria, in patients with IBD although their behaviour appears different in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis at pre- and post-operative stages. Before surgery in patients with Crohn's disease we found a decreased citrate (p < 0.001) and magnesium (p < 0.005) excretion together with a low urinary volume (p < 0.001) and pH (p < 0.005). After surgery patients with Crohn's disease showed a further reduction of magnesium and citrate. Patients with ulcerative colitis before surgery showed a reduced citrate excretion (p < 0.05) and a more acidic pH (p < 0.05) than healthy subjects. Surgical treatment of proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis seems to increase the risk of stone formation; in fact, after surgery we observed a relevant decrease of urinary volume (p < 0.001), pH (p < 0.0001) and urinary excretion of citrate (p < 0.0001) as well as magnesium (p < 0.005). Patients with IBD seem to be at greater risk of stone formation than patients with idiopathic calcium lithiasis; in fact, they show a lower excretion of citrate (p < 0.001) and magnesium (p < 0.001) together with a low urinary pH (p < 0.001) and volume (p < 0.001). Urinary volume reduction is probably one of the major risk factors together with the decrease of small molecular weight inhibitors that is a constant finding in all patients with IBD. PMID:8316806

  7. Differences in susceptibility of Arabidopsis ecotypes to crown gall disease may result from a deficiency in T-DNA integration.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, J; Matthysse, A G; Gelvin, S B

    1997-01-01

    We show that among ecotypes of Arabidopsis, there is considerable variation in their susceptibility to crown gall disease. Differences in susceptibility are heritable and, in one ecotype, segregate as a single major contributing locus. In several ecotypes, recalcitrance to tumorigenesis results from decreased binding of Agrobacterium to inoculated root explants. The recalcitrance of another ecotype occurs at a late step in T-DNA transfer. Transient expression of a T-DNA-encoded beta-glucuronidase gusA gene is efficient, but the ecotype is deficient in crown gall tumorigenesis, transformation to kanamycin resistance, and stable GUS expression. This ecotype is also more sensitive to gamma radiation than is a susceptible ecotype. DNA gel blot analysis showed that after infection by Agrobacterium, less T-DNA was integrated into the genome of the recalcitrant ecotype than was integrated into the genome of a highly susceptible ecotype. PMID:9090878

  8. A Drosophila Model Identifies a Critical Role for Zinc in Mineralization for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W.; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?XANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall’s plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  9. A Drosophila model identifies a critical role for zinc in mineralization for kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Chi, Thomas; Kim, Man Su; Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?XANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall's plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  10. Comparison of gall bladder bile and endoscopically obtained duodenal bile.

    PubMed Central

    Janowitz, P; Swobodnik, W; Wechsler, J G; Zöller, A; Kuhn, K; Ditschuneit, H

    1990-01-01

    In 10 patients with gall stone disease (eight women, two men; mean (SD) age 47.4 (13) years), bile was obtained by endoscopic aspiration after stimulation of the gall bladder with ceruletid and also by fine needle puncture of the gall bladder under local anaesthetic. The total lipid concentration of the puncture bile samples was mean (SD) 11.9 (4.7) g/dl, significantly higher than the endoscopic bile samples (3.9 (3.3) g/dl, p less than 0.001). Total bile acids, phospholipids, and biliary cholesterol (expressed in mol%) and cholesterol saturation index showed no significant differences between the two types of samples. The glycocholic acid concentration in the endoscopically obtained bile (27.7 (6.6) mol% v 23.3 (5.4) mol%; p less than 0.01) was significantly higher than the puncture bile samples. Puncture bile exhibited a significantly shorter nucleation time (3.5 (3.3) days v 19.6 (11.9) days; p less than 0.001). For determination of the nucleation time, endoscopic bile aspiration after gall bladder stimulation with ceruletid led to adequately concentrated samples in 50% of the study subjects. Cholesterol monohydrate crystal formation in native bile was observed in six samples of puncture bile and in three samples of the endoscopically obtained bile. The presence of cholesterol crystals and the determination of nucleation time in the puncture bile were the best discriminants between cholesterol and pigment gall stones and correlated well with computed tomogram analysis. PMID:2265783

  11. Shock Wave Lithotripsy: Effects on the Pancreas and Recurrent Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krambeck, Amy E.; Rohlinger, Audrey L.; Lohse, Christine M.; Patterson, David E.; Gettman, Matthew T.

    2007-04-01

    Long-term effects of shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) are unknown; however, we recently found an association between SWL and diabetes mellitus in a population based case control cohort. To further study the association between SWL and diabetes mellitus, we determined the immediate impact of SWL on the pancreas as well as the long-term natural history of stone disease following treatment. Chart review identified 630 patients treated with SWL at our institution in 1985. Questionnaires focusing on recurrent stone episodes after SWL were sent to 578 patients alive in 2004. To further assess impact of SWL on the pancreas, pancreatic enzyme measurements were performed on 24 symptomatic stone patients treated in 2006 with ureteroscopy (n=12) and SWL (n=12). Serum amylase and lipase were evaluated pre and post SWL. A?5 U/L increase in either lab value was considered significant. Among patients in the long-term SWL treatment group, the questionnaire response rate was 58.9% (288/489). Recurrent stone events were noted in 154 (53.5%) of the survey respondents. Characteristics associated with stone recurrences were: gender (p=0.004), age at SWL (p=0.022), BMI (p=0.007), SWL complications (p=0.009), and lower pole SWL (p=0.025). Recurrent stone disease was also associated with the development of diabetes mellitus (p=0.020). In the contemporary group of treated stone patients, pancreatic enzyme analysis demonstrated an increase in serum amylase and lipase in 3 (25.0%) SWL patients and 1 (8.3%) ureteroscopy patient (p=0.273). In conclusion, over half of the patients treated with SWL will develop recurrent stone events. We found a strong association between recurrent stone disease and the development of diabetes mellitus at long-term follow-up. Although not statistically significant due to small number, data in a contemporary treatment cohort suggest the possibility that the pancreas can be adversely affected by SWL.

  12. Dent's disease and prevalence of renal stones in dialysis patients in Northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Tosetto, Enrica; Graziotto, Romina; Artifoni, Lina; Nachtigal, Josef; Cascone, Carmelo; Conz, Piero; Piva, Michele; Dell'Aquila, Roberto; De Paoli Vitali, Ermanno; Citron, Lorenzo; Nalesso, Federico; Antonello, Augusto; Vertolli, Ugo; Zagatti, Riccardo; Lupo, Antonio; D'Angelo, Angela; Anglani, Franca; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Dent's disease (DD) involves nephrocalcinosis, urolithiasis, hypercalciuria, LMW proteinuria, and renal failure in various combinations. Males are affected. It is caused by mutations in the chloride channel CLCN5 gene. It has been suggested that DD is underdiagnosed, occurring in less overt forms, apparently without family history. A possible approach to this problem is to search for CLCN5 mutations in patients who may have a high prevalence of mutations: end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with previous calcium, struvite, or radio-opaque (CSR) stones. We looked for CLCN5 mutations in 25 males with ESRD-CSR stones selected from all of the patients (1,901 individuals, of which 1,179 were males) of 15 dialysis units in the Veneto region. One DD patient had a new DD mutation (1070 G > T) in exon 7. The new polymorphism IVS11-67 C > T was detected in intron 11 in one patient and one control. We also found 28 females with ESRD and stone history, and seven more males with ESRD and non-CSR stones. The prevalence of stone formers among dialysis patients in our region was 3.2%, much lower than the prevalence observed in older studies. Struvite stones continue to play a major role in causing stone-associated ESRD . PMID:16247550

  13. Urinary Stone Formation: Dent’s Disease Moves Understanding Forward

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Sayer; Nicholas L. Simmons

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones form in the late collecting duct in a complex milieu involving salts and protein components of the urine together with direct interactions at the epithelial cells lining the duct. The operation of newly discovered physiological controls that limit crystal formation by feedback mechanisms which sense the luminal environment are discussed. Adhesion at the epithelial surface and intracellular processing

  14. Minimal Invasive Treatment of Bile Stone Disease in Patients with Situs inversus totalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Yildirim; K. Aksoz; N. Erkan; S. Agdeniz; A. F. Polat; C. Yilmaz; Belkis Unsal

    2005-01-01

    Background: Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare condition with an autosomal recessive genetic predisposition. In abdominal surgery this condition can be associated with substantial difficulties. Here we report diagnostic pitfalls and technical details of two patients with SIT and bile stone diseases who were treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Patients and Methods:

  15. Ureteroscopy for stone disease in the paediatric population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hiro; Griffin, Stephen; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present review was to look at the role of ureteroscopy (URS) for treatment of paediatric stone disease. We conducted a systematic review using studies identified by a literature search between January 1990 and May 2013. All English-language articles reporting on a minimum of 50 patients aged ?18 years treated with URS for stone disease were included. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study. A total of 14 studies (1718 procedures) were reported in patients with a mean (range) age of 7.8 (0.25-18.0) years. The mean (range) stone burden was 9.8 (1-30) mm and the mean (range) stone-free rate (SFR) 87.5 (58-100)% with initial therapeutic URS. The majority of these stones were in the ureter (n = 1427, 83.4%). There were 180 (10.5%) Clavien I-III complications and 38 cases (2.2%) where there was a failure to complete the initial ureteroscopic procedure and an alternative procedure was performed. To assess the impact of age on failure rate and complications, studies were subcategorized into those that included children with either a mean age <6 years (four studies, 341 procedures) or a mean age >6 years. (10 studies, 1377 procedures). A higher failure rate (4.4 vs 1.7%) and a higher complication rate (24.0 vs 7.1%) were observed in children whose mean age was <6 years. URS for paediatric stone disease is a relatively safe procedure with a reasonably good SFR, but there seems to be a higher failure and complication rate in children aged <6 years. PMID:25203925

  16. Primary bladder stone disease in children-crystallisation studies with special reference to urinary excretion of pyrophosphates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. S. Teotia; M. Teotia; N. P. S. Teotia

    1974-01-01

    Summary  Urinary crystallisation on a glass fibre and the 24-hour pyrophosphate and orthophosphate excretion were studied in 32 children,\\u000a 15 normal and 17 with primary bladder stone disease.\\u000a \\u000a There was no significant difference between the controls and patients. Inhibitors of crystallisation were present in normal\\u000a controls and in children with primary bladder stone disease. Their striking absence in children with renal

  17. Factors Influencing Urologist Treatment Preference in Surgical Management of Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Childs, M. Adam; Rangel, Laureano J.; Lingeman, James E.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the surgeon factors influencing the surgical treatment decisions for symptomatic stone disease. The factors influencing the selection of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy, or percutaneous nephrolithotomy to treat symptomatic stone disease are not well studied. Methods Electronic surveys were sent to urologists with American Medical Association membership. Information on training, practice, and ideal treatment of common stone scenarios was obtained and statistically analyzed. Results In November 2009, 600 surveys were sent and 180 were completed. High-volume SWL practices (>100 cases annually) were more common in community practice (P < .01), and high-volume ureteroscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy practices were more common in academic practice (P = .03). Community practice was associated with SWL selection for proximal urolithiasis and upper pole nephrolithiasis (P < .005). An increasing time since urologic training was associated with SWL selection for proximal urolithiasis and upper pole nephrolithiasis (P < .01). Urologists reporting shock wave lithotriptor ownership were 3-4 times more likely to select SWL for urolithiasis or nephrolithiasis compared with urologists who did not own a lithotripter (P < .01). Routine concern for stent pain and rigid ureteroscope preference (vs flexible) were associated with SWL selection (P < .03). Conclusion Surgeon factors significantly affected urolithiasis treatment selection. SWL was associated with community urology practice, increasing time since training, shock wave lithotriptor ownership, concern for stent pain, and ureteroscope preference. PMID:22245295

  18. The Pattern of Urinary Stone Disease in Leeds and in the United Kingdom in Relation to Animal Protein Intake during the Period 1960–1980

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Robertson; M. Peacock

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the occurrence of urinary stone disease in Leeds between 1960 and 1980 show that there was an increase in the number of stones formed during the period 1960–1970, a fall between 1972 and 1976 and a subsequent rise between 1977 and 1980. The fluctuations in stone incidence were accounted for almost entirely be changes in the number of

  19. Non-communicating multiseptate gall bladder and choledochal cyst: a case report and review of publications.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C E; Howard, E R; Driver, M; Murray-Lyon, I M

    1993-01-01

    A 14 year old girl with multiseptate gall bladder and cystic dilatation of the biliary tree is presented. This is the 20th published case report of patients with multiseptate gall bladder and only the second to be associated with a choledochal cyst. The cystic spaces of the gall bladder did not communicate with the neck of the gall bladder or the rest of the biliary tree, and this unusual feature has not been previously described. A multiseptate gall bladder with a normal biliary tree commonly causes symptoms suggestive of cholecystitis, although gall stones are seldom present. Diagnosis is confirmed by an oral cholecystogram or ultrasound scan that may show the fine intraluminal septae, and these features should be looked for in patients with biliary symptoms without biliary calculi. Cholecystectomy is curative for the isolated gall bladder anomaly but hepaticojejunostomy may be necessary for an associated choledochal cyst. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8314522

  20. Disruption of gene pqqA or pqqB reduces plant growth promotion activity and biocontrol of crown gall disease by Rahnella aquatilis HX2.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Jiao, Ziwei; Hale, Lauren; Wu, Wenliang; Guo, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis strain HX2 has the ability to promote maize growth and suppress sunflower crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium vitis, A. tumefaciens, and A. rhizogenes. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor of aldose and alcohol dehydrogenases, is required for the synthesis of an antibacterial substance, gluconic acid, by HX2. Mutants of HX2 unable to produce PQQ were obtained by in-frame deletion of either the pqqA or pqqB gene. In this study, we report the independent functions of pqqA and pqqB genes in relation to PQQ synthesis. Interestingly, both the pqqA and pqqB mutants of R. aquatilis eliminated the ability of strain HX2 to produce antibacterial substance, which in turn, reduced the effectiveness of the strain for biological control of sunflower crown gall disease. The mutation also resulted in decreased mineral phosphate solubilization by HX2, which reduced the efficacy of this strain as a biological fertilizer. These functions were restored by complementation with the wild-type pqq gene cluster. Additionally, the phenotypes of HX2 derivatives, including colony morphology, growth dynamic, and pH change of culture medium were impacted to different extents. Our findings suggested that pqqA and pqqB genes individually play important functions in PQQ biosynthesis and are required for antibacterial activity and phosphorous solubilization. These traits are essential for R. aquatilis efficacy as a biological control and plant growth promoting strain. This study enhances our fundamental understanding of the biosynthesis of an environmentally significant cofactor produced by a promising biocontrol and biological fertilizer strain. PMID:25502691

  1. Disruption of Gene pqqA or pqqB Reduces Plant Growth Promotion Activity and Biocontrol of Crown Gall Disease by Rahnella aquatilis HX2

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Lauren; Wu, Wenliang; Guo, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis strain HX2 has the ability to promote maize growth and suppress sunflower crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium vitis, A. tumefaciens, and A. rhizogenes. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor of aldose and alcohol dehydrogenases, is required for the synthesis of an antibacterial substance, gluconic acid, by HX2. Mutants of HX2 unable to produce PQQ were obtained by in-frame deletion of either the pqqA or pqqB gene. In this study, we report the independent functions of pqqA and pqqB genes in relation to PQQ synthesis. Interestingly, both the pqqA and pqqB mutants of R. aquatilis eliminated the ability of strain HX2 to produce antibacterial substance, which in turn, reduced the effectiveness of the strain for biological control of sunflower crown gall disease. The mutation also resulted in decreased mineral phosphate solubilization by HX2, which reduced the efficacy of this strain as a biological fertilizer. These functions were restored by complementation with the wild-type pqq gene cluster. Additionally, the phenotypes of HX2 derivatives, including colony morphology, growth dynamic, and pH change of culture medium were impacted to different extents. Our findings suggested that pqqA and pqqB genes individually play important functions in PQQ biosynthesis and are required for antibacterial activity and phosphorous solubilization. These traits are essential for R. aquatilis efficacy as a biological control and plant growth promoting strain. This study enhances our fundamental understanding of the biosynthesis of an environmentally significant cofactor produced by a promising biocontrol and biological fertilizer strain. PMID:25502691

  2. Surgical outcome of carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder: A review

    PubMed Central

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sun, Zhao-Li; Montgomey, Robert A; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma, which comprises less than one percent of all gall bladder neoplasms, is characterized by the presence of variable proportions of carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. Recently, several reports have described patients suffering from carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder. However, there are no large studies regarding the clinicopathologic features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this disease because the number of patients who undergo resection of gall bladder carcinosarcoma at a single institution is limited. A Medline search was performed using the keywords ‘gall bladder’ and ‘carcinosarcoma’. Additional articles were obtained from references within the papers identified by the Medline search. Optimal adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy protocols for carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder have not been established. Curative surgical resection offers the only chance for long-term survival from this disease. The outcome of 36 patients who underwent surgical resection for carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder was poor; the 3-year overall survival rate was only 31.0% and the median survival time was 7.0 mo. Since the postoperative prognosis of carcinosarcoma of the gall bladder is worse than that of adenocarcinoma, new adjuvant chemotherapies and/or radiation techniques are essential for improvement of surgical outcome. PMID:19842216

  3. On the Relationship of Cholelithiasis to Carcinoma of the Gall-Bladder and on the Sex Dependency of the Carcinoma of the Bile Ducts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Om Parkash

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of the autopsy data from the Pathology Department of the Wilhelminen Hospital, Vienna from 1928 to 1972, it has been shown that gall-stones occur more frequently in conjunction with the carcinoma of the gall-bladder but have not aetiological relationship with the malignancy. It is further shown that the carcinoma of the bile ducts is more common in

  4. Biliary peritonitis due to gall bladder perforation after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nikhil; Singh, Rana Pratap; Tiwary, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old male patient underwent right percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) for right renal 1.5 × 1.5 cm lower pole stone. The procedure was completed uneventfully with complete stone clearance. The patient developed peritonitis and shock 48 h after the procedure. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large amount of bile in the abdomen along with three small perforations in the gall bladder (GB) and one perforation in the caudate lobe of the liver. Retrograde cholecystectomy was performed but the patient did not recover and expired post-operatively. This case exemplifies the high mortality of GB perforation after PNL and the lack of early clinical signs.

  5. Gallbladder stone inspection and identification for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yacob; Kokaj, Jahja O.

    1999-03-01

    Using high speed imaging techniques, the gall bladder stone immersed in liquid is detected and identified. The detection of the shock waves induced by laser power is reached by using interferometry technique. Using gall bladder and tissue images obtained by ultra-fast photography and time resolved laser fluorescence the correlation of correlation is performed. The tissue image is used to perform the correlation filter. Hence lower correlation output is used for firing of the laser power.

  6. Managing caliceal stones.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andreas J; Knipper, Sophie; Netsch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The natural course of untreated asymptomatic caliceal calculi has not been clearly defined, especially in terms of disease progression, and the indications for and outcomes of surgical intervention are not precise. Caliceal stones may remain asymptomatic but, in case of migration, ureteral calculi can cause acute ureteric colic with severe complications. The decision for an active treatment of caliceal calculi is based on stone composition, stone size and symptoms. Extracorporal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has a low complication rate and is recommended by the current guidelines of the European Association of Urology as a first-line therapy for the treatment of caliceal stones <2 cm in diameter. However, immediate stone removal is not achieved with ESWL. The primary stone-free rates (SFR) after ESWL depend on stone site and composition and, especially for lower pole calculi, the SFR differ widely from other caliceal stones. Minimally-invasive procedures including percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy are alternatives for the treatment of caliceal stones, associated with low morbidity and high primary SFR when performed in centers of excellence. PMID:24497690

  7. Management of pancreatic duct stone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Li; Sheng-Ning Zhang

    2008-01-01

    ancreatic duct stone is a rare disease. With the advancement of radiological techniques in diagnosis and in-depth study the incidence of the disease has appeared to be rising in recent years, especially in the Western world. Defined as stone or calcification in the pancreatic duct, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown, but many theories are available for its formation.

  8. Kidney Stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew N. Primak; Terri J. Vrtiska; Mingliang Qu; Cynthia H. McCollough

    \\u000a Although state-of-the-art CT provides accurate sub millimeter details of the size and location of renal stones, current routine\\u000a clinical image analysis does not differentiate stone composition. This is particularly important in the case of uric acid\\u000a (UA) stones (?10% of cases), since urinary alkalinization can be prescribed to dissolve UA stones. Therefore, simple and reliable\\u000a differentiation of UA vs. non-UA

  9. Gall-Making Insects and Mites 

    E-print Network

    Bogran, Carlos E.; Drees, Bastiaan M.; Hudgeons, Jeremy L.

    2006-03-30

    Galls are abnormal swellings of plant tissue caused by insects, bacteria, fungi, mites or nematodes. Insects that cause galls include certain moth caterpillars, beetles, flies, jumping plant lice, aphids and small wasps. Ways to control galls...

  10. Polymorphisms in CaSR and CLDN14 Genes Associated with Increased Risk of Kidney Stone Disease in Patients from the Eastern Part of India

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudakshina; Pattanayak, Arup Kumar; Ghosh, Saurabh; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Puri, Anurag; Kundu, Anup Kumar; Das, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stone disease (KSD) is a major clinical problem imposing a large burden for both healthcare and economy globally. In India, the prevalence of kidney stone disease is rapidly increasing. This study aimed to evaluate the association between genetic defects in vitamin D receptor (VDR), calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) and claudin 14 (CLDN14) genes and kidney stone disease in patients from eastern India. We enrolled 200 consecutive kidney stone patients (age 18–60 years) (cases) and their corresponding sex and age matched 200 normal individuals (controls). To identify genetic variants responsible for KSD, we performed sequence analysis of VDR, CaSR and CLDN14 genes. Four non-synonymous (rs1801725, rs1042636, rs1801726 and rs2228570), one synonymous (rs219780) and three intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs731236, rs219777 and rs219778) were identified. Genotype and allele frequency analysis of these SNPs revealed that, rs1801725 (Ala986Ser), rs1042636 (Arg990Gly) of CaSR gene and rs219778, rs219780 (Thr229Thr) of CLDN14 gene were significantly associated with KSD. Serum calcium levels were significantly higher in subjects carrying 986Ser allele and calcium excretion was higher in subjects bearing 990Gly allele. In conclusion, rs1801725, rs1042636, rs219778 and rs219780 SNPs were associated with kidney stone risk in patients from the eastern part of India. PMID:26107257

  11. Gall induction by hemipteroid insects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anantanarayanan Raman

    2012-01-01

    The Thysanoptera and sternorrhynchous Hemiptera induce galls through feeding action, a behavior similar to that in the Cecidomyiidae. Salivary glands of gall-founding female thrips include greater quantities of hydrolyzing enzymes and soluble proteins than those in either males or pupae, which possibly alter the host-tissue metabolism, enabling galls to develop. Piercing-and-sucking mouthparts of the Hemiptera are adapted for an exclusively

  12. Gall induction by hemipteroid insects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anantanarayanan Raman

    2011-01-01

    The Thysanoptera and sternorrhynchous Hemiptera induce galls through feeding action, a behavior similar to that in the Cecidomyiidae. Salivary glands of gall-founding female thrips include greater quantities of hydrolyzing enzymes and soluble proteins than those in either males or pupae, which possibly alter the host-tissue metabolism, enabling galls to develop. Piercing-and-sucking mouthparts of the Hemiptera are adapted for an exclusively

  13. Clinical significance of stone analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmucki, O; Asper, R

    1986-01-01

    The bases of a real metaphylaxis in the renal stone diseases are the analysis of stones and the research of metabolism in blood plasma and urine. The greatest part of the stones analyzed may be classified in four groups: oxalate, phosphate, uric acid and cystine. The metaphylaxis by whewellite and weddellite is the same for both species but there is a distinction in growth and recurrence. In the phosphate stones, the section with the most different composition, a postoperative therapy is only possible with the distinction of 'acid' and 'alkaline' stones. The uric acid and cystine stones need a tight supervision and metaphylaxis for the whole life. On the basis of 15,000 analyses with X-ray diffraction the difference of the renal stones is discussed and the deducation for a genuine metaphylaxis is shown. PMID:3811035

  14. Decreased Renal Parenchymal Density on Unenhanced Helical Computed Tomography for Diagnosis of Ureteral Stone Disease in Emergent Patients with Acute Flank Pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen-Chih Huang; Yon-Cheong Wong; Li-Jen Wang; Te-Fa Chiu; Chip-Jen Ng; Jih-Chang Chen

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness and optimal cutoff point of decreased renal parenchymal density (DRD) for diagnosis of ureteral stone disease (USD) in emergent patients with acute flank pain. Methods: A total of 85 emergency patients with acute flank pain who underwent unen- hanced helical computed tomography (UHCT) were prospectively included in this study

  15. Agropine in ``Null-Type'' Crown Gall Tumors: Evidence for Generality of the Opine Concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Guyon; Mary-Dell Chilton; Annik Petit; Jacques Tempe

    1980-01-01

    Agrobacterium Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmids, the causative agents of crown gall disease, fall into four genetic groups based on the patterns of octopine and nopaline synthesis (by crown gall tumors) and catabolism (by Agrobacterium tumefaciens) for which they are responsible. Two classes of Ti plasmids induce tumors that synthesize neither octopine nor nopaline. The existence of these Ti plasmids challenged the

  16. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  17. Gallbladder agenesis with a primary choledochal stone in a patient with situs inversus totalis

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Hassan A.; Yamani, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Gallbladder agenesis with situs inversus totalis Symptoms: Epigastric pain • jaundice Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Situs inversus totalis is an inherited condition characterized by the mirror-image transposition of thoracic and abdominal organs. Gallbladder agenesis, which has normal bile ducts, is a rare congenital condition that occurs in 13 to 65 people out of 100 000. A common bile duct (CBD) stone or choledocholithiasis in patients with gallbladder agenesis is even rarer. Case Report: We report the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain and jaundice. She was not known to have situs inversus totalis. Abdominal ultrasound showed a large stone in the CBD, which could not be extracted by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), necessitating exploration. The gall-bladder and cystic duct were found to be absent. Incisional exploration of the CBD was performed, and a large stone was removed. A choledochoscope was used to identify the remnants and exclude the presence of ectopic gallbladder, and a T-tube was placed into the CBD. Conclusions: Gallbladder agenesis in a patient with situs inversus totalis is extremely rare, with no single reported case identified in the literature. In addition, our case showed a rare complication of ERCP – a failure to extract the CBD stone – and illustrates a way to overcome this complication. PMID:24803979

  18. Galle Cr. Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03637 Galle Cr. Dunes

    These dunes are located on the floor of Galle Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 51.5S, Longitude 329.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Stone chewing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Picking stones up into the mouth and chewing them has been commonly reported in pigs and also in dogs. It has variously been described as play behavior, redirected foraging behavior or a stereotypic behavior. In pigs, stone chewing is often observed in sows housed on paddocks, and most frequently o...

  20. Molecular mechanisms of crystal-related kidney inflammation and injury. Implications for cholesterol embolism, crystalline nephropathies and kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Evan, Andrew; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Crystals are particles of endogenous inorganic or organic composition that can trigger kidney injury when deposited or formed inside the kidney. While decades of research have focused on the molecular mechanisms of solute supersaturation and crystal formation, the pathomechanisms of crystal-induced renal inflammation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery of the intracellular NLRP3 inflammasome as a pattern recognition platform that translates crystal uptake into innate immune activation via secretion of IL-1? and IL-18 revised the pathogenesis of gout, silicosis, asbestosis, atherosclerosis and other crystal-related disorders. As a proof of concept, the NLRP3 inflammasome was now shown to trigger inflammation and acute kidney injury (AKI) in oxalate nephropathy. It seems likely that this and potentially other innate immunity mechanisms drive crystalline nephropathies (CNs) that are associated with crystals of calcium phosphate, uric acid, cysteine, adenine, certain drugs or contrast media, and potentially of myoglobin during rhabdomyolysis and of light chains in myeloma. Here, we discuss the proven and potential mechanisms of renal inflammation and kidney injury in crystal-related kidney disorders. In addition, we list topics for further research in that field. This perspective may also provide novel therapeutic options that can help to avoid progressive tissue remodeling and chronic kidney disease in patients with kidney stone disease or other CNs. PMID:24163269

  1. Gender Distribution of Pediatric Stone Formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Thomas E.; Trock, Bruce J.; Lakshmanan, Yegappan; Gearhart, John P.; Matlaga, Brian R.

    2008-09-01

    Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that the gender prevalence among adult stone-formers is changing, with an increasing incidence of stone disease among women. No similar data have ever been reported for the pediatric stone-forming population. We performed a study to define the gender distribution among pediatric stone-formers using a large-scale national pediatric database. Our findings suggest that gender distribution among stone formers varies by age with male predominance in the first decade of life shifting to female predominance in the second decade. In contrast to adults, females in the pediatric population are more commonly affected by stones than are males. The incidence of pediatric stone disease appears to be increasing at a great rate in both sexes. Further studies should build on this hypothesis-generating work and define the effects of metabolic and environmental risk factors that may influence stone risk in the pediatric patient population

  2. 77 FR 73654 - Eau Galle Renewable Energy Company, Eau Galle Hydro, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...No. 10078-053] Eau Galle Renewable Energy Company, Eau Galle Hydro...October 12, 2012, Eau Galle Renewable Energy Company informed the Commission...and transferred to Eau Galle Renewable Energy Company by letter.\\2\\...

  3. Therapies for Musculoskeletal Disease: Can we Treat Two Birds with One Stone?

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Christian M.; Mokbel, Nancy; DiGirolamo, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases are highly prevalent with staggering annual health care costs across the globe. The combined wasting of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis)— both in normal aging and pathologic states—can lead to vastly compounded risk for fracture in patients. Until now, our therapeutic approach to the prevention of such fractures has focused solely on bone, but our increasing understanding of the interconnected biology of muscle and bone has begun to shift our treatment paradigm for musculoskeletal disease. Targeting pathways that centrally regulate both bone and muscle (eg, GH/IGF-1, sex steroids, etc.) and newly emerging pathways that might facilitate communication between these 2 tissues (eg, activin/myostatin) might allow a greater therapeutic benefit and/or previously unanticipated means by which to treat these frail patients and prevent fracture. In this review, we will discuss a number of therapies currently under development that aim to treat musculoskeletal disease in precisely such a holistic fashion. PMID:24633910

  4. Effects of cisapride on gall bladder emptying, intestinal transit, and serum deoxycholate: a prospective, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Veysey, M; Malcolm, P; Mallet, A; Jenkins, P; Besser, G; Murphy, G; Dowling, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Octreotide inhibits gall bladder emptying and prolongs intestinal transit. This leads to increases in the proportion of deoxycholic acid in, and cholesterol saturation of, gall bladder bile, factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of octreotide induced gall stones.?AIMS—To see if an intestinal prokinetic, cisapride, could overcome these adverse effects of octreotide and if so, be considered as a candidate prophylactic drug for preventing iatrogenic gall bladder stones.?METHODS—A randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, crossover design was used to examine the effects of cisapride (10 mg four times daily) on gall bladder emptying, mouth to caecum and large bowel transit times, and the proportions of deoxycholic acid and other bile acids, in fasting serum from: (i) control subjects (n=6), (ii) acromegalic patients not treated with octreotide (n=6), (iii) acromegalics on long term octreotide (n=8), and (iv) patients with constipation (n=8).?RESULTS—Cisapride had no prokinetic effect on the gall bladder. In fact, it significantly increased both fasting and postprandial gall bladder volumes. However, it shortened mouth to caecum (from 176 (13) to 113 (11) minutes; p<0.001) and large bowel (from 50 (3.0) to 31 (3.4) h; p<0.001) transit times. It also reduced the proportion of deoxycholic acid in serum from 26 (2.3) to 15 (1.8)% (p<0.001), with a reciprocal increase in the proportion of cholic acid from 40 (3.5) to 51 (3.8)% (p<0.01). There were significant linear relationships between large bowel transit time and the proportions of deoxycholic acid (r=0.81; p<0.001) and cholic acid (r=?0.53; p<0.001) in fasting serum.?INTERPRETATION/SUMMARY—Cisapride failed to overcome the adverse effects of octreotide on gall bladder emptying but it countered octreotide induced prolongation of small and large bowel transit. Therefore, if changes in intestinal transit contribute to the development of octreotide induced gall bladder stones, enterokinetics such as cisapride may prevent their formation.???Keywords: cisapride; deoxycholic acid; octreotide; acromegaly; gall bladder stones; large bowel transit time PMID:11709518

  5. Kidney stones

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tests to check calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, and electrolyte levels Kidney function tests Urinalysis to see crystals and look for red blood cells in urine Examination of the stone to determine ...

  6. Phylogeny, evolution, and classification of gall wasps: the plot thickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall wasps (Cynipidae) represent the most spectacular radiation of gall-inducing insects. In addition to true gall formers, gall wasps also include phytophagous inquilines, which live inside the galls induced by gall wasps or other insects. Here we present the first comprehensive molecular and total...

  7. Dent’s disease and prevalence of renal stones in dialysis patients in Northeastern Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrica Tosetto; Romina Graziotto; Lina Artifoni; Josef Nachtigal; Carmelo Cascone; Piero Conz; Michele Piva; Roberto Dell’Aquila; Ermanno De Paoli Vitali; Lorenzo Citron; Federico Nalesso; Augusto Antonello; Ugo Vertolli; Riccardo Zagatti; Antonio Lupo; Angela D’Angelo; Franca Anglani; Giovanni Gambaro

    2006-01-01

    Dents disease (DD) involves nephrocalcinosis, urolithiasis, hypercalciuria, LMW proteinuria, and renal failure in various combinations. Males are affected. It is caused by mutations in the chloride channel CLCN5 gene. It has been suggested that DD is underdiagnosed, occurring in less overt forms, apparently without family history. A possible approach to this problem is to search for CLCN5 mutations in patients

  8. Carcinoma of gall bladder presenting as dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhaiah, Deepti Akkihebbal; Premkumar, Jennifer Anne; Moses, Viju; Chacko, Geeta

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-related muscle diseases are usually paraneoplastic disorders. Dermatomyositis (DM) is a type of inflammatory myopathy that is strongly associated with a broad range of malignant disorders. The malignancy can occur before, concomitantly or after the onset of myositis. The malignancies most commonly associated with DM are carcinomas of ovary, lung, stomach, colorectal and pancreas, as well as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. An association of DM with carcinoma of the gall bladder (GB) is extremely rare with only two previously reported cases in the literature. We report a case of carcinoma of GB with DM as the paraneoplastic manifestation. PMID:21655205

  9. Struvite Stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Brooke Johnson; Margaret S. Pearle

    The occurrence of urinary infection in patients with nephrolithiasis is not uncommon. Although stones of any composition may\\u000a occur in patients who experience urinary tract infections owing to a variety of urinary pathogens, the term“infection stone”\\u000a is reserved for calculi that form as a direct consequence of infection with urease-producing bacteria and the urinary environment\\u000a they promote. This chapter will

  10. Ptotic gall bladder with hepatic masses: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hasan; Aydin, Z Banu; Hekimo?lu, Baki; Görmeli, Ay?e

    2013-01-01

    Gall bladder (GB) may be found in a variety of abnormal positions. Most of them are due to arrested development of embryonic growth at different stages. A 63-year-old female patient was admitted to our radiology unit for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver for the lesions identified in abdominal ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). MRI showed that there was a lobulated heterogenous mass in the left lobe of the liver and a smaller one in the right lobe of the liver with the same appearance. The inferior pole of the liver was located in the pelvic space, and the GB, which contained sludges and stones, was lying down to the upper pelvic space. Hepatic masses were considered to be hemangiomas, and GB was diagnosed as ptotic GB with luminal sludge and stones. In this case, especially, MR imaging helped the surgeon to plan a proper approach to the GB in abnormal localization. PMID:23476872

  11. Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, Charles R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Lee, David B. N.; Narins, Robert G.; Ehrlich, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones has steadily risen during this century; passage of a calculus and a positive family history increase the probability of recurrence. Findings from recent studies on the cause of renal calculi have stressed crystallization and crystal aggregation of stone minerals from supersaturated urine, rather than excessive organic matrix. Absence of normal urine inhibitors of calcium salts is also stressed. Formation of calcium oxalate stones is the major problem. Therapy with decreased calcium and oxalate intake, thiazides, phosphate salts and allopurinol in various combinations has substantially decreased the prevalence of recurrent stones. The rationale for the use of allopurinol is that uric acid salts enhance the tendency for calcium oxalate to crystallize from supersaturated urine. The hypercalciuria seen in 30 percent to 40 percent of patients with oxalate stones is usually caused by intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. Although patients with uric acid calculi constitute only a small fraction of those in whom stones form, they represent a group in whom good medical therapy, based on sound physiologic principles, has proved extremely successful. Renal tubular syndromes lead to nephrocalcinosis and lithiasis through hypercalciuria, alkaline urine and hypocitraturia, the latter an inhibitor of calcium salt precipitation. Recent advances in surgical techniques are discussed, including the rationale for removing staghorn calculi. The ileal ureter and coagulum pyelolithotomy deserve special emphasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 7. PMID:7385835

  12. Metabolic stress response patterns in urinary compositions of idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, patients with chronic bowel diseases and controls.

    PubMed

    Berg, Wolfgang; Gayde, Sabine; Uhlemann, Christine; Laube, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    Emotional stress is associated with e.g. increased hormone release, high blood-sugar level and blood pressure. Stress clearly affects metabolism. Whether chronic stress exposure leads to altered urinary compositions with increased risk of CaOx; urolithiasis was examined by investigating the relation between stress burden and urine composition. 29 controls (CG), 29 CaOx stone formers (SF), and 28 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (CIBD) were advised to avoid unfavorable aliment. Any urolithiasis-related medications were stopped. At day 5, a 24-h urine was collected and comprehensive urinalysis performed. AP (CaOx) index was calculated. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to measure perceived stress ("Trier-Inventory-of-Chronic-Stress"). Mean AP (CaOx) in CG, SF and CIBD amount to 0.8 (+/-0.3), 1.2 (+/-0.7), and 1.9 (+/-1.2), respectively. Increased AP (CaOx) in SF is mainly attributed to an increased effect of calcium and oxalate, whereas in CIBD this is additionally caused by a reduced effect of citrate, magnesium and volume. Stress dimensions are correlated to any investigated urinary parameter with an absolute value of r < or = 0.600; some correlations are statistically significant: whereas in SF only one combination, "lack of social recognition" versus calcium, shows significance, in CIBD various combinations are significantly related. In particular, sodium excretion increases with stress. In CG, some stress dimensions are directly related to citrate; with increasing stress, protection against CaOx crystallization tends to increase. It could be shown that stress load and urinary composition are related by statistical means. The observed metabolic stress response patterns in urinary compositions are different for the distinct groups, thereby, reflecting a conclusive picture. This is in particular in CIBD, for which a link between stress and inflammatory activity and between inflammatory activity and altered urinary composition is well established. PMID:20440612

  13. Metastatic carotid body paraganglioma detected during evaluation for biliary stone disease.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Alison; Witt, Benjamin; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-10-01

    Carotid body paragangliomas are neuroendocrine cell tumors. Most invade locally to surrounding tissues with metastases being less commonly encountered than with other tumors: a minority of tumors metastasizes to distal sites. Spread is more unusual after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Hepatic spread is very rare but has been documented. We report a case of a clinically silent metastatic paraganglioma identified during an evaluation for choledocholithiasis. We describe a 70-year-old female presenting with symptoms of abdominal pain who was found to have cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis. MRI imaging performed during evaluation revealed enhancing liver and lung lesions suspicious for metastasis. FNA of a hepatic lesion showed paraganglioma. She had a remote history of bilateral carotid body tumors, of which the left tumor was resected in 2005. This is a rare case of metastatic carotid body paraganglioma. Primary tumor source was a resected tumor or a smaller sized nodule that was managed with serial imaging. The subject's lack of symptoms and her disease extent with confirmed hepatic and presumed pulmonary spread is unique. PMID:24610753

  14. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Contains Domains for ATP Binding, Nuclear Localization, and Type IV Secretion?

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Vergunst, Annette C.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Ream, Walt

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  15. Antioxidant activity of Syzygium cumini leaf gall extracts

    PubMed Central

    Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Iyer, Raman Shanthi; Subbaramaiah, Sundara Rajan; Richard, S Austin; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Free radicals are implicated in several metabolic diseases and the medicinal properties of plants have been explored for their potent antioxidant activities to counteract metabolic disorders. This research highlights the chemical composition and antioxidant potential of leaf gall extracts (aqueous and methanol) of Syzygium cumini (S. cumini), which have been extensively used in traditional medications to treat various metabolic diseases. Methods: The antioxidant activities of leaf gall extracts were examined using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide scavenging, hydroxyl scavenging and ferric reducing power (FRAP) methods. Results: In all the methods, the methanolic extract showed higher antioxidant potential than the standard ascorbic acid. The presence of phenolics, flavonoids, phytosterols, terpenoids, and reducing sugars was identified in both the extracts. When compared, the methanol extract had the highest total phenolic and flavonoid contents at 474±2.2 mg of GAE/g d.w and 668±1.4 mg of QUE/g d.w, respectively. The significant high antioxidant activity can be positively correlated to the high content of total polyphenols/flavonoids of the methanol extract. Conclusion: The present study confirms the folklore use of S. cumini leaves gall extracts as a natural antioxidant and justifies its ethnobotanical use. Further, the result of antioxidant properties encourages the use of S. cumini leaf gall extracts for medicinal health, functional food and nutraceuticals applications. PMID:25035854

  16. A Case of Recurrent Renal Aluminum Hydroxide Stone

    PubMed Central

    Cak?roglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  17. A case of recurrent renal aluminum hydroxide stone.

    PubMed

    Cak?roglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  18. Patio Stones

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Math Forum

    1999-01-01

    This Technology Problem of the Week (tPoW) challenges students to count and extrapolate the number of paving stones tiling successive hexagonal rings in a patio tessellation. It links to the Java applet "Pattern Blocks." Solve and explain your solution; download hints and answer checks. Free registration is required.

  19. Fungus-insect gall of Phlebopus portentosus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Xia; He, Ming-Xia; Cao, Yang; Liu, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Bing; Ji, Kai-Ping; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Phlebopus portentosus is a popular edible wild mushroom found in the tropical Yunnan, China, and northern Thailand. In its natural habitats, a gall often has been found on some plant roots, around which fungal fruiting bodies are produced. The galls are different from common insect galls in that their cavity walls are not made from plant tissue but rather from the hyphae of P. portentosus. Therefore we have termed this phenomenon "fungus-insect gall". Thus far six root mealy bug species in the family Pseudococcidae that form fungus-insect galls with P. portentosus have been identified: Formicococcus polysperes, Geococcus satellitum, Planococcus minor, Pseudococcus cryptus, Paraputo banzigeri and Rastrococcus invadens. Fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of more than 21 plant species, including Delonix regia, Citrus maxima, Coffea arabica and Artocarpus heterophyllus. Greenhouse inoculation trials showed that fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of A. heterophyllus 1 mo after inoculation. The galls were subglobose to globose, fulvous when young and became dark brown at maturation. Each gall harbored one or more mealy bugs and had a chimney-like vent for ventilation and access to the gall. The cavity wall had three layers. Various shaped mealy bug wax deposits were found inside the wall. Fungal hyphae invaded the epidermis of plant roots and sometimes even the cortical cells during the late stage of gall development. The identity of the fungus inside the cavity was confirmed by molecular methods. PMID:25344264

  20. Effect of Cardinal Directions on Gall Morphology and Parasitization of the Gall Wasp, Cynips quercusfolii

    PubMed Central

    Zargaran, Mohammed Reza; Safaralizadeh, Mohammed Hassan; Pourmirza, Ali Asghar; Valizadegan, Orouj

    2011-01-01

    This survey investigated the relationship between gall morphology and some fitness components in the asexual generation of Cynips quercusfolii L. (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae). Results showed that larger C. quercusfolii galls were formed on the south side of oak trees Quercus infectoria Olivier (Fagales: Fagaceae). Larval chamber diameter in the gall was similar, but gall diameter and gall wall thickness varied with the location of the gall on the tree. Cynips quercusfolii was attacked by parasitoids, and the south-facing galls suffered significantly lower parasitoid attacks. Thickness of gall walls and parasitism rate were negatively correlated. Mean gall diameter and gall wall thickness were significantly larger in south-facing galls than other directions, but the difference in the mean larval chamber diameter was not significant. These results suggest that the position of galls on the tree affected gall wall thickness, and this plays an important role in parasitoid attacks. These results suggest that C. quercusfolii prefer to attack the south side of oak trees, and selection of this side by wasps led to formation of larger galls with thick walls that decreased parasite attack, which will affect growth and survival of wasp larvae. PMID:22950357

  1. Woody stem galls interact with foliage to affect community associations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) hijack the physiology of their host plant to produce galls which house wasps throughout their immature stages. The gall-maker – host plant interaction is highly evolved, and galls represent an extended phenotype of the gall wasp. We evaluated two-way interaction...

  2. Exploring population history and gall induction in cynipid gall wasps using genomics and transcriptomics 

    E-print Network

    Hearn, Jack

    2014-06-28

    Cynipid gall wasps have fascinating biology that has piqued the interest of naturalists throughout history. They induce morphologically complex, sometimes spectacular, gall structures on plants in which the larval ...

  3. Gall induction may benefit host plant: a case of a gall wasp and eucalyptus tree.

    PubMed

    Rocha, S; Branco, M; Boas, L Vilas; Almeida, M H; Protasov, A; Mendel, Z

    2013-04-01

    Gall-inducing insects display intimate interactions with their host plants, usually described as parasitic relationships; the galls seem to favor the galler alone. We report on a case in which the presence of the galls induced by Leptocybe invasa Fisher & LaSalle (Hymenoptera; Eulophidae) benefit its host plant, the river red gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. Field observations showed that E. camaldulensis plants infected by this gall wasp were less susceptible to cold injury than neighboring conspecific plants without galls. In the laboratory, frost resistance was compared between galled and non-galled plants which were both divided into two subgroups: cold-acclimated plants and plants that were non-acclimated. Galled plants displayed higher frost resistance than the non-galled ones, and the differences were higher in non-acclimated plants compared with acclimated ones. Physiological changes in host plant were determined by chemical analyses of chlorophylls, proteins, soluble sugars and anthocyanin contents. The results showed higher values of all physiological parameters in the galled plants, supporting the hypothesis that the presence of the gall wasp induces physiological changes on the plant foliage, which may in turn increase plant defense mechanisms against cold. Therefore, the toll of galling by the herbivore may pay off by the host plant acquiring increased frost resistance. This work provides evidence for physiological changes induced by a herbivore which might have a positive indirect effect on the host plant, promoting frost resistance such as cold acclimation. PMID:23513035

  4. Interactions in iron gall inks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Jan?ovi?ová; M. ?eppan; B. Havlínová; M. Reháková; Z. Jakubíková

    2007-01-01

    Simple iron gall inks composed of gallic acid, ferrous sulfate, and gum arabic and in some cases also of copper(II) sulfate\\u000a were prepared. The process of iron ion complex formation with gallic acid was investigated using UV-VIS spectroscopy, pH measurements,\\u000a and by monitoring the concentration changes of Fe(II) ions. The admixture of Fe(II) ions to gallic acid induced a bathochromic

  5. Biology of Crown Gall Tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roni Aloni; Cornelia I. Ullrich

    Specific adaptive mechanisms for water and nutrient acquisition and the suppression of shoot and root differentiation characterize\\u000a crown gall tumor development. Strong vascularization like in animal and human tumors is the most prominent and important feature\\u000a of tumor proliferation. Vascular bundles consisting of phloem and xylem are from the onset of tumor initiation functionally\\u000a connected to the host bundle. At

  6. Approach to the Adult Kidney Stone Former

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Naim

    2012-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a prevalent and costly condition with high recurrence rate. A medical evaluation to identify abnormalities responsible for nephrolithiasis and guide subsequent therapy has been advocated to reduce the risk of stone recurrence. The evaluation of kidney stone formers generally comprises an extensive medical history to identify metabolic, environmental, dietary and/or genetic factors contributing to stone formation. Imaging studies are utilized to evaluate and follow stone burden. Laboratory studies including stone composition analysis and serum and urinary chemistries are commonly obtained to further assess for any underlying systemic disorders, to detect environmental and metabolic processes contributing to stone disease, and to guide initial and follow-up dietary and pharmacological therapy. The nature and extent of such an evaluation is discussed in this review article. PMID:22654574

  7. Medical and Dietary Therapy for Kidney Stone Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention. PMID:25512810

  8. Gall midges (hessian flies) as plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall midges constitute an important group of plant-parasitic insects. The Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), the most investigated gall midge, was the first insect hypothesized to have a gene-for-gene interaction with its host plant, wheat (Triticum spp.). Recent investigations support that h...

  9. An Update and Practical Guide to Renal Stone Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikhil Johri; Bruce Cooper; William Robertson; Simon Choong; David Rickards; Robert Unwin

    2010-01-01

    Renal stone disease covers kidney and lower urinary tract stones caused by a variety of conditions, including metabolic and inherited disorders, and anatomical defects with or without chronic urinary infection. Most cases are idiopathic, in which there is undoubtedly a genetic predisposition, but where environmental and lifestyle factors play an important role. Indeed, it is becoming apparent that renal stone

  10. Roughness characterization of the galling of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Marteau, J.; Deltombe, R.; Chen, Y. M.; Bigerelle, M.

    2014-09-01

    Several kinds of tests exist to characterize the galling of metals, such as that specified in ASTM Standard G98. While the testing procedure is accurate and robust, the analysis of the specimen?s surfaces (area=1.2 cm) for the determination of the critical pressure of galling remains subject to operator judgment. Based on the surface?s topography analyses, we propose a methodology to express the probability of galling according to the macroscopic pressure load. After performing galling tests on 304L stainless steel, a two-step segmentation of the S q parameter (root mean square of surface amplitude) computed from local roughness maps (100 ? m× 100 ? m) enables us to distinguish two tribological processes. The first step represents the abrasive wear (erosion) and the second one the adhesive wear (galling). The total areas of both regions are highly relevant to quantify galling and erosion processes. Then, a one-parameter phenomenological model is proposed to objectively determine the evolution of non-galled relative area A e versus the pressure load P, with high accuracy ({{A}e}=100/(1+a{{P}2}) with a={{0.54}+/- 0.07}× {{10}-3} M P{{a}-2} and with {{R}2}=0.98). From this model, the critical pressure of galling is found to be equal to 43MPa. The {{S}5 V} roughness parameter (the five deepest valleys in the galled region?s surface) is the most relevant roughness parameter for the quantification of damages in the ‘galling region’. The significant valleys’ depths increase from 10 ?m–250 ?m when the pressure increases from 11–350 MPa, according to a power law ({{S}5 V}=4.2{{P}0.75}, with {{R}2}=0.93).

  11. Bringing the Outside In: Insects and Their Galls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Ness, Daniel; Wilkens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Introduces gall-making insects and explains gall development. Explains how to bring galls into the classroom and conduct experiments. Suggests using gall systems to introduce students to the concepts of genetic control, biodiversity, plant and animal development, species interactions, biodiversity, and the flow of energy through the food web. (YDS)

  12. Miscellaneous Stone Types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James B. Cutrell; Robert F. Reilly

    Drug-induced calculi and other rare stone types, such as ammonium acid urate or protein matrix stones, represent only about\\u000a 2% of all renal calculi. However, the chance to easily reverse stone formation risk by discontinuing the offending drug makes\\u000a identification of these entities important for clinicians. Additionally, study of these rare stone types contributes to understanding\\u000a the biochemistry of stone

  13. NOT ALL OAK GALL WASPS GALL OAKS: THE DESCRIPTION OF DRYOCOSMUS RILEYPOKEI, A NEW, APOSTATE SPECIES OF CYNIPINI

    E-print Network

    Hammerton, James

    NOT ALL OAK GALL WASPS GALL OAKS: THE DESCRIPTION OF DRYOCOSMUS RILEYPOKEI, A NEW, APOSTATE SPECIES-mail: simorita@ncsu.edu) Abstract.--Cynipini gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) are commonly known as oak gall wasps for their almost exclusive use of oak (Quercus spp.; Fagaceae) as their host plant. Previously

  14. Kidney stone risk following modern bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D; Canales, Benjamin K

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers. PMID:24658828

  15. Predation on Rose Galls: Parasitoids and Predators Determine Gall Size through Directional Selection

    PubMed Central

    László, Zoltán; Sólyom, Katalin; Prázsmári, Hunor; Barta, Zoltán; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Both predators and parasitoids can have significant effects on species’ life history traits, such as longevity or clutch size. In the case of gall inducers, sporadically there is evidence to suggest that both vertebrate predation and insect parasitoid attack may shape the optimal gall size. While the effects of parasitoids have been studied in detail, the influence of vertebrate predation is less well-investigated. To better understand this aspect of gall size evolution, we studied vertebrate predation on galls of Diplolepis rosae on rose (Rosa canina) shrubs. We measured predation frequency, predation incidence, and predation rate in a large-scale observational field study, as well as an experimental field study. Our combined results suggest that, similarly to parasitoids, vertebrate predation makes a considerable contribution to mortality of gall inducer larvae. On the other hand, its influence on gall size is in direct contrast to the effect of parasitoids, as frequency of vertebrate predation increases with gall size. This suggests that the balance between predation and parasitoid attack shapes the optimal size of D. rosae galls. PMID:24918448

  16. Phytohormones and willow gall induction by a gall-inducing sawfly.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Morifumi; Tokuda, Makoto; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2012-10-01

    A variety of insect species induce galls on host plants. Several studies have implicated phytohormones in insect-induced gall formation. However, it has not been determined whether insects can synthesize phytohormones. It has also never been established that phytohormones function in gall tissues. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) were used to analyse concentrations of endogenous cytokinins and the active auxin IAA in the gall-inducing sawfly (Pontania sp.) and its host plant, Salix japonica. Feeding experiments demonstrated the ability of sawfly larvae to synthesize IAA from tryptophan. Gene expression analysis was used to characterize hormonal signalling in galls. Sawfly larvae contain high concentrations of IAA and t-zeatin, and produce IAA from tryptophan. The glands of adult sawflies, the contents of which are injected into leaves upon oviposition and are involved in the initial stages of gall formation, contain an extraordinarily high concentration of t-zeatin riboside. Transcript levels of some auxin- and cytokinin-responsive genes are significantly higher in gall tissue than in leaves. The abnormally high concentration of t-zeatin riboside in the glands strongly suggests that the sawfly can synthesize cytokinins as well as IAA. Gene expression profiles indicate high levels of auxin and cytokinin activities in growing galls. PMID:22913630

  17. Influence of Anti-Scuffing and Anti-Galling Properties in Oils on Hypoid Gear Galling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovák, Pavol

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents (in shorter form) the values of lubricant anti-galling factor for various hypoid oils and also the comparison of these factors in the galling of four tested hypoid gears OERLIKON. The results were obtained from laboratory and performance experiments.

  18. Gall production on hawthorns caused by Gymnosporangium spp.in Hatay province, Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three hawthorn and related rust diseases caused by Gymnosporangium confusum on Crataegus monogyna, G. clavariiforme on C. orientalis, and G. sabinae on Pyrus communis were detected in Hatay province, Turkey. Gymnosporangium confusum was also found causing telial galls on Juniperus communis. Gymnospo...

  19. Stone Wall Classification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This outline provides a taxonomic classification of all types of stone walls, standing stones, pavements, monuments and other structures made of human-arranged stones. The hierarchy consists of domain (the broadest), class, family, type, subtype, and variant (the narrowest). Users can refer to the book 'Exploring Stone Walls' for the criteria used to distinguish one taxon of stone walls from another and for their descriptions. The ranks are sized and color-coded for convenience, and names that are commonly used are highlighted in boldface.

  20. Geography of Stone Walls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides an overview of the distribution and occurrence of stone walls in New England. Topics include what constitutes a stone wall province and three critical factors in the occurrence of stone walls: bedrock geology, glacial history, and land use history. Users can determine the type of stone wall in any given area by using the maps to determine its location, determine the type of bedrock, type of surface materials, and type of settlement history for that spot. Referring to the text of 'Exploring Stone Walls', they can determine which type of stone wall province contains those types of rock and surface process and read the description of what the most common type of stone walls should be in that area.

  1. Evaluation of Diastolic Filling of Left Ventricle in Health and Disease: Doppler Echocardiography Is the Clinician’s Rosetta Stone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rick A Nishimura; A. Jamil Tajik

    1997-01-01

    Abnormalities of diastolic function have a major role in producing the signs and symptoms of heart failure. However, diastolic function of the heart is a complex sequence of multiple interrelated events, and it has been difficult to understand, diagnose and treat the various abnormalities of diastolic filling that occur in patients with heart disease. Recently, Doppler echocardiography has been used

  2. XX1 Asian chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus, is an invasive pest of chestnut in Japan, Europe, and the United States. D. kuriphilus induces formation of galls on all chestnut species. Damage caused by galling reduces commercial chestnut yields and threatens restoration of American chestnut i...

  3. Life history, ecology and communal gall occupation in the manzanita leaf-gall aphid, Tamalia coweni (cockerell) (Homoptera: Aphididae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Miller III

    1998-01-01

    I describe life history details for a California population of Tamalia coweni on the host plants Arctostaphylos patula and Arctostaphylos viscida. In particular, studies on the sequence of gall initiation and the identity of gall-making morphs reveal that later generations of wingless females, as well as the stem mother, are capable of inducing galls. Winged females disperse to other sites

  4. Observing Stone Walls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students will learn why and how stone walls were built. A prior knowledge of New England colonists and the history of New England is helpful. After a directed reading and discussion, they will take a nature walk to an area where they can examine a stone wall. The students will then use notebook and pencil to sketch the wall and make observations of the stones, the plants growing nearby, and other materials they see around the wall.

  5. Kidney Stones 2012: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Naim M.; Sinnott, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    Context: The pathogenetic mechanisms of kidney stone formation are complex and involve both metabolic and environmental risk factors. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney stone disease. Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: Both original and review articles were found via PubMed search reporting on pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of kidney stones. These resources were integrated with the authors' knowledge of the field. Conclusion: Nephrolithiasis remains a major economic and health burden worldwide. Nephrolithiasis is considered a systemic disorder associated with chronic kidney disease, bone loss and fractures, increased risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the metabolic syndrome. Further understanding of the pathophysiological link between nephrolithiasis and these systemic disorders is necessary for the development of new therapeutic options. PMID:22466339

  6. Impact of urinary stone volume on computed tomography stone attenuations measured in Hounsfield units in a large group of Austrian patients with urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Patzak, Johanna; Lutfi, Andre; Pummer, Karl; Augustin, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To investigate retrospectively the impact of urinary stone volume on computed tomography stone attenuations measured in Hounsfield units in 253 patients with urolithiasis. Material and methods CT scans were performed in 253 patients with suspected urinary stone disease from 2008 to 2010 using CT–Scanner Siemens, SOMATOM, Sensation 64. One experienced radiologist (A.L) who was blinded to the chemical composition of the stones retrospectively reviewed images and analyzed data to determine the composition of the stones. The results were compared with the biochemical analysis results obtained by infrared spectroscopy (100 FTIR, PerkinElmer). Results 253 consecutive patients from 2008 to 2010 were included into analysis: 189 males, and 64 females. Mean age was 51.2. According to stone volume, stones were divided into 2 groups: 126 stones with volume of 4.3 mm or more, 127 stones with volume less than 4.3 mm. There was a significant relationship between stone volume and its CT attenuation only in stones with a volume 4.3 mm or more (p <0.05). Conclusions We failed to show a significant relationship between stone volume and its attenuations in Hounsfield units. We could not distinguish uric acid stones from non uric acid stones. PMID:25247090

  7. Random trees Jean-Franois Le Gall

    E-print Network

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    of "children" of the root, then recursively the number of children of each child of the root, and so on with a large size is close to this continuous model. Strong analogy with the classical invariance theorems(). (ku() = number of children of u in ) Jean-François Le Gall (Université Paris-Sud) Random trees

  8. Description of Stone Walls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This outline provides a list of key terms used to describe stone walls. The definitions for each term can be found in the corresponding chapter and section of the book 'Exploring Stone Walls'. Users can use the outline as a checklist, marking off the terms that best describe the wall they are investigating.

  9. Building Stone Walls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will learn to identify the distinguishing characteristics of a stone wall. They will first draw a picture of a stone wall from memory, then go outside to view and sketch a real wall. Following the field activity, they will construct models of walls using modeling clay. A recipe for the clay ('model magic') is provided.

  10. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CRUSHED STONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of air emissions from crushed stone production. The potential environmental effect of the source is evaluated. Crushed stone production in 1972 was 1.07 x 10 to the 8th power metric tons (1.18 x 10 to the 8th power tons), 68% of which was traprock. C...

  11. Stone Mountain in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The colored square in this grayscale image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the location of Stone Mountain, located within the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop.

  12. Urinary stone analysis on 12,846 patients: a report from a single center in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenqi; Yang, Bicheng; Ou, Lili; Liang, Yeping; Wan, Shawpong; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    We reported a retrospective review of the urinary stone compositions in 12,846 patients. Data on urinary stone compositions analyzed between January 2003 and December 2012 in our center were collected. Infrared spectroscopy was used for stone analysis. Predominant stone component was recorded. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-18, 19-40, 41-60, and 61-92, and five categories by components. In order to determine the change of stone characteristics with respect to time, data were also divided into two periods, 2003-2007 and 2008-2012. A total of 12,846 stones were included in this study. The age of the patients ranged from 1 to 92 years with 7,736 males and 5,110 females. Stone made of single component was rare, 2.61%. Calcium oxalate stone was the most common component at 82.56%. Calcium oxalate and uric acid stones were more common in male than in female. The incidence of calcium phosphate stones and uric acid stones had increased during the past 5 years, while calcium oxalate stones decreased. We found the highest incidence of stone disease in the 41-60 years old group and the lowest in the 1-18 years old for both genders. Calcium oxalate was the dominant component in every group but was more prevalent in 19-40 years group. The percentage of magnesium ammonium phosphate stone and uric acid stone increased with age. PMID:24362574

  13. Characteristics of nanobacteria and their possible role in stone formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Olavi Kajander; Neva Ciftcioglu; Katja Aho; Enrique Garcia-Cuerpo

    2003-01-01

    Kidney stone formation is a multifactorial disease in which the defence mechanisms and risk factors are imbalanced in favour of stone formation. We have proposed a novel infectious agent, mineral forming nanobacteria (NB), to be active nidi that attach to, invade and damage the urinary epithelium of collecting ducts and papilla forming the calcium phosphate center(s) found in most kidney

  14. Kidney stones are common after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lieske, John C; Mehta, Ramila A; Milliner, Dawn S; Rule, Andrew D; Bergstralh, Eric J; Sarr, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    Obesity, a risk factor for kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD), is effectively treated with bariatric surgery. However, it is unclear whether surgery alters stone or CKD risk. To determine this we studied 762 Olmsted County, Minnesota residents who underwent bariatric surgery and matched them with equally obese control individuals who did not undergo surgery. The majority of bariatric patients underwent standard Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB; 78%), with the remainder having more malabsorptive procedures (very long limb RYGB or biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch; 14%) or restrictive procedures (laparoscopic banding or sleeve gastrectomy; 7%). The mean age was 45 years with 80% being female. The mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 46.7?kg/m(2) for both cohorts. Rates of kidney stones were similar between surgery patients and controls at baseline, but new stone formation significantly increased in surgery patients (11.0%) compared with controls (4.3%) during 6.0 years of follow-up. After malabsorptive and standard surgery, the comorbidity-adjusted hazard ratio of incident stones was significantly increased to 4.15 and 2.13, respectively, but was not significantly changed for restrictive surgery. The risk of CKD significantly increased after the malabsorptive procedures (adjusted hazard ratio of 1.96). Thus, while RYGB and malabsorptive procedures are more effective for weight loss, both are associated with increased risk of stones, while malabsorptive procedures also increase CKD risk. PMID:25354237

  15. Morphology of Major Stone Types, As Shown by Micro Computed Tomography (micro CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Molly E.; Beuschel, Christian A.; McAteer, James A.; Williams, James C. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2008-09-18

    Micro CT offers the possibility of providing a non-destructive method of stone analysis that allows visualization of 100% of the stone's volume. For the present study, micro CT analysis was completed on stones of known composition with isotropic voxel sizes of either 7 or 9.1 {mu}m. Each mineral type was distinctive, either by x-ray attenuation values or by morphology. Minor components, such as the presence of apatite in oxalate stones, were easily seen. The analysis of stones by micro CT opens up the possibility of exploring the stone as an encapsulated history of the patient's disease, showing changes in mineral deposition with time.

  16. 12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; STONE CRANE HAS OAK SPAR, JIB AND BRACE, METAL SCREW, IRON YOKE AND DOGS; IRON PINS FIT THROUGH HOLES IN DOGS INTO HOLES DRILLED IN RUNNER STONE - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  17. Physicochemical analysis of urinary stones from Dharmapuri district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslin Shamema, A.; Thanigai Arul, K.; Senthil Kumar, R.; Narayana Kalkura, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease caused by the multifactorial components such as geographical location, bacterial infection, low urine volume, and low intake of water. This disease induces severe metabolic abnormalities in the human body. As the prevalence of this disease was high in Dharmapuri district located in Tamil Nadu, urinary stones removed from the patients pertaining to this district were collected and to identify the toxic elements present in the stones. The presence of functional groups and phases of the stones were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The majority of stones were found to be calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and mixed stones having minor existence of struvite and uric acid. Hexagonal shaped COM crystals, needle shaped uric acid crystals and layered arrangement of struvite crystals in the core region were revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to determine the thermal stability and the hardness of the stone which was measured using Vickers hardness (HV). The presence of toxic elements in stones such as zirconium and mercury was identified using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The EDS analysis showed higher concentration of zirconium in the core region compared to the periphery. The percentage of zirconium was relatively high compared to other toxic elements in the stones. The Vickers hardness results indicated that high HV values in the core region than the periphery and this might be due to the presence of zirconium.

  18. Physicochemical analysis of urinary stones from Dharmapuri district.

    PubMed

    Aslin Shamema, A; Thanigai Arul, K; Senthil Kumar, R; Narayana Kalkura, S

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease caused by the multifactorial components such as geographical location, bacterial infection, low urine volume, and low intake of water. This disease induces severe metabolic abnormalities in the human body. As the prevalence of this disease was high in Dharmapuri district located in Tamil Nadu, urinary stones removed from the patients pertaining to this district were collected and to identify the toxic elements present in the stones. The presence of functional groups and phases of the stones were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The majority of stones were found to be calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and mixed stones having minor existence of struvite and uric acid. Hexagonal shaped COM crystals, needle shaped uric acid crystals and layered arrangement of struvite crystals in the core region were revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to determine the thermal stability and the hardness of the stone which was measured using Vickers hardness (HV). The presence of toxic elements in stones such as zirconium and mercury was identified using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The EDS analysis showed higher concentration of zirconium in the core region compared to the periphery. The percentage of zirconium was relatively high compared to other toxic elements in the stones. The Vickers hardness results indicated that high HV values in the core region than the periphery and this might be due to the presence of zirconium. PMID:25033236

  19. THE POPULATION BIOLOGY OF OAK GALL WASPS (HYMENOPTERA: CYNIPIDAE)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham N. Stone; Karsten Schonrogge; Rachel J. Atkinson; David Bellido; Juli Pujade-Villar

    2002-01-01

    ? Abstract Oak gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, Cynipini) are characterized by possession of complex,cyclically parthenogenetic,life cycles and the ability to induce a wide,diversity of highly complex,species- and generation-specific galls on oaks and other Fagaceae. The galls support species-rich, closed communities of inquilines and parasitoids that have become,a model,system,in community,ecology. We review recent advances in the ecology of oak cynipids, with

  20. The Stone Wall Initiative

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Stone Wall Initiative (SWI) promotes the appreciation, investigation, and conservation of stone walls in New England. SWI emphasizes the cultural, natural, and aesthetic resources provided by historic walls, which are the closest thing New England has to classical ruins. Materials available at the site include news articles; links to books and other publications; and links to information on public presentations, school presentations, and field trips. For teachers, there are collaborative, field-tested curricula for students in primary and secondary grades, a reference book that provides background information, and information on a teacher's kit that contains specimens of stone found in walls, an identification card for the specimens, and materials for studying them. There is also information on threats to New England's stone walls and how to preserve them.

  1. Stone Wall Initiative

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Stone Wall Initiative (SWI) promotes the appreciation, investigation, and conservation of stone walls in New England. SWI emphasizes the cultural, natural and aesthetic resources provided by historic walls, which are the closest thing New England has to classical ruins. Materials available at the site include news articles, links to books and other publications, and links to information on public presentations, school presentations, and field trips. For teachers, there are collaborative, field-tested curricula for students in primary and secondary grades, a reference book that provides background information, and information on a teacher's kit that contains specimens of stone found in walls, an identification card for the specimens, and materials for studying them. There is also information on threats to New England's stone walls and how to preserve them.

  2. Kidney Stones: A Fetal Origins Hypothesis†

    PubMed Central

    Howles, Sarah A.; Edwards, Mark H.; Cooper, Cyrus; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney stones are common with a multifactorial aetiology involving dietary, environmental and genetic factors. In addition, patients with nephrolithiasis are at greater risk of hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis although the basis for this is not fully understood. All of these renal stone associated conditions have also been linked with adverse early life events, including low birth weight, and it has been suggested that this developmental effect is due to excess exposure to maternal glucocorticoids in utero. This is proposed to result in long-term increased hypothalamic-pituitary-axis activation and there are mechanisms through which this effect could also promote urinary lithogenic potential. We therefore hypothesise that the association between renal stone disease and hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis may be related by a common pathway of programming in early life which, if validated, would implicate the developmental origins hypothesis in the aetiology of nephrolithiasis. PMID:23703881

  3. Changing patient and stone features for shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ilker, Y; Tarcan, T; Sim?ek, F; Akda?, A

    1995-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has made a revolution in the treatment of urolithiasis. Recent reports suggesting that stone features for SWL have changed during the last years have forced us to compare our initial and last 250 patients treated at our ESWL unit in terms of stone and patient characteristics. We found that the number of ureteric stones and small calyceal stones have increased significantly with time whereas the number of larger stones undergoing SWL has decreased significantly. We believe that this change in stone features is caused by the changing trends in the treatment of stone disease by incorporating other therapeutic options and modifying the SWL indications according to patient characteristics We also believe that prophylactic lithotripsy for asymptomatic calyceal stones still remains to be a debatable issue. PMID:8725029

  4. COMPARATIVE TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF THREE ECONOMICALLY IMPORTANT GALL MIDGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall midge insect species cause economic threshold loss on cereal crops worldwide and the family Cecidomyiidae makes up the sixth largest group of Dipteran insects. The most important of these pests include the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor; the Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae; and the wh...

  5. Evaluation of wild juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A. tumefaciens is a soil-borne Gram-negative bacterium which causes crown gall on many dicotyledonous plant species including walnut. Crown gall symptoms on walnut are characterized by large tumors located near the crown of the tree but can occur near wounds caused by bleeding cuts or at the graft u...

  6. Stem galls affect oak foliage with potential consequences for herbivory

    E-print Network

    Rieske-Kinney, Lynne K.

    assessed. 2. Second-instar caterpillars of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, preferred foliage from of older, fourth instar gypsy moth caterpillars did not differ between galled and ungalled trees. Key words. Budburst phenology, Cynipidae, gypsy moth, horned oak gall, insect­plant interactions, phytochemistry, pin

  7. Antibacterial activity of clove, gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448

    PubMed Central

    Mirpour, Mirsasan; Gholizadeh Siahmazgi, Zohreh; Sharifi Kiasaraie, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antimicrobial compounds from herbal sources have good therapeutic potential. In this study, the antibacterial effects of clove and gall nut, methanolic and ethanolic extractions, were evaluated for their effect on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448, as both the two cause oral diseases. Method The clove and gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts were prepared and antibacterial activity was evaluated for S. mutans and S. salivarius in the base of inhibition zone diameter using agar diffusion method. In this part minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were assessed. Results These extracts showed effective antibacterial activity on bacteria. Antibacterial activity of Methanolic extract of clove was more than that of ethanolic extract, and ethanolic extracts of gall nut had antibacterial activity more than that of methanolic extracts. MIC and MBC results for clove methanolic extract were 1.5 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml for S. mutans and 6.25 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for clove ethanolic extracts were 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. MIC and MBC results for gall nut methanolic extract were 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. mutans and 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for gall nut ethanolic extracts were 3.1 mg/ml and 6.2 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. Discussion The results showed effective antibacterial activity using clove and gall nut methanolic extracts. If other properties such as tolerance of tissue can also be studied, these extracts can be used as a mouthwash. PMID:25853041

  8. Not all oak gall wasps gall oaks: the description of Dryocosmus rileypokei, a new, apostate species of Cynipini from California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cynipini gall wasps are commonly known as oak gall wasps for their almost exclusive use of oak (Quercus spp.) as their host plant. Previously, only three of the nearly1000 species of Cynipini have been recorded from a host plant other than Quercus. These three species are known from western chinqu...

  9. The evolution of inquilinism, host-plant use and mitochondrial substitution rates in Tamalia gall aphids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Miller; B. Crespi

    2003-01-01

    We used mitochondrial DNA data to infer phylogenies for 28 samples of gall- inducing Tamalia aphids from 12 host-plant species, and for 17 samples of Tamalia inquilinus, aphid 'inquilines' that obligately inhabit galls of the gall inducers and do not form their own galls. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that the inquilines are monophyletic and closely related to their host aphids.

  10. Diversity of gall-inducing insects in the high altitude wetland forests in Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; Almeida-Cortez, J S; Fernandes, G W

    2011-02-01

    We report on the richness of galling insects in the altitudinal wetland forests of Pernambuco State, Northeastern Brazil. We found 80 distinct types of insect galls on 49 species of host plants belonging to 28 families and 35 genera. Most of the galled plant species belong to Nyctaginaceae, Fabaceae, Meliaceae, Sapindaceae and Myrtaceae. The most common gall were spheroid and globoid; most galls were glabrous, predominantly green and with one chamber, and on the leaves. Most galls were induced by Cecidomyiidae (Diptera). The results of this study contribute to existing knowledge richness of galling insects and host-plant diversity in the altitudinal wetland forests of Northeastern Brazil. PMID:21437398

  11. When Stones Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucier, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Creating towers of balanced stones is a versatile outdoor learning activity that can be experienced in the classroom, school yard, forest, or parking lot. Students discover hidden talents, learn to work and communicate clearly with others, and reconnect with the natural world. Several variations on the exercise are given, along with principles of…

  12. Nephrolithiasis: Molecular Mechanism of Renal Stone Formation and the Critical Role Played by Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kanu Priya; Narula, Shifa; Kakkar, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Urinary stone disease is an ailment that has afflicted human kind for many centuries. Nephrolithiasis is a significant clinical problem in everyday practice with a subsequent burden for the health system. Nephrolithiasis remains a chronic disease and our fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of stones as well as their prevention and cure still remains rudimentary. Regardless of the fact that supersaturation of stone-forming salts in urine is essential, abundance of these salts by itself will not always result in stone formation. The pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stone formation is a multistep process and essentially includes nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal retention. Various substances in the body have an effect on one or more of the above stone-forming processes, thereby influencing a person's ability to promote or prevent stone formation. Promoters facilitate the stone formation while inhibitors prevent it. Besides low urine volume and low urine pH, high calcium, sodium, oxalate and urate are also known to promote calcium oxalate stone formation. Many inorganic (citrate, magnesium) and organic substances (nephrocalcin, urinary prothrombin fragment-1, osteopontin) are known to inhibit stone formation. This review presents a comprehensive account of the mechanism of renal stone formation and the role of inhibitors/promoters in calcium oxalate crystallisation. PMID:24151593

  13. Does urokinase play a role in renal stone formation?

    PubMed

    du Toit, P J; Van Aswegen, C H; Steinmann, C M; Klue, L; Du Plessis, D J

    1997-07-01

    Renal stone formation is a complex multifactorial disease, and it is believed that the initial step in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis must be the precipitation of an organic matrix of mucoproteins followed by precipitation of minerals onto this matrix. An important factor in this process may be the activity and/or concentration of the urinary enzyme, urokinase, which would affect the level of urinary mucoproteins such as uromucoid. In support of this hypothesis, ELISA studies were conducted to investigate the urokinase concentrations in urine obtained from males (22-60 years) with and without renal stones. These results showed a significant decrease in urinary urokinase concentration of renal stone patients which, once again, underlines the possible involvement of urokinase in renal stone formation. Therefore, it seems logical to conclude that urokinase may play an integral role in this multifactorial disease. PMID:9247909

  14. Wanted: suitable replacement stones for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, T.; Dewanckele, J.; Boone, M. A.; De Boever, W.; De Schutter, G.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Lede stone is an arenaceous limestone with a Lutetian age, occurring as discrete (most of the times three) stone banks in the marine sandy sediments of the Lede Formation (Belgium). It has a quartz content of approximate 40%. This increases abrasion strength and together with the cementation results in an average compressive strength of about 80-85 MPa. The cement is a microsparitic calcite cement. Other carbonate particles are both microfossils (mainly foraminifers) and macrofossils (bivalves, serpulids, echinoderms, …). This great diversity gives the stone a heterogeneous, animated appearance. The intra- and interparticle porosity is in total 5-10 % in average and the apparent density is 2400-2550 kg/m3. Another important constituent is glauconite, present in a few percent. In fresh state, the stone has a greenish-grey colour, but when it is exposed to atmospheric conditions for a couple of years, the stone acquires a yellowish to rust-coloured patina due to the weathering of glauconite. Sulphatation causes severe damage to the stone, and black gypsum crusts are common in urban environments on stones protected from runoff. This stone was excavated in both open air and underground quarries in the areas of Brussels and Ghent. The proximity of main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne provided transport routes for export towards the north (e.g. Antwerp and The Netherlands). Its first known use dates back to Roman times but the stone flourished in Gothic architecture due to its easy workability and its 'divine' light coloured patina. This results nowadays in a dominant occurrence in the cultural heritage of northwestern Belgium and the south of The Netherlands. Socio-economical reasons caused several declines and revivals of Lede stone in use. In the beginning of the 20th century, only a few excavation sites remained, with as main quarry the one located at Bambrugge (Belgium). By the end of the first half of the 20th century, however, no quarry sites remained. In the sixties, a sand quarry located in Balegem (Belgium) started with the extraction of Lede stone combined with its other activities. Until now, only this site supplies blocks of fresh Lede stones and it doesn't seem there will rise an opportunity of a new site in the near future. Therefore, during the huge amount of renovation works in the past century, the Lede stone was often replaced by imported (mostly French) limestones such as Massangis stone, Savonnières stone and Euville stone. The commercial value seems to have had a large impact and too little attention was paid on the optical appearance, ageing and technical compatibility of the stones. The use of especially Massangis stone was taken for granted. In the 21st century, there is a growing awareness of the impact of such consequent replacement for the historical value of our cultural heritage and several alternative stones are suggested and even used. These include stones from France, Spain and Portugal, but also from other regions in Belgium. For the moment, there is no consensus on the most appropriate replacement stone and further research should be done in order to evaluate compatibility of the different stone types with Lede stone. In this context, it is also very important to actively search for better alternatives, which resemble the Lede stone in both a mechanical and aesthetical point of view. Therefore, this abstract is an open question to its readers. Any commercial natural stone suggestions with affiliation to the aforementioned properties are welcome by e-mailing the corresponding author.

  15. Focused Ultrasonic Propulsion of Kidney Stones: Review and Update of Preclinical Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael R.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Simon, Julianna C.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Dunmire, Barbrina L.; Paun, Marla; Starr, Frank; Lu, Wei; Evan, Andrew P.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A noninvasive tool to reposition kidney stones could have significant impact in the management of stone disease. Our research group has developed a noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound device. A review and update of the current status of this technology is provided. Discussion of Technology Stone propulsion is achieved through short bursts of focused, ultrasonic pulses. The initial system consisted of an eight-element annular array transducer, computer, and separate ultrasound imager. In the current generation, imaging and therapy are completed with one ultrasound system and a commercial probe. This generation allows real-time ultrasound imaging, targeting, and propulsion. Safety and effectiveness for the relocation of calyceal stones have been demonstrated in the porcine model. Role in Endourology This technology may have applications in repositioning stones as an adjunct to lithotripsy, facilitating clearance of residual fragments after lithotripsy, expelling de novo stones, and potentially repositioning obstructing stones. Human trials are in preparation. PMID:23883117

  16. Taking advantage of hyperspectral imaging classification of urinary stones against conventional infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Francisco; Lumbreras, Felipe; Serrat, Joan; Siener, Roswitha; Serranti, Silvia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of urinary stones is mandatory for the best management of the disease after the stone passage in order to prevent further stone episodes. Thus the use of an appropriate methodology for an individualized stone analysis becomes a key factor for giving the patient the most suitable treatment. A recently developed hyperspectral imaging methodology, based on pixel-to-pixel analysis of near-infrared spectral images, is compared to the reference technique in stone analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The developed classification model yields >90% correct classification rate when compared to IR and is able to precisely locate stone components within the structure of the stone with a 15 ?m resolution. Due to the little sample pretreatment, low analysis time, good performance of the model, and the automation of the measurements, they become analyst independent; this methodology can be considered to become a routine analysis for clinical laboratories.

  17. The comparative survey of Hounsfield units of stone composition in urolithiasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahnani, Parisa Sotoodeh; Karami, Mehdi; Astane, Bahman; Janghorbani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) is the diagnostic choice for renal stone disease. Knowing the composition of a stone before passage can help to choose a better management. We sought to determine whether the Hounsfield unit (HU) measured by NCCT can predict the composition. Materials and Methods: 180 urinary stones from patients seen at Shariati, Kashani and Alzahra CT centers, were submitted to stone analysis, 2012. All scans had been interpreted for HU. Primitive statistical findings showed an effect of size on the HU. To avoid confounding bias, Hounsfield Density (HD: HU/largest transverse diameter) was calculated. Statistical comparisons were performed between composition with HU and HD. Results: Calcium stones had specific ranges for HD and HU. No non-calcium stone had HU more than 448 and HD greater than 50 HU/mm. Conclusion: NCCT can differentiate just Calcium from non-calcium stones. PMID:25364366

  18. Chestnut Species and Jasmonic Acid Treatment Influence Development and Community Interactions of Galls Produced by the Asian Chestnut Gall Wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, William R.; Rieske, Lynne K.

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant—signaling hormone involved in defenses against insects and pathogens as well as the regulation of nutrient partitioning. Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) induce the formation of galls on their host plants, which house immature wasps and provide them with nutrition and protection. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of JA application on gall development and defenses. Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) galls on American chestnut, Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkhausen (Fagales: Fagaceae), and Chinese chestnut, C. mollissima Blume, were treated with JA or a JA– inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DIECA), to determine the effects of these treatments on gall characteristics and defenses. Chinese chestnut galls treated with JA had greater volume and dry weight, thicker sclerenchyma layers, and fewer external fungal lesions compared with controls. Galls from both chestnut species treated with JA contained a lower proportion of empty chambers, and elevated tannin levels compared with controls. The effects of DIECA on galls were generally opposite from those of JA. American chestnut galls treated with DIECA had lower dry weight and fewer feeding punctures caused by the lesser chestnut weevil compared with controls. Galls from both chestnut species that were treated with DIECA were smaller and had more external fungal lesions compared with controls. Compared to American chestnut galls, Chinese chestnut galls had increased parasitism rates and fewer gall wasps. This study is the first to investigate the effects of JA on an insect gall, and indicates that JA treatments benefit gall wasps by increasing gall size and defenses. PMID:22233098

  19. Lessons from a Stone Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, John P.; Rao, P. Nagaraj

    2007-04-01

    The stone farm is a system for measuring macroscopic stone growth of 12 calcium stones simultaneously. It is based on mixed suspension, mixed product removal continuous crystallization principles and the stones are grown continuously for about 500 hours or more. The growth of the stones follows a surface area dependent pattern and the growth rate constants are very similar irrespective of whether the stating materials are fragments of human stone or pieces of marble chip. Increasing citrate from 2mM to 6mM caused a significant growth inhibition which persisted in the presence of urinary macromolecules. Phytate was a very effective inhibitor (about 50% at sub-?M concentrations) but the effective concentration was increased by an order of magnitude in the presence of urinary macromolecules. The effective concentration for inhibition in a crystallization assay was a further two orders of magnitude higher. Urinary macromolecules or almost whole urine were also strongly inhibitory although neither human serum albumin nor bovine mucin had any great effect. The relationship between the size distribution of crystals in suspension and the stone enlargement rate suggests that the primary enlargement mechanism for these in vitro stones is through aggregation. The stone farm is a powerful tool with which to study crystallization inhibitors in a new light. Some differences between inhibition of crystallization and inhibition of stone growth have emerged and we have obtained quantitative evidence on the mechanism of stone enlargement in vitro. Our findings suggest that the interface between crystals in suspension and the stone surface is the key to controlling stone enlargement.

  20. Galls as a Disputed Resource for Female Parasitoid Wasps Contests

    E-print Network

    Dell’Aglio, Denise Dalbosco; Mendonça, Milton de Souza Jr

    2015-06-05

    . Presence of a competitor greatly changed resident exploitation behavior. Wasps alone spent more time in gall exploitation behaviors (walk-antennate and probe) and in post-oviposition behaviors (stationary and groom), and when intruders were present...

  1. Using Goldenrod Galls to Teach Science Process Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peard, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of using examples from the student's environment to aid in teaching science process skills. The author uses diagrams to aid in discussing the various uses of goldenrod (Solidago sp) galls in the classroom. (ZWH)

  2. Increased gall bladder volume in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed Central

    van de Meeberg, P C; Portincasa, P; Wolfhagen, F H; van Erpecum, K J; VanBerge-Henegouwen, G P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) requires invasive procedures such as liver biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Sonographic measurement of fasting gall bladder volume, which has been reported to be enlarged in PSC, could serve as a non-invasive screening test. METHODS: Fasting gall bladder volume was studied in patients with PSC (n = 24), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, n = 13), liver cirrhosis due to other causes (n = 18), ulcerative colitis (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 23). Meal induced gall bladder emptying was studied in patients with PSC, patients with PBC, and healthy controls. RESULTS: In patients with PSC gall bladder volume was greatly enlarged (72.9 (SEM 3.7) ml) compared with healthy controls (25.4 (1.7) ml, and patients with PBC (30.9 (2.7) ml), liver cirrhosis (31.3 (4.0) ml) or ulcerative colitis (25.8 (2.0) ml) (p < 0.0005 v all). In four patients with PSC the gall bladder wall was irregularly thickened (> 4 mm) as previously described in PSC. Postprandial residual fractions (% of fasting volume) were comparable between patients with PSC (17.5 (3.7)%) and those with PBC (23.6 (7.1%) and healthy controls (12.7 (2.3)%) Although gall bladder emptying seems normal, increased biliary pressure in patients with PSC cannot be excluded. CONCLUSION: Apart from wall thickening, patients with PSC often present with enlargement of the gall bladder. Sonographic determination of fasting gall bladder volume may be a useful, non-invasive, and easy to perform tool in the evaluation of patients suspected of having PSC. Images Figure 2 PMID:8944571

  3. Investigations on the Auxins in Tomato Crown-Gall Tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Dye; G. Clarke; R. L. Wain

    1962-01-01

    Galls were induced to form on the stems of tomato plants by inoculation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Free ether-soluble auxins in the galls and in normal tomato stem tissue were extracted and the acidic and neutral fractions of the extracts were examined by paper chromatography. Evidence for the presence of 3-indolylacetic acid (IAA), 3-indole-carboxylic acid (ICA) and 3-indolyl-acetonitrile (IAN) was found

  4. Does smoking have any effect on urinary stone composition and the distribution of trace elements in urine and stones?

    PubMed

    S?ojewski, Marcin; Czerny, Bogus?aw; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dro?dzik, Marek; Pawlik, Andrzej; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Olszewska, Maria; Go?ab, Adam; Byra, Elzbieta; Chlubek, Dariusz; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    The role of particular elements in lithogenesis is still unclear and debated. Probably some of them may promote or conversely inhibit crystal nucleation of organic or mineral species. A few epidemiological data link smoking with the risk of calcium stones. The aim of this hospital-based study was to evaluate the distribution of trace elements in urine and urinary stones, and possible correlation with stone constituents in smoking and non-smoking individuals. 209 stones and urine samples collected from idiopathic stone-formers were analyzed to evaluate the mineral composition and the distribution of elements, 29 in stones and 21 in urine. Values were statistically compared considering smoking, arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease as grouping variables. No differences were noted either for comparison of mineral components or the elements concentrations in stones in both groups. The concentration of mercury in urine was higher in smokers than in non-smokers, but the statistical significance was at the moderate level. Our findings do not support the concept of possible association between smoking and urinary lithogenesis, but we believe that further investigations are needed in this area. PMID:19826801

  5. The history of urinary stones: in parallel with civilization.

    PubMed

    Tefekli, Ahmet; Cezayirli, Fatin

    2013-01-01

    The roots of modern science and history of urinary stone disease go back to the Ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamia. Hippocrates defined the symptoms of bladder stones. The first recorded details of "perineal lithotomy" were those of Cornelius Celsus. Ancient Arabic medicine was based mainly on classical Greco-Roman works. Interestingly, the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 forbade physicians from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men. With Renaissance new procedures could be tried on criminals. The first recorded suprapubic lithotomy was carried out by Pierre Franco in 1561. In 1874, Bigelow developed a lithotrite, which was introduced into the bladder under anaesthesia (called as "litholopaxy"). Young was the first to report ureteroscopy (1929). With advances in intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques, ureteroscopy became the treatment of choice for ureteric stones. In 1976, Fernstrom and Johannson established percutaneous access to remove a renal stone. However, with the introduction of the first extracorporeal shock wave machine in 1980, a dramatic change in stone management was observed. Civilization in parallel with scientific developments has brought us to a point where we try not to "cut" our patients for stone disease, as Hippocrates admonishes, but rather manage them with minimal invasive alternatives. PMID:24348156

  6. The History of Urinary Stones: In Parallel with Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Tefekli, Ahmet; Cezayirli, Fatin

    2013-01-01

    The roots of modern science and history of urinary stone disease go back to the Ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamia. Hippocrates defined the symptoms of bladder stones. The first recorded details of “perineal lithotomy” were those of Cornelius Celsus. Ancient Arabic medicine was based mainly on classical Greco-Roman works. Interestingly, the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 forbade physicians from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men. With Renaissance new procedures could be tried on criminals. The first recorded suprapubic lithotomy was carried out by Pierre Franco in 1561. In 1874, Bigelow developed a lithotrite, which was introduced into the bladder under anaesthesia (called as “litholopaxy”). Young was the first to report ureteroscopy (1929). With advances in intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques, ureteroscopy became the treatment of choice for ureteric stones. In 1976, Fernstrom and Johannson established percutaneous access to remove a renal stone. However, with the introduction of the first extracorporeal shock wave machine in 1980, a dramatic change in stone management was observed. Civilization in parallel with scientific developments has brought us to a point where we try not to “cut” our patients for stone disease, as Hippocrates admonishes, but rather manage them with minimal invasive alternatives. PMID:24348156

  7. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  8. The Rosetta stone method.

    PubMed

    Date, Shailesh V

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of amino acid sequences from different organisms often reveals cases in which two or more proteins encoded for separately in a genome also appear as fusions, either in the same genome or that of some other organism. Such fusion proteins, termed Rosetta stone sequences, help link disparate proteins together, and suggest the likelihood of functional interactions between the linked entities, describing local and global relationships within the proteome. These relationships help us understand the role of proteins within the context of their associations, and facilitate assignment of putative functions to uncharacterized proteins based on their linkages with proteins of known function. PMID:18712302

  9. Western diseases: current concepts and implications for pediatric surgery research and practice.

    PubMed

    Bickler, Stephen W; DeMaio, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    The term "Western diseases" refers to those conditions that are rare or absent in underdeveloped areas of the Third World and increase in frequency with adoptions of Western customs. In adults, they include such common conditions as coronary artery disease, essential hypertension, appendicitis, cholesterol gall stones, and colon cancer. The best examples of Western diseases in the pediatric population are asthma, allergies, appendicitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Limited data from sub-Saharan Africa suggest other pediatric surgical conditions may fall into this category, including hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, gastroesophageal reflux, perirectal abscess, anal fissure, gastroschesis, and neuroblastoma. Existing theories for the origins of Western diseases have postulated a role for decreased dietary fiber, improved hygiene, fetal programming, and a protective effect of tropical enteropathy. How these factors might relate to the rise of appendicitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and possibly other common pediatric surgical diseases in industrialized societies remains poorly understood. Further research is needed to better define geographical differences in common pediatric surgical conditions and to investigate how genetic and environmental factors interact to modify risk of disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that give rise to Western diseases could lead to new therapeutic and prevention strategies for some of the most common pediatric surgical conditions in industrialized countries. PMID:18087704

  10. Oliver stone's defense of JFK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William L. Benoit; Dawn M. Nill

    1998-01-01

    Oliver Stone and his film JFK were subjected to a scathing attack in the mainstream press. Stone, his direction of the film, his sources, and the conspiracy theory advanced by JFK were all subjected to harsh criticism. Nevertheless, his movie provoked renewed discussion and provoked calls for declassification of secret documents on the assassination. This essay addresses the question of

  11. Biodeterioration of stone: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Th. Warscheid; J. Braams

    2000-01-01

    The alteration and weathering of stone is basically determined by natural and anthropogenic impacts influencing various physical, chemical and biological damage factors at the object site. Whether as direct or catalytically enhancing factor, the biodeterioration of stone is coupled with nearly all environmentally induced degradation processes: the presence of the one makes deterioration by the other all the more effective.

  12. Microbial biofilms on building stone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hoppert; A. Kemmling; M. Kämper

    2003-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestric ecosystems as well as on man-made material. The organisms take part in biogenic weathering on natural rocks as well as on building stone [1]. Though the presence of biofilms on stone monuments exposed to the outdoor environment is obvious, thin films also occur on monuments under controllable indoor environment conditions. Numerous biofilm

  13. Ultrasonic lithotripsy of bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Cetin, S; Ozgür, S; Yazicio?lu, A; Unsal, K; Ilker, Y

    1988-01-01

    In the second half of 1985, 15 patients with 25 bladder stones were treated with Lutzeyer's Ultrasonic Lithotriptor. Of the patients 13 underwent additional operations, mostly transurethral resection of the prostate. The average duration of lithotripsy was 30.5 minutes. Some difficulties were experienced especially when drilling hard stones and as a complication late urethral bleeding occurred in one patient. PMID:3170106

  14. Recumbent Stone Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  15. Environmental and stressful factors affecting the occurrence of kidney stones and the kidney colic.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzidis, Rigas G; Damigos, Dimitrios; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2014-09-01

    The first renal disease described from Hippocrates is nephrolithiasis with renal colic, which is the pain of stone passage and is also a common renal problem with easily recognizable characteristics. There has been much written about dietary factors, which have unequivocally been proved to play an important role in the formation of kidney stones. In this regard, it is of interest that the contribution of factors such as stressful events, life style, or occupation in the formation of kidney stones has not been well studied. This review examines the clinical evidence of the stressful events and other environmental factors affecting the occurrence of kidney stones. PMID:24927933

  16. Renal geology (quantitative renal stone analysis) by ‘Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy’

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iqbal Singh

    2008-01-01

    Aim  To prospectively determine the precise stone composition (quantitative analysis) by using infrared spectroscopy in patients\\u000a with urinary stone disease presenting to our clinic. To determine an ideal method for stone analysis suitable for use in a\\u000a clinical setting.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  After routine and a detailed metabolic workup of all patients of urolithiasis, stone samples of 50 patients of urolithiasis\\u000a satisfying the entry

  17. Gall inducing arthropods from a seasonally dry tropical forest in Serra do Cipó, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcel Serra Coelho; Emmanuel D. Almada; G. Wilson Fernandes; Marco Antonio A. Carneiro; Rubens M. dos Santos; André V. Quintino; Arturo Sanchez-Azofeifa

    2009-01-01

    Gall inducing arthropods from a seasonally dry tropical forest in Serra do Cipó, Brazil. Highly diverse forms of galling arthropods can be identified in much of southeastern Brazil's vegetation. Three fragments of a Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest (SDTF) located in the southern range of the Espinhaço Mountains were selected for study in the first survey of galling organisms in such

  18. Gall structure affects ecological associations of Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) induce structures (galls) on their host plants which house developing wasps and provide them with protection from natural enemies. The Asian chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu, is an invasive pest that is destructive to chestnut (Castanea spp.). ...

  19. Manipulation of the phenolic chemistry of willows by gall-inducing sawflies

    E-print Network

    Nyman, Tommi

    Manipulation of the phenolic chemistry of willows by gall-inducing sawflies Tommi Nyman* and Riitta plant defense compounds in willow leaves and sawfly galls. We found that the galls are probably coordinated pattern in all studied willow species, which suggests that the insects control the phenolic

  20. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in the late 20th century but several quarries and underground mines remain operational providing stone for the local market, repair and maintenance of historic buildings and for special international projects. Reserves permitted for extraction are substantial and resources are fairly extensive so the stone will be accessible in the long term. Taking such points into account, it is suggested that Bath Stone should be recognised as a Global Heritage Stone Resource.

  1. Rolling Stone Radio

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rolling Stone Radio is a fun and interesting site that may represent the future of Internet radio. The site provides a number of streaming audio channels that can be listened to via RealNetworks' RealPlayer G2 combined with a customized, radio-like interface to the site. Each channel features a particular genre of music, and the interface displays the artist and song title during play. The sound quality ranges from acceptable to excellent, and the sound controls and channel selectors are easy-to-use. While the site borders on the exploitative in its advertising and ability to purchase music by clicking through the interface, it does combine some of the best ideas on the Internet into a seamless entertainment package. All downloadable components of this site are free but run only on Win95/98/NT.

  2. The bioreceptivity of building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranji?, Alenka; Mulec, Janez; Muck, Tadeja; Hladnik, Aleš; Mladenovi?, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Bioreceptivity is an intrinsic property of stone, and is defined as the ability of a material to be colonized by living organisms. The fouling and staining of building stone material due to the activity of microorganisms presents a serious problem in modern as well as historical buildings, not only due to the aesthetic impact but also due to the deterioration of the material. Biological colonisation on stone materials is influenced by a number of factors, e.g. the intrinsic properties of the stone (porosity, roughness, permeability, mineral composition), environmental parameters (e.g. solar radiation, temperature, water regime, climate, etc.), and specific microclimatic parameters (e.g. orientation, exposure to shadow, permanent capillary humidity, etc.). In order to assess the bioreceptivity of building stones, use is often made of artificial colonisation experiments compromising the inoculation of stones with a single species or a few isolated strains under laboratory conditions. In the present work the authors present the development of a method for the determination of bioreceptivity, as well as a study of the bioreceptivity of selected natural stone versus the latter's intrinsic properties. Field examples of biodeterioration are also presented. The study was supported by the Slovenian Research Agency (L1-5453).

  3. Changes in clonal poplar leaf chemistry caused by stem galls alter herbivory and leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Künkler, Nora; Brandl, Roland; Brändle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores that modify the phenotype of their host plants. Beyond the direct manipulation of plant morphology and physiology in the immediate environment of the gall, there is also evidence of plant-mediated effects of gall-inducing insects on other species of the assemblages and ecosystem processes associated with the host plant. We analysed the impact of gall infestation by the aphid Pemphigus spirothecae on chemical leaf traits of clonal Lombardy poplars (Populus nigra var. italica) and the subsequent effects on intensity of herbivory and decomposition of leaves across five sites. We measured the herbivory of two feeding guilds: leaf-chewing insects that feed on the blade (e.g. caterpillars and sawfly larvae) and skeletonising insects that feed on the mesophyll of the leaves (e.g. larvae of beetles). Galled leaves had higher phenol (35%) and lower nitrogen and cholorophyll contents (35% respectively 37%) than non-galled leaves, and these differences were stronger in August than in June. Total herbivory intensity was 27% higher on galled than on non-galled leaves; damage by leaf chewers was on average 61% higher on gall infested leaves, whereas damage by skeletonising insects was on average 39% higher on non-galled leaves. After nine months the decomposition rate of galled leaf litter was 15% lower than that of non-galled leaf litter presumably because of the lower nitrogen content of the galled leaf litter. This indicated after-life effects of gall infestation on the decomposers. We found no evidence for galling x environment interactions. PMID:24260333

  4. Changes in Clonal Poplar Leaf Chemistry Caused by Stem Galls Alter Herbivory and Leaf Litter Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Künkler, Nora; Brandl, Roland; Brändle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores that modify the phenotype of their host plants. Beyond the direct manipulation of plant morphology and physiology in the immediate environment of the gall, there is also evidence of plant-mediated effects of gall-inducing insects on other species of the assemblages and ecosystem processes associated with the host plant. We analysed the impact of gall infestation by the aphid Pemphigus spirothecae on chemical leaf traits of clonal Lombardy poplars (Populus nigra var. italica) and the subsequent effects on intensity of herbivory and decomposition of leaves across five sites. We measured the herbivory of two feeding guilds: leaf-chewing insects that feed on the blade (e.g. caterpillars and sawfly larvae) and skeletonising insects that feed on the mesophyll of the leaves (e.g. larvae of beetles). Galled leaves had higher phenol (35%) and lower nitrogen and cholorophyll contents (35% respectively 37%) than non-galled leaves, and these differences were stronger in August than in June. Total herbivory intensity was 27% higher on galled than on non-galled leaves; damage by leaf chewers was on average 61% higher on gall infested leaves, whereas damage by skeletonising insects was on average 39% higher on non-galled leaves. After nine months the decomposition rate of galled leaf litter was 15% lower than that of non-galled leaf litter presumably because of the lower nitrogen content of the galled leaf litter. This indicated after-life effects of gall infestation on the decomposers. We found no evidence for galling x environment interactions. PMID:24260333

  5. Ant mutualists alter the composition and attack rate of the parasitoid community for the gall wasp Disholcaspis

    E-print Network

    Inouye, Brian

    Ant mutualists alter the composition and attack rate of the parasitoid community for the gall wasp mutualists. 2. The gall wasp Disholcaspis eldoradensis induces plant galls that secrete a sweet honeydew from their top surfaces while the wasp larvae are active. These galls are actively tended by Argentine ants

  6. Photosynthetic efficiency of Clusia arrudae leaf tissue with and without Cecidomyiidae galls.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G W; Coelho, M S; Lüttge, U

    2010-10-01

    Leaf galls induced by a still undescribed new species of Cecidomyiidae (Diptera) are frequent on leaves of Clusia arrudae Planchon & Tirana (Clusiaceae) in the rupestrian fields at 1400 m a.s.l. in Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Galls were 7.1 ± 0.7 mm in diameter, one chambered with only one larva inside. Gall tissue is green and soft. Assessments of photosynthetic capacity using chlorophyll-a fluorescence measurements revealed that photosynthetic performance of gall tissue and healthy leaf tissue were rather similar. Hence, the morphological changes due to gall development were not associated with significant changes in the photosynthetic capacity of the tissue. PMID:21085778

  7. A novel mechanism of gall midge resistance in the rice variety Kavya revealed by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Chiruvuri Naga, Neeraja; Raman Meenakshi, Sundaram; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, Jagadish S

    2012-06-01

    The Asian rice gall midge [Orseolia oryzae (Wood-Mason)] is an important rice pest causing an annual average yield loss of about US $80 million in India. Rice varieties possess several discrete resistance (R) genes conferring resistance against the pest in two distinct ways, i.e., with (HR+ type) or without (HR- type) the expression of hypersensitive reaction (HR). The aim of the present work is to understand the molecular basis of compatible and incompatible (HR- type) rice gall midge interactions between the rice variety Kavya and the two gall midge biotypes: the virulent GMB4M and the avirulent GMB1 using transcriptional microarray gene expression analysis. A large number of differentially expressed genes (602genes in incompatible interaction and 1,330 genes in compatible interaction with at least twofold changes, p value <0.05) was obtained from the microarray analysis that could be grouped into six clusters based on their induction during both or either of the interactions. MapMan software was used for functional characterization of these genes into 13 categories (BINs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction validation of 26 genes selected through the analysis revealed four genes viz. NADPH oxidase, AtrbohF, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and von Willebrand factor type A domain containing protein coding genes to be significantly upregulated during the incompatible interaction. But most of the signature genes related to HR+ type resistance like salicylic acid pathway-related genes and disease resistance protein coding genes were downregulated. On the other hand, during the compatible interaction, genes related to primary metabolism and nutrient transport were upregulated and genes for defense and signaling were downregulated. We propose a hypothesis that HR- type of resistance in the rice variety Kavya against gall midge could be due to the constitutive expression of an R gene and a case of extreme resistance which is devoid of cell death. Compatible interaction, however, modulated a large number of differentially expressed transcripts to reprogram cell organization, cell remodeling, and relocation of nutrients through transport to support insect growth. PMID:22447493

  8. Dating of iron gall ink using the dissolution-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Xie, Peng

    2015-03-01

    In many criminal and civil cases, some questioned documents are written with iron gall ink. Determining the date when an iron gall ink entry was written can be important to assess the authenticity of a document. A dissolution-diffusion method was successfully employed to draw aging curves of iron gall ink entries stored in controlled conditions over 40 months. Calibration curves were created to indicate the relationship between the average dissolution-diffusion rate of ink components and the age of ink entries stored under natural aging conditions. As preliminary findings of this study, the mixed solution of dimethyl formamide (DMF) and anhydrous ethanol was suitable to dissolve the dye of iron gall ink strokes made at different time. It was also determined that brands of iron gall inks, types of paper, and thickness of iron gall ink strokes had varying impacts on estimating the dates of iron gall ink strokes. PMID:25677356

  9. The gap junction as a "Biological Rosetta Stone": implications of evolution, stem cells to homeostatic regulation of health and disease in the Barker hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of the gap junction structure, its functions and the family of the "connexin" genes, has been basically ignored by the major biological disciplines. These connexin genes code for proteins that organize to form membrane-associated hemi-channels, "connexons", co-join with the connexons of neighboring cells to form gap junctions. Gap junctions appeared in the early evolution of the metazoan. Their fundamental functions, (e.g., to synchronize electrotonic and metabolic functions of societies of cells, and to regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis), were accomplished via integrating the extra-cellular triggering of intra-cellular signaling, and therefore, regulating gene expression. These functions have been documented by genetic mutations of the connexin genes and by chemical modulation of gap junctions. Via genetic alteration of connexins in knock-out and transgenic mice, as well as inherited connexin mutations in various human syndromes, the gap junction has been shown to be directly linked to many normal cell functions and multiple diseases, such as birth defects, reproductive, neurological disorders, immune dysfunction and cancer. Specifically, the modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), either by increasing or decreasing its functions by non-mutagenic chemicals or by oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in normal or "initiated" stem cells and their progenitor cells, can have a major impact on tumor promotion or cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. The overview of the roles of the gap junction in the evolution of the metazoan and its potential in understanding a "systems" view of human health and aging and the diseases of aging will be attempted. PMID:21484590

  10. Targeted microbubbles: a novel application for the treatment of kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Krishna; Marx, Vanessa; Laser, Daniel; Kenny, Thomas; Chi, Thomas; Bailey, Michael; Sorensen, Mathew D; Grubbs, Robert H; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-07-01

    Kidney stone disease is endemic. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was the first major technological breakthrough where focused shockwaves were used to fragment stones in the kidney or ureter. The shockwaves induced the formation of cavitation bubbles, whose collapse released energy at the stone, and the energy fragmented the kidney stones into pieces small enough to be passed spontaneously. Can the concept of microbubbles be used without the bulky machine? The logical progression was to manufacture these powerful microbubbles ex vivo and inject these bubbles directly into the collecting system. An external source can be used to induce cavitation once the microbubbles are at their target; the key is targeting these microbubbles to specifically bind to kidney stones. Two important observations have been established: (i) bisphosphonates attach to hydroxyapatite crystals with high affinity; and (ii) there is substantial hydroxyapatite in most kidney stones. The microbubbles can be equipped with bisphosphonate tags to specifically target kidney stones. These bubbles will preferentially bind to the stone and not surrounding tissue, reducing collateral damage. Ultrasound or another suitable form of energy is then applied causing the microbubbles to induce cavitation and fragment the stones. This can be used as an adjunct to ureteroscopy or percutaneous lithotripsy to aid in fragmentation. Randall's plaques, which also contain hydroxyapatite crystals, can also be targeted to pre-emptively destroy these stone precursors. Additionally, targeted microbubbles can aid in kidney stone diagnostics by virtue of being used as an adjunct to traditional imaging methods, especially useful in high-risk patient populations. This novel application of targeted microbubble technology not only represents the next frontier in minimally invasive stone surgery, but a platform technology for other areas of medicine. PMID:25402588

  11. Targeted microbubbles: a novel application for the treatment of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Krishna; Marx, Vanessa; Laser, Daniel; Kenny, Thomas; Chi, Thomas; Bailey, Michael; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Grubbs, Robert H.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is endemic. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was the first major technological breakthrough where focused shockwaves were used to fragment stones in the kidney or ureter. The shockwaves induced the formation of cavitation bubbles, whose collapse released energy at the stone, and the energy fragmented the kidney stones into pieces small enough to be passed spontaneously. Can the concept of microbubbles be used without the bulky machine? The logical progression was to manufacture these powerful microbubbles ex vivo and inject these bubbles directly into the collecting system. An external source can be used to induce cavitation once the microbubbles are at their target; the key is targeting these microbubbles to specifically bind to kidney stones. Two important observations have been established: (i) bisphosphonates attach to hydroxyapatite crystals with high affinity; and (ii) there is substantial hydroxyapatite in most kidney stones. The microbubbles can be equipped with bisphosphonate tags to specifically target kidney stones. These bubbles will preferentially bind to the stone and not surrounding tissue, reducing collateral damage. Ultrasound or another suitable form of energy is then applied causing the microbubbles to induce cavitation and fragment the stones. This can be used as an adjunct to ureteroscopy or percutaneous lithotripsy to aid in fragmentation. Randall’s plaques, which also contain hydroxyapatite crystals, can also be targeted to pre-emptively destroy these stone precursors. Additionally, targeted microbubbles can aid in kidney stone diagnostics by virtue of being used as an adjunct to traditional imaging methods, especially useful in high-risk patient populations. This novel application of targeted microbubble technology not only represents the next frontier in minimally invasive stone surgery, but a platform technology for other areas of medicine. PMID:25402588

  12. THE EFFECTS OF STONE FRUIT EXTRACT ON THE PROCESS OF PLATELET AGGREGATION IN VITRO 

    E-print Network

    Deleeuw, Peter 1990-

    2011-07-25

    that the extract inhibits the aggregation caused by ADP. This would also lead one to believe that there are compounds in stone fruits that could lower the chances of cardiovascular disease by limiting aggregation and subsequently inflammation in arterial walls....

  13. Lunar stone saw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Tom; Croker, Todd; Hines, Ken; Knight, Mike; Walton, Todd

    1988-01-01

    This project addresses the problem of cutting lunar stones into blocks to be used to construct shelters to protect personnel and equipment from harmful solar radiation. This plant will manufacture 6 in x 1 ft x 2 ft blocks and will be located near the south pole to allow it to be in the shade at all times. This design uses a computer controlled robot, a boulder handler that uses hydraulics for movement, a computer system that used 3-D vision to determine the size of boulders, a polycrystalline diamond tipped saw blade that utilizes radiation for cooling, and a solar tower to collect solar energy. Only two electric motors are used in this plant because of the heavy weight of electric motors and the problem of cooling them. These two motors will be cooled by thermoelectric cooling. All other motors and actuators are to be hydraulic. The architectural design for the building as well as the conceptual design of the machines for cutting the blocks are described.

  14. Stone formation and calcification by nanobacteria in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Bjorklund, Michael; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1998-07-01

    The formation of discrete and organized inorganic crystalline structures within macromolecular extracellular matrices is a widespread biological phenomenon generally referred to as biomineralization. Recently, bacteria have been implicated as factors in biogeochemical cycles for formation of many minerals in aqueous sediments. We have found nanobacterial culture systems that allow for reproducible production of apatite calcification in vitro. Depending on the culture conditions, tiny nanocolloid-sized particles covered with apatite, forming various size of aggregates and stones were observed. In this study, we detected the presence of nanobacteria in demineralized trilobit fossil, geode, apatite, and calcite stones by immunofluorescence staining. Amethyst and other quartz stones, and chalk gave negative results. Microorganisms are capable of depositing apatite outside the thermodynamic equilibrium in sea water. We bring now evidence that this occurs in the human body as well. Previously, only struvite kidney stones composed of magnesium ammonium phosphate and small amounts of apatite have been regarded as bacteria related. 90 percent of demineralized human kidney stones now screened, contained nanobacteria. At least three different distribution patterns of nanobacteria were conditions, and human kidney stones that are formed from small apatite units. Prerequisites for the formation of kidney stones are the supersaturation of urine and presence of nidi for crystallization. Nanobacteria are important nidi and their presence might be of special interest in space flights where supersaturation of urine is present due to the loss of bone. Furthermore, we bring evidence that nanobacteria may act as crystallization nidi for the formation of biogenic apatite structures in tissue calcification found in e.g., atherosclerotic plaques, extensive metastatic and tumoral calcification, acute periarthritis, malacoplakia, and malignant diseases. In nanaobacteria-infected fibroblasts, electron microscopy revealed intra- and extra-cellular needle-like crystal deposits, which were stainable with von Kossa stain and resemble calcospherules found in pathological calcification. Thus bacteria-mediated apatite formation takes place in aqueous environments, in humans and in geological sediments.

  15. Franz Joseph Gall and music: the faculty and the bump.

    PubMed

    Eling, Paul; Finger, Stanley; Whitaker, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The traditional story maintains that Franz Joseph Gall's (1758-1828) scientific program began with his observations of schoolmates with bulging eyes and good verbal memories. But his search to understand human nature, in particular individual differences in capacities, passions, and tendencies, can also be traced to other important observations, one being of a young girl with an exceptional talent for music. Rejecting contemporary notions of cognition, Gall concluded that behavior results from the interaction of a limited set of basic faculties, each with its own processes for perception and memory, each with its own territory in both cerebral or cerebellar cortices. Gall identified 27 faculties, one being the sense of tone relations or music. The description of the latter is identical in both his Anatomie et Physiologie and Sur les Fonctions du Cerveau et sur Celles de Chacune de ses Parties, where he provided positive and negative evidences and discussed findings from humans and lower animals, for the faculty. The localization of the cortical faculty for talented musicians, he explained, is demonstrated by a "bump" on each side of the skull just above the angle of the eye; hence, the lower forehead of musicians is broader or squarer than in other individuals. Additionally, differences between singing and nonsinging birds also correlate with cranial features. Gall even brought age, racial, and national differences into the picture. What he wrote about music reveals much about his science and creative thinking. PMID:25684283

  16. Evaluation of wild Juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox, the most widely used rootstock in CA walnut production, is highly susceptible to the causal agent of crown gall (CG) Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The bacterial pathogen induces the formation of large tumors around the crown of the tree resulting in a reduction in both vigor and yield. If left...

  17. The Gall Midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) of Hickories (Juglandaceae: Carya)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This monograph treats the 63 species of gall midges that feed on North American hickories. Previously named species are redescribed, except for four relegated to junior synonymy. One species is renamed and a new genus is described for another. One other new genus is erected and 49 species are descri...

  18. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

  19. Purbeck Stone - A possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    By definition, a Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) should have international significance. The Purbeck Group of uppermost Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous age (Tithonian- Berriasian) outcrops mainly in the Purbeck area of Dorset, England. It was deposited in shallow freshwater to brackish lagoons with occasional marine incursions. Limestones, mainly biosparites, occur at 6 main levels. Differences in bed thickness, jointing and hardness make it suitable for a variety of purposes including dimension stone, monumental and ornamental stone, roofing tiles, paving, flooring and rockery stone. Near the top of the sequence is a dark gastropod biosparite, traditionally called Purbeck Marble, easily carved, which has been extensively used for decorative interior work in churches and cathedrals particularly for fonts, tombs, flooring and facings on columns for example in the medieval cathedrals of Salisbury, Exeter, Durham, York and Wells and Worcester and Westminster Abbey. The stone was extracted at least from Roman times (1st century AD) through the medieval period. Quarrying expanded from about 1700 reaching a peak in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Stone was transported first by sea but later by rail for wider use. Used in many local buildings, it gives an important element of local character. Many of the villages are designated conservation areas with a requirement for repair, maintenance and new building using local stone. Initially the stone was taken from quarries but was later mined. The number of operating companies declined from 15 to 5 over the past 40 years, with 10 active small quarries. Outputs are from few hundred tonnes to a few thousand tonnes per annum or about 9 to 12 years of permitted reserves but the Planning Authority intends to make sufficient provision for production at recent levels for their development plan period. The extraction sites are in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and close to Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. This might be a test case for considering whether a stone with this history is significant enough to be designated as a GHSR or is, rather, of national significance.

  20. Prevalence of Coronal Pulp Stones and Its Relation with Systemic Disorders in Northern Indian Central Punjabi Population

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Sandeep Kumar; Bhatia, Archana; Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Biswal, Swati Swagatika; Kanth, Shashi; Nalla, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To estimate the prevalence of coronal pulp stones in the molar teeth of dental outpatients of Sunam, Sangrur district, Punjab, India, to report any association between occurrence of pulp stones with age, gender, dental arch, side, and dental status and to find out correlation between pulp stones with dental and systemic diseases. Materials and Methods. 500 routine dental outpatients within age group of 18–67 years were involved in the study. Molar bitewing of left and right side of each patient was taken with XCP bitewing instrument and size 2 film. The presence or absence of pulp stones was recorded. Chi-square analysis was used to record the prevalence of pulp stones and to compare it with demographic and systemic factors. Results. Overall prevalence of pulp stones was 41.8%. Pulp stones were significantly higher in maxilla (11.59%) than mandible (6.54%), left side than right side, and first molar than other molars. Higher numbers of pulp stones were recorded in patients with cardiovascular disease (38.89%) than with cholelithiasis and renal lithiasis. Conclusion. Pulp stones were higher in maxillary arch than mandibular arch and in females than males. Cardiovascular patients had higher number of pulp stones than other groups. PMID:24944821

  1. The hole truth: intracrystalline proteins and calcium oxalate kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Ryall, R L; Fleming, D E; Grover, P K; Chauvet, M; Dean, C J; Marshall, V R

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate aim of our research is to understand the role of macromolecules in the formation of human kidney stones, particularly their interactions with calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals. The invariable association of stones with proteins raises the possibility that proteins play a role in their formation, similar to the role of proteins in healthy biomineralization. Do these proteins induce mineralization? Are they merely a response to the disease process? Or are they protective molecules that were overwhelmed by mineral supersaturation? A protein of particular interest is fragment 1 (F1) of prothrombin. We have shown that mRNA for prothrombin is present in the kidney. Because the F1 fragment of prothrombin present in urine is slightly different from that found in the blood, we refer to this protein as "urinary prothrombin fragment 1" (UPTF1). Available evidence suggests that the kidney manufactures the protein for protection against stone disease and that the protein has a directive role in stone formation. We now have evidence that proteins are interred within CaOx crystals precipitated from human urine, where it is distributed in continuous channels. These proteins could facilitate crystal deconstruction and removal after attachment to the renal epithelium and endocytosis. We suspect that the formation of CaOx crystals in the urine is a normal process designed to permit harmless disposal of an excess of calcium, oxalate, or both. The incorporation of proteins provides a second line of defense against stone formation by enabling the destruction and removal of retained crystals. Understanding the basic molecular strategies by which plants produce protein-containing CaOx crystals may provide insight into human CaOx stone formation. PMID:11156707

  2. FOSSIL PHYLLOXERID PLANT GALLS From the Lower Eocene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene B. Wittlake

    1969-01-01

    stone outcrops of the Upper Wilcox formation at Lafe, Arkansas. These deposits consist of very fine, buff-colored to whitish sand- stone. Great detail of a structural nature is recorded in individual specimens. The deposit must represent the central area of a large lake or lagoon that was fed by streams with a moderate current. All coarse material in suspension had

  3. Chestnut species and jasmonic acid treatment influence development and community interactions of galls produced by the Asian chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant-signaling compound involved in defenses against insects and pathogens, and in the regulation of nutrient partitioning. Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) induce the formation of structures (galls) on their host plants which house immature wasps and provide them with nu...

  4. Linear echoendoscope-guided ERCP for the diagnosis of occult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Less than 67% of patients with intermediate risk for common bile duct (CBD) stones require therapeutic intervention. It is important to have an accurate, safe, and reliable method for the definitive diagnosis of CBD stones before initiating therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Few publications detail the diagnostic efficacy of linear echoendoscopy (EUS) for CBD stones. Methods 30 patients with biliary colic, pancreatitis, unexplained derangement of liver function tests, and/or dilated CBD without an identifiable cause were enrolled in the study. When a CBD stone was disclosed by linear EUS, ERCP with stone extraction was performed. Patients who failed ERCP were referred for surgical intervention. If no stone was found by EUS, ERCP would not be performed and patients were followed-up for possible biliary symptoms for up to three months. Results The major reason for enrollment was acute pancreatitis. The mean predicted risk for CBD stones was 47% (28–61). Of the 12 patients who were positive for CBD stones by EUS, nine had successful ERCP, one failed ERCP (later treated successfully by surgical intervention) and two were false-positive cases. No procedure-related adverse events were noted. For those 18 patients without evidence of CBD stones by EUS, no false-negative case was noted during the three-month follow-up period. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicted values for the detection of CBD stones of 1, 0.9, 0.8 and 1, respectively. Conclusion Linear EUS is safe and efficacious for the diagnosis of occult CBD stones in patients with intermediate risk for the disease. PMID:23497328

  5. Drinking Water Helps Prevent Kidney Stones

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_151715.html Drinking Water Helps Prevent Kidney Stones Researchers find eight or ... March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking plenty of water will lower your risk of kidney stones, researchers ...

  6. Labouring Under The Stone—A Literary Legacy of Lithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The history of mankind's suffering greatly from calculus disease has been one of excruciating longevity. Since the first historical records, humans have formed stones and endured the wrath of these concretions' passage via the delicate mechanisms of the urinary tract. This study involved detailed investigations of historical writings of famous stone sufferers to better appreciate the circumstances of our patients. Collected histories both of textbooks and articles were scrutinized for the accounts of famous stone sufferers. Once identified, primary resources were sought with English translations given preference. Cross-referencing all informational sources was attempted. The accounts were then classified as lower urinary tract (BS), upper urinary tract (KS), by century of the individual, and whether these were ancient (before 100 years ago) or recent (from the 20th Century onwards). Many of these great men and woman suffered in relative silence. Not much is available on descriptions of their colic. However, there are others such as Michel Montaigne, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Sydenham, Sir William Osler and Richard Selzer who were able to transform their suffering into ethereal expressions of pure pain and suffering. The ancient descriptions are twofold fascinating, as the victims of stone disease faced quackery and profound ignorance from the medical profession and no effective remedy for the pain. Here again, there are two typical responses: the enlightened cerebral concerns of Montaigne, Sydenham, and Franklin versus the punitive, religious overtones from Erasmus and Pepys. Lower and upper tract stones produced equal horrors to those once thought to incur punishment from the gods, or turning to stone-like "living statues." No amount of literary expression can capture the true essence of renal colic. Medical texts from their earliest times place stone passage near the top of the pantheon of medical suffering. Each of these prolific and erudite stone sufferers provides us, the next generation, a unique window into the perception of colic. "The colic was followed by an ulcer, or more accurately, by a hard swelling which first extended all along the lower right groin. Then it centered on the pit of my stomach, almost like a dragon with its teeth biting my navel while the rest of its body was writhing and its tail stretching towards my loins…it causes constant, sometimes, unbearable pain." [Erasmus

  7. Edaphic environment, gall midges, and goldenrod clonal expansion in a mid-successional old-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael J.; Abrahamson, Warren G.; Landis, Kelly

    2006-11-01

    During the middle stage of old-field succession, genets of clonal plants vie to take over space from annual and short-lived perennial plants. We studied factors that may influence the relative rates of expansion of Solidago altissima genets in an old-field population attacked by the gall midge Rhopalomyia solidaginis. Genets growing in more clayey soil expanded more slowly, as evidenced by differences in rhizome growth. Edaphic conditions also affected galling frequencies, with genets in more sandy soil having twice as many galls. Gall midges reduced goldenrod stem growth, and stem height was positively correlated with rhizome growth. For a given stem height, galled ramets allocated relatively more biomass to rhizome growth than ungalled ramets. The end result was that galled ramets produced the same number and sizes of rhizomes as ungalled ramets.

  8. Androgens Involvement in the Pathogenesis of Renal Stones Formation

    PubMed Central

    Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Babaei, Mnasour; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective The potential role for the gonadal steroids in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis, higher mean of plasma oxalate concentration and kidney calcium oxalate deposition influenced by androgens in men has been proposed. In this study, the serum levels of steroid hormones as a pathogenesis of this condition in male patients with active renal stone disease compared with controls was investigated. Methods Forty patients diagnosed with renal stones and hospitalized for further clinical treatments or referred to our office after ultrasonographic evaluations participated in the study. Forty six healthy subjects served as controls. Steroid sex hormones in the plasma samples including testosterone, free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin were analyzed. Results A significant difference was observed between patients and the control subjects regarding serum testosterone, free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin. Conclusions Based on the results, a higher androgens level was diagnosed in renal stone patients, indicating a possibility of a substantial pathogenic role of testosterone, free testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone involvement in the pathogenesis of renal stones formation. Therefore, data presentation and further investigation on the relation between male steroids and urolithiasis is of importance and should be considered in evaluation of the etiology of the disease. PMID:24695421

  9. EDAX versus FTIR in mixed stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. M. Fazil Marickar; P. R. Lekshmi; Luxmi Varma; Peter Koshy

    2009-01-01

    Mixed stones form a significant number of all urinary stones. Accurate analysis of individual areas of stones is fraught with\\u000a uncertainties. Scanning electron microscopy with elemental distribution analysis (SEM-EDAX) is a very important tool in assessing\\u000a stone composition. The objective of this paper is to project the role of the combination of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)\\u000a spectroscopy and SEM-EDAX combination

  10. Luserna Stone: A nomination for "Global Heritage Stone Resource"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primavori, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Luserna Stone (Pietra di Luserna) is the commercial name of a grey-greenish leucogranitic orthogneiss, probably from the Lower Permian Age, that outcrops in the Luserna-Infernotto basin (Cottian Alps, Piedmont, NW Italy) on the border between the Turin and Cuneo provinces. Geologically speaking, it pertains to the Dora-Maira Massif that represents a part of the ancient European margin annexed to the Cottian Alps during the Alpine orogenesis; from a petrographic point of view, it is the metamorphic result of a late-Ercinian leucogranitic rock transformation. Lithological features and building applications allow the recognition of two main varieties: 1) a micro-augen gneiss with very regular schistosity planes with centimetric spacing and easy split workability, known as Splittable facies; 2) a micro-Augen gneiss characterized by lower schistosity and poor split, suitable for blocks cutting machines (diamond wires, gang-saws, traditional saws), known as Massive facies. A third, rare, white variety also exists, called "Bianchetta". Luserna stone extends over an area of approximately 50 km2, where more than fifty quarries are in operation, together with a relevant number of processing plants and artisanal laboratories. The stone is quarried and processed since almost the Middle Age, and currently represents one of the three most important siliceous production cluster in Italy (together with the Ossola and Sardegna Island granites). Some characteristics of this stone - such as the relevant physical-mechanical properties, an intrinsic versatility and its peculiar splittability - have made it one of the most widely used stone materials in Italy and in the countries surrounding the North Western border of Italy. Apart from its intrinsic geological, petrographic, commercial and technical properties, several issues related to the Luserna Stone are considered to be of relevant importance for its designation as a Global Heritage Stone Resource, such as the distinctive mark on the architecture and urban landscape of many areas in NW Italy, some quite peculiar applications (for ex.: the "so-called "loze" or "lose", for the traditional roofing in alpine buildings) and the related constructive culture, the presence of an Eco-Museum, the occurrence of a local Fair (Pietra & Meccanizzazione), and many other important aspects.

  11. Selection of tool materials and surface treatments for improved galling performance in sheet metal forming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingke Hou; Weigang Zhang; Zhongqi Yu; Shuhui Li

    2009-01-01

    Galling is a known failure mechanism in automotive stamping. It results in increased cost of die maintenance and scrap rate\\u000a of products. In this study, rectangular pan and U-channel stamping experiments are used to (1) investigate the effect of stress\\u000a states on galling performance in sheet metal forming, (2) select proper tool materials and surface treatments for improved\\u000a galling properties,

  12. Micropropagation ofActinidia polygama from fruit galls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyuki Tanaka; Yukihiro Shoyama; Yoshinori Sasaki; Yutaka Sashida

    1997-01-01

    Callus was induced from the fruit galls of Actinidia polygama on the B5 medium supplemented with NAA, BA and kinetin (1 mg\\u000a l?1 each). When the callus was subcultured on the same medium 3 times, shoot primordia and adventitious roots appeared on the\\u000a surface of the callus. Shoots subcultured on growth regulator free MS medium or supplemented with NAA (1

  13. Petra: Lost City of Stone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site, created to complement the Petra: Lost City of Stone exhibit, looks at this once flourishing city in the heart of the ancient Near East. Although the exhibit is now closed, the web site contains a wealth of information about Petra.

  14. Black Body Detector Temperature from Gall and Planck Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Clarence A.

    2009-05-01

    The laws of Gall (http://sites.google.com/site/purefieldphysics) and Planck are generally defined with zero intensity at 0 K. However actual measurements involve detectors above absolute zero. These detectors must also be treated as approximate black body radiators. The zero intensity reference point is thus defined by the radiated intensity at the detector temperature. Planck's law thus becomes ( IP=c1?^51e^c2?T;-1-c1?^51e^c2?Td;-1) where Td is the detector temperature. Provided that T>Td;;;IP;is;always>0. Thus from a Planck perspective, wavelength increase should not be a factor in defining detector temperature. The corresponding expression for Gall's law is ( IG=?T^6b^2?e^-?Tb-?Td^6b^2?e^-?Tdb) . Above the crossover wavelength (http://absimage.aps.org/image/MWSMAR09-2008-000004.pdf), even though T>Td;;;IG<0. From a Gall perspective, this sets a limit on the long wavelength range for a given detector temperature. Longer wavelength measurements require lower detector temperatures. For a 6000 K black body radiator, the long wavelength crossover limits for detectors at 300 K, 100 K and 4 K are 9.138, 12.066 and 21.206 microns respectively.

  15. Effects of ileal resection on biliary lipids and bile acid composition in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, A; Einarsson, K

    1991-01-01

    Biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, and bile acid pattern were determined in fasting duodenal bile of 10 patients (four men and six women, mean age 41 years) with Crohn's disease and a history of ileal resection (mean 64 cm). The data were compared with corresponding values in a group of healthy subjects. None of the patients with Crohn's disease had supersaturated bile. Cholesterol saturation was significantly lower in the patients with Crohn's disease than in the healthy subjects. The molar percentage of cholesterol was also lower among the patients but there was no significant difference. The molar percentages of phospholipids and bile acids were normal. Bile acid composition in the patients with ileal resection was characterised by a significant decrease in the deoxycholic acid fraction and a pronounced increase in the ursodeoxycholic acid fraction compared with the healthy subjects. The surprisingly high percentage of ursodeoxycholic acid may contribute to the low degree of cholesterol saturation in bile. Based on these results patients with Crohn's disease should not have an increased risk of cholesterol gall stone formation. PMID:1773954

  16. A new species of invasive gall wasp (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) on blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN LA SALLE; GEVORK ARAKELIAN; ROSSER W. GARRISON; MICHAEL W. GATES

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates, n. sp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (Myrtaceae), in California.

  17. A preliminary review of some interesting aspects of bio-ethology of the chalcids (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) associated with plant galls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T C Narendran

    1984-01-01

    The interactions and inter-relationships between plant galls and the chalcids with them are often extremely intricate and\\u000a it is not easy always to assess correctly a given species as a gall former or an inquiline or a parasite of another inhabitant\\u000a of a gall. The chalcids show complex inter-relationships with other inhabitants of a gall in many instances. The existence

  18. Evaluating the Antimicrobial Activity of Methonolic Extract of Rhus Succedanea Leaf Gall

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Savitri; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Lakkappa, Dhananjaya Bhadrapura

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The worldwide increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the undesirable side effects associated with constant use of synthetic drugs has prompted the search for novel antimicrobial agents, particularly those manufactured from plants. This study is designed to ascertain the antibacterial potential of Rhus succedanea leaf gall extracts on the growth of gram-positive and gram–negative bacteria. Methods: The methanolic and hexane extract of different concentrations (100, 250, and 500 ?g/ml) were prepared and their antibacterial efficacy was tested against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Micrococcus luteus, and Staphylococcus aureus using agar well diffusion method and the size of inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. Results: The methanol and hexane extracts differed significantly in their antimicrobial activity with methanol extract showing a potent inhibitory activity in the range of 16±2 to 23±1, which was almost equal to the values of ciprofloxacin (25±3), used as a standard. Further, the methanol extract was mostly potent and effective in inhibiting the growth of gram-negative bacteria, namely, E. coli, when compared to gram –positive bacteria stains, which are responsible for antimicrobial activities. The phytochemical screening showed positive results for the presence of steroids, triterpenes, alkaloids, and carbohydrates. Conclusion: The potent antibacterial activity of Rhus succedanea leaf gall extracts indicates its useful therapeutic application against bacterial infection. Furthermore, this study indicates that the extract might be exploited as natural drug for the treatment of infectious diseases and could be useful in understanding the relations between traditional cures and current medications. PMID:24455483

  19. Ant mutualists alter the composition and attack rate of the parasitoid community for the gall wasp Disholcaspis eldoradensis (Cynipidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN D. I NOUYE

    The strength or density dependence of pairwise species interactions can depend on the presence or absence of other species, especially potential mutualists. 2. The gall wasp Disholcaspis eldoradensis induces plant galls that secrete a sweet honeydew from their top surfaces while the wasp larvae are active. These galls are actively tended by Argentine ants, which collect the honeydew and drive

  20. Host manipulation by the orange leafhopper Cicadulina bipunctata: gall induction on distant leaves by dose-dependent stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Keiichiro; Matsumura, Masaya; Tokuda, Makoto

    2009-09-01

    The evolution of the gall-inducing ability in insects and the adaptive significance of the galling habit have been addressed by many studies. Cicadulina bipunctata, the maize orange leafhopper, is an ideal study organism for evaluating these topics because it can be mass-reared and it feeds on model plants such as rice ( Oryza sativa) and maize ( Zea mays). To reveal differences between gall inductions by C. bipunctata and other gall inducers, we conducted four experiments concerning (a) the relationship between the feeding site and gall-induction sites of C. bipunctata on maize, (b) the effects of leafhopper sex and density, (c) the effects of length of infestation on gall induction, and (d) the effects of continuous infestation. C. bipunctata did not induce galls on the leaves where it fed but induced galls on other leaves situated at more distal positions. The degree of gall induction was significantly correlated with infestation density and length. These results indicate that C. bipunctata induces galls in a dose-dependent manner on leaves distant from feeding sites, probably by injecting chemical(s) to the plant during feeding. We suggest that insect galls are induced by a chemical stimulus injected by gall inducers during feeding into the hosts.

  1. Variation in the Degree of Pectin Methylesterification during the Development of Baccharis dracunculifolia Kidney-Shaped Gall

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Denis Coelho; Magalhães, Thiago Alves; Ferreira, Bruno Garcia; Teixeira, Cristiane Trindade; Formiga, Anete Teixeira; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Insect galls may be study models to test the distribution of pectins and arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) and their related functions during plant cell cycles. These molecules are herein histochemically and immunocitochemically investigated in the kidney-shaped gall induced by Baccharopelma dracunculifoliae (Psyllidae) on leaves of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. (Asteraceae) on developmental basis. The homogalacturonans (HGAs) (labeled by JIM5) and the arabinans (labeled by LM6) were detected either in non-galled leaves or in young galls, and indicated stiffening of epidermal cell walls, which is an important step for cell redifferentiation. The labeling of HGAs by JIM7 changed from young to senescent stage, with an increase in the rigidity of cell walls, which is important for the acquaintance of the final gall shape and for the mechanical opening of the gall. The variation on the degree of HGAs during gall development indicated differential PMEs activity during gall development. The epitopes recognized by LM2 (AGP glycan) and LM5 (1–4-?-D-galactans) had poor alterations from non-galled leaves towards gall maturation and senescence. Moreover, the dynamics of pectin and AGPs on two comparable mature kidney-shaped galls on B. dracunculifolia and on B. reticularia revealed specific peculiarities. Our results indicate that similar gall morphotypes in cogeneric host species may present distinct cell responses in the subcelular level, and also corroborate the functions proposed in literature for HGAs. PMID:24747777

  2. A fully reproductive fighting morph in a soldier clade of gall-inducing thrips ( Oncothrips morrisi )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda D. Kranz; Michael P. Schwarz; Taryn E. Wills; Thomas W. Chapman; David C. Morris; Bernard J. Crespi

    2001-01-01

    We present the first life history data for Oncothrips morrisi, a species in a clade of haplodiploid, Australian gall-inducing thrips that has a micropteran fighting morph in the first generation of the gall. Micropterans in other species in the clade have lower fecundity than their mother, and these species are considered eusocial. There is no such reproductive skew in O.

  3. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Fig Flowers Provides Insights into Potential Mechanisms for Mutualism Stability and Gall Induction

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Ellen O.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.; Machado, Carlos A.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A striking property of the mutualism between figs and their pollinating wasps is that wasps consistently oviposit in the inner flowers of the fig syconium, which develop into galls that house developing larvae. Wasps typically do not use the outer ring of flowers, which develop into seeds. To better understand differences between gall and seed flowers, we used a metatranscriptomic approach to analyze eukaryotic gene expression within fig flowers at the time of oviposition choice and early gall development. Consistent with the unbeatable seed hypothesis, we found significant differences in gene expression between gall- and seed flowers in receptive syconia prior to oviposition. In particular, transcripts assigned to flavonoids and carbohydrate metabolism were significantly up-regulated in gall flowers relative to seed flowers. In response to oviposition, gall flowers significantly up-regulated the expression of chalcone synthase, which previously has been connected to gall formation in other plants. We propose several genes encoding proteins with signal peptides or associations with venom of other Hymenoptera as candidate genes for gall initiation or growth. This study simultaneously evaluates the gene expression profile of both mutualistic partners in a plant-insect mutualism and provides insight into a possible stability mechanism in the ancient fig-fig wasp association. PMID:26090817

  4. Gall Mite Molecular Phylogeny and its Relationship to the Evolution of Plant Host Specificity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Fenton; A. N. E. Birch; G. Malloch; P. G. Lanham; R. M. Brennan

    2000-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of all seven known species of Cecidophyopsis mites (Acari: Eriophyidae) with Ribes hosts have been inferred from ribosomal DNA sequences. This analysis found groups of closely related mites. The five gall-forming species, four of which are monophagous and one which has two hosts, were found in two groups. Another group consisted of the two non gall-forming species,

  5. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Fig Flowers Provides Insights into Potential Mechanisms for Mutualism Stability and Gall Induction.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Ellen O; Hackett, Jeremiah D; Machado, Carlos A; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A striking property of the mutualism between figs and their pollinating wasps is that wasps consistently oviposit in the inner flowers of the fig syconium, which develop into galls that house developing larvae. Wasps typically do not use the outer ring of flowers, which develop into seeds. To better understand differences between gall and seed flowers, we used a metatranscriptomic approach to analyze eukaryotic gene expression within fig flowers at the time of oviposition choice and early gall development. Consistent with the unbeatable seed hypothesis, we found significant differences in gene expression between gall- and seed flowers in receptive syconia prior to oviposition. In particular, transcripts assigned to flavonoids and carbohydrate metabolism were significantly up-regulated in gall flowers relative to seed flowers. In response to oviposition, gall flowers significantly up-regulated the expression of chalcone synthase, which previously has been connected to gall formation in other plants. We propose several genes encoding proteins with signal peptides or associations with venom of other Hymenoptera as candidate genes for gall initiation or growth. This study simultaneously evaluates the gene expression profile of both mutualistic partners in a plant-insect mutualism and provides insight into a possible stability mechanism in the ancient fig-fig wasp association. PMID:26090817

  6. DIVERSITY IN EUCALYPTUS SUSCEPTIBILITY TO THE GALL-FORMING WASP LEPTOCYBE INVASA

    E-print Network

    DIVERSITY IN EUCALYPTUS SUSCEPTIBILITY TO THE GALL-FORMING WASP LEPTOCYBE INVASA Prepared by Gudrun Dittrich-Schröder Leptocybe invasa is a gall-forming wasp attacking a variety of Eucalyptus species, hybrids and clones. This wasp is native to Australia and was unknown until it was noticed causing

  7. Altered host plant volatiles are proxies for sex pheromones in the gall wasp Antistrophus rufus

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    Altered host plant volatiles are proxies for sex pheromones in the gall wasp Antistrophus rufus location. Larvae of the gall wasp Antistrophus rufus Gillette (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) feed within studies revealed complete reproductive isolation between wasp subpopu- lations in the two plant species

  8. Histological Comparisons of Fergusobia/Fergusonina-Induced Galls on Different Myrtaceous Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Giblin-Davis, R. M.; Center, B. J.; Davies, K. A.; Purcell, M. F.; Scheffer, S. J.; Taylor, G. S; Goolsby, J.; Center, T. D.

    2004-01-01

    The putative mutualism between different host-specific Fergusobia nematodes and Fergusonina flies is manifested in a variety of gall types involving shoot or inflorescence buds, individual flower buds, stems, or young leaves in the plant family Myrtaceae. Different types of galls in the early-to-middle stages of development, with host-specific species of Fergusobia/Fergusonina, were collected from Australian members of the subfamily Leptospermoideae (six species of Eucalyptus, two species of Corymbia, and seven species of broad-leaved Melaleuca). Galls were sectioned and histologically examined to assess morphological changes induced by nematode/fly mutualism. The different gall forms were characterized into four broad categories: (i) individual flower bud, (ii) terminal and axial bud, (iii) 'basal rosette' stem, and (iv) flat leaf. Gall morphology in all four types appeared to result from species-specific selection of the oviposition site and timing and number of eggs deposited in a particular plant host. In all cases, early parasitism by Fergusobia/Fergusonina involved several layers of uninucleate, hypertrophied cells lining the lumen of each locule (gall chamber where each fly larva and accompanying nematodes develop). Hypertrophied cells in galls were larger than normal epidermal cells, and each had an enlarged nucleus, nucleolus, and granular cytoplasm that resembled shoot bud gall cells induced by nematodes in the Anguinidae. PMID:19262813

  9. The North American gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) of hackberries (Cannabaceae: Celtis spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-three species of gall midges occur exclusively on hackberries in North America north of Mexico. Twenty-one of them belong to Celticecis and form complex, dehiscent galls on leaves and the current year’s twigs. Celticecis are definitely known only from the typical subgenus of Celtis that is di...

  10. A new parasitoid of the Erythrina Gall Wasp, Quadrastichus erythrinae Kim (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN LA SALLE; MOHSEN RAMADAN; BERNARR R. KUMASHIRO

    Aprostocetus exertus La Salle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) is described as a parasitoid of the invasive Erythrina Gall Wasp, Quadrastichus erythrinae Kim (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae). The description is based on material originally collected in Tanzania and South Africa. This species is described because of its potential as a biological control agent against the Erythrina Gall Wasp.

  11. Symbiotic fungal flora in leaf galls induced by Illiciomyia yukawai (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) and in its mycangia.

    PubMed

    Kobune, Shun; Kajimura, Hisashi; Masuya, Hayato; Kubono, Takanori

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the association between a gall midge, Illiciomyia yukawai, and its symbiotic fungi on Japanese star anise, Illicium anisatum. The number of fungal species isolated from the galls increased with development of the galls, whereas those from the leaves showed a different trend. Botryosphaeria dothidea was dominant in the galls from June to October, and after that Phomopsis sp. 1, Colletotrichum sp., and Pestalotiopsis sp. became dominant. Although B. dothidea was not isolated from the leaves, it was detected from mycangia (abdominal sternite VII) of egg-laying adults at a high isolation frequency (>90%). However, B. dothidea was not isolated from mycangia of adults emerging from galls that were enclosed by plastic bags. This indicates that I. yukawai is closely associated with B. dothidea and that its newly emerged adults do not take the fungus into mycangia directly from the galls where they had developed. Also, the fungus from the fungal layers of ambrosia galls has less ability to propagate on artificial media despite the presence of its mycelial mass in mature galls. PMID:22015684

  12. Cytological and histochemical gradients on two Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Fabaceae)--Cecidomyiidae gall systems.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Denis Coelho; Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Magalhães, Thiago Alves; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2011-10-01

    Previous ultrastructural and histochemical analysis proposed patterns in the accumulation of substances in galls of Diptera: Cecidomyiidae in some plant species of the temperate region. Similar analyses were done to verify the conservativeness of these patterns in the Neotropical region, where a great number of species of Cecidomyiidae is responsible for a wide diversity of morphotypes. Two gall morphotypes induced by Cecidomyiidae in a unique host plant, Copaifera langsdorffii, were studied. The gradients of carbohydrates and the activity of invertases and acid phosphatases were similar, but the cytological gradients and distribution of proteins evidenced that the sites of the induction as well as the amount of neoformed tissues may be peculiar to each gall system. The production of lipids just in the secretory cavities either in the non-galled or galled tissues indicated a potentiality of the host plant which could not be manipulated by the galling insects. Further, the absence of nucleus in the nutritive tissue, an exclusive feature of the horn-shaped galls, indicates cell death attributed to the feeding habit of the galling herbivore. PMID:21207084

  13. Distinguishing intrapopulational categories of plants by their insect faunas: galls on rabbitbrush

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin D. Floate; G. Wilson Fernandes; Jan A. Nilsson

    1996-01-01

    Within a population of rubber rabbitbrush, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, the subspecies C. nauseosus consimilis and C. nauseosus hololeucus, and a third unidentified group were better segregated by their insect galls, than by differences in plant morphology. This level of segregation was further increased when morphological measurements and counts of insect galls were analyzed simultaneously. We interpret this result to mean that

  14. High-Temperature Galling Characteristics of TI6AL4V with and without Surface Treatments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Julian Blau; DONALD L ERDMAN; Evan Keith Ohriner; Brian C Jolly

    2011-01-01

    Galling is a severe form of surface damage in metals and alloys that typically arises under relatively high normal force and low sliding speed and in the absence of effective lubrication. It can lead to macroscopic surface roughening and seizure. The occurrence of galling can be especially problematic in high-temperature applications like diesel engine exhaust gas recirculation system components and

  15. Geology of Stone Mountain, Georgia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pamela Gore

    This virtual field trip to Stone Mountain Georgia includes both a narrative and photographs of such features as flow banding, tourmaline pods, and several types of xenoliths. Intrusive granite and diabase dikes are shown at both the east quarry and old route 78 locations where products of weathering such as saprolite, kaolinite, halloysite, and gibbsite reside. Photographs of an area of the east quarry taken six years apart show the progress of exfoliation. The site also has a list of references.

  16. The Matariki Stone of Rapanui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Anthropological studies of Rapanui (Easter Island) are valuable insofar as the island's remoteness allowed its culture to develop independently until western contact. Of special importance to cultural astronomers is the indigenous inhabitants' expressed interest in the sky, through lore, monumental architecture, and rock art. 1 The Matariki Stone is a unique basaltic boulder found on Rapanui; my analysis of it is the result of in situ investigation (2000). The boulder is 1 m x 1.5 m x 2 m in approximate size and weighs in excess of 10,000 kg. According to local informants, at least six cupules, averaging 6 cm in diameter and 5 cm in depth, were placed in it prior to western contact with the island and prior to transport to the boulder's present location. Information about the Matariki Stone's original setting, orientation, and context is lost. "Matariki" means "Pleiades" (or, more generally, a group of stars). However, the pattern of the Matariki Stone cupules strongly resembles another familiar asterism of third-magnitude stars. 2 These zodiac stars were placed significantly in the Rapanui sky of 1500 CE. Yet no local ethnographic evidence mentions these stars, nor is association with these stars and other regional cultures (e. g., Australian aboriginal and Mayan) compelling. 3 Moreover, there is no Polynesian tradition of constellation depiction in rock art at all, whereas the Pleiades figure prominently in that culture's oral tradition. 4 Thus, the Matariki Stone remains a conundrum. 1 Liller, William. The Ancient Solar Observatories of Rapanui: The Archaeoastronomy of Easter Island. (1993) 2 Hockey, Thomas and Hoffman, Alice. "An Archaeoastronomical Investigation: Does A Constellation Pattern Appear in Rapanui Rock Art?" Rapa Nui Journal. 14, no. 3. (2000) 3 For example, Kelly, David H. and Milone, Eugene F. Exploring Ancient Skies: An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy. (2005) 4 For example, Makemson, Maude. The Morning Star Rises. (1941)

  17. Taxonomy and molecular phylogeny of Daphnephila gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) inducing complex leaf galls on Lauraceae, with descriptions of five new species associated with Machilus thunbergii in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Makoto; Yang, Man-Miao; Yukawa, Junichi

    2008-05-01

    Five new species of the genus Daphnephila (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae: Asphondyliini), D. ornithocephala, D. stenocalia, D. sueyenae, D. taiwanensis, and D. truncicola, all associated with Machilus thunbergii (Lauraceae), are described from Taiwan, and one previously known species, D. machilicola, is redescribed from Japan. Among the five new species, D. truncicola induces stem galls and the other four species induce leaf galls. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene suggests that in this genus the stem-galling habit is a more ancestral state compared to the leaf-galling habit. Daphnephila seems to be of tropical origin and to have dispersed to Japan through Taiwan. PMID:18558807

  18. Matters of sex and gender in F. J. Gall's Organology: a primary approach.

    PubMed

    Cornel, Tabea

    2014-01-01

    The originator of phrenology, F. J. Gall (1758-1828), saw himself as a natural scientist and physiologist. His approach consisted of brain anatomy but also of palpating skulls and inferring mental faculties. Unlike some of the philosophical principles underlying Gall's work, his conception of sex/gender has not yet been examined in detail. In this article, I will focus on Gall's treatment of men and women, his idea of sex differences, and how far an assumed existence of dichotomous sexes influenced his work. In examining his primary writings, I will argue that Gall held some contradictory views concerning the origin and manifestation of sex/gender characteristics, which were caused by the collision of his naturalistic ideas and internalized gender stereotypes. I will conclude that Gall did not aim at deducing or legitimizing sex/gender relations scientifically, but that he tried to express metaphysical reasons for a given social order in terms of functional brain mechanisms. PMID:25144128

  19. The gall mite Aceria cladophthirus . I. Life-cycle, survival outside the gall and symptoms' expression on susceptible or resistant Solanum dulcamara plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Westphat; F. Dreger; R. Bronner

    1990-01-01

    The gall miteAceria cladophthirus (Nalepa) is able to survice outside its gall on detached leaves ofSolanum dulcamara L. kept under non-aseptic in-vitro conditions. The survival rate of the females on susceptible leaves is about 90% after 1 day and 85% for the following days. In contrast, on resistant leaves, less than 40$ survive after 1 day while necrotic local lesions

  20. Could the Extended Phenotype Extend to the Cellular and Subcellular Levels in Insect-Induced Galls?

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Pacheco, Priscilla; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Neo-ontogenesis of plant galls involves redifferentiation of host plant tissues to express new phenotypes, when new cell properties are established via structural-functional remodeling. Herein, Psidium cattleianum leaves and Nothotrioza cattleiani galls are analyzed by developmental anatomy, cytometry and immunocytochemistry of cell walls. We address hypothesis-driven questions concerning the organogenesis of globoid galls in the association of P. cattleianum - N. cattleianum, and P. myrtoides - N. myrtoidis. These double co-generic systems represent good models for comparing final gall shapes and cell lineages functionalities under the perspective of convergent plant-dependent or divergent insect-induced characteristics. Gall induction, and growth and development are similar in both galls, but homologous cell lineages exhibit divergent degrees of cell hypertrophy and directions of elongation. Median cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls hypertrophy the most, while in P. myrtoides galls there is a centrifugal gradient of cell hypertrophy. Cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls tend to anisotropy, while P. myrtoidis galls have isotropically hypertrophied cells. Immunocytochemistry evidences the chemical identity and functional traits of cell lineages: epidermal cells walls have homogalacturonans (HGAs) and galactans, which confer rigidity to sites of enhanced cell division; oil gland cell walls have arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) that help avoiding cell death; and parenchyma cell walls have HGAs, galactans and arabinans, which confer porosity. Variations in such chemical identities are related to specific sites of hypertrophy. Even though the double co-generic models have the same macroscopic phenotype, the globoid morphotype, current analyses indicate that the extended phenotype of N. cattleiani is substantiated by cellular and subcellular specificities. PMID:26053863

  1. Diet and renal stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between diet and the formation of renal stones is demonstrated, but restrictive diets do not take into account the complexity of metabolism and the complex mechanisms that regulate the saturation and crystallization processes in the urine. The restriction of dietary calcium can reduce the urinary excretion of calcium but severe dietary restriction of calcium causes hyperoxaluria and a progressive loss of bone mineral component. Furthermore urinary calcium excretion is influenced by other nutrients than calcium as sodium, potassium, protein and refined carbohydrates. Up to 40% of the daily excretion of oxalate in the urine is from dietary source, but oxalate absorption in the intestine depends linearly on the concomitant dietary intake of calcium and is influenced by the bacterial degradation by several bacterial species of intestinal flora. A more rational approach should be based on the cumulative effects of foods and different dietary patterns on urinary saturation rather than on the effect of single nutrients. A diet based on a adequate intake of calcium (1000-1200 mg per day) and containment of animal protein and salt can decrease significantly urinary supersaturation for calcium oxalate and reduce the relative risk of stone recurrence in hypercalciuric renal stone formers. The DASH-style diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, moderate in low-fat dairy products and low in animal proteins and salt is associated with a lower relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate and a marked decrease in risk of incident stone formation. All the diets above mentioned have as a common characteristic the reduction of the potential acid load of the diet that can be correlated with a higher risk of recurrent nephrolithiasis, because the acid load of diet is inversely related to urinary citrate excretion. The restriction of protein and salt with an adequate calcium intake seem to be advisable but should be implemented with the advice to increase the intake of vegetables that can carry a plentiful supply of alkali that counteract the acid load coming from animal protein. New prospective studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the diet for the prevention of renal stones should be oriented to simple dietary advices that should be focused on a few specific goals easily controlled by means of self-evaluation tools, such as the LAKE food screener. PMID:23392537

  2. 6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE TO LEFT OF STONES ADJUSTS SPACE BETWEEN STONES, THUS CONTROLING FINENESS OF FLOUR. STONE CRANE AT RIGHT USED TO LIFT STONES FOR DRESSING). OTHER EQUIPMENT NOT IDENTIFIED. NOTE STAIRS IN LEFT REAR. - Hildebrand's Mill, Flint, Delaware County, OK

  3. Fluoride metabolism and fluoride content of stones from children with endemic vesical stones.

    PubMed

    Teotia, M; Rodgers, A; Teotia, S P; Wandt, A E; Nath, M

    1991-10-01

    Twenty children with endemic vesical stones showed normal plasma and urinary excretion of fluoride on a mean fluoride intake of 2.5 +/- 0.8 mg/24 h. The mean fluoride content of the stones obtained from these children was 315.6 +/- 264.9 micrograms/g in the nucleus and 229.9 +/- 212.8 micrograms/g in the periphery (this was not statistically significant). Calcium-containing stones had a higher fluoride content than stones containing uric acid and ammonium urate. It was concluded that children with endemic vesical stones have normal fluoride metabolism. Trace quantities of fluoride present equally in the nucleus and peripheral parts of the stones suggest that fluoride does not cause initiation or growth of the nucleus of vesical stones and is adventitiously deposited with calcium salts in these stones. PMID:1933167

  4. OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY ·Sedimentation ·Phosphorus and nutrient loading ·Harmful algal blooms LABORATORY Blue-green Algae Bloom circa 1971, Lake Erie Photo: Forsythe and Reutter OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE

  5. Use of Potassium Citrate to Reduce the Risk of Renal Stone Formation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Jones, J. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hudson, E. K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: NASA s Vision for Space Exploration centers on exploration class missions including the goals of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. One of NASA s objectives is to focus research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect crewmembers during long duration voyages. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes in the urinary chemical composition favoring urinary supersaturation and an increased risk of stone formation. Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and development of a renal stone is significantly influenced by both dietary and environmental factors. Previous results from long duration Mir and short duration Shuttle missions have shown decreased urine volume, pH, and citrate levels and increased calcium. Citrate, an important inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, binds with urinary calcium reducing the amount of calcium available to form stones. Citrate inhibits renal stone recurrence by preventing crystal growth, aggregation, and nucleation and is one of the most common therapeutic agents used to prevent stone formation. Methods: Thirty long duration crewmembers (29 male, 1 female) participated in this study. 24-hour urines were collected and dietary monitoring was performed pre, in, and postflight. Crewmembers in the treatment group received two potassium citrate (KCIT) pills, 10 mEq/pill, ingested daily beginning 3 days before launch, all inflight days and through 14 days postflight. Urinary biochemical and dietary analyses were completed. Results: KCIT treated subjects exhibited decreased urinary calcium excretion and maintained the levels of calcium oxalate supersaturation risk at their preflight levels. The increased urinary pH levels in these subjects reduced the risk of uric acid stones. Discussion: The current study investigated the use of potassium citrate as a countermeasure to minimize the risk of stone formation during ISS missions. Results suggest that supplementation with potassium citrate decreases the risk of stone formation during and immediately after spaceflight.

  6. Management of common bile duct stones with a biliary endoprosthesis. Report on 40 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, R; Macmathuna, P; Lombard, M; Karani, J; Westaby, D

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of a biliary endoprosthesis has been proposed for the management of choledocholithiasis when stone extraction is difficult or considered hazardous. Over a two year period this approach was used in 40 such patients. There were 24 women and 16 men with a median age of 76 years. In seven patients with severe cholangitis no attempt was made to extract the stones. Twenty three (57.5%) patients underwent a sphincterotomy and four (10%) needle knife papillotomy. The endoprosthesis insertion was considered a temporary measure in 13 (32.5%) patients and definitive treatment in 27 (67.5%). Bile duct drainage was established in all patients. Early complications occurred in six patients (15%), but were without sequelae. Late complications developed in eight (20%) of the patients and included biliary colic (four), cholangitis (three), and cholecystitis (one). Two patients (one cholangitis and one cholecystitis) died as a consequence of the complication. Only patients without a sphincterotomy developed cholangitis. A total of eight patients (20%) underwent surgery (one as an emergency) and nine a repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (two as an emergency) to clear the duct. The remaining 23 patients are asymptomatic at a median of 13 months (range five to 24 months). Biliary endoprosthesis insertion for choledocholithiasis is an important alternative means of establishing drainage in selected cases, and is probably the optimum method of management for the elderly and or debilitated patients with previous cholecystectomy. Caution must be exercised, however, in patients with an in situ gall bladder. PMID:1446871

  7. Is a Gall an Extended Phenotype of the Inducing Insect? A Comparative Study of Selected Morphological and Physiological Traits of Leaf and Stem Galls on Machilus thunbergii (Lauraceae) Induced by Five Species of Daphnephila (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Northeastern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang-Yu; Chen, Wen-Neng; Chiu, Shau-Ting; Raman, Anantanarayanan; Chiang, Tung-Chuang; Yang, Man-Miao

    2015-06-01

    Mature galls induced by Daphnephila truncicola, D. taiwanensis, D. sueyenae, D. stenocalia, and D. ornithocephala on Machilus thunbergii in northern Taiwan were examined to verify the dictum that the morphology of galls is an expression of the extended phenotype of the respective gall-inducing insect. Based on their length-width ratio, the materials were grouped into either fleshy (those induced by D. taiwanensis and D. sueyenae) or slim galls (those induced by D. truncicola, D. stenocalia, and D. ornithocephala). Stem galls induced by D. truncicola showed an energy level of 0.0178 kJ/g. Among leaf galls, the greatest energy level was in the one induced by D. stenocalia (0.0193 kJ/g), followed by D. sueyenae (0.0192 kJ/g), D. taiwanensis (0.0189 kJ/g), and D. ornithocephala (0.0160 kJ/g). The numbers of reserve and nutritive cell layers in galls were greater in the stem galls induced by D. truncicola, similar to those in the fleshy leaf galls, than in the slim leaf galls. Based on the fungal taxa isolated from the larval chambers and considering the similarities and divergences among gall characteristics, the galls induced by D. truncicola and D. taiwanensis clustered into one, whereas those of D. sueyenae aligned with the 'D. stenocalia-D. ornithocephala' cluster. The present study verified that shapes, structure, nutritive tissues, energy levels, and multiple coexisting fungal taxa within galls reinforce that they are extended phenotypes of the respective gall-inducing Daphnephila species and they represent adaptive evolution of Daphnephila on M. thunbergii. PMID:26003988

  8. What I Need to Know about Kidney Stones

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on the type of kidney stone you had: Calcium Oxalate Stones reduce sodium reduce animal protein, such as ... Kidney stones are caused by high levels of calcium, oxalate, and phosphorus in the urine. You may have ...

  9. Rampant host- and defensive phenotype-associated diversification in a goldenrod gall midge.

    PubMed

    Stireman, J O; Devlin, H; Abbot, P

    2012-10-01

    Natural selection can play an important role in the genetic divergence of populations and their subsequent speciation. Such adaptive diversification, or ecological speciation, might underlie the enormous diversity of plant-feeding insects that frequently experience strong selection pressures associated with host plant use as well as from natural enemies. This view is supported by increasing documentation of host-associated (genetic) differentiation in populations of plant-feeding insects using alternate hosts. Here, we examine evolutionary diversification in a single nominal taxon, the gall midge Asteromyia carbonifera (O.S.), with respect to host plant use and gall phenotype. Because galls can be viewed as extended defensive phenotypes of the midges, gall morphology is likely to be a reflection of selective pressures by enemies. Using phylogenetic and comparative analyses of mtDNA and nuclear sequence data, we find evidence that A. carbonifera populations are rapidly diversifying along host plant and gall morphological lines. At a broad scale, geography explains surprisingly little genetic variation, and there is little evidence of strict co-cladogenesis with their Solidago hosts. Gall morphology is relatively labile, distinct gall morphs have evolved repeatedly and colonized multiple hosts, and multiple genetically and morphologically distinct morphs frequently coexist on a single host plant species. These results suggest that Asteromyia carbonifera is in the midst of an adaptive radiation driven by multitrophic selective pressures. Similar complex community pressures are likely to play a role in the diversification of other herbivorous insect groups. PMID:22882228

  10. Comparative anatomy of gall development on Gypsophila paniculata induced by bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Chalupowicz, L; Barash, I; Schwartz, M; Aloni, R; Manulis, S

    2006-07-01

    Galls induced on Gypsophila paniculata by Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae (Pag) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At), bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity, were compared morphologically and anatomically. The pathogenicity of Pag is dependent on the presence of an indigenous plasmid that harbors hrp gene cluster, genes encoding Hop virulence proteins and biosynthetic genes for auxin (IAA) and cytokinins (CKs), whereas that of At involves host transformation. The Pag-induced gall was rough, brittle and exhibited limited growth, in contrast to the smooth, firm appearance and continuous growth of the At-induced gall. Anatomical analysis revealed the presence of cells with enlarged nuclei and multiple nucleoli, giant cells and suberin deposition in Pag that were absent from At-induced galls. Although circular vessels were observed in both gall types, they were more numerous and the vascular system was more organized in At. An aerenchymal tissue was observed in the upper part of the galls. Ethylene emission from Pag galls, recorded 6 days after inoculation, was eight times as great as that from non-infected controls. In contrast, a significant decrease in ethylene production was observed in Gypsophila cuttings infected with Pag mutants deficient in IAA and CK production. The results presented are best accounted for by the two pathogens having distinct pathogenicity mechanisms that lead to their differential recognition by the host as non-self (Pag) and self (At). PMID:16477460

  11. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gall bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Hari Shankar; Sirohi, Bhawna; Behari, Anu; Sharma, Atul; Majumdar, Jahar; Ganguly, Manomoy; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Sandeep; Saini, Sunil; Sahni, Peush; Singh, Tomcha; Kapoor, Vinay Kumar; Sucharita, V.; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.All postcholecystectomy gallbladder specimens should be opened and examined carefully by the operating surgeon and be sent for histopathological examination.All “incidental” gall bladder cancers (GBCs) picked up on histopathological examination should have an expert opinion.Evaluation of a patient with early GBC should include essential tests: A computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests. magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For early stage disease (up to Stage IVA), surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment would be guided by the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.Patients with Stage IVB/metastatic disease must be assessed for palliative e.g. endoscopic or radiological intervention, chemotherapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. These patients do not require extensive workup outside of a clinical trial setting.There is an urgent need for multicenter trials from India covering various aspects of epidemiology (viz., identification of population at high-risk, organized follow-up), clinical management (viz., bile spill during surgery, excision of all port sites, adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapy) and basic research (viz., what causes GBC).

  12. Agrocinopine A, a phosphorylated opine is secreted from crown gall cells

    PubMed Central

    Messens, E.; Lenaerts, A.; Hedges, R. W.; Montagu, M. Van

    1985-01-01

    We showed that phosphorus-containing metabolites of crown gall tissues were all taken up by appropriate pTi+ agrobacteria. All but one were also taken up by pTi- bacteria. This one compound, produced by nopaline-, but not by octopine-type tumours, was the only phosphorylated organic compound actively secreted by healthy crown gall cells, and it appears to be agrocinopine A. Testing crown gall cell exudates may be a general procedure for the identification of opines by transformed plant cells. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:15926217

  13. Obituary: Ronald Cecil Stone, 1946-2005

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice Kay Babcock Monet

    2006-01-01

    Ronald C. Stone, an astronomer at the US Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, passed away on 10 September 2005 in Downer's Grove, IL, following a valiant struggle with cancer. He was fifty-nine years old. Ron was born on 9 June 1946 in Seattle, Washington, to Helen (Vocelka) and Cecil Stone. His father was a World War II veteran who attended college

  14. Stone cutting automation technology based on features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julio Garrido Campos; Ricardo Marin Martin; Jose Ignacio Armesto; Juan Saez Lopez

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a CAD\\/CAM\\/CNC architecture to automate saw blade stone cutting machines (disc stone cutting machines). The architecture is designed to give the controller the capacity of decision making as well as control of the machine tool, with the objective of being able to react to changes in the machining conditions, which is common in this kind technology. Adopting

  15. STONE DUALITY, TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA, AND RECOGNITION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STONE DUALITY, TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA, AND RECOGNITION MAI GEHRKE Abstract. Our main result is that any topological algebra based on a Boolean space is the extended Stone dual space of a certain associated Boolean algebra with additional operations. A particular case of this result is that the profinite

  16. Briles WE, Stone HA, Coke R K, 1977. Effects of B histocompatibility alloalleles in resistant and susceptible chicken lines. Science 195:193-195

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in resistant and susceptible chicken lines. Science 195:193-195 Briles WE, Briles RW, Gibbon WH, Stone HA, 1980 Mazzella 0, Cauchy L, Coudert F, Richard J, 1986. Chicken thymocyte-specific antigens identified's disease chicken. Hybridoma 5:sous-presse Pazderka FB, Longenecker FBM, Law GRJ, Stone HA, Ruth RF, 1975

  17. 9 CFR 95.17 - Glands, organs, ox gall, and like materials; requirements for unrestricted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...unrestricted entry. Glands, organs, ox gall or bile, bone marrow, and various like materials derived from domestic ruminants or swine, intended for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products shall not be imported except subject to...

  18. Leaf-Mining and Gall-Forming Insects: Tools for Teaching Population Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Valerie K.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the use of leaf mines (formed by larvae of small moths or flies) and galls (wasps' larvae) in various insect population studies. Also considers the advantages of using these structures for instructional purposes. (DH)

  19. 9 CFR 95.17 - Glands, organs, ox gall, and like materials; requirements for unrestricted entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...unrestricted entry. Glands, organs, ox gall or bile, bone marrow, and various like materials derived from domestic ruminants or swine, intended for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products shall not be imported except subject to...

  20. Do Cecidomyiidae galls of Aspidosperma spruceanum (Apocynaceae) fit the pre-established cytological and histochemical patterns?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Denis Coelho; Magalhães, Thiago Alves; Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves Silva; Alvim, Marina Neiva; Isaias, Rosy Mary Santos

    2010-06-01

    Cecidomyiidae galls commonly present a zonation of tissues with lignified cell layers externally limiting a reserve tissue and internally limiting a specialized nutritive tissue next to the larval chamber. The cytological aspects of this specialized tissue indicate high metabolic activity as well as carbohydrate accumulation. In Aspidosperma spruceanum-Cecidomyiidae gall system, ultrastructural and histochemical investigations corroborated this pattern and also revealed the storage of proteins in the nutritive cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), callose, and pectin accumulation were related to the feeding activity of the galling herbivore. Phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, acid phosphatases, invertases, and sucrose synthase activities were detected for the first time, in the Neotropical region, and discussed in relation to gall maintenance and the feeding activity of the Cecidomyiidae. PMID:20306094

  1. A remarkable career in science-Joseph G. Gall.

    PubMed

    Endow, Sharyn A; Nizami, Zehra F; Gerbi, Susan A

    2013-07-01

    A festive group of ?150 current and former students, postdoctoral and other associates, and colleagues gathered during the weekend of April 12-14, 2013 to celebrate Joe Gall's 85th birthday. The gathering, hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Embryology (Allan Spradling, Director) and organized by a group of Joe's current and former students (Zehra Nizami, Alison Singer, Ji-Long Liu, Virginia Zakian, Susan Gerbi), was held in Baltimore, MD. Dinners and symposia extending over 3 days celebrated Joe's scientific findings over the years, together with those of his former students, postdoctoral fellows, and other associates (see program at https://sites.google.com/site/gallsymposium2013/ ). PMID:23828690

  2. The solidification and welding metallurgy of galling-resistant stainless steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. V. Robino; J. R. Michael; M. C. Maguire

    1998-01-01

    The autogenous welding behavior of two commercial galling-resistant austenitic stainless steels, Nitronic 60 and Gall-Tough, was evaluated and compared. The solidification behavior and fusion zone hot-cracking tendency of the alloys was evaluated by using differential thermal analysis, Varestraint testing and laser spot-welding trials. Gleeble thermal cycle simulations were used to assess the hot ductility of the alloys during both on-heating

  3. After the Bell: Bringing the Outside In--Insects and their galls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beverly A. Joyce

    2003-01-01

    Gall systems are excellent tools for teaching biology. They demonstrate important concepts such as genetic control, plant and animal development, species interactions, biodiversity, and the flow of energy through the food web. Galls, and the animals that attack them, make for a self-contained and somewhat tractable community for study. In this month's column, background information, inquiry-based procedures, and safety notes are provided for students to embark on an investigation of these fascinating systems.

  4. Heat Tolerance and Aging of the Anhydrobiotic Seed Gall Nematode with SEM Observations.

    PubMed

    Eisenback, J D; Wei, Ma; Roane, C W

    2013-03-01

    The seed gall nematode, Anguina agrostis, feeds and reproduces within the developing ovaries of bentgrass seeds and overwinters in seed galls as anhydrobiotic juveniles. These dormant juveniles can survive within the seed gall for many years. In this dehydrated state, they are more tolerant to extreme environmental conditions than are their hydrated counterparts. Nematodes in seed galls were exposed to various high temperatures (80 to 160°C) for time intervals of 5 to 30 min. Survival decreased as time and temperature increased. Remarkably, these nematodes survived exposure to 155°C for 5 min, higher than that recorded for any other metazoan. In contrast, seed galls that had been stored at room temperature and humidity for 5 yr also survived exposure to extreme temperatures; however, their survival rates were not as high as those for freshly collected galls. Juveniles within the seed gall were coiled and grouped together conforming to the shape of the seed gall. The gross morphology of the cuticle of the juveniles was very smooth and relatively undistorted by the shrinkage from the loss water from their body tissues. Wherever the nematodes were cut with a razor blade, a small amount of their contents oozed out of the opening and coalesced with that of other nearby specimens and appeared gel-like. Elucidation of the mechanisms that enable these nematodes to remain viable after exposure to extreme heat remains a mystery. Understanding the changes that occur in these nematodes as they rehydrate and return to life from an ametabolic state may have major impacts on the life sciences, including insights into the answer of the age-old question: "What is life?" PMID:23589659

  5. Heat Tolerance and Aging of the Anhydrobiotic Seed Gall Nematode with SEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Eisenback, J. D.; Wei, Ma; Roane, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    The seed gall nematode, Anguina agrostis, feeds and reproduces within the developing ovaries of bentgrass seeds and overwinters in seed galls as anhydrobiotic juveniles. These dormant juveniles can survive within the seed gall for many years. In this dehydrated state, they are more tolerant to extreme environmental conditions than are their hydrated counterparts. Nematodes in seed galls were exposed to various high temperatures (80 to 160°C) for time intervals of 5 to 30 min. Survival decreased as time and temperature increased. Remarkably, these nematodes survived exposure to 155°C for 5 min, higher than that recorded for any other metazoan. In contrast, seed galls that had been stored at room temperature and humidity for 5 yr also survived exposure to extreme temperatures; however, their survival rates were not as high as those for freshly collected galls. Juveniles within the seed gall were coiled and grouped together conforming to the shape of the seed gall. The gross morphology of the cuticle of the juveniles was very smooth and relatively undistorted by the shrinkage from the loss water from their body tissues. Wherever the nematodes were cut with a razor blade, a small amount of their contents oozed out of the opening and coalesced with that of other nearby specimens and appeared gel-like. Elucidation of the mechanisms that enable these nematodes to remain viable after exposure to extreme heat remains a mystery. Understanding the changes that occur in these nematodes as they rehydrate and return to life from an ametabolic state may have major impacts on the life sciences, including insights into the answer of the age-old question: “What is life?” PMID:23589659

  6. Cytological and histochemical gradients on two Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Fabaceae)—Cecidomyiidae gall systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Coelho de Oliveira; Renê Gonçalves da Silva Carneiro; Thiago Alves Magalhães; Rosy Mary dos Santos Isaias

    Previous ultrastructural and histochemical analysis proposed patterns in the accumulation of substances in galls of Diptera:\\u000a Cecidomyiidae in some plant species of the temperate region. Similar analyses were done to verify the conservativeness of\\u000a these patterns in the Neotropical region, where a great number of species of Cecidomyiidae is responsible for a wide diversity\\u000a of morphotypes. Two gall morphotypes induced

  7. Written in Stone Earthquake Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeff Sale, EdCenter Staff Scientist

    This group of brief animations shows destructive phenomena related to earthquakes and provides some advice on mitigating their effects. The collection includes an animation of Rayleigh waves, showing the reverse elliptical motion that makes them especially damaging; a demonstration of the difference in wave propagation and amplitude between hard rock and unconsolidated sediment; and an animation showing the relationship between earthquake magnitude and fault movement on the San Andreas Fault. For homeowners, there are animations depicting an unsecured cripple wall and chimney failure, with suggestions for strengthening these components. There are also animations of fault movement that occurred during specific earthquakes, including the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the 1992 Landers earthquake, and the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The animations were developed for the educational video "Written in Stone," a project funded by and developed for the California Seismic Safety Commission.

  8. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  9. Molecular Logic: Browsing Stepping Stones

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by the Concord Consortium with support from the National Science Foundation, the goal of the Molecular Logic website is "to develop students' understanding of molecules, their interactions and the consequences of these interactions." The researchers and specialists in charge of the site have selected ten physical-chemical principles that underlie many biological processes. They call them "Molecular Stepping Stones", and the site includes entry-level model-based activities for each of these steps. Some of the steps have multiple parts, and visitors will note that each section includes an interactive activity and notes for teachers. Some of the subjects covered here include molecular folding, chemical reactions, and the structure and function in proteins.

  10. A "Rosetta Stone" for AViz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Joan; Glanz, Hila; Izrael, Nadir

    The Computational Physics group at the Technion has developed a visualization code, AViz, for atomistic visualization. AViz can visualize atoms, vector spins, quadrupoles, electronic densities, polymers and more. The required input of data files in the standard .xyz format can be prepared from a wide range of private and public domain simulation codes; and in the event that these are not the natural output of the code, conversion can be made. In order to extend its use, especially for industrial simulations, it is highly desirable to simplify the translation from simulation output to visualization input. We describe some steps towards the goal of providing a "Rosetta Stone" for such translation that can lead to better understanding. A recent simulation of liquid crystals is used as an example.

  11. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  12. Prophylactic effects of quercetin and hyperoside in a calcium oxalate stone forming rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Yun-fei; Feng, Yuan; Peng, Bo; Che, Jian-ping; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-hua

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin and hyperoside (QH) are the two main constituents of the total flavone glycosides of Flos Abelmoschus manihot, which has been prescribed for treating chronic kidney disease for decades. This study aimed to investigate the effect of QH on calcium oxalate (CaOx) formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-fed rats. Rats were divided into three groups: an untreated stone-forming group, a QH-treated stone-forming group (20 mg/kg/day) and a potassium citrate-treated stone-forming group (potassium citrate was a worldwide-recognized calculi-prophylactic medicine). Ethylene glycol (0.5 %) was administered to the rats during the last week, and vitamin D3 was force-fed to induce hyperoxaluria and kidney calcium oxalate crystal deposition. 24 h urine samples were collected before and after inducing crystal deposits. Rats were killed and both kidneys were harvested after 3 weeks. Bisected kidneys were examined under a polarized light microscope for semi-quantification of the crystal-formation. The renal tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were measured by Western blot. QH and potassium citrate have the ability to alkalinize urine. The number of crystal deposits decreased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group as compared to the other groups. Superoxide dismutase and catalase levels also increased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group, as compared with the untreated stone-forming group. QH administration has an inhibitory effect on the deposition of CaOx crystal in EG-fed rats and may be effective for preventing stone-forming disease. PMID:25085199

  13. High-Temperature Galling Characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V with and without Surface Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Galling is a severe form of surface damage in metals and alloys that typically arises under relatively high normal force, low-sliding speed, and in the absence of effective lubrication. It can lead to macroscopic surface roughening and seizure. The occurrence of galling can be especially problematic in high-temperature applications like diesel engine exhaust gas recirculation system components and adjustable turbocharger vanes, because suitable lubricants may not be available, moisture desorption promotes increased adhesion, and the yield strength of metals decreases with temperature. Oxidation can counteract these effects to some extent by forming lubricative oxide films. Two methods to improve the galling resistance of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were investigated: (a) applying an oxygen diffusion treatment, and (b) creating a metal-matrix composite with TiB2 using a high-intensity infrared heating source. A new, oscillating three-pin-on-flat, high-temperature test method was developed and used to characterize galling behavior relative to a cobalt-based alloy (Stellite 6B ). The magnitude of the oscillating torque, the surface roughness, and observations of surface damage were used as measures of galling resistance. Owing to the formation of lubricative oxide films, the galling resistance of the Ti-alloy at 485o C, even non-treated, was considerably better than it was at room temperature. The IR-formed composite displayed reduced surface damage and lower torque than the substrate titanium alloy.

  14. 'Candidatus Phytoplasmas pruni', a novel taxon associated with X-disease of stone fruits, Prunus spp.: multilocus characterization based on 16S rRNA, secY, and ribosomal protein genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    X-disease is one of the most serious diseases known in peach (Prunus persica). Based on RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, peach X-disease phytoplasma strains from eastern and western United States and eastern Canada were classified in 16S rDNA RFLP group 16SrIII, subgroup A. Phylogenetic a...

  15. Hounsfield Units on Computed Tomography Predict Calcium Stone Subtype Composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sutchin R. Patel; George Haleblian; Gyan Pareek

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Hounsfield unit (HU) determination of urinary stones on noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) has been shown to predict stone composition. However, no in vivo studies have attempted to radiographically separate the various calcium stone compositions. We investigate the efficacy of HU measurement on NCCT to determine if it can differentiate the various calcium stone subtypes. Patients and Methods: Of the

  16. Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Who deciphered the Rosetta Stone and the Egyptian hieroglyphs? The usual answer is Jean-François Champollion, beginning in 1822. But ever since that time, Egyptologists have debated the role of his rival, the polymath Thomas Young, the first person to publish a partially correct translation of the Rosetta Stone. A recent BBC television dramatisation rekindled the controversy by presenting Champollion as a 'lone genius' who succeeded independently of Young. While there is no doubt that Champollion deciphered the hieroglyphic script as a whole, the evidence suggests that Young's early detailed study of the Rosetta Stone created the conceptual framework that made possible Champollion's later breakthrough. PMID:17583792

  17. Genetic analysis of nonpathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants arising in crown gall tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, C; Canfield, M L; Moore, L W; Dion, P

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of the host on the genetic stability of bacterial plant pathogens. Crown gall, a plant disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, may represent a useful model to study this effect. Indeed, our previous observations on the natural occurrence and origin of nonpathogenic agrobacteria suggest that the host plant might induce loss of pathogenicity in populations of A. tumefaciens. Here we report that five different A. tumefaciens strains initially isolated from apple tumors produced up to 99% nonpathogenic mutants following their reintroduction into axenic apple plants. Two of these five strains were also found to produce mutants on pear and/or blackberry plants. Generally, the mutants of the apple isolate D10B/87 were altered in the tumor-inducing plasmid, harboring either deletions in this plasmid or point mutations in the regulatory virulence gene virG. Most of the mutants originating from the same tumor appeared to be of clonal origin, implying that the host plants influenced agrobacterial populations by favoring growth of nonpathogenic mutants over that of wild-type cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by coinoculation of apple rootstocks with strain D10B/87 and a nonpathogenic mutant. PMID:7601840

  18. Salivary stones: symptoms, aetiology, biochemical composition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kraaij, S; Karagozoglu, K H; Forouzanfar, T; Veerman, E C I; Brand, H S

    2014-12-01

    Salivary stones, also known as sialoliths, are calcified concrements in the salivary glands. Sialoliths are more frequently located in the submandibular gland (84%), than in the parotid gland (13%). The majority of the submandibular stones are located in Wharton's duct (90%), whereas parotid stones are more often located in the gland itself. Salivary stones consist of an amorphous mineralised nucleus, surrounded by concentric laminated layers of organic and inorganic substances. The organic components of salivary stones include collagen, glycoproteins, amino acids and carbohydrates. The major inorganic components are hydroxyapatite, carbonate apatite, whitlockite and brushite. The management of salivary stones is focused on removing the salivary stones and preservation of salivary gland function which depends on the size and location of the stone. Conservative management of salivary stones consists of salivary gland massage and the use of sialogogues. Other therapeutic options include removal of the stone or in some cases surgical removal of the whole salivary gland. PMID:25476659

  19. Galling by Rhopalomyia solidaginis alters Solidago altissima architecture and litter nutrient dynamics in an old-field ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Crutsinger, Greg [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Habenicht, Melissa N [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Schweitzer, Jennifer A [ORNL; Sanders, Dr. Nathan James [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    Plant-insect interactions can alter ecosystem processes, especially if the insects modify plant architecture, quality, or the quantity of leaf litter inputs. In this study, we investigated the interactions between the gall midge Rhopalomyia solidaginis and tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima, to quantify the degree to which the midge alters plant architecture and how the galls affect rates of litter decomposition and nutrient release in an old-field ecosystem. R. solidaginis commonly leads to the formation of a distinct apical rosette gall on S. altissima and approximately 15% of the ramets in a S. altissima patch were galled (range: 3-34%). Aboveground biomass of galled ramets was 60% higher and the leaf area density was four times greater on galled leaf tissue relative to the portions of the plant that were not affected by the gall. Overall decomposition rate constants did not differ between galled and ungalled leaf litter. However, leaf-litter mass loss was lower in galled litter relative to ungalled litter, which was likely driven by modest differences in initial litter chemistry; this effect diminished after 12 weeks of decomposition in the field. The proportion of N remaining was always higher in galled litter than in ungalled litter at each collection date indicating differential release of nitrogen in galled leaf litter. Several studies have shown that plant-insect interactions on woody species can alter ecosystem processes by affecting the quality or quantity of litter inputs. Our results illustrate how plant-insect interactions in an herbaceous species can affect ecosystem processes by altering the quality and quantity of litter inputs. Given that S. altissima dominates fields and roadsides and that R. solidaginis galls are highly abundant throughout eastern North America, these interactions are likely to be important for both the structure and function of old-field ecosystems.

  20. The nutrition consult for recurrent stone formers.

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L

    2015-07-01

    Diet is implicated in stone formation and growth. Whether alone or in concert with pharmacologics, dietary changes may be useful in reducing recurrence but only when they correct dietary stone-forming risks. Patients benefit from recommendations individualized to their food preferences as well as to lifestyle, age, food knowledge and access, preparation skills, and cultural and ethnic identities. Urologists can provide general dietary recommendations but often lack the time to provide the full complement of individualized nutrition care offered by a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). Urologists can partner with and refer patients to a RDN for any component of the nutrition care process: assessment of diet, diagnosis of dietary factors that contribute to stone risk factors, intervention formulation and implementation, and monitoring the effectiveness of the intervention and modifying it as needed to maintain suitably low dietary risk for stone recurrence. PMID:26025494

  1. Kitkahahki Chipped Stone Technologies: A Comparative Study

    E-print Network

    Asher, Brendon Patrick

    2009-06-11

    The decades around 1800 A.D. witnessed dramatic changes in material culture and technology among Central Plains tribes. About this time, the rapidity of change in and transition from traditional chipped stone technologies was unprecedented...

  2. Ambient temperature as a contributor to kidney stone formation: implications of global warming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J Fakheri; David S Goldfarb

    2011-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease across the world that is becoming more prevalent. Although the underlying cause for most stones is not known, a body of literature suggests a role of heat and climate as significant risk factors for lithogenesis. Recently, estimates from computer models predicted up to a 10% increase in the prevalence rate in the next half century

  3. When should one perform shockwave lithotripsy for lower caliceal stones?

    PubMed

    Ilker, Y; Tarcan, T; Akdas, A

    1995-12-01

    Extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy of lower caliceal stones is often unrewarding because of the difficulty of passing stone fragments. We report our results in SWL of lower pole stones in 219 patients and compare them with the results of SWL of middle (82 patients) and upper pole (85 patients) stones. The stone-free rate of SWL monotherapy was found to be 59%, 77%, and 64% in lower, middle, and upper caliceal stones, respectively. In lower pole stones, SWL was unsuccessful in 41% of the patients, of whom 9% had minimal residual asymptomatic stones (less than 4 mm in greatest diameter). In comparison with the results of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCN) of lower pole urolithiasis in the literature, SWL was unsuccessful in large stones, with stone-free rates of 13% and 0 when the stone size was 3 to 4.9 cm2 and > 5 cm2, respectively. A stone-free rate of 82% when the stone burden was < 1 cm2 is similar to the PCN results of other centers, suggesting that SWL may be the first choice of treatment in lower pole stones of this size. We achieved a stone-free rate of 59% when the stone size was between 1 and 3 cm2, which is lower than the stone-free rates of PCN in the literature. In spite of its lower stone-free rates, SWL, with its lower morbidity, may still be considered an acceptable treatment modality in this range of moderate stone burden, especially when there is a patient desire for conservative treatment. PMID:8775070

  4. Stepping stones in DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stranneheim, Henrik; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there have been tremendous advances in our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively sequence DNA. This has revolutionized the fields of genetics and biology, leading to a deeper understanding of the molecular events in life processes. The rapid technological advances have enormously expanded sequencing opportunities and applications, but also imposed strains and challenges on steps prior to sequencing and in the downstream process of handling and analysis of these massive amounts of sequence data. Traditionally, sequencing has been limited to small DNA fragments of approximately one thousand bases (derived from the organism's genome) due to issues in maintaining a high sequence quality and accuracy for longer read lengths. Although many technological breakthroughs have been made, currently the commercially available massively parallel sequencing methods have not been able to resolve this issue. However, recent announcements in nanopore sequencing hold the promise of removing this read-length limitation, enabling sequencing of larger intact DNA fragments. The ability to sequence longer intact DNA with high accuracy is a major stepping stone towards greatly simplifying the downstream analysis and increasing the power of sequencing compared to today. This review covers some of the technical advances in sequencing that have opened up new frontiers in genomics. PMID:22887891

  5. FOP: still turning into stone.

    PubMed

    Taslimi, Reza; Jafarpour, Saba; Hassanpour, Nahid

    2015-02-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare catastrophic genetic condition of extraskeletal (heterotopic) ossification. One in every two million people is affected worldwide, with no ethnic, racial, gender, or geographic predisposition. Most cases of FOP arise from a spontaneous missense mutation in the gene encoding bone morphogenic protein (BMP) type II receptor (ACVR1/ALK2). Affected individuals are normal at birth apart from malformed great toes. Onset of clinical symptoms is usually in the first decade of life, presenting with episodic emergence of painful rapidly appearing tumor-like soft tissue swellings (flare-ups). Heterotopic bone replaces the skeletal muscles, tendons, ligaments, and connective tissue at the site of the damage through a process of endochondral ossification, causing fixation of joints and permanent limitation of motion. Most affected individuals are confined to wheelchair in the third decade of life. Worldwide rate of misdiagnosis of FOP is very high; clinicians often fail to associate the two classic clinical features of FOP: rapidly developing soft tissue swellings and the abnormal great toes. The current case presents a previously undiagnosed 39-year-old FOP patient, sadly a victim of lack of clinical awareness of this rare condition. As a result of repetitive iatrogenic harm, he has tragically "turned into stone." PMID:24253442

  6. The genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae: characterization and role in gall formation.

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, A; Barash, I; Valinsky, L; Manulis, S

    1995-01-01

    A locus conferring cytokinin production was previously isolated from the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae. This locus resided in a cluster with the genes specifying indole-3-acetic acid production on the pathogenicity-associated plasmid pPATH (A. Lichter, S. Manulis, O. Sagee, Y. Gafni, J. Gray, R. Meilen, R. O. Morris, and I. Barash, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact., 8:114-121, 1995). Sequence analysis of this locus indicated the presence of a cytokinin biosynthesis gene (etz) homologous to other described cytokinin biosynthesis genes. A unique open reading frame (pre-etz) encoding 169 amino acids preceded etz and together with etz formed a region with a distinctive low G+C content. Northern (RNA) analysis indicated the presence of an etz-specific transcript of 1 kb and a common transcript for pre-etz and etz of 1.4 kb. The level of the 1-kb transcript was high in the late logarithmic phase and very low in the stationary phase. In contrast, the level of the 1.4-kb transcript was lower than that of the 1-kb transcript in the late logarithmic phase and predominant in the stationary phase. A marker exchange mutant of etz which did not produce cytokinins exhibited a reduction in gall size on Gypsophila cuttings and almost abolished disease symptoms in a whole-plant assay. Complementation of this marker exchange mutant with the intact etz gene on a multicopy plasmid resulted in overproduction of cytokinins and larger plant galls from which small shoots emerged. Insertional mutation in pre-etz resulted in a sharp decrease in both the level of the etz-specific transcript and cytokinin production. A frameshift mutation in pre-etz caused a similar reduction in the cytokinin level. A marker exchange mutation in pre-etz caused a reduction of symptoms but to lower degree than the etz mutation. In the former mutant, cytokinin production and pathogenicity could not be restored by complementation. Furthermore, attempts to complement the etz marker exchange mutant with a plasmid containing an intact etz gene and a frameshift mutation in the pre-etz gene were unsuccessful. These results suggest that the mutations in pre-etz were trans dominant. PMID:7635829

  7. Nematodes from galls on Myrtaceae. IV. Fergusobia from flat leaf galls on Eucalyptus and Corymbia, with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kerrie A; Giblin-Davis, Robin M; Ye, Weimin; Taylor, Gary S; Thomas, W Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Fergusobia are described. Both were collected from flat leaf galls from South Australia, one on Eucalyptus microcarpa and the other on E. porosa. Fergusobia microcarpae n. sp. Davies is characterised by the combination of a C-shaped parthenogenetic female with a short, broadly rounded conoid tail, an arcuate to open C-shaped infective female with an hemispherical tail tip, and arcuate to J-shaped males with angular spicules and short peloderan bursa. Fergusobia porosae n. sp. Davies is similar in having an arcuate to C-shaped parthenogenetic female with a small conoid tail, an almost straight to arcuate infective female with an hemispherical tail tip, and males that are almost straight to barely J-shaped with angular spicules and short peloderan bursa. They differ in that the bodies of parthenogenetic and infective females of F. microcarpae n. sp. are more curved than in F. porosae n. sp. Other known similar forms of Fergusobia/Fergusonina galls are outlined and the larval shield morphologies of their associated mutualistic Fergusonina fly species are discussed where known. An inventory of all known Fergusobia/Fergusonina associations from flat leaf galls from Corymbia spp. and Eucalyptus spp. is presented. Relationships of Fergusobia nematodes were inferred from analysis of sequences of 28S rDNA D2/D3 domains and a portion of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI). Nematodes from flat leaf galls appeared in two clades.  PMID:25112980

  8. Introductory Overview of Stone Heritages in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Oikawa, Teruki; Fujita, Masayo; Yokoyama, Shunji

    2013-04-01

    As one contribution to 'Global Heritage Stone Resources' (GHSR), some stone heritages in Japan, which are nominated in the interim list, are briefly introduced. The geology of Japanese Islands where are the one of the most active areas in the history of the Earth, is very complicated. Therefore Japanese Islands consist of various kinds of minerals and rocks. Some of them were used to make stone implements and accessories. Japanese people also used to the best possible advantage to built tombstone, gate, pavement ,and the basement and wall of the large building such as temples, shrines, castles and modern buildings. 1. Stone Heritages of Pre-historical age: In the late Pleistocene and the early Holocene, ancient Japanese used obsidian cooled rapidly from rhyolitic magma.to make small implements and accessories. For example, Shirataki, Hokkaido (north island) is the largest place producing obsidian in Japan where Paleolithic people made arrowhead, knives and so on. Another example, Jade yielded in Itoigawa City, Japan Sea coast of central Japan, was made in the metamorphic rock about five hundred million years ago. Itoigawa area is only one place where jade is abundantly produced in Japan. Ancient people had been already collected and processed to ornaments although it is very hard and traded in wide area more than several thousand years ago. 2. Stone Heritages of Historical age: 2.1 Archaeological remains: In the Kofun (old mound) period (250 to 538 AD), stone burial chambers were used for old mounds to preserve against the putrefaction and to protect from the theft. For example, Ishibutai Kofun ("ishi" means "stone" and "butai" means "stage") in Nara old capital city, southwest Japan, is the largest known megalithic structure made of granite in Japan. 2.2 Stone walls of some typical castles Stones used is because of not only the rich reserves of rocks but also restriction of transportation. Osaka (second biggest city) castle, are composed of Cretaceous granite exceeding over 500,000 in number and the largest block is 108 ton in weight. Stoens of Hikone Castle came from Paleogene Koto Rhyolite. Edo (old Tokyo, biggest city, central Japan) castle ,Imperial Palace at present, Stones are late Quaternary andesite of Hakone Volcanic Products whose quarrying places are more than 100km far from Edo.They were transported by ships and manpower on land .

  9. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    PubMed

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96 %). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70 % of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ? 25 in 56 % (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8 %. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45 % (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22 % (55/255); Uric Acid 16 % (40/255); and Cystine 4 % (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies. PMID:25805105

  10. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight produces a number of metabolic and physiological changes in the crewmembers exposed to microgravity. Following launch, body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary chemical composition may lead to the potentially serious consequences of renal stone formation. Previous data collected immediately after space flight indicate changes in the urine chemistry favoring an increased risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation (n = 323). During short term Shuttle space flights, the changes observed include increased urinary calcium and decreased urine volume, pH and citrate resulting in a greater risk for calcium oxalate and brushite stone formation (n = 6). Results from long duration Shuttle/Mir missions (n = 9) followed a similar trend and demonstrated decreased fluid intake and urine volume and increased urinary calcium resulting in a urinary environment saturated with the calcium stone-forming salts. The increased risk occurs rapidly upon exposure to microgravity, continues throughout the space flight and following landing. Dietary factors, especially fluid intake, or pharmacologic intervention can significantly influence the urinary chemical composition. Increasing fluid intake to produce a daily urine output of 2 liters/day may allow the excess salts in the urine to remain in solution, crystals formation will not occur and a renal stone will not develop. Results from long duration crewmembers (n = 2) who had urine volumes greater than 2.5 L/day minimized their risk of renal stone formation. Also, comparisons of stone-forming risk in short duration crewmembers clearly identified greater risk in those who produced less than 2 liters of urine/day. However, hydration and increased urine output does not correct the underlying calcium excretion due to bone loss and only treats the symptoms and not the cause of the increased urinary salts. Dietary modification and promising pharmacologic treatments may also be used to reduce the potential risk for renal stone formation. Potassium citrate is being used clinically to increase the urinary inhibitor levels to minimize the development of crystals and the growth of renal stones. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs recently shown to help in patients with osteoporosis by inhibiting the loss of bones in elderly patients. This drug could potentially prevent the bone loss observed in astronauts and thereby minimize the increase in urinary calcium and reduce the risk for renal stone development. Results of NASA's renal stone risk assessment program clearly indicate that exposure to microgravity changes the urinary chemical environment such that there is an increased risk for supersaturation of stone-forming salts, including calcium oxalaie and brushite. These studies have indicated specific avenues for development of countermeasures for the increased renal stone risk observed during and following space flight. Increased hydration and implementation of pharmacologic countermeasures should largely mitigate the in-flight risk of renal stones.

  11. Reduction of respirable silica following the introduction of water spray applications in Indian stone crusher mills.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Perry; Nicas, Mark; Kephart, John W; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Rinehart, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Respirable crystalline silica dust generated during stone crushing operations has been linked to chronic lung disease and increased risk of tuberculosis. In India, most stone crushing mills operate without any dust control or containment systems. This investigation in the Khurda District of Orissa demonstrated a reduction in respirable particulate mass following the application of a fine mist of water. Average respirable quartz and cristobalite levels declined 82% and 69%, respectively, after water spray controls were installed. This finding suggests that relatively inexpensive modifications that are available in the local market can be effective at reducing silica exposures. Although average exposure levels, particularly during the dry season, may exceed the Permissible Exposure Limit for silica, the overall reductions observed were substantial. Widespread adoption of this simple control technology by stone crushers in India could have a positive public health impact. PMID:18507285

  12. Crown gall transformation of tobacco callus cells by cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.; Manzara, T.; Lurquin, P.F.

    1984-09-17

    Incubation of cells from squashed tobacco callus tissue with virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens leads to the production of cells displaying a crown gall phenotype. In vitro crown gall transformation of dicotyledonous plant cells has been demonstrated after cocultivation of cell-wall regenerating mesophyll protoplasts with Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells. In addition, it has been shown that protoplasts freshly isolated from suspension cultures, when treated with A. tumefaciens spheroplasts and a fusogen, also generated cells displaying a typical crown gall phenotype, i.e., phytohormone-independent growth and opine synthesis. Subsequently, both techniques were used to transfer and express foreign genes in plant cells via A. tumefaciens T-DNA integration. For practical purposes, it would be advantageous to be able to perform crown gall transformation of plant cells in tissue culture. The authors report here for the first time the production of Nicotiana tabacum crown gall cells after cocultivation of callus tissue with A. tumefaciens A136 cells. 11 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. Agricultural and Forest Entomology (2012), 14, 419427 DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-9563.2012.00583.x Diversity in Eucalyptus susceptibility to the gall-forming wasp

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    Diversity in Eucalyptus susceptibility to the gall-forming wasp Leptocybe invasa Gudrun Dittrich-Schr ¨oder, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Abstract 1 Extensive variation to damage by the invasive gall-forming wasp and development of the wasp. Gall development on the petiole and leaves of plants was compared to calculate

  14. Determination of the Fe(II)\\/Fe(III) ratio in iron gall inks by potentiometry: A preliminary study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cédric Burgaud; Véronique Rouchon; Alain Wattiaux; Jean Bleton; René Sabot; Philippe Refait

    2010-01-01

    Ancient iron gall ink manuscripts can be treated by immersion in water to dissolve excess iron compounds known to be involved in the degradation of such manuscripts. In this study, redox potential measurements were performed so as to follow the dissolution of iron gall inks from original degraded manuscripts over a period of time. Due to the complexity of the

  15. The Eucalyptus gall wasp,Leptocybe invasa,is the most recently introduced Eucalyptus pest in South Africa.Its

    E-print Network

    15 The Eucalyptus gall wasp,Leptocybe invasa,is the most recently introduced Eucalyptus pest wasp.For this reason,the TPCP launched a pilot Dealing with new invasive pests of forestry trees: The Leptocybe gall wasp as an example By Dr Bernard Slippers to page 17 Wood SA & Timber Times November 2010

  16. A new Choleoeimeria species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting the gall bladder of Scincus mitranus (Reptilia: Scincidae) in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2011-12-01

    Choleoeimeria mitranusensis n. sp. is described from the gall bladder of the lizard Scincus mitranus in Saudi Arabia. The prevalence of the infection was 20% (6/30). Oocysts were ellipsoidal and measured 29 µm × 20 µm. Sporocysts were dizoic and elliptical in shape. The endogenous development was confined to the gall bladder epithelium. Meronts, gamonts, and young oocysts were detected. PMID:21612416

  17. 77 FR 46127 - Interim Staff Guidance on Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...Guidance on Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP...NUREG-1801, Revision 2, ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,'' and the...issues LR-ISG to communicate insights and lessons learned and to address emergent...

  18. Size, age and composition: characteristics of plant taxa as diversity predictors of gall-midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Araújo, Walter S

    2011-12-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diversity of gall-midge insects (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), some of them taking into account plant diversity. This study aims to test the importance of size, age and composition of host plant taxa in the diversity of Cecidomyiidae. For this we used inventories data on the diversity of galling and host plants in Brazil. We found that Asterales, Myrtales and Malpighiales, were the most important orders, with 34, 33 and 25, gall morphotypes, respectively. The most representative host families were Asteraceae (34 morphotypes), Myrtaceae (23) and Fabaceae (22). In general, the order size and the plant family were good predictors of the galling diversity, but not the taxon age. The most diverse host genera for gall-midges were Mikania, Eugenia and Styrax, with 15, 13 and nine galler species, respectively. The size of plant genera showed no significant relationship with the richness of Cecidomyiidae, contrary to the prediction of the plant taxon size hypothesis. The plant genera with the greatest diversity of galling insects are not necessarily those with the greatest number of species. These results indicate that some plant taxa have a high intrinsic richness of galling insects, suggesting that the plant species composition may be equally or more important for the diversity of gall-midges than the size or age of the host taxon. PMID:22208077

  19. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products as well as block. Recent international projects by Gosford Quarries include Mishima Golf Club in Japan, Al Awadi Tower in Kuwait, New World Resort in China and a Hard Rock Café in Florida, USA. Arguably Sydney sandstone is Australia's most prominent potential Global Heritage Stone Resource and details are readily available in existing publications to make the nomination.

  20. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni', a novel taxon associated with X-disease of stone fruits, Prunus spp.: multilocus characterization based on 16S rRNA, secY, and ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Yan; Dally, Ellen L; Lee, Ing-Ming; Jomantiene, Rasa; Douglas, Sharon M

    2013-02-01

    X-disease is one of the most serious diseases known in peach (Prunus persica). Based on RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, peach X-disease phytoplasma strains from eastern and western United States and eastern Canada were classified in 16S rRNA gene RFLP group 16SrIII, subgroup A. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the X-disease phytoplasma strains formed a distinct subclade within the phytoplasma clade, supporting the hypothesis that they represented a lineage distinct from those of previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Nucleotide sequence alignments revealed that all studied X-disease phytoplasma strains shared less than 97.5?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Based on unique properties of the DNA, we propose recognition of X-disease phytoplasma strain PX11CT1(R) as representative of a novel taxon, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni'. Results from nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of secY and ribosomal protein (rp) gene sequences provided additional molecular markers of the 'Ca. Phytoplasma pruni' lineage. We propose that the term 'Ca. Phytoplasma pruni' be applied to phytoplasma strains whose 16S rRNA gene sequences contain the oligonucleotide sequences of unique regions that are designated in the formally published description of the taxon. Such strains include X-disease phytoplasma and--within the tolerance of a single base difference in one unique sequence--peach rosette, peach red suture, and little peach phytoplasmas. Although not employed for taxon delineation in this work, we further propose that secY, rp, and other genetic loci from the reference strain of a taxon, and where possible oligonucleotide sequences of unique regions of those genes that distinguish taxa within a given 16Sr group, be incorporated in emended descriptions and as part of future descriptions of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' taxa. PMID:22798643

  1. Gastrointestinal small-cell lymphoma with gall bladder involvement in a cat.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Katie J; Hill, Richard C; Parfitt, Shannon L; Berry, Clifford R; Heskett, Travis W; Sheppard, Barbara J

    2012-04-01

    A 13-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat presented for investigation of decreased appetite and increased serum liver enzyme concentrations. An abdominal ultrasound revealed multiple sessile hyperechoic structures along the luminal aspect of the gall bladder wall and a mildly enlarged liver with hyperechoic nodules. Cholecystectomy was performed and biopsies were obtained by laparotomy. Histopathologic examination with immunohistochemistry was consistent with a diagnosis of small-cell lymphoma of T cells within the gall bladder, liver and small intestine. Clonality testing confirmed the diagnosis. The cat remains clinically stable 23 months after institution of treatment with prednisolone, chlorambucil and ursodeoxycholic acid. This is the first report of small-cell lymphoma in the gall bladder of a cat. PMID:22412164

  2. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements. PMID:24513932

  3. The solidification and welding metallurgy of galling-resistant stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Michael, J.R.; Maguire, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The autogenous welding behavior of two commercial galling-resistant austenitic stainless steels, Nitronic 60 and Gall-Tough, was evaluated and compared. The solidification behavior and fusion zone hot-cracking tendency of the alloys was evaluated by using differential thermal analysis, Varestraint testing and laser spot-welding trials. Gleeble thermal cycle simulations were used to assess the hot ductility of the alloys during both on-heating and on-cooling portions of weld thermal cycles. Solidification microstructures were characterized by light optical and electron microscopy, and the solidification modes and phases were identified. Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in both alloys solidified by the ferritic-austenitic mode, and their behavior was best described using chromium and nickel equivalents developed specifically for the Nitronic series of alloys. Both alloys were found to be somewhat more susceptible to solidification hot cracking than conventional austenitic stainless steels, although the cracking resistance of Nitronic 60 was somewhat superior to Gall-Tough. Laser spot-welding trials resulted in both fusion and heat-affected zone cracking in the Nitronic 60, while Gall-Tough was resistant to cracking in these high-solidification-rate welds. Comparison of the laser weld microstructures indicated that Nitronic 60 shifts to fully austenitic solidification, while Gall-Tough shifts to an austenitic-ferritic solidification mode in high-energy-density processing. The hot ductility measurements indicated that Gall-Tough is generally superior to Nitronic 60 in both on-heating and on-cooling tests, apparently as a result of differences in grain size and the mechanism of ferrite formation at high temperatures.

  4. 8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR MOUNTED ON STONE SPINDLE, VERY SHORT STEELYARD - Windmill at Water Mill, Montauk Highway & Halsey Lane, Water Mill, Suffolk County, NY

  5. Prompt Treatment of Kidney Stones Keeps Costs Down: Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of patients presenting with kidney stones," Dr. Howard Adler, associate professor of urology at Stony Brook University ... States as prevalence of kidney stones has increased, Adler said. More than one million Americans are expected ...

  6. The biology and ecology of the live oak woolly leaf gall Andricus laniger Ashmead. (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae 

    E-print Network

    Hamel, Dennis Robert

    1973-01-01

    . to the unisexual generation 74 x Pacae Inquilines and their relations to A. ~1', 't p* 't d t g 11 f the unisexual generation. . . . . . . ~ . ~ 8O Predators and their relations to A. ~1', 't p t d t tt galls of the unisexual generations , . . . 82 As ' t f A... Dallas locations 95 10 Comparison of size and abundance of woolly leaf galls in Texas and Mexico populations of live oak 98 P acae Seasonal parasitism and inquilinism f A, ~l' g 11* ' t b locations ot Houston 100 LIST OF FIGURES Ficiure Pacae D...

  7. New records and new species of gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) developing on Chenopodiaceae in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Ayman Khamis; Skuhravá, Marcela; Karam, Hedaya Hamza; Elminshawy, Abdelaziz; Al-Eryan, Mohamed Awad

    2015-01-01

    The Cecidomyiidae (Diptera: Bibionomorpha) fauna of Egypt is poorly known. Investigations in northern Egypt in 2013 revealed the presence of seven species of gall midges on three host plant species: Atriplex halimus L., Arthrocnemum macrostachyum (Moric.) and Suaeda pruniosa Lange (all Chenopodiaceae). Among the gall midges, Baldratia salicorniae  Kieffer and Stefaniella trinacriae De Stefani are reconfirmed records in Egypt; Houardiella gracilis Dorchin & Freidberg and Asphondylia punica Marchal are new records; and Baldratia karamae Elsayed & Skuhraván. sp. , Primofavilla aegyptiaca Elsayed n. sp. and Stefaniella skuhravae Elsayed n. sp. are new to science. Adult morphology of the latter three new species is described and illustrated, and their biology and geographic distribution are given.  PMID:25660774

  8. A Quantum Rosetta Stone for Interferometry

    E-print Network

    Lee, H; Dowling, J P; Lee, Hwang; Kok, Pieter; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Heisenberg-limited measurement protocols can be used to gain an increase in measurement precision over classical protocols. Such measurements can be implemented using, e.g., optical Mach-Zehnder interferometers and Ramsey spectroscopes. We address the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and the discrete Fourier transform. Based on this equivalence we introduce the ``quantum Rosetta stone'', and we describe a projective-measurement scheme for generating the desired correlations between the interferometric input states in order to achieve Heisenberg-limited sensitivity. The Rosetta stone then tells us the same method should work in atom spectroscopy.

  9. A Quantum Rosetta Stone for Interferometry

    E-print Network

    Hwang Lee; Pieter Kok; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2002-04-09

    Heisenberg-limited measurement protocols can be used to gain an increase in measurement precision over classical protocols. Such measurements can be implemented using, e.g., optical Mach-Zehnder interferometers and Ramsey spectroscopes. We address the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and the discrete Fourier transform. Based on this equivalence we introduce the ``quantum Rosetta stone'', and we describe a projective-measurement scheme for generating the desired correlations between the interferometric input states in order to achieve Heisenberg-limited sensitivity. The Rosetta stone then tells us the same method should work in atom spectroscopy.

  10. Pigment vs cholesterol cholelithiasis: Comparison of stone and bile composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce W. Trotman; J. Donald Ostrow; Roger D. Soloway; Eleanor B. Cheong; Regina B. Longyear

    1974-01-01

    This report presents a comparative study of gallstone and gallbladder bile composition from 100 unselected American patients, 23 with pigment and 77 with cholesterol cholelithiasis. Cholesterol stones were predominantly composed of cholesterol, whereas pigment stones were mainly composed of an unidentified residue, bilirubin, and bile salts. The residue in pigment stones was not calcium bilirubinate, which sharply contrasts with the

  11. Stone Soup: The Teacher Leader's Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bambrick-Santoyo, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In the tale of "Stone Soup," a stranger vows to make soup for everyone in a village using only a stone--and convinces everyone in town to throw an ingredient into the stewpot. Schools that need to improve teacher practice quickly can also make stone soup, the author says, by harnessing the power of well-prepared teacher leaders to…

  12. Reproducing stone monument photosynthetic-based colonization under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana Zélia Miller; Leonila Laiz; Juan Miguel Gonzalez; Amélia Dionísio; Maria Filomena Macedo; Cesareo Saiz-Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the biodeterioration process occurring on stone monuments, we analyzed the microbial communities involved in these processes and studied their ability to colonize stones under controlled laboratory experiments. In this study, a natural green biofilm from a limestone monument was cultivated, inoculated on stone probes of the same lithotype and incubated in a laboratory chamber. This incubation

  13. Relationship between common duct stones and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Song; Jie Wu; Ping Wang; Xiao-Dong Huang; Heng Zhang; Dan Zheng; Yan Su Min Song; Song M; Wu J; Wang P; Huang XD; Zheng D

    AIM: To investigate the rate of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in patients with common duct stones and analyze the relationship between common duct stones and H pylori infection. METHODS: One hundred and five patients with common duct stones (experiment group) and 132 control subjects (control group) were in- cluded in the study. All the patients underwent electronic gastroscopy, rapid

  14. Mineral inlays in natural stone slabs: techniques, materials and preservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Garcia-Guinea; Cristina Sapalski; Victor Cardenes; Manuel Lombardero

    2000-01-01

    Italy (first) and Spain (second) are the largest producers of marble in the world, and they share a rich history of quarrying and artworks made from natural stone and coloured stones inlaid in marbles. The present decrease of manufactured marble from Spain and Italy is directly related to the increased imports of high quality manufactured natural stone products from Asian

  15. Characterisation of stone matrix asphalt mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laith Tashman; Brian Pearson

    2011-01-01

    This study applied conventional laboratory tests and advanced imaging techniques to experimentally verify the voids in coarse aggregate (VCA) method. Five stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mixtures designed to have different coarse aggregate skeletons were investigated to establish relationships between the VCA ratio, microstructure parameters and the mechanical response of SMA. X-ray CT and image analysis techniques were utilised to non-destructively

  16. Characterisation of stone matrix asphalt mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laith Tashman; Brian Pearson

    2012-01-01

    This study applied conventional laboratory tests and advanced imaging techniques to experimentally verify the voids in coarse aggregate (VCA) method. Five stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mixtures designed to have different coarse aggregate skeletons were investigated to establish relationships between the VCA ratio, microstructure parameters and the mechanical response of SMA. X-ray CT and image analysis techniques were utilised to non-destructively

  17. MARS PRESS CONFERENCE Dr. Edward Stone's Presentation

    E-print Network

    Leveson, Nancy

    1 MARS PRESS CONFERENCE Dr. Edward Stone's Presentation #12;2 Actions · MANAGEMENT ­ Additional of Entry, Descent & Landing #12;5 Actions · ENGINEERING ­ Significantly increased temperature margin of propulsion system during Descent and Landing ­ Reverified propulsion system operation #12;6 Actions · PEER

  18. Environmental management of the stone cutting industry.

    PubMed

    Nasserdine, Khaled; Mimi, Ziad; Bevan, Blair; Elian, Belal

    2009-01-01

    Environmental Management of the stone cutting industry in Hebron is required to reduce the industry's adverse impact on the downstream agricultural land and the adverse impact on the drinking water aquifers. This situation requires the implementation of an industrial wastewater management strategic approach and technology, within the available technical and financial resources. Ten pilot projects at different locations were built at Hebron to reduce or eliminate the incompatible discharge of the liquid and solid waste to the environment and improve the stone cutting industry's effluent quality. A review of existing practices and jar test experiments were used to optimize the water recycling and treatment facilities. The factors reviewed included influent pumping rates and cycles, selection of the optimal coagulant type and addition methods, control of the sludge recycling process, control over flow rates, control locations of influent and effluent, and sludge depth. Based on the optimized doses and Turbidity results, it was determined that the use of Fokland polymer with an optimal dose of 1.5mg/L could achieve the target turbidity levels. The completion of the pilot projects resulted in the elimination of stone cutting waste discharges and an improvement in the recycled effluent quality of 44-99%. This in turn reduced the long term operating costs for each participating firm. A full-scale project that includes all the stone cutting firms in Hebron industrial area is required. PMID:18248874

  19. The Dedekind Reals in Abstract Stone Duality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrej Bauer; Paul Taylor

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Stone Duality (ASD) is a direct axiomatisation of the spaces and maps in general topology, whereas the traditional and all other contemporary approaches treat spaces as sets (types, objects of a topos) with additional structure. ASD is presented as a -calculus, of which this paper provides a self-contained summary, the foundational background having been investigated in earlier work. This

  20. The Stone Age in the Malay Peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Hale

    1886-01-01

    IN NATURE, vol. xxxiii. p. 377, there is a notice of a paper by M. de Morgan, published in Cosmos, on the Stone Age in the Malay Peninsula. Will you permit me to offer a few remarks with reference to this matter. In the first place, it is said that M. de Morgan came into contact with three native races,

  1. Subpixel Registration of Images Harold Stone

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ee-Chien

    Subpixel Registration of Images Harold Stone NEC Research Institute Princeton, NJ 08540 hstone@research.nj.nec.com Michael Orchard Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08540 orchard@ee.princeton.edu Ee­chien Chang NEC Research Institute Princeton, NJ 08540 changec@cz3.nus.edu.sg Abstract Phase correlation has been studied

  2. Profilometry of medieval Irish stone monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daubos, Thierry; Redfern, Michael; O Croinin, Daibh

    2005-06-01

    National monuments are at ever-increasing risk of severe and permanent damage. The 3D laser scanning of stone monuments brings a new dimension in the field of cultural heritage by providing means of preserving, visualizing, accessing and analysing some of its most invaluable artefacts. In this article, we present the results obtained with our project "Profilometry of Medieval Irish Stone Monuments" hosted at the Centre for the Study of Human Settlement and Historical Change, NUI Galway. This project aims to create a virtual archive of selected incised stones from 3D scans taken in the field. The raw scans are processed into watertight 3D models and new processing techniques have been developed to enhance the surface features of the stones. Also, textured 3D models of the artefacts have been made available online for the benefit of both the historian community and the broader public. This article focuses on the analysis we performed on the shaft of the east cross at Toureen Peacaun, Co Tipperary, which shows the longest inscription in Ireland with geometrical capitals.

  3. Endolithic phototrophs in built and natural stone.

    PubMed

    Gaylarde, Christine C; Gaylarde, Peter M; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-08-01

    Lichens, algae and cyanobacteria have been detected growing endolithically in natural rock and in stone buildings in various countries of Australasia, Europe and Latin America. Previously these organisms had mainly been described in natural carbonaceous rocks in aquatic environments, with some reports in siliceous rocks, principally from extremophilic regions. Using various culture and microscopy methods, we have detected endoliths in siliceous stone, both natural and cut, in humid temperate and subtropical climates. Such endolithic growth leads to degradation of the stone structure, not only by mechanical means, but also by metabolites liberated by the cells. Using in vitro culture, transmission, optical and fluorescence microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy, both coccoid and filamentous cyanobacteria and algae, including Cyanidiales, have been identified growing endolithically in the facades of historic buildings built from limestone, sandstone, granite, basalt and soapstone, as well as in some natural rocks. Numerically, the most abundant are small, single-celled, colonial cyanobacteria. These small phototrophs are difficult to detect by standard microscope techniques and some of these species have not been previously reported within stone. PMID:22614098

  4. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Maciejewski; R. Neuhäuser; R. Errmann; M. Mugrauer; Ch. Adam; A. Berndt; T. Eisenbeiss; S. Fiedler; Ch. Ginski; M. Hohle; U. Kramm; C. Marka; M. Moualla; T. Pribulla; St. Raetz; T. Roell; T. O. B. Schmidt; M. Seeliger; I. Spaleniak; N. Tetzlaff; L. Trepl

    2011-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger

  5. Suppressive subtraction hybridization reveals that rice gall midge attack elicits plant-pathogen-like responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Himabindu, Kudapa; Neeraja, Chiruvuri Naga; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, Jagadish S

    2013-02-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is the third most destructive insect pest of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Till date, 11 gall midge resistance gene loci have been characterized in different rice varieties. To elucidate molecular basis of incompatible (hypersensitive response plus [HR+] type) and compatible rice-gall midge interactions, two suppressive subtraction hybridization cDNA libraries were constructed. These were enriched for differentially expressed transcripts after gall midge infestation in two rice varieties (resistant Suraksha and susceptible TN1). In total, 2784 ESTs were generated and sequenced from the two libraries, of which 1536 were from the resistant Suraksha and 1248 were from the susceptible TN1. Majority (80%) of the ESTs was non-redundant sequences with known functions and was classified into three principal gene ontology (GO) categories and 12 groups. Upregulation of NBS-LRR, Cytochrome P450, heat shock proteins, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and OsPR10? genes from the Suraksha library, as revealed by real-time PCR, indicated that R gene mediated, salicylic acid related defense pathway is likely to be involved in gall midge resistance. Present study suggested that resistance in Suraksha against gall midge is similar in nature to the resistance observed in plants against pathogens. However, in TN1, genes related to primary metabolism and redox were induced abundantly. Results suggested that genes encoding translationally controlled tumor protein and NAC domain proteins are likely to be involved in the gall midge susceptibility. PMID:23257077

  6. Quercus infectoria galls possess antioxidant activity and abrogates oxidative stress-induced functional alterations in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2008-02-15

    The present study reports the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls. The antioxidant potency of galls was investigated employing several established in vitro model systems. Their protective efficacy on oxidative modulation of murine macrophages was also explored. Gall extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and possess a potent reducing power. HPTLC analysis of the extract suggested it to contain 19.925% tannic acid (TA) and 8.75% gallic acid (GA). The extract potently scavenged free radicals including DPPH (IC(50)~0.5 microg/ml), ABTS (IC(50)~1 microg/ml), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (IC(50)~2.6 microg/ml) and hydroxyl (*OH) radicals (IC(50)~6 microg/ml). Gall extract also chelated metal ions and inhibited Fe(3+) -ascorbate-induced oxidation of protein and peroxidation of lipids. Exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced oxidative stress in them and altered their phagocytic functions. These macrophages showed elevated secretion of lysosomal hydrolases, and attenuated phagocytosis and respiratory burst. Activity of macrophage mannose receptor (MR) also diminished following oxidant exposure. Pretreatment of macrophages with gall extract preserved antioxidant armory near to control values and significantly protected against all the investigated functional mutilations. MTT assay revealed gall extract to enhance percent survival of tBOOH exposed macrophages. These results indicate that Q. infectoria galls possess potent antioxidant activity, when tested both in chemical as well as biological models. PMID:18076871

  7. Dietary habits of calcium stone formers.

    PubMed

    Martini, L A; Heilberg, I P; Cuppari, L; Medeiros, F A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Schor, N

    1993-08-01

    1. Since dietary factors are known to be related to nephrolithiasis, calcium stone-forming (CSF) patients were evaluated in terms of calcium, total protein of both animal and plant origin, carbohydrate and energy intakes, on the basis of 72-h dietary records during the week plus 24-h dietary records during the week-end. 2. The data for 77 calcium stone formers (57 with absorptive hypercalciuria and 20 with renal hypercalciuria) were compared to those for 29 age-matched healthy subjects. The body mass index of the CSF group was higher than that of healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Consumption of all nutrients was similar for both groups during the week but week-end dietary records for CSF showed higher calcium intake (586 +/- 38 vs 438 +/- 82 mg/day, P < 0.05), protein to body weight ratio (1.2 +/- 0.1 vs 1.0 +/- 0.5 g kg-1 day-1, P < 0.05) and animal protein (56 +/- 3 vs 40 +/- 3 g/day, P < 0.05) when compared with healthy subjects. 3. Comparison of hypercalciuria subtypes (renal hypercalciuria and absorptive hypercalciuria) did not indicate any difference in calcium or energy intake between groups, either during the week or during the week-end. However, the absorptive hypercalciuric group presented higher protein and animal protein consumption during the week-end. 4. These data suggest a low calcium intake in this population, even by stone formers. The higher animal protein consumption by our calcium stone formers observed during week-ends seems to be more important than calcium intake for stone formation. PMID:8298515

  8. Bessel processes, the Brownian snake and super-Brownian motion Jean-Franois Le Gall

    E-print Network

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    Bessel processes, the Brownian snake and super-Brownian motion Jean-François Le Gall June 2014 Abstract We prove that, both for the Brownian snake and for super-Brownian motion in dimension one discuss a spine decomposition for the Brownian snake conditioned on the minimizing path. 1 Introduction

  9. Distortion of a Steel Cylinder Casting with a Core D. Galles and C. Beckermann

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Distortion of a Steel Cylinder Casting with a Core D. Galles and C. Beckermann Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA Abstract Casting, are studied through a series of in situ casting trials in which a low-carbon steel cylinder with a core

  10. Oviposition Stimulant for a Gall-Inducing Sawfly, Euura lasiolepis , on Willow is a Phenolic Glucoside

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heikki Roininen; Peter W. Price; Riitta Julkunen-Tiitto; Jorma Tahvanainen; Arsi Ikonen

    1999-01-01

    The ovipositional stimulation for the shoot galling sawfly, Euura lasiolepis, whose natural host is the North American willow, Salix lasiolepis, was studied in response to its original host, Finnish willows, poplar species, and individual phenolic glucosides and fractions. The major phenolic glucosides in the natural host were salicortin and tremulacin, which were also the major components in the Finnish S.

  11. Mössbauer spectrometry applied to the study of laboratory samples made of iron gall ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgaud, C.; Rouchon, V.; Refait, P.; Wattiaux, A.

    2008-07-01

    Iron gall inks consist of a mixture of vitriol, gall nut extracts and gum arabic. The association of the iron(II) sulphate present in vitriols, and the carboxyphenolic acids present in gall nut extracts leads to the formation of dark coloured iron-based precipitates. In order to evaluate the percentage of iron used in the formation of these precipitates, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) measurements were performed on laboratory made inks at room temperature. These were completed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The samples consisted of several solutions of iron(II) sulphate, gallic acid and gum arabic. After evaporation, the residues were analysed. Up to eight different Mössbauer signatures were detected, most of them correlated to iron sulphates. The Mössbauer signature of the iron gall precipitate was also isolated. It is not distinctly defined and may overlap with the signatures of iron(III) hydroxy-sulphates, such as jarosite or copiapite. Raman spectrometry then proved to be a useful complementary technique for the identification of the precipitate.

  12. HORTICULTURAL ENTOMOLOGY The Influence of Pruning on Wasp Inhabitants of Galls Induced

    E-print Network

    Reekie, Ed

    nubilipennis Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on Lowbush Blueberry DAVID I. HAYMAN,1 KENNA E. MACKENZIE,2 for managing blueberry stem galls caused by the chalcid wasp, Hemadas nubilipennis (Ashmead), was studied in Þve commercial lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) Þelds in Nova Scotia, Canada, between

  13. Adult rhabdomyosarcoma of the gall bladder: case report and review of published works.

    PubMed Central

    al-Jaberi, T M; al-Masri, N; Tbukhi, A

    1994-01-01

    A 90 year old woman with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the gall bladder is described. The patient died with tumour metastasis four months after diagnosis despite complete excision of the tumour. The histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of the tumour are summarised and published works are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8020820

  14. Development of a galling resistance test method with a uniform stress distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott R. Hummel

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a new galling test method is presented along with results from a pilot testing program. The pilot program was performed on type 303 stainless steel. The new testing configuration consists of two concentrically aligned hollow cylindrical specimens loaded along their longitudinal axes. The specimens are held in alignment using a custom made alignment pin. The pin maintains

  15. Measurement and Simulation of Distortion of a Steel Bracket Casting D. Galles and C. Beckermann

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Measurement and Simulation of Distortion of a Steel Bracket Casting D. Galles and C Abstract Casting distortion, caused by core expansion, is measured during in situ experiments involving a cast steel bracket. Additional measurements of various bracket features are taken after shakeout

  16. The Rector and Visitors University Building Official (reports to the Rector and Visitors) Elaine B. Gall

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    i. Chief, Supply Chain Management ­ Kurt Heyssel j. Chief, Transitional Care Hospital ­ Michelle HerThe Rector and Visitors University Building Official (reports to the Rector and Visitors) ­ Elaine B. Gall General Counsel ­ Paul J. Forch Chief Audit Executive ­ Barbara J. Deily Architect

  17. First report of crown gall caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens on Euphorbia esula/virgata in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypertrophy and hyperplasia resembling crown galls were found on roots of Euphorbia esula virgata occurring at a single site (47°34’32.52”N, 21° 27’ 38.31”E) in east-central Hungary in 2005. Leafy spurge (E. esula/virgata) is an invasive species causing substantial economic losses to the value of gr...

  18. Isolation of an Antihistaminic Principle Resembling Tomatine from Crown Gall Tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Kovacs; J. A. Wakkary; L. Goodfriend; B. Rose

    1964-01-01

    Antihistaminic activity was demonstrated previously in extracts of crown gall tumors by assaying in vivo. A crystalline substance isolated from the crude extracts has now been found to possess a high degree of potency against histamine, acetylcholine, bradykinin, and serotonin when assayed in vitro. The chemical characteristics of the substance resemble closely those of tomatine. When tomatine was investigated, it

  19. Test de conformit : une approche algbrique Agns Arnould* --Pascale Le Gall**

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RECHERCHE Test de conformité : une approche algébrique Agnès Arnould* -- Pascale Le Gall** * IRCOM@lami.univ-evry.fr RÉSUMÉ. Nous proposons dans cet article une formalisation du test de conformité contre des spécifications concrétisons les tests abstraits issus des spécifications en tests concrets dans les langages de programmation

  20. Complex software systems : Formalization and Applications Marc Aiguier, Pascale Le Gall and Mbarka Mabrouki

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Complex software systems : Formalization and Applications Marc Aiguier, Pascale Le Gall and Mbarka denotation is proposed for the notion of complex software systems whose behavior is specified by rigorous. Hence, what makes such software systems complex is they cannot be reduced to simple rules of property

  1. Plant Galls and Ecological Concepts: A Multidisciplinary Outdoor Education Teaching Resource Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Bruce; And Others

    Designed for adaptation in primary through high school classes, the lessons in this resource packet use the development of plant galls (plant growths caused by irritation of the plant tissue) as a focus for outdoor education studies and activities. Emphasis is on science and ecology, though other disciplines are represented. Illustrations and…

  2. Using Microwave Irradiation to Improve Preservation of Female Nematodes and Gall Tissues for TEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wergin, William P.; Murphy, Charles A.; Orion, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Microwave irradiation of glutaraldehyde-immersed samples was evaluated for the chemical fixation of 3-week-old galls that resulted from the infection of tomato roots (Lycopersicon esculentum) by a root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that the best results were obtained when vials containing the intact galls were immersed in buffered glutaraldehyde and irradiated for 10 seconds then allowed to cool for 30 seconds; this procedure was repeated two additional times. Galls that were fixed by this method and subsequently embedded in resin provided thin sections that remained stable in the electron beam so that fine structural details could be evaluated and photographed. Root cortical cells displayed no indication of osmotic stress, which usually results in plasmolysis or displacement of the cytoplasm toward the interior of the cell. All organelles in the giant cells appeared normal and well fixed. Cross sections near the center of the gall showed that the hypodermis of the female was not separated from the cuticle, which in turn was appressed to the outer cell walls of the giant cells. No obvious evidence of shrinkage, distortion, or failure of resin infiltration into the female nematode was apparent. High magnifications of the female nematode indicated that fine structural features of the tissues were also well preserved. Immersion fixation combined with microwave irradiation not only improved fixation of older tissues but enabled preservation of stages and feeding sites that could not be easily obtained by conventional methods. PMID:19270984

  3. Leukaemic infiltration of gall bladder – unusual presentation of occult chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, VSR; Watkins, R; Kaleem, AZ; Cooke, J; Wedgwood, K

    2011-01-01

    Extramedullary involvement in early stage chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is rare. We report the first case of an incidental finding of gall bladder infiltration in a patient who underwent a cholecystectomy for gallstone pancreatitis with no preceding history of CLL. This case reiterates the importance of subjecting even routine cholecystectomy specimens for histopathology examination in the context of this unusual presentation. PMID:24950545

  4. The authority and types for the hackberry gall psyllid genus Pachypsylla (Riley) (Hemiptera-Homoptera: Psyllidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nomenclatural problems with the hackberry gall psyllid species names are rectified. The genus Pachypsylla Riley, 1883, type species, Psylla venusta Osten-Sacken, includes 14 nominal species. These are: Pachypsylla venusta (Osten-Sacken, 1861); P. celtidismamma Riley, 1875; P. celtidisgemma Ri...

  5. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Nur Saeida; Abdullah, Hasmah; Abdul Wahab, Wan Nor Amilah Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the two-fold serial dilution technique of concentrations ranging from 16 mg/ml to 0.03 mg/ml. After 24 h, the minimum fungicidal concentrations were determined by subculturing the wells, which showed no turbidity on the agar plate. Potential phytochemical group in the crude extracts was screened by phytochemical qualitative tests and subsequently subjected to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Both methanol and aqueous extracts displayed substantial anti-Candida activity and pyrogallol was the major component of both crude extracts. Conclusions: Data from current study suggested that Q. infectoria gall extracts are a potential source to be developed as anti-candidiasis. PMID:25709331

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA integrates into multiple sites of the sunflower crown gall genome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doris Ursic; Jerry L. Slightom; John D. Kemp

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the integration of a tumor inducing (Ti) plasmid into an octopine producing crown gall tumor of sunflower, line PSCG 15955. A continuous Ti plasmid segment (T-DNA) of about 19.5 kilo base pairs (kbp) is transferred and integrated into a small number of sites of the plant DNA.

  7. Comparative anatomy of gall development on Gypsophila paniculata induced by bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Chalupowicz; I. Barash; M. Schwartz; R. Aloni; S. Manulis

    2006-01-01

    Galls induced on Gypsophila paniculata by Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae (Pag) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At), bacteria with different mechanisms of pathogenicity, were compared morphologically and anatomically. The pathogenicity of Pag is dependent on the presence of an indigenous plasmid that harbors hrp gene cluster, genes encoding Hop virulence proteins and biosynthetic genes for auxin (IAA) and cytokinins (CKs), whereas that

  8. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Main report and appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Kaza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This document is Volume 1, consisting of the executive summary, summary and observations, and an appendix listing the GALL literature review tables.

  9. DNA extraction techniques for DNA barcoding of minute gall-inhabiting wasps

    E-print Network

    DNA extraction techniques for DNA barcoding of minute gall-inhabiting wasps GUDRUN DITTRICH, South Africa Abstract DNA extraction from minute hymenopterans and their larvae is difficult extraction methods were compared to determine their efficacy in isolating DNA. Success of each method

  10. Variations in the Spatial Distribution of Gall Bladder Cancer: A Call for Collaborative Action

    PubMed Central

    Krishnatreya, M; Saikia, A; Kataki, AC; Sharma, JD; Baruah, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of gall bladder cancers in this part of the world is high and the spatial variation in occurrence of gall bladder cancers can be identified by using geographical information system. Materials and Methods: Data set containing the address information of gall bladder cancer patients from the District of Kamrup, India was obtained from cancer registry of a regional cancer center. The data set consisted of patients registered during the period of January 2010 to December 2012. The ArcGIS 10.0 used for the present analysis and the population density map of the District was prepared by using LandScan, 2008™. Results: There were isolated areas with very high density of cases and low population density termed as “hot spots”. Alternatively there were areas with very high population density and lesser number of cases with gall bladder cancers. Conclusion: This type of an analysis using GIS provides evidence to conduct joint research by epidemiologists and specialists from environmental and geological sciences in tandem. PMID:25364614

  11. Effects of Alum Treatment on Phosphorus and Phytoplankton Dynamics in Eau Galle Reservoir: A Synopsis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Barko; W. F. James; W. D. Taylor; D. G. McFarland

    1990-01-01

    Eau Galle Reservoir, located in west central Wisconsin, is a small eutrophic flood control impoundment. The reservoir sustains high sediment and associated nutrient loadings from its agricultural watershed. Despite this system's riverine nature, much of the phosphorus accumulated in the water column during the summer derives typically from internal loading. Entrainment of phosphorus in the epilimnion from hypolimnetic sources during

  12. Update on the Pathophysiology and Management of Uric Acid Renal Stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon-Emile S. Kenny; David S. Goldfarb

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic uric acid nephrolithiasis appears to be increasing in prevalence. While it has long been known that low urine pH\\u000a is associated with uric acid stones, only recently has the pathophysiological basis for this disease emerged. Excessively\\u000a acidic urine is the decisive risk for uric acid lithogenesis, and patients with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome often\\u000a hold the company of

  13. Stones River Battlefield Historic Landscape Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Battle of Stones River (or the Battle of Murfreesboro as it referred to in the South), was fought between December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863 in middle Tennessee. At the conclusion of this skirmish, the Union Army had repelled two intense Confederate attacks and it was a bit of an uplift after the Union's defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg. This fine collection from Middle Tennessee State University's Walker Library "documents the history of people, land use, and nature in the Stones River Battlefield area." The collection contains over 500 documents, including photographs, deeds to various land parcels, and so on. Visitors can browse the collection by names, deeds, and photographs, or they can also perform their own search. For anyone interested in rural geography, Tennessee history, and related matters this site will warrant several visits.

  14. PBS-Nova: America's Stone Age Explorers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Nova website asks the question: "Who were the first Americans, and where did they come from?" The site was designed to accompany a Nova program about America's Stone Age Explorers that aired on November 9, 2004. The site provides a transcript of the program; a brief article discussing the disappearance of many large mammals around 13,000 years ago; a photographic exhibit of 10 expertly-crafted stone Clovis tools from the Fenn Cache; a map that shows potential pre-Clovis sites in North America; and an interactive matching game that examines early human artifacts. The site also links to a brief, downloadable Teacher's Guide that includes a Program Overview, Classroom Activity, and Viewing Ideas.

  15. Testing species limits of eurytomids (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) associated with galls induced by Diplolepis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Canada using DNA barcoding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of insect host-parasitoid relationships are often confounded by the difficulties associated with species delimitation in taxonomically challenging groups. Eurytomids (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) are the most common parasitoids associated with rose galls of Diplolepis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae...

  16. JERBOA : un modeleur gomtrique base de rgles Thomas Bellet1, Agns Arnould1, Pascale Le Gall2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    JERBOA : un modeleur géométrique à base de règles Thomas Bellet1, Agnès Arnould1, Pascale Le Gall2-cartes, [Lie91, Lie94] utilisées par JERBOA. La mise en oeuvre d'une opération topologique nécessite de prouver

  17. Are stone analysis results different with repeated sampling?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Terence T. N.; Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Andonian, Sero

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We assessed differences in results of stone analyses on subsequent sampling. Methods: A retrospective review of patients with stone analyses at a tertiary stone centre between March 2006 and July 2012 was performed. All stones were analyzed at a centralized laboratory using infrared spectroscopy. Patients were grouped according to the first predominant stone type on record, as defined by the predominant stone component of at least 60%. Stone groups included calcium oxalate (CaOx), calcium phosphate (CaP), uric acid (UA), cystine, struvite, mixed CaOx-CaP and mixed CaOx-UA. All patients had a full metabolic stone workup. Results: Of the 303 patients with stone analyses, 118 (38.9%) patients had multiple stone analyses. The mean age was 53.4 ± 15.1 years, and 87 (73.7%) were males. Of the 118, the initial stone analysis showed 43 CaOx, 38 CaP, 21 UA, 4 CaOx-CaP, 2 CaOx-UA, 6 cystine, and 4 struvite. There was a different stone composition in 25 (21.2%) patients with a median time delay of 64.5 days. Different compositions were found in 7 CaOx (to 3 CaP, 2 CaOx-CaP, and 2 UA), 5 CaP (to 3 CaOx and 2 CaOx-CaP), 3 UA (to 3 CaOx), 4 CaOx-CaP (to 2CaOx, 1 UA and 1 CaP), 2 CaOx-UA (to 2 CaOx) and 4 struvite (to 3 CaP and 1 UA). Conclusions: Stone composition was different in 21.2% of patients on subsequent analyses. PMID:24940457

  18. Pricing the C's of Diamond Stones

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chu, Singfat

    This article, created by Singfat Chu of the National University of Singapore, describes a dataset containing information on 308 diamond stones, which is useful when studying concepts in multiple linear regression analysis. Some of the key concepts include: categorical variables, data transformation and standardized residuals. It shows how the same type of linear regression used in such fields as finance, marketing and human resources can be used for this type of study.

  19. Preparation of charcoal from cherry stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán-Valle, Carlos J.; Gómez-Corzo, Manuel; Gómez-Serrano, Vicente; Pastor-Villegas, José; Rojas-Cervantes, María L.

    2006-06-01

    Cherry stones (CS) are carbonised at 400-1000 °C for 0-4 h in N 2 and the charcoals obtained are characterised to gain information about their chemical composition and porous texture, with a view to their use in the preparation of activated carbon. Depending on the heating conditions, the products obtained may possess a low ash content and a high fixed carbon content and are essentially microporous and macroporous solids.

  20. FastStone Capture 5.2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-01-01

    Screen capture software can be quite helpful and potential applications include looking at graphics for use in a report or just reviewing visual material later for other purposes. The latest version of FastStone Capture allows users to capture full screen rectangle regions, scrolling windows, and other objects. The application takes up a small amount of memory, and it also allows users to add comments to each captured image. This version is compatible with all computers running Windows 95 and newer.

  1. A quantum Rosetta stone for interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hwang Lee; Pieter Kok; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2002-01-01

    Heisenberg-limited measurement protocols can be used to gain an increase in measurement precision over classical protocols. Such measurements can be implemented using, e.g., optical Mach-Zehnder interferometers and Ramsey spectroscopes. We address the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and the discrete Fourier transform. Based on this equivalence we introduce the ``quantum Rosetta stone'', and we describe a

  2. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Maciejewski; R. Neuhaeuser; R. Errmann; M. Mugrauer; Ch. Adam; A. Berndt; T. Eisenbeiss; S. Fiedler; Ch. Ginski; M. Hohle; U. Kramm; C. Marka; M. Moualla; T. Pribulla; St. Raetz; T. Roell; T. O. B. Schmidt; M. Seeliger; I. Spaleniak; N. Tetzlaff; L. Trepl

    2010-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just about 10 Myrs after formation of\\u000atheir host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation\\u000atheories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet\\u000aformation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10\\u000aMyrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by\\u000agravitational collapse (being

  3. Weathering and weathering rates of natural stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Erhard M.

    1987-06-01

    Physical and chemical weathering were studied as separate processes in the past. Recent research, however, shows that most processes are physicochemical in nature. The rates at which calcite and silica weather by dissolution are dependent on the regional and local climatic environment. The weathering of silicate rocks leaves discolored margins and rinds, a function of the rocks' permeability and of the climatic parameters. Salt action, the greatest disruptive factor, is complex and not yet fully understood in all its phases, but some of the causes of disruption are crystallization pressure, hydration pressure, and hygroscopic attraction of excess moisture. The decay of marble is complex, an interaction between disolution, crack-corrosion, and expansion-contraction cycies triggered by the release of residual stresses. Thin spalls of granites commonly found near the street level of buildings are generally caused by a combination of stress relief and salt action. To study and determine weathering rates of a variety of commercial stones, the National Bureau of Standards erected a Stone Exposure Test Wall in 1948. Of the many types of stone represented, only a few fossiliferous limestones permit a valid measurement of surface reduction in a polluted urban environment.

  4. Iron gall ink-induced corrosion of cellulose: aging, degradation and stabilization. Part 1: model paper studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antje Potthast; Ute Henniges; Gerhard Banik

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose in historic paper documents is often damaged by the writing media used, especially iron gall ink or copper pigments.\\u000a Degradation induced by iron gall ink is suggested to be a synergistic process comprising both hydrolytic and oxidative reactions.\\u000a These processes were studied on very low sample amounts according to the CCOA and FDAM method, i.e. by fluorescence labeling\\u000a of

  5. Consequences of communal gall occupation and a test for kin discrimination in the aphid Tamalia coweni (Cockerell) (Homoptera: Aphididae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the consequences of communal gall induction on individual and group fitness in the aphid Tamaliacoweni. The possibilities that kin discrimination and foundress density are factors favoring communal gall occupation were examined.\\u000a Clonally produced aphid foundresses were collected to create two treatments: clonal groups and groups of less closely related\\u000a individuals. These were confined on suitable host plant

  6. Structure of floral galls of Byrsonima sericea (Malpighiaceae) induced by Bruggmanniella byrsonimae (Cecidomyiidae, Diptera) and their effects on host plants.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, A L A; Cruz, S M S; Vieira, A C M

    2014-03-01

    Galls are anomalies in plant development from parasitic origin, and affect cellular differentiation or growth of plants. This parasite-plant interaction occurs in many environments and typically in vegetative organs of plants. The existence of galls in reproductive organs and their effects on the host plant are seldom described in the literature. In this paper, we present a novel study of galls in plants of the neotropical region. Galls of Bruggmmaniella byrsonimae develop in the flower buds of Byrsonima sericea DC. (Malpighiaceae) and affect development of the reproductive organs and the reproductive effort of these plants. The sepals and petals show hypertrophy of parenchyma tissues after differentiation, and the stamens exhibit degeneration of the sporogenic tissue. The gynoecium is not entirely developed; ovary and ovules are often absent. Changes in vascular tissues are also frequent, which may indicate high demand for nutrient resources by the new tissues initiated by the larva. We compared the amount of inflorescences, galls and fruits to evaluate possible effects on host reproduction. The results suggest that the Cecidomyiidae galls in flower organs affect fruit set and the reproductive success of B. sericea. PMID:23890089

  7. Identification of Seed Gall Nematodes of Agronomic and Regulatory Concern with PCR-RFLP of ITS1.

    PubMed

    Powers, T O; Szalanski, A L; Mullin, P G; Harris, T S; Bertozzi, T; Griesbach, J A

    2001-12-01

    A molecular analysis of eight described species of seed gall nematode, along with six undescribed isolates from different hosts, has revealed a strong association between nucleotide sequence polymorphism and host status. Each anguinid nematode associated with a unique host produced a unique PCR-RFLP pattern for the ITS1 region. Anguina species that had been synonymized in the past, Anguina agrostis, A. funesta, and A. wevelli (Afrina wevelli), were readily discriminated. Two undescribed species from northern New South Wales and southeastern South Australia, reported to be vectors of Rathyaibacter toxicus in the disease called ''floodplain staggers,'' were differentiated by a single restriction enzyme, and both could be separated easily from A. funesta, the vector of R. toxicus in annual ryegrass toxicity. Other species differentiated in this study include A. agropyronifloris, A. graminis, A. microlaenae, A. pacificae, and undescribed species from host species Dactylis glomerata, Agrostis avenacea, Polypogon monospeliensis, Stipa sp., Astrebla pectinata, and Holcus lanatus. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region suggests that considerable anguinid genetic diversification has accompanied specialization on different host species. PMID:19265880

  8. Peanut Diseases Atlas. 

    E-print Network

    Horne, Wendell C.

    1974-01-01

    in color. The fungus develops at or very near the soil surface, presumably because of a high oxygen requirement. 23. Black mold of peanuts (fungus Aspergillus niger) This fungal disease-characterized by a black mold growth, may occur on planted seed... be dug instead of pulled, since galls may be dis lodged from the roots. 31. Yellow mold (fungus-Aspergillus ffavus) This fungus produces a toxin called "afla toxin," and infected peanuts are placed in Segre gation III at the buying point. Exact...

  9. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

  10. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  11. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  12. WPW syndrome: the 'Rosetta stone' of rhythmology. The history of the Rosetta stone.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-03-01

    Prior to the 'discovery' of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, interpreting the respective phenomena was akin to reading hieroglyphic characters; thus a clear pathophysiological understanding and practical clinical diagnosis were impossible. The epochal work by Wolff, Parkinson, and White, which resulted in the electrophysiologically correct interpretation of circus movements as the cause of tachycardic rhythm disorders, can therefore indeed be compared to the deciphering of hieroglyphic writing by Champollion in 1822 with the aid of the Rosetta stone. After intensive archaeological and graphological examinations by the Society of Antiquaries, the Rosetta stone finally made its way to the British Museum, where it can still be viewed and admired today. PMID:19131345

  13. Regeneration of normal and fertile plants that express octopine synthase, from tobacco crown galls after deletion of tumour-controlling functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henri De Greve; Jan Leemans; Jean-Pierre Hernalsteens; Lin Thia-Toong; Marc De Beuckeleer; Lothar Willmitzer; Leon Otten; Marc Van Montagu; Jeff Schell

    1982-01-01

    Crown gall, a neoplasmic transformation of plant cells, is caused by transfer and integration into nuclear plant DNA of T-DNA, a segment of the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens1-8. In plant cells, this T-DNA is expressed9-12 and determines the morphogenetic growth properties of crown gall cells12-16 and the synthesis of opines17-21. The T-DNA in octopine crown galls is composed of

  14. Milk of calcium stones: radiological signs and management outcome.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, M

    2015-06-01

    Milk of calcium (MOC) is a rare type of stone that was first described in 1940 by Ludin and Howald who reported MOC in renal cysts. Milk of calcium is a viscous colloidal suspension of calcium salts. Stasis, obstruction and infection are important predisposing factors. Due to a layering effect, characteristic radiological signs especially in CT can help in diagnosis to avoid unsuccessful shock wave lithotripsy. This is the largest reported case series, in which radiological signs by CT scan to predict renal MOC stones, clinical picture and management outcome are described in detail. Cases with suspected renal milk of calcium stones were studied over 7 years (2008-2015). All cases were diagnosed preoperatively by non-contrast CT. Urine cultures were performed in all patients preoperatively. Intra-operative and postoperative findings were reported. Stones retrieved were sent for chemical analysis using an infrared method. Seven cases of milk of calcium renal stones were included in this study. These stones were faint radio-opaque in two cases and radiolucent in five cases. All cases were diagnosed preoperatively with non-contrast CT. Their Hounsfield units (HU) ranged from 114 to 612. All stones were located in a dependent position (gravitational effect) in the posterior aspect of dilated calyces. Five cases exhibited the typical fluid level and two cases demonstrated semilunar (half moon) pattern in the anterior surface of the stones. All cases underwent PCNL with suction and retrieval of soft stones without the need for disintegration. When stones demonstrate a low Hounsfield unit, are arranged in dependent positions within dilated calyces and exhibit fluid level or semilunar pattern on non-contrast CT, milk of calcium stones should be considered. PCNL is an effective modality for management of renal milk of calcium stones. PMID:25820293

  15. The Stone Wall Initiative: Grades 3-5 Curricula

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This curriculum includes lessons and activities which are grounded in the children's book 'Stone Wall Secrets' as well as in New England's abundance of stone walls. Many students are familiar with stone walls in their neighborhoods and are afforded instances in which they may delve into essential questions regarding the walls, the stones they are made from, and the history associated with their construction. The curriculum includes a set of lessons with national content standard alignments for each one, accompanied by worksheets, a teacher's kit, a teacher's reference, links to related texts, and some sample student work.

  16. Renal stone risk assessment during Space Shuttle flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The metabolic and environmental factors influencing renal stone formation before, during, and after Space Shuttle flights were assessed. We established the contributing roles of dietary factors in relationship to the urinary risk factors associated with renal stone formation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 24-hr. urine samples were collected prior to, during space flight, and following landing. Urinary and dietary factors associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative urinary supersaturation of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were calculated. RESULTS: Urinary composition changed during flight to favor the crystallization of calcium-forming salts. Factors that contributed to increased potential for stone formation during space flight were significant reductions in urinary pH and increases in urinary calcium. Urinary output and citrate, a potent inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, were slightly reduced during space flight. Dietary intakes were significantly reduced for a number of variables, including fluid, energy, protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first in-flight characterization of the renal stone forming potential in astronauts. With the examination of urinary components and nutritional factors, it was possible to determine the factors that contributed to increased risk or protected from risk. In spite of the protective components, the negative contributions to renal stone risk predominated and resulted in a urinary environment that favored the supersaturation of stone-forming salts. Dietary and pharmacologic therapies need to be assessed to minimize the potential for renal stone formation in astronauts during/after space flight.

  17. Advances in the endoscopic management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Arain, Mustafa A; Attam, Rajeev; Freeman, Martin L

    2014-09-01

    Extraction of common bile duct stones by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography generally involves biliary sphincterotomy, endoscopic papillary balloon dilation or a combination of both. Endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilation after sphincterotomy has increased the safety of large stone extraction. Cholangioscopically directed electrohydraulic and laser lithotripsy using single-operator mother-daughter systems or direct peroral cholangioscopy using ultraslim endoscopes are increasingly utilized for the management of refractory stones. In this Review, we focus on advances in endoscopic approaches and techniques, with a special emphasis on management strategies for 'difficult' common bile duct stones. PMID:24860928

  18. Sequential malt lymphomas of the stomach, small intestine, and gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Stephen, M R; Farquharson, M A; Sharp, R A; Jackson, R

    1998-01-01

    Low grade lymphomas of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) are indolent neoplasms that, although tending to remain localised for many years, may spread to other mucosal sites. A 53 year old woman treated by total gastrectomy for low grade MALT lymphoma of the stomach developed a recurrence in the small bowel 18 years later, and a further recurrence involving the gall bladder after three years in complete clinical remission after chemotherapy. In situ hybridisation showed that the small intestine and gall bladder recurrences had the same pattern of light chain restriction. Tumour from all three sites was shown to be derived from a single clone by the demonstration of an identical immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement by the polymerase chain reaction. The case illustrates the propensity of MALT lymphomas to "home" to mucosal sites and gives an insight into their behavior over an extended follow up. PMID:9577379

  19. Leptomeningeal Dissemination in Gall Bladder Carcinoma: Sequelae of Long-Term Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mohanti, Bidhu Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with gall bladder malignancies usually present at an advanced stage with less than 20% cases being resectable at presentation and over a half harbouring distant metastases to liver or paraaortic nodes. Long-term cure is uncommon and so is the presence of central nervous system metastases. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with adenocarcinoma gall bladder, treated with postoperative locoregional irradiation following simple cholecystectomy, who developed headache, backache, vision loss, and multiple joint pains six years following adjuvant therapy. A diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatous meningitis was established with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positivity for carcinoma. She deteriorated on palliative cranial irradiation and was managed with best supportive care. PMID:25431707

  20. Determination of elemental concentrations of iron gall ink components by PIXE

    SciTech Connect

    Budnar, Milos; Simcic, Jure; Ursic, Mitja; Rupnik, Zdravko [Jozef Stefan Institute, p.p.3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kolar, Jana [National and University Library, Turjaska 1, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Strlic, Matija [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Askerceva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2003-08-26

    The harmful effects of the iron gall ink on the supporting media (i.e. paper, parchment) are known for a long time. High contents of the catalytic ions and acids present in the ink can cause corrosion of the support and even its irreversible damage. Several historical documents from National and University Library (NUL) are being studied. The samples were measured nondestructively by the in-air PIXE for determination of the iron gall elemental composition. The measured concentrations prove that the analyzed inks contain a variety of different transition metals, which may influence the ink's corrosive character. For already measured documents dating from 14th to 19th century the ink and paper elemental concentrations and their ratios to iron were studied by the statistical methods.

  1. Evolutionary diversification of the gall midge genus Asteromyia (Cecidomyiidae) in a multitrophic ecological context.

    PubMed

    Stireman, John O; Devlin, Hilary; Carr, Timothy G; Abbot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Gall-forming insects provide ideal systems to analyze the evolution of host-parasite interactions and understand the ecological interactions that contribute to evolutionary diversification. Flies in the family Cecidomyiidae represent the largest radiation of gall-forming insects and are characterized by complex trophic interactions with plants, fungal symbionts, and predators. We analyzed the phylogenetic history and evolutionary associations of the North American cecidomyiid genus Asteromyia, which is engaged in a complex and perhaps co-evolving community of interactions with host-plants, fungi, and parasitoids. Mitochondrial gene trees generally support current classifications, but reveal extensive cryptic diversity within the eight named species. Asteromyia likely radiated after their associated host-plants in the Astereae, but species groups exhibit strong associations with specific lineages of Astereae. Evolutionary associations with fungal mutualists are dynamic, however, and suggest rapid and perhaps coordinated changes across trophic levels. PMID:19765662

  2. Effects of thienorphine on contraction of the guinea pig sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilan; Li, Tingting; Su, Ruibin; Gong, Zehui

    2014-08-15

    Opioid analgesics are widely believed to cause spasm of the bile duct sphincter and so impede bile flow. Thienorphine is a partial opioid agonist that is a good candidate for the treatment of opioid dependence; however, to date, no studies have reported the effects of thienorphine on the function of the biliary tract. This study examined the in vivo effects of thienorphine on the guinea pig isolated sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder and on bile flow. The area under the curve (AUC) of isolated sphincter of Oddi was not influenced by thienorphine or buprenorphine, whereas morphine increased the AUC of the isolated sphincter of Oddi in a concentration-dependent manner. Thienorphine and buprenorphine concentration-dependently decreased the AUC of isolated choledochus, while morphine increased the AUC of isolated choledochus. Thienorphine had no effect on the contractile amplitude or basal tension of isolated gall bladder muscle strips. In contrast, buprenorphine and morphine increased the contractile basal tension of isolated gall bladder muscle strips in a concentration-dependent manner. Thienorphine (0.01-1.0mg/kg) had no significant inhibitory effect on bile flow. However, morphine (1.0-10mg/kg) and buprenorphine (1.0mg/kg) significantly inhibited bile flow. The maximum inhibition of bile flow by buprenorphine was 63.9±12.9% and by morphine was 74.1±11.3%. In summary, thienorphine has little influence on the guinea pig isolated sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder or on bile flow, which may result in a lack of adverse biliary colic effects. PMID:24830319

  3. Biological activities of phenolic compounds isolated from galls of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aranya Manosroi; Pensak Jantrawut; Hiroyuki Akazawa; Toshihiro Akihisa; Jiradej Manosroi

    2010-01-01

    The aqueous extract of galls from Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) was fractionated on Diaion and refractionated on octadecyl silica column. Six phenolic compounds were isolated and identified as gallic acid (1), punicalagin (2), isoterchebulin (3), 1,3,6-tri-O-galloyl-?-D-glucopyranose (4), chebulagic acid (5) and chebulinic acid (6). All of the compounds showed stronger 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and melanin inhibitory activities than ascorbic

  4. The impact of two gall-forming arthropods on the photosynthetic rates of their hosts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine C. Larson

    1998-01-01

    The impact of herbivores on host plant photosynthetic rates can range from negative to positive. While defoliation by chewing\\u000a herbivores can result in increases in photosynthesis followed by compensatory growth, other herbivore guilds, such as mesophyll\\u000a feeders which damage photosynthetic leaf tissues, almost always reduce photosynthetic rates. The impact of galling herbivores\\u000a on host photosynthesis has rarely been examined, even

  5. Note: Release and recovery of parasitoids of the eucalyptus gall wasp Ophelimus maskelli in Israel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Mendel; A. Protasov; D. Blumberg; D. Brand; Nitza Saphir; Z. Madar; J. La Salle

    2007-01-01

    Four parasitoids emerged from leaves galled by the waspOphelimus maskelli (Ashmead) that were collected in Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia:Closterocerus chameleon (Girault) and an unidentified Tetrastichinae species (Eulophidae); andStethynium ophelimi Huber andStethynium breviovipositor (Huber (Mymaridae).C. chamaeleon andS. ophelimi were released in eucalyptus plantations infested withO. maskelli in Israel. The recovery of the parasitoids, as well as several aspects of their possible

  6. The biology and ecology of the live oak woolly leaf gall Andricus laniger Ashmead. (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae

    E-print Network

    Hamel, Dennis Robert

    1973-01-01

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Entomology THE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF THE LIVE OAI& WOOLLY LEAF GALL ANDRICUS LANIGER ASHMEAD (HYMENOPTERA: CYNIPIDAE) A Thesis by DENNIS ROBERT HAMEL Approved as to style, and content by...: (Chairman of Committee (He o Department) Member Member (Member Member August 1973 ABSTRACT The Biology and Ecology of the Live Oak Woolly 1 f d ll lid'~1'At d (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae). (August 1973) Dennis Robert Hamel, B. S. , Montana State...

  7. Ribosomal DNA methylation in a flax genotroph and a crown gall tumour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith S. Blundy; Christopher A. Cullis; Angus G. Hepburn

    1987-01-01

    The methylation patterns of two flax lines are described. One, a genotroph S1, has 800 rNA genes per haploid cell while FT37\\/1, a crown gall tumour incited on S1, has only 300. Using the enzymes EcoRII, BstNI and ApyI to assess CXG methylation and HpaII and MspI for CG, we show that the methylation patterns of the rDNAs of both

  8. Induced resistance in Solanum dulcamara triggered by the gall mite Aceria cladophthirus (Acari: Eriophyoidea)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Westphal; F. Dreger; R. Bronner

    1991-01-01

    After infestation ofSolanum dulcamara leaves by the eriophyoid gall miteAceria cladophthirus (Nalepa), induced resistance became operative against subsequent eriophyoid attacks. The protective effect, manifested by reduction in plant damage and\\/or mite proliferation, lasted up to 40 days. When the challenger wasA. cladophthirus, the number and size of lesions decreased significantly but mite mortality was not enhanced. When the rust miteThamnacus

  9. Intragastric bile acid concentrations are unrelated to symptoms of flatulent dyspepsia in patients with and without gallbladder disease and postcholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, R G; Love, A H

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that duodenogastric reflux may be the basic underlying mechanism which gives rise to symptoms of flatulent dyspepsia. Fasting and postprandial gastric juice bile acid concentrations were measured in patients with flatulent dyspepsia with and without gall bladder disease and postcholecystectomy. There were 13 patients with gall bladder disease, 12 with normal gall bladders and 13 postcholecystectomy. Gastric juice was obtained by intubation. Bile acid concentrations were compared with 21 controls and 15 asymptomatic subjects with gall bladder disease. For 21 patients with gall bladder disease who underwent cholecystectomy, levels were again assessed postoperatively to allow correlation with outcome. The occurrence of reflux and the resultant gastric juice bile acids did not correlate with symptoms. Concentrations postcholecystectomy, including asymptomatic subjects were significantly higher than controls (p less than 0.01). It is concluded that limited duodenogastric reflux is common and need not be associated with symptoms even when the resultant intra-gastric concentrations are higher than normal. PMID:3557185

  10. Proposed Experimental Test of Gall's Predicted Isochromatic Black Body Displacement Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Clarence A.

    2010-03-01

    The test of any Black Body Distribution function is how well it satisfies: Stefan-Boltzmann law ( I=?T^4) ; Wien's isothermal displacement law ( ?mT=b) and the maximum isothermal emitted intensity condition ( I?mT^5) . Gall's function ( I?=?T^6b^2 ?e^-?Tb) satisfies these conditions exactly and unlike all previous candidates employs the original empirical constants ( ?,b) in its formulation. Distinct from Planck and all others, it predicts an isochromatic displacement law: ?Tm=6b, where Tm is the temperature of maximum emitted intensity for a given ?. The associated maximum isochromatic emitted intensity should satisfy ITm?-5 . At wavelengths of 20, 25 and 29 ?m, Tm is calculated to be 870, 696 and 600 K respectively. In this range ( Tm<1000,) , temperatures can be measured without using the colour temperature. Gall's exact distribution function seriously questions Planck's inexact function. This proposed test is imperative as the existence of an isochromatic maximum intensity at Tm would affirm Gall's prediction of a crossover wavelength above which a colder body would emit with greater intensity than a hotter one. Its non-existence would reassert support for Planck's traditional notion that a hotter body always emits more intensely than a colder one throughout the entire EMR spectrum (http://sites.google.com/site/purefieldphysics).

  11. Strigolactones as an auxiliary hormonal defence mechanism against leafy gall syndrome in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stes, Elisabeth; Depuydt, Stephen; De Keyser, Annick; Matthys, Cedrick; Audenaert, Kris; Yoneyama, Koichi; Werbrouck, Stefaan; Goormachtig, Sofie; Vereecke, Danny

    2015-08-01

    Leafy gall syndrome is the consequence of modified plant development in response to a mixture of cytokinins secreted by the biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. The similarity of the induced symptoms with the phenotype of plant mutants defective in strigolactone biosynthesis and signalling prompted an evaluation of the involvement of strigolactones in this pathology. All tested strigolactone-related Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were hypersensitive to R. fascians. Moreover, treatment with the synthetic strigolactone mixture GR24 and with the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase inhibitor D2 illustrated that strigolactones acted as antagonistic compounds that restricted the morphogenic activity of R. fascians. Transcript profiling of the MORE AXILLARY GROWTH1 (MAX1), MAX2, MAX3, MAX4, and BRANCHED1 (BRC1) genes in the wild-type Columbia-0 accession and in different mutant backgrounds revealed that upregulation of strigolactone biosynthesis genes was triggered indirectly by the bacterial cytokinins via host-derived auxin and led to the activation of BRC1 expression, inhibiting the outgrowth of the newly developing shoots, a typical hallmark of leafy gall syndrome. Taken together, these data support the emerging insight that balances are critical for optimal leafy gall development: the long-lasting biotrophic interaction is possible only because the host activates a set of countermeasures-including the strigolactone response-in reaction to bacterial cytokinins to constrain the activity of R. fascians. PMID:26136271

  12. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    PubMed

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages. PMID:23542649

  13. The effect of indwelling endoprosthesis on stone size or fragmentation after long-term treatment with biliary stenting for large stones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Katsinelos; I. Galanis; I. Pilpilidis; G. Paroutoglou; P. Tsolkas; B. Papaziogas; S. Dimiropoulos; E. Kamperis; D. Katsiba; M. Kalomenopoulou; A. Papagiannis

    2003-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic biliary stenting is often used for large or difficult common bile duct (CBD) stones, but the effect of indwelling endoprosthesis on size or fragmentation of stones after long-term treatment with biliary stenting has not been formally established. We compared the stone size or fragmentation of common bile duct stones after a long period of biliary stenting. Methods: Endoscopic

  14. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. 330...Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. ...areas in the Continental United States of earth (including soil), stone,...

  15. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. 330...Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. ...areas in the Continental United States of earth (including soil), stone,...

  16. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. 330...Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. ...areas in the Continental United States of earth (including soil), stone,...

  17. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  18. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...true Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  19. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  20. 32 CFR 644.505 - Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. 644.505 Section 644...Standing Timber, Crops, and Embedded Gravel, Sand and Stone § 644.505 Disposal plan for embedded gravel, sand or stone. Prior to offering...

  1. Cystone® for 1 year did not change urine chemistry or decrease stone burden in cystine stone formers.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Stephen B; Vrtiska, Terri J; Canzanello, Vincent J; Lieske, John C

    2011-06-01

    Cystine kidney stones frequently recur because inadequate prevention exists. We recruited documented recurrent cystine kidney stone formers (6 men, 4 women, 44 ± 17 years) into a 2-phased study to assess safety and effectiveness of Cystone®, a herbal treatment used to prevent and facilitate passage of cystine kidney stones. The first phase was a randomized double-blinded 12 weeks crossover study assessing the effect of Cystone® versus placebo (2 tablets BID) on urinary chemistries. The second phase was an open label 1 year study of Cystone® to determine if renal stone burden decreased, as assessed by quantitative and subjective assessment of CT. There was no statistically significant change of urinary composition from baseline short (6 weeks) or long (52 weeks) term on Cystone®, including volume (2525, 2611, 2730 ml), pH (6.7, 6.7, 7.05), and cystine excretion (2770, 2889, 4025 ?mol). Pre and post-CT was available in nine patients. Although seven kidneys lost stones spontaneously or surgically, overall stone burden increased in seven kidneys, was unchanged in nine, and fell in only two. Quantitative scoring increased in both the left and right kidneys (1602-1667 and 301-2064 volumetric units, respectively). Therefore, this study does not suggest that Cystone® has a favorable effect on urinary chemistries that could decrease cystine stone formation, nor does it appear to prevent stone growth or promote stone passage over a 1-year period. PMID:21161651

  2. Management of waste from stone processing industry.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, K; Joseph, Kurian

    2007-10-01

    Characteristics of waste generated in stone processing industries, impact of its current disposal practices and waste recycling potential were assessed by field studies. The physical and chemical characteristics of waste are comparable to construction materials like sand and cement. The environmental issues due to the disposal of waste including that on ambient air quality were identified at respective disposal sites. It was found that the waste can be used to replace about 60% of sand and 10% of cement in concrete. Similarly the waste can replace 40% of clay in clay bricks with affecting its compressive strength. PMID:18476374

  3. Renal effects of percutaneous stone removal

    SciTech Connect

    Eshghi, M.; Schiff, R.G.; Smith, A.D.

    1989-02-01

    Preoperative and postoperative renography with 99mTechnetium-diethylene-triamine pentaacetic acid was performed on 33 patients who were free of renal scarring, infection, and obstruction and who underwent percutaneous renal stone removal. Although there was a transient decrease in renal function postoperatively in some patients, statistically significant reductions in renal function occurred only in 1 patient with an arteriovenous malformation that was embolized and in 1 patient who had a postoperative ureteropelvic junction stricture. The creation of more than one nephrostomy tract did not affect the results. In the absence of serious complications, percutaneous nephrostomy does not have a significant effect on renal function.

  4. Exploring the building stones of downtown Seattle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lyn Gualtieri

    Most introductory geology students have experience identifying hand-sized rock samples in the lab, but never get to see bigger rock exposures outside the classroom. This activity includes takes students to downtown Seattle, where they observe the geology of the building stones within a few blocks of campus. The exercise exposes students to large, polished rock samples in an area where they are familiar, but might not have noticed the rocks before. For students on urban campuses or online geology classes with a limited amount of lab time this is a useful activity.

  5. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    E-print Network

    Maciejewski, G; Errmann, R; Mugrauer, M; Adam, Ch; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Fiedler, S; Ginski, Ch; Hohle, M; Kramm, U; Marka, C; Moualla, M; Pribulla, T; Raetz, St; Roell, T; Schmidt, T O B; Seeliger, M; Spaleniak, I; Tetzlaff, N; Trepl, L

    2010-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just about 10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young) or accretion growth (being smaller when young). We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  6. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Neuhäuser, R.; Errmann, R.; Mugrauer, M.; Adam, Ch.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Fiedler, S.; Ginski, Ch.; Hohle, M.; Kramm, U.; Marka, C.; Moualla, M.; Pribulla, T.; Raetz, St.; Roell, T.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Spaleniak, I.; Tetzlaff, N.; Trepl, L.

    2011-02-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young) or accretion growth (being smaller when young). We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  7. Study on the sensitivity of three oat varieties to the saddle gall midge, haplodiplosis margina ta (von Roser) (Diptera: cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Censier, F; Chavalle, S; G, San Martin Y Gomez; De Proft, M; Bodson, B

    2013-01-01

    The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginota (von Roser, 1840) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae feed on stems and attractive saddle-shaped depressions, driving to important yield losses when the galls are numerous. After 40 years without any reporting, large populations of H. marginata and important damage have been observed since 2010 in wheat crops in Belgium, especially in the Flemish Polders where clay soils and intensive farming of cereals favour heavy infestations. According to some research conducted in the 1960s during the last outbreak, oat (Avena sativa L.) is known to be one of the less favourable hosts to the saddle gall midge. Our study was performed in order to assess the host sensitivity of three oat varieties currently grown in Belgium: EVITA, EFFEKTIv and FREDDY. Therefore, oat varieties were sown on infested soil in two separate enclosures in a glasshouse. In the first enclosure, only the three oat varieties were grown; in the second one, these three oat varieties were grown together with two varieties of spring wheat: GRANNY and KWS CHAMSIN. TWO parameters were measured: the percentage of leaves with laid eggs, and the number of galls per stem. The percentage of leaves with eggs showed that the infestation was significantly lower on oats when they were in presence of wheat. The egg infestation was also significantly higher on wheat than on oat, which means oat is a much less favourable host plant than spring wheat for egg laying. Oat varieties were significantly different from each other regarding the number of galls per stem, but with very little damage compared to wheat. The FREDDY variety even seemed to be completely resistant to saddle gall midge, as no galls were observed although there was a similar percentage of leaves with eggs for the three oat varieties. Cropping oat could thus contribute to reduce infestations of H. morginato. PMID:25145247

  8. Daily Mean Temperature and Clinical Kidney Stone Presentation in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas: A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Gasparrini, Antonio; Saigal, Christopher S.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Landis, J. Richard; Madison, Rodger; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Background: High ambient temperatures are a risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the precise relationship between temperature and kidney stone presentation is unknown. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation according to lag time and temperatures. Methods: Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of kidney stone presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 20-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 20 days. Our analysis used data from the MarketScan Commercial Claims database for 60,433 patients who sought medical evaluation or treatment of kidney stones from 2005–2011 in the U.S. cities of Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Results: Associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation were not monotonic, and there was variation in the exposure–response curve shapes and the strength of associations at different temperatures. However, in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the reference value of 10°C. The cumulative RR for a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was 1.38 in Atlanta (95% CI: 1.07, 1.79), 1.37 in Chicago (95% CI: 1.07, 1.76), 1.36 in Dallas (95% CI: 1.10, 1.69), 1.11 in Los Angeles (95% CI: 0.73, 1.68), and 1.47 in Philadelphia (95% CI: 1.00, 2.17). Kidney stone presentations also were positively associated with temperatures < 2°C in Atlanta, and < 10°C in Chicago and Philadelphia. In four cities, the strongest association between kidney stone presentation and a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was estimated for lags of ? 3 days. Conclusions: In general, kidney stone presentations increased with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days. These findings further support an adverse effect of high temperatures on nephrolithiasis. Citation: Tasian GE, Pulido JE, Gasparrini A, Saigal CS, Horton BP, Landis JR, Madison R, Keren R, for the Urologic Diseases in America Project. 2014. Daily mean temperature and clinical kidney stone presentation in five U.S. metropolitan areas: a time-series analysis. Environ Health Perspect 122:1081–1087;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307703 PMID:25009122

  9. A Guideline for the Management of Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James; Johnston, Smith

    2014-01-01

    There are no specific guidelines for the management of renal stones in astronauts. Given the increased risk for bone loss, hypercalcuria, and stone formation due to microgravity, a clinical practice guideline is needed. Methods An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. This information was used to create an algorithm for the management of renal stones in astronauts. Results Guidelines are proposed based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In a usual medical setting, asymptomatic, small stones less than 7 mm are often observed over time. Given the constraints of schedule, and the risks to crew health and mission, this approach is too liberal. An upper limit of 3 mm stone diameter was adopted before requiring intervention, because this is the largest size that has a significant chance of spontaneous passage on its own. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion The spaceflight environment requires more aggressive treatment than would otherwise be found with the usual practice of medicine. A small stone can become a major problem because it may ultimately require medical evacuation from orbit. Thus renal stones are a significant mission threat and should be managed in a systematic way to mitigate risks to crew health and mission success.

  10. Imaging-based logics for ornamental stone quality chart definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Aldo; Serranti, Silvia; Raspi, Costantino

    2007-02-01

    Ornamental stone products are commercially classified on the market according to several factors related both to intrinsic lythologic characteristics and to their visible pictorial attributes. Sometimes these latter aspects prevail in quality criteria definition and assessment. Pictorial attributes are in any case also influenced by the performed working actions and the utilized tools selected to realize the final stone manufactured product. Stone surface finishing is a critical task because it can contribute to enhance certain aesthetic features of the stone itself. The study was addressed to develop an innovative set of methodologies and techniques able to quantify the aesthetic quality level of stone products taking into account both the physical and the aesthetical characteristics of the stones. In particular, the degree of polishing of the stone surfaces and the presence of defects have been evaluated, applying digital image processing strategies. Morphological and color parameters have been extracted developing specific software architectures. Results showed as the proposed approaches allow to quantify the degree of polishing and to identify surface defects related to the intrinsic characteristics of the stone and/or the performed working actions.

  11. 259. View of the stone curbing used at the Hefner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    259. View of the stone curbing used at the Hefner Overlook. This is a common feature at all overlooks on the parkway. All stone on the parkway, except for the Linn Cove Viaduct was quarried from within fifty miles of where it was used. Looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. Biofilm quantification on stone surfaces: comparison of various methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Prieto; B. Silva; O. Lantes

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of three different methods of estimating biofilm biomass on stone (amount of chlorophyll a, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and changes in colour) is discussed. Stone samples were sprayed with solutions of cyanobacteria and the actual microbial biomass—determined by cell culture—was compared with the biomass estimated using the different methods. Statistically significant differences between actual biomass

  13. Temporally variable macroinvertebrate–stone relationships in streams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean Jacobsen

    2005-01-01

    Stones were used to sample macroinvertebrates and characterise microhabitats at monthly or bimonthly intervals in six Ecuadorian streams covering a gradient in four different stability measures and other stream characteristics. The physical variables current velocity, water depth, horizontal position, embeddedness and size were measured to characterise stone microhabitats and presumed to be affected by or related to physical impact during

  14. Measuring stone weathering in cities: Surface reduction on marble monuments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragovich, D. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia))

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether measurements of stone weathering recorded by different observers could be aggregated into a simple data base for evaluating pollution effects on calcareous building stone. Apparent differences in recorded weathering rates on marble tombstones were here found to be partly a result of lettering size measured, measuring devices used, and individual observers.

  15. 11. FLOOR 2 LOOKING NORTH; SHOWS BURR STONES AND ROCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. FLOOR 2 LOOKING NORTH; SHOWS BURR STONES AND ROCK STONES, BEARING OF UPRIGHT SHAFT ON CENTER POST, BELT AT BASE OF UPRIGHT SHAFT DRIVES GOVERNOR SPINDLE; TRUNDLEWHEELS OF TWO LAYSHAFTS ENGAGE WITH CROWN WHEEL ABOVE GREAT SPUR WHEEL - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  16. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles grafted on stone surface.

    PubMed

    Bellissima, F; Bonini, M; Giorgi, R; Baglioni, P; Barresi, G; Mastromei, G; Perito, B

    2014-12-01

    Microbial colonization has a relevant impact on the deterioration of stone materials with consequences ranging from esthetic to physical and chemical changes. Avoiding microbial growth on cultural stones therefore represents a crucial aspect for their long-term conservation. The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively investigated in recent years, showing that they could be successfully applied as bactericidal coatings on surfaces of different materials. In this work, we investigated the ability of AgNPs grafted to Serena stone surfaces to inhibit bacterial viability. A silane derivative, which is commonly used for stone consolidation, and Bacillus subtilis were chosen as the grafting agent and the target bacterium, respectively. Results show that functionalized AgNPs bind to stone surface exhibiting a cluster disposition that is not affected by washing treatments. The antibacterial tests on stone samples revealed a 50 to 80 % reduction in cell viability, with the most effective AgNP concentration of 6.7 ?g/cm(2). To our knowledge, this is the first report on antimicrobial activity of AgNPs applied to a stone surface. The results suggest that AgNPs could be successfully used in the inhibition of microbial colonization of stone artworks. PMID:24151026

  17. Electrohydraulic impulse lithotripsy of bladder stones with URAT-I.

    PubMed

    Trapeznikova, M F; Borodulin, G G

    1977-03-01

    The electrohydraulic method of crushing bladder stones due to many aforesaid advantages can fully replace mechanical lithotripsy as being both more effective and having little danger of traumas. In rare cases when the stone cannot be crushed with Urat-I its removal should be performed by way of cystomy. PMID:862590

  18. Response of porous building stones to acid deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Grossi; M. Murray; R. N. Butlin

    1995-01-01

    This work investigates the response of porous carbonate building stones to acid deposition during a short-terra exposure period and the characteristics that influence their reactivity and\\/or durability. Several carbonate porous stones used in Spanish and English monuments were exposed to English urban and suburban environments. In each location they were both exposed to and sheltered from rainfall. Monthly analyses were

  19. Monte-Carlo Tree Search in Crazy Stone Remi Coulom

    E-print Network

    Coulom, Rémi - Groupe de Recherche sur l'Apprentissage Automatique, Université Charles de Gaulle

    Monte-Carlo Tree Search in Crazy Stone R´emi Coulom Universit´e Charles de Gaulle, INRIA, CNRS Introduction 2 Crazy Stone's Algorithm Principles of Monte-Carlo Evaluation Tree Search Patterns 3 Playing global understanding The Monte-Carlo Approach random playouts dynamic evaluation with global

  20. Kinetics of Swelling in Clay-Bearing Stones

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    with theory #12;The Problem The swelling of clays in stone leads to stress which can cause the stone to break Cylindrical Samples: 8mm 10mm 14mm 20mm 40mm diameter All samples are from the same block of Portland Brownstone with clay layers horizontally orientated Samples to be used to analyze varying kinetics based

  1. Use of Local Stone: Successes, Failures and Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerns, Edward; Will, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    Stone has been used in construction for thousands of years. Until relatively recently, local stone was used almost exclusively due to limited transportation options and to reduce costs. . Historically, the stone was often taken from nearby fields, known as fieldstone, without any specific quarrying operations and used to create unique assemblages of vernacular buildings. Stone, perhaps more than any other natural building material, has numerous varieties and characteristics within the broader classifications of stone: sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic. In exterior applications, stone historically has been used for foundations, localized cladding elements and in some instances entire building facades. Many of these local stones are appropriate for foundations, but not necessarily for cladding systems, particularly once the stone was quarried and modified rather than used in its natural form. These issues tended to be less significant in historic buildings when wall systems were much thicker and had more redundancies in the cladding systems Since around 1880, the use of these thinner applications of quarried stones as more traditional cladding systems (rather than cladding and structure) has resulted in challenges including unanticipated weathering characteristics, residual stresses and detrimental inclusions. These conditions can result in expensive and extensive repairs and maintenance. Often the options to address these characteristics are limited or potentially drastic depending on the scale of installation. It is important to understand the cause of the issues, understand if these issues are significant and finally how to address them appropriately. Where and how these unique local stones are installed as well as climate and weathering patterns certainly contribute to the potential unanticipated conditions. This presentation will be divided into two general parts. The first will address various stones used historically throughout regions within the United States including looking at some of the physical characteristics and problems that have been encountered with the use of the stone in various building applications. The focus will be on limestones and sandstones utilized in the Midwestern United States that have variable performances in these installations, contrasted with, the coral and shell stones of the Southern United States have performed as intended. The second part of the presentation will include a variety of case studies focusing on evaluation, distress and repair options for these local stones.

  2. Microbial deterioration of stone monuments--an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Stefanie; Ortega-Morales, Otto; Gaylarde, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Cultural heritage monuments may be discolored and degraded by growth and activity of living organisms. Microorganisms form biofilms on surfaces of stone, with resulting aesthetic and structural damage. The organisms involved are bacteria (including actinomycetes and cyanobacteria), fungi, archaea, algae, and lichens. Interactions between these organisms and stone can enhance or retard the overall rate of degradation. Microorganisms within the stone structure (endoliths) also cause damage. They grow in cracks and pores and may bore into rocks. True endoliths, present within the rock, have been detected in calcareous and some siliceous stone monuments and are predominantly bacterial. The taxonomic groups differ from those found epilithically at the same sites. The nature of the stone substrate and the environmental conditions influence the extent of biofilm colonization and the biodeterioration processes. A critical review of work on microbial biofilms on buildings of historic interest, including recent innovations resulting from molecular biology, is presented and microbial activities causing degradation are discussed. PMID:19203650

  3. A plant needs ants like a dog needs fleas: Myrmelachista schumanni ants gall many tree species to create housing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David P; Frederickson, Megan E; Shepard, Glenn H; Yu, Douglas W

    2009-11-01

    Hundreds of tropical plant species house ant colonies in specialized chambers called domatia. When, in 1873, Richard Spruce likened plant-ants to fleas and asserted that domatia are ant-created galls, he incited a debate that lasted almost a century. Although we now know that domatia are not galls and that most ant-plant interactions are mutualisms and not parasitisms, we revisit Spruce's suggestion that ants can gall in light of our observations of the plant-ant Myrmelachista schumanni, which creates clearings in the Amazonian rain forest called "supay-chakras," or "devil's gardens." We observed swollen scars on the trunks of nonmyrmecophytic canopy trees surrounding supay-chakras, and within these swellings, we found networks of cavities inhabited by M. schumanni. Here, we summarize the evidence supporting the hypothesis that M. schumanni ants make these galls, and we hypothesize that the adaptive benefit of galling is to increase the amount of nesting space available to M. schumanni colonies. PMID:19799500

  4. Tracking kidney stones with sound during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Jonathan M.

    The prevalence of kidney stones has increased significantly over the past decades. One of the primary treatments for kidney stones is shock wave lithotripsy which focuses acoustic shock waves onto the stone in order to fragment it into pieces that are small enough to pass naturally. This typically requires a few thousand shock waves delivered at a rate of about 2 Hz. Although lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment option for kidney stories, both acute and chronic complications have been identified which could be reduced if fewer shock waves were used. One factor that could be used to reduce the number of shock waves is accounting for the motion of the stone which causes a portion of the delivered shock waves to miss the stone, yielding no therapeutic benefit. Therefore identifying when the stone is not in focus would allow tissue to be spared without affecting fragmentation. The goal of this thesis is to investigate acoustic methods to track the stone in real-time during lithotripsy in order to minimize poorly-targeted shock waves. A relatively small number of low frequency ultrasound transducers were used in pulse-echo mode and a novel optimization routine based on time-of-flight triangulation is used to determine stone location. It was shown that the accuracy of the localization may be estimated without knowing the true stone location. This method performed well in preliminary experiments but the inclusion of tissue-like aberrating layers reduced the accuracy of the localization. Therefore a hybrid imaging technique employing DORT (Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator) and the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm was developed. This method was able to localize kidney stories to within a few millimeters even in the presence of an aberrating layer. This would be sufficient accuracy for targeting lithotripter shock waves. The conclusion of this work is that tracking kidney stones with low frequency ultrasound should be effective clinically.

  5. Algal 'greening' and the conservation of stone heritage structures.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Viles, Heather A; Ahmad, Samin; McCabe, Stephen; Smith, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    In humid, temperate climates, green algae can make a significant contribution to the deterioration of building stone, both through unsightly staining ('greening') and, possibly, physical and chemical transformations. However, very little is known about the factors that influence the deteriorative impact and spatial distribution of green algal biofilms, hindering attempts to model the influence of climate change on building conservation. To address this problem, we surveyed four sandstone heritage structures in Belfast, UK. Our research had two aims: 1) to investigate the relationships between greening and the deterioration of stone structures and 2) to assess the impacts of environmental factors on the distribution of green biofilms. We applied an array of analytical techniques to measure stone properties indicative of deterioration status (hardness, colour and permeability) and environmental conditions related to algal growth (surface and sub-surface moisture, temperature and surface texture). Our results indicated that stone hardness was highly variable but only weakly related to levels of greening. Stone that had been exposed for many years was, on average, darker and greener than new stone of the same type, but there was no correlation between greening and darkening. Stone permeability was higher on 'old', weathered stone but not consistently related to the incidence of greening. However, there was evidence to suggest that thick algal biofilms were capable of reducing the ingress of moisture. Greening was negatively correlated with point measurements of surface temperature, but not moisture or surface texture. Our findings suggested that greening had little impact on the physical integrity of stone; indeed the influence of algae on moisture regimes in stone may have a broadly bioprotective action. Furthermore, the relationship between moisture levels and greening is not straightforward and is likely to be heavily dependent upon temporal patterns in moisture regimes and other, unmeasured, factors such as nutrient supply. PMID:23178775

  6. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Siener, Roswitha; Netzer, Linda; Hesse, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. Methods Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. Results Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p?=?0.035), calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p?=?0.001) and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p?=?0.005) as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. Conclusions Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect. PMID:24265740

  7. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  8. BIOTROPICA 38(4): 569573 2006 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2006.00171.x Abundance of Gall Midges on Poulsenia armata (Moraceae): Importance of Host Plant

    E-print Network

    Quesada Avendaño, Mauricio

    on Poulsenia armata (Moraceae): Importance of Host Plant Size and Light Environment in Tropical Rain Forests1 I on the relationship between the host plant size of Poulsenia armata and the abundance of two gall midges in a tropical with host plant size only in the forest trees. Larger plants had more galls than small plants, although

  9. Selective Pressures on Clutch Size in the Gall Maker Asteromyia Carbonifera Author(s): Arthur E. Weis, Peter W. Price, Michael Lynch

    E-print Network

    Weis, Arthur

    Selective Pressures on Clutch Size in the Gall Maker Asteromyia Carbonifera Author(s): Arthur E SELECTIVE PRESSURES ON CLUTCH SIZE IN THE GALL MAKER ASTEROMYIA CARBONIFERA' ARTHUR E. WEIS,2 PETER W. PRICE evaluated to determine the selective pressure they exert on the number of eggs deposited per ovipositional

  10. 77 FR 21813 - Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, “Buried and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0055] Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, ``Buried...changes to the NUREG-1801, Revision 2, ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,'' and the NRC staff's aging...

  11. 77 FR 14446 - Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, “Buried and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...NRC-2012-0055] Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP...NUREG-1801, Revision 2, ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,'' and the...LR-ISGs to communicate insights and lessons learned and to address emergent...

  12. Biological control of the eucalyptus gall wasp Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead): Taxonomy and biology of the parasitoid species Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault), with information on its establishment in Israel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Protasov; D. Blumberg; D. Brand; J. La Salle; Z. Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault) (Hymenoptera; Eulophidae) was introduced into Israel for biological control of its family member, a gall-inducing pest Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead). Closterocerus chamaeleon appears to be a widespread species in Australia, ranging from northern Queensland to Victoria and Western Australia. It was reared from galls on Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh., E. tereticornis (=umbellata Smith.), E. amplifolia Naudin, E. cloziana F.Muell.

  13. Two new species of gall midges (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae) associated with Erythroxylum ovalifolium Peyr. (Erythroxylaceae) from the Barra de Maricá restinga, Maricá, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maia, V C; Fernandes, S P C

    2011-05-01

    Two new species of gall midges (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae) Dasineura ovalifoliae and Clinodiplosis maricaensis are described based on material from the Barra de Maricá restinga, Maricá, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Both species are associated with Erythroxylum ovalifolium Peyr. (Erythroxylaceae). The former is the gall inducer and the latter an inquiline. PMID:21755172

  14. A stone miner with both silicosis and constrictive pericarditis: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The working environment of stone miners has been believed to cause their susceptibility to respiratory diseases. Silicosis is an occupational disease caused by exposure to crystalline silica dust which is marked by inflammation and scarring in the lung. The immune system boosted after the silica invasion led to self-damage and lay the foundation of silicosis pathogenesis. Silicosis coexisting with other diseases in one patient has been reported, however, was not reported to coexist with constrictive pericarditis. We, for the first time, reported a patient with silicosis and constrictive pericarditis and thought the immune response was probably the link between the two. Case presentation A 59-year-old Chinese stone miner complained of chest distress was found to have lung nodules which were found to be silica deposits by biopsy. This patient was also found to have constrictive pericarditis at the same time. Later surgical decortication cured his symptoms. Conclusion We provided the first case having constrictive pericarditis concomitant with silicosis. A probable link between the two diseases was the immune response boosted by the silica deposits. PMID:24314106

  15. [Juxta-papillary duodenal diverticula in patients with primary common duct stones].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kawaguchi, H; Hasegawa, S; Muto, T

    1985-09-01

    Incidence of juxta papillary duodenal diverticula (JPDD) was studied in 182 patients with benign biliary diseases. Incidences of JPDD were 11.1% in cholecystolithiasis, 23.4% in cholecystocholedocholithiasis and 54.5% in choledocholithiasis. Concerning to the patients with common duct stones, average of age was significantly higher in the group with diverticulum than in the group without diverticulum (65.9 +/- 7.6 vs 55.9 +/- 13.7, p less than 0.01). Diameter of the common duct was also significantly larger in the group with diverticulum. To exclude the effect of aging, the same comparison was performed in patients older than 60 years. Here again, the group with diverticulum showed significantly greater dilatation of the common duct. Incidences of JPDD in the primary and secondary common duct stones were 73.1% and 19.7%, respectively. The difference was highly significant. JPDD seemed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cholestasis in the aged patients which may result in formation of primary common duct stones. PMID:3937042

  16. Common bile duct stones on multidetector computed tomography: Attenuation patterns and detectability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Whan; Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, In Seok; Han, Sok Won

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the attenuation patterns and detectability of common bile duct (CBD) stones by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). METHODS: Between March 2010 and February 2012, 191 patients with suspicion of CBD stones undergoing both MDCT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were enrolled and reviewed retrospectively. The attenuation patterns of CBD stones on MDCT were classified as heavily calcified, radiopaque, less radiopaque, or undetectable. The association between the attenuation patterns of CBD stones on MDCT and stone type consisting of pure cholesterol, mixed cholesterol, brown pigment, and black pigment and the factors related to the detectability of CBD stones by MDCT were evaluated. RESULTS: MDCT showed CBD stones in 111 of 130 patients in whom the CBD stones were demonstrated by ERCP with 85.4% sensitivity. The attenuation patterns of CBD stones on MDCT were heavily calcified 34 (26%), radiopaque 31 (24%), less radiopaque 46 (35%), and undetectable 19 (15%). The radiopacity of CBD stones differed significantly according to stone type (P < 0.001). From the receiver operating characteristic curve, stone size was useful for the determination of CBD stone by MDCT (area under curve 0.779, P < 0.001) and appropriate cut-off stone size on MDCT was 5 mm. The factors related to detectability of CBD stones on MDCT were age, stone type, and stone size on multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The radiopacity of CBD stones on MDCT differed according to stone type. Stone type and stone size were related to the detectability by MDCT, and appropriate cut-off stone size was 5 mm. PMID:23555167

  17. [Mineralogical and spectral characteristics of "Gaozhou stone" from Jiangxi Province].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Shi, Guang-hai; Lou, Fa-sheng; Wu, Shi-jin; Shi, Miao; Huang, An-jie

    2015-01-01

    The seal stone is a kind of artwork with historical and cultural characteristics of China, which has been playing an important role in Chinese traditional culture. "Gaozhou stone", a new kind of the seal stone, has been found in the market recently. To investigate the mineralogical and spectral characterastics of "Gaozhou stone", samples were studied by using XRF, XRD, FTIR, SEM and DTA. Measurements by XRD reveal that kaolin minerals (kaolinite, dickite), pyrophyllite and minor sericite and illite occur in the ores. When kaolinite and dickite are associated, it is not easy to differentiate them from each other. Although some reflections overlap others, kaolin polytypes can be differentiated by XRD patterns in the range 18°-40° (2?), the reflections at 0. 395, 0. 379, 0. 343, 0. 326, 0. 294, 0. 280, 0. 232 and 0. 221 nm are diagnostic of dickite. The XRD results indicate the presence of transitional mineral of kaolinite and dickite in these samples. The main chemical components of "Gaozhou stone" are SiO2 and Al2O3 with minor Fe2O3, K2O and Na2O, corresponding with that of kaolin minerals. The OH groups in kaolin group minerals have attracted considerable attention as a sensitive indicator of structural disorder. In principle, dickite has three bands, whereas kaolinite has four bands at the OH-stretching region. According to the results of FTIR, transitional mineral of kaolinite and dickite in "Gaozhou stone" has 3 absorption bands of 3 670, 3 650 and 3 620 cm-1 in high frequency region. The intensity of 3 670 cm-1 band that belongs to outer layer hydroxyl vibration is approximately equal to the intensity of 3 620 cm band ascribing to inner layer OH vibration. This value will only have subtle changes due to the different component ratio of kaolinite and dickite layers. Micro-morphology viewed by SEM presents irregular platy or pseudo-hexagonal platy particles with an average diameter of 0. 5-4 µm of "Gaozhou stone". Such morphologies are quite similar to other seal stones of China that the formation environments of all these stones are of the same kind. DTA curves demonstrate that the disparity of dehydroxylation temperature can be seen as a differential feature for identifying kaolin group minerals, but that is not undoubted. And what's more, the size of the mineral grains seems has a greater effect on the disparity of dehydroxylation temperature. This research shows that the mineral type of "Gaozhou stone" is similar to "Four Famous stones of China", and it could be a viable substitute of other famous seal stones. In this point, "Gaozhou stone" has a broad market prospect. PMID:25993822

  18. Microelements in stones, urine, and hair of stone formers: a new key to the puzzle of lithogenesis?

    PubMed

    S?ojewski, Marcin; Czerny, Bogus?aw; Safranow, Krzysztof; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Olszewska, Maria; Pawlik, Andrzej; Go??b, Adam; Dro?dzik, Marek; Chlubek, Dariusz; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    The role of trace elements in lithogenesis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of elements in urinary stones and in the urine and hair of stone formers to identify these elements that have synergic correlations in studied materials and may contribute to lithogenesis. A total of 219 consecutive patients with idiopathic upper urinary tract stones were prospectively enrolled in the study. Urine and hair samples were collected from all patients. The content of the stone was evaluated using atomic absorption spectrometry, spectrophotometry, and colorimetric methods. The analysis of 29 elements in stones and hair and 21 elements in urine was performed using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The strength of correlation was described with the value of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The positive correlation between concentration of sodium, potassium, magnesium, barium, vanadium, zinc, silicon, phosphorus, and iodine in phosphate stones was observed. Only a few incidental correlations between the composition of stones and the distribution of elements in urine and in hair were found. There were 109 positive two-element correlations between two materials. The most common were observed for vanadium, aluminum, lead, cobalt, and molybdenum. Two-element positive correlations for all samples were established only for three elements: vanadium, lead, and aluminum. Results indicate that analysis of particular elements in hair and urine cannot predict the composition of urinary stones. This study showed, for the first time, correlations between the levels of vanadium, lead, and aluminum in the stones, urine, and hair of stone formers. PMID:20024629

  19. Proper dimensioning of stone paving slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Loorents, Karl-Johan; Larsson, Jörgen; Holstad, Terje

    2015-04-01

    In Europe, dimensioning of stone paving slabs is usually made according to the European product standard EN 1341: Slabs of natural stone for external paving - Requirements and test methods. An informative annex provides guidelines for determining the slab thickness depending on the flexural strength, traffic loads and surface dimensions of the slab. The present edition of the standard has been updated with a possibility to use different safety factors depending on the type of foundation, e.g. paving over a bound construction, unbound or over a gap supported on two or four sides or four corners. In addition, the safety factors differ depending on the length of the slabs. Slabs larger than 600 mm are "punished" by larger safety factors. However, these safety factors are not uncontroversial. A project was therefore undertaken to compare the calculated thickness of paving slabs strictly according to the standard requirements and the measured breaking load of tested slabs on different foundations/supports. The standard way of determining the thickness is based on measurement of the flexural strength of test prisms according to EN 12372: Natural stone test methods - Determination of flexural strength under concentrated load, e.g. with 50x50x300 mm sized prisms. The conversion into breaking load of the final slab and its thickness is based on a standard beam theory, also given in the annex of the standard. The questions to be answered by the project were whether the beam theory is appropriate for slabs, if the safety factors for different foundations are realistic and if the difference in safety factors above and below 600 mm length is relevant. The Evja granite from the SW Sweden was used for the tests on unbound and bound paving. The Offerdal schist from NW Sweden was used for testing paving over a gap with support on four corners. A large number of granite slabs ranging from 350 x 350 x 40 mm up to 1050 x 1050 x 40 mm were tested. As regards the schist specimens, the four following, commonly used dimensions were tested: 500 x 400 x 25 mm, 500 x 400 x 30 mm, 800 x 400 x 25 mm and 800 x 400 x 30 mm. In short, the results clearly indicated that the product standard recommendations generate very conservative thicknesses, i.e. too thick slabs. The use of the recommendations in the standard's annex thus results in unnecessarily high consumption of natural resources, increased environmental loads due to heavy freights, handling and more expensive paving construction. All test results will be presented together with a reasoning about an improved dimensioning system.

  20. Nutrient intake and urine composition in calcium oxalate stone-forming dogs: comparison with healthy dogs and impact of dietary modification.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Abigail E; Blackburn, Judith M; Markwell, Peter J; Robertson, William G

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient intake and urine composition were analyzed in calcium oxalate (CaOx)stone-forming and healthy control dogs to identify factors that contribute to CaOx urolithiasis. Stone-forming dogs had significantly lower intake of sodium, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus and significantly higher urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx relative supersaturation (RSS). Feeding a diet used in the treatment of canine lower urinary tract disease for 1 month was associated with increased intake of moisture, sodium, and fat; reduced intake of potassium and calcium; and decreased urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx RSS. No clinical signs of disease recurrence were observed in the stone-forming dogs when the diet was fed for an additional 11 months. The results suggest that hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria contribute to the formation of CaOx uroliths in dogs and show that dietary modifications can alter this process. PMID:15578454

  1. A new species of Dasineura Rondani (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in flower galls of Camassia (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) in the Pacific Northwest, USA.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Raymond J; Barosh, Theresa; Kephart, Susan

    2014-01-01

    A new species, Dasineura camassiae Gagné (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is described, illustrated and compared to some of its congeners from related hosts and western North America. The new species causes flower galls on Camassia (Agavoideae; Asparagaceae) in the Pacific Northwest. Its current known distribution is Oregon and Washington, USA. Larvae develop in spring in flowers of Camassia spp., causing the young ovaries to enlarge prematurely and eventually abort, without forming seeds or mature fruit. Full-grown larvae crawl out of the gall in rapid succession and drop to the soil where they pupate; they remain there until spring of the following year when the adults emerge and lay eggs. The galls they induce in camas lily buds represent the first known association of the cosmopolitan genus Dasineura with the group of plants that includes Agave and its relatives. PMID:25543738

  2. Intravesical stone formation on intrauterine contraceptive device.

    PubMed

    Ozgür, Abdurrahman; Si?mano?lu, Alper; Yazici, Cenk; Co?ar, Emine; Tezen, Devrim; Ilker, Yalçin

    2004-01-01

    Since more than 30 years, intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) have been used for a contraceptive opportunity. Although they are termed to be a safe and effective method for contraception, they also have some type of complications and uterine perforation, septic abortion, pelvic abscess are the serious complications of these devices. The incidence of uterine perforation is very low, but in the literature nearly 100 cases were reported about the extra uterine localization of IUCD. Migration may occur to the adjacent organs. We here in describe a case of a 31 year-old woman who had an IUCD with stone formation in the bladder. In the literature all of the cases were reported as IUCD migration, but although it seems technically impossible, IUCD placement into the bladder should also be considered in misplaced IUCDs. PMID:15783103

  3. Laserlithotripsy of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed Central

    Ell, C; Lux, G; Hochberger, J; Müller, D; Demling, L

    1988-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde laser lithotripsy of common bile duct stones is a new technique which can be carried out through the endoscope without anaesthesia using ordinary endoscopic equipment. In the method described here a flashlamp pulsed Neodymium YAG laser (wave length 1064 nm) was used. Light energy was transmitted along a highly flexible quartz fibre with a diameter of 0.2 mm. This new technique was used in nine patients with concrements in the common bile duct, which could not be removed with the established endoscopic techniques. In eight of the nine the concrements (maximum diameter 4.7 x 3.1 cm) could be fragmented and in six the fragments could be extracted from the common bile duct. The total energy required was 80-300 J; complications were not observed. Images Figs 3 and 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Figs 8 and 9 PMID:2898421

  4. Injury experience in stone mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  5. Injury experience in stone mining, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  6. Recent advances in endoscopic management of difficult bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Itoi, Takao

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment is now recognized worldwide as the first-line treatment for bile duct stones. Endoscopic sphincterotomy combined with basket and/or balloon catheter is generally carried out for stone extraction. However, some stones are refractory to treatment under certain circumstances, necessitating additional/other therapeutic modalities. Large bile duct stones are typically treated by mechanical lithotripsy. However, if this fails, laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) is carried out under the guidance of conventional mother-baby cholangioscopy. More recently, direct cholangioscopy using an ultrathin gastroscope and the newly developed single-use cholangioscope system - the SpyGlass direct visualization system - are also used. In addition, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has also been used for stone fragmentation. Such fragmentation techniques are effective in cases with impacted stones, including Mirizzi syndrome. Most recently, endoscopic papillary large balloon dilationhas been introduced as an easy and effective technique for treating large and multiple stones. In cases of altered anatomy, it is often difficult to reach the papilla; in such cases, a percutaneous transhepatic approach, such as EHL or laser lithotripsy under percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy, can be a treatment option. Moreover, enteroscopy has recently been used to reach the papilla. Furthermore, an endoscopic ultrasound-guided procedure has been attempted most recently. In elderly patients and those with very poor general condition, biliary stenting only is sometimes carried out with or without giving subsequent dissolution agents. PMID:23650878

  7. Role of Transport and Kinetics in Growth of Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Iskovitz, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    Renal stone disease is not only a concern on earth but could conceivably pose as a serious risk to the astronauts health and safety in Space. In this paper, a combined transport-kinetics model for growth of calcium oxalate crystals is presented. The model is used to parametrically investigate the growth of renal calculi in urine with a focus on the coupled effects of transport and surface reaction on the ionic concentrations at the surface of the crystal and their impact on the resulting growth rates. It is shown that under nominal conditions of low solution supersaturation and low Damkohler number that typically exist on Earth, the surface concentrations of calcium and oxalate approach their bulk solution values in the urine and the growth rate is most likely limited by the surface reaction kinetics. But for higher solution supersaturations and larger Damkohler numbers that may be prevalent in the microgravity environment of Space, the calcium and oxalate surface concentrations tend to shift more towards their equilibrium or saturation values and thus the growth process may be limited by the transport through the medium. Furthermore, parametric numerical studies suggest that changes to the renal biochemistry of astronauts due in space may promote development of renal calculi during long duration space expeditions.

  8. Embryological Basis and Clinical Correlation of the Rare Congenital Anomaly of the Human Gall Bladder: - “The Diverticulum” - A Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rajguru, Jaba; Jain, Shilpi; Khare, Satyam; Fulzele, Ratna R; Ghai, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diverticulum of the human gall bladder is an important but distinct anatomical entity with significant clinical implications. It is one of the rarest congenital anomalies of the gall bladder being rarely discussed in literature. This article details the morphology of the diverticula found, along with the embryological basis and clinical significance of this important anatomical and clinical entity. Aim: To study the diverticula found, with respect to their morphology, and ascertain whether they were of congenital or acquired variety. Setting and Designs: The present study is a retrospective study carried on hundred cadavers during undergraduate dissection, in the Department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, and Department of Anatomy, Subharti Medical College , Meerut during a four year period i.e. 2008-2012 after obtaining necessary permission from institutional ethical committee. Material and Methods: Hundred gall bladder specimens collected from 10% formalin fixed cadavers were studied in detail with regard to their number, position, shapes dimensions and histology. Results: Nine, congenital (true) diverticula were found in one hundred gall bladder specimens. The diverticula were of various shapes and dimensions. They formed pouches on the luminal surface of the gall bladder. Diagnosis of congenital diverticulum was confirmed by histology. Conclusion: In this cadaveric study, solitary diverticulum was found in nine (9%) specimens out of one hundred specimens. Association of diverticulum with non-specific prolonged ailments, acalculus cholecystitis, cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, recurrent cholangitis and carcinoma of gallbladder has been reported in literature. This important anatomical as well as clinical entity poses challenges for radiologists and laparoscopic surgeons during interventional procedures and also should be differentiated from other types of congenital anomalies and pathological states of gall bladder. PMID:24298450

  9. Diverse Filters to Sense: Great Variability of Antennal Morphology and Sensillar Equipment in Gall-Wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae)

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Carlo; Nieves-Aldrey, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on antennal sensillar equipment in insects are largely lacking, despite their potential to provide insights into both ecological and phylogenetic relationships. Here we present the first comparative study on antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in female Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera), a large and diverse group of wasps, with special reference to the so-called gall-wasps (Cynipidae). A SEM analysis was conducted on 51 species from all extant cynipoid families and all cynipid tribes, and spanning all known life-histories in the superfamily (gall-inducers, gall-inquilines, and non-gall associated parasitoids). The generally filiform, rarely clavate, antennal flagellum of Cynipoidea harbours overall 12 types of sensilla: s. placoidea (SP), two types of s. coeloconica (SCo-A, SCo-B), s. campaniformia (SCa), s. basiconica (SB), five types of s. trichoidea (ST-A, B, C, D, E), large disc sensilla (LDS) and large volcano sensilla (LVS). We found a great variability in sensillar equipment both among and within lineages. However, few traits seem to be unique to specific cynipid tribes. Paraulacini are, for example, distinctive in having apical LVS; Pediaspidini are unique in having ?3 rows of SP, each including 6–8 sensilla per flagellomere, and up to 7 SCo-A in a single flagellomere; Eschatocerini have by far the largest SCo-A. Overall, our data preliminarily suggest a tendency to decreased numbers of SP rows per flagellomere and increased relative size of SCo-A during cynipoid evolution. Furthermore, SCo-A size seems to be higher in species inducing galls in trees than in those inducing galls in herbs. On the other hand, ST seem to be more abundant on the antennae of herb-gallers than wood-gallers. The antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in Cynipoidea are the complex results of different interacting pressures that need further investigations to be clarified. PMID:25003514

  10. Plant senescence cues entry into diapause in the gall fly Eurosta solidaginis: resulting metabolic depression is critical for water conservation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason B; Lee, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    Mechanisms and possible cues for seasonal increases in desiccation resistance in larvae of the goldenrod gall fly Eurosta solidaginis, were examined before and after natural and premature plant senescence, or after being removed from their gall and placed in either 100, 95 or 75% relative humidity (RH). Rates of water loss were 8.6-fold lower, averaging 0.7+/-0.2 microg mm(-2) h(-1), in larvae from senescent gall tissue and after all RH treatments than in control larvae from pre-senescent plants. Enhanced desiccation resistance occurred quickly, within 3 days of removal from their gall. Contrary to most previous reports, a large majority of the increased desiccation resistance (approximately 85%) was due to reduced respiratory transpiration with the remainder being the result of a lowered cuticular permeability. Rates of cuticular water loss were reduced by the presence of a vapor pressure gradient between the larval hemolymph and environmental water vapor and were probably due to increases in cuticular lipids and/or production of the cryoprotectant glycerol. Metabolic rate was reduced by over fourfold, averaging 0.07+/-0.01 microl CO2 g(-1) h(-1), in larvae from senescent gall tissue and all RH treatments compared to larvae from pre-senescent plants. The magnitude of the reduction in metabolic rates indicated that these larvae had entered diapause. In addition, larvae entered diapause in response to removal from, or degeneration of, the gall tissue they feed, on rather than seasonal changes in temperature or photoperiod. The low metabolic rates of the diapausing larvae probably allowed them to dramatically reduce their respiratory transpiration and total rate of water loss compared with non-diapausing controls. Thus, diapause, with its associated lowered metabolic rate, may be essential for conserving water in overwintering temperate insects, which may be dormant for six or more months of the year. PMID:16339864

  11. Effect of barley chromosome addition on the susceptibility of wheat to feeding by a gall-inducing leafhopper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumashiro, Shun; Matsukura, Keiichiro; Kawaura, Kanako; Matsumura, Masaya; Ogihara, Yasunari; Tokuda, Makoto

    2011-11-01

    The maize orange leafhopper Cicadulina bipunctata is distributed widely in tropical and subtropical regions of the Old World and feeds on various Poaceae. The leafhopper is recognized as an important pest of maize in several countries. Adults as well as nymphs of C. bipunctata induce growth stunting and galls characterized by the severe swelling of leaf veins on many cereal crops including wheat, rice, and maize, but do not on barley. To clarify the mechanism of growth stunting and gall induction by C. bipunctata, we used six barley chromosome disomic addition lines of wheat (2H-7H) and investigated the effect of barley (cv. Betzes) chromosome addition on the susceptibility of wheat (cv. Chinese Spring) to feeding by the leafhopper. Feeding by C. bipunctata significantly stunted the growth in 2H, 3H, 4H, and 5H, but did not in 6H and 7H. The degree of gall induction was significantly weaker and severer in 3H and 5H than in Chinese Spring, respectively. These results suggest that barley genes resistant to growth stunting and gall induction exist in 6H and 7H, and 3H, respectively. 5H is considered to be useful for future assays investigating the mechanism of gall induction by this leafhopper because of the high susceptibility to the feeding by C. bipunctata. Significant correlation between the degrees of growth stunting and gall induction was not detected in the six chromosome addition lines and Chinese spring. This implies that these two symptoms are independent phenomena although both are initiated by the feeding of C. bipunctata.

  12. Renal-Stone Risk Assessment During Space Shuttle Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1996-01-01

    The metabolic and environmental factors influencing renal stone formation before, during, and after Space Shuttle flights were assessed. We established the contributing roles of dietary factors in relationship to the urinary risk factors associated with renal stone formation. 24-hr urine samples were collected prior to, during space flight, and following landing. Urinary factors associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative urinary supersaturation ratios of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were calculated. Food and fluid consumption was recorded for a 48-hr period ending with the urine collection. Urinary composition changed during flight to favor the crystallization of stone-forming salts. Factors that contributed to increased potential for stone formation during space flight were significant reductions in urinary pH and increases in urinary calcium. Urinary output and citrate, a potent inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, were slightly reduced during space flight. Dietary intakes were significantly reduced for a number of variables, including fluid, energy, protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium. This is the first in-flight characterization of the renal stone forming potential in astronauts. With the examination of urinary components and nutritional factors, it was possible to determine the factors that contributed to increased risk or protected from risk. In spite of the protective components, the negative contributions to renal stone risk predominated and resulted in a urinary environment that favored the supersaturation of stone-forming salts. The importance of the hypercalciuria was noted since renal excretion was high relative to the intake.

  13. Decay and preservation of stone in modern environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauri, K. Lal

    1990-01-01

    Stone objects decay in all environments, but the modes of decay vary from one region to another. In the modern industrial countries acid deposition has accelerated the decay of stone. Many objects that survived centuries of weathering without serious damage have, in the present century, decomposed beyond recognition. The black crusts seen on stone structures mostly contain gypsum formed by SO2 reactions with calcareous minerals. These crusts exfoliate, destroying the sculptural form. Because of the absence of proven technology to treat and restore these objects, the caryatids at the Acropolis had to be moved indoors to save them from further disfiguration. In arid climates, the salts in stone and the meteorologic conditions combine to disrupt stone structures. The Great Sphinx at Giza is a prominent example of this mode of stone decay. In humid, tropical regions, such as in southern India, hydrolysis disrupts the mineral structure, causing rapid damage even to such durable stone as granite. The human effort to save the deteriorating structures has often aggravated the problem. The sandstone at the Legislative Building in Olympia, Washington has, because of the “protective” acrylic coating, suffered greater damage than the similar but unprotected sandstone at a nearby school building. It appears that proper management can greatly help to reduce the decay of the stone. A scientifically designed cleaning can inhibit the formation of crusts and the accumulation of efflorescences. The absence of the crusts and efflorescence and application of appropriate impregnants, which consolidate yet maintain the "breathability" of stone, may prolong the life of historic structures.

  14. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1996-01-01

    The absorptive or renal origin of hypercalciuria can be discriminated using an acute oral calcium load test (ACLT). Of 86 patients with calcium oxalate kidney stones, 28 (23%) were found to be hypercalciuric (HCa) and 58 (67%) normocalciuric (NCa) on their customary free diet, containing 542 +/- 29 mg/day (mean +/- SE) of calcium. Since the apparently normal 24-hour calcium excretion of many calcium stone formers (CSF) may be due to a combination of high calcium absorption with moderately low calcium intake, all patients were investigated by ACLT. Of 28 HCa patients, 13 (46%) were classified as absorptive (AH) and 15 (54%) as renal hypercalciuria (RH). Of the 58 NCa patients, 38 (65%) presented features of intestinal hyperabsorption and were therefore designated as AH-like, and 20 (35%) as RH-like. To further elucidate the role of dietary calcium in these CSF, a chronic calcium load test (CCLT), consisting of 1 g/day of oral Ca for 7 days, was designed. A positive response to the CCLT was considered to occur when urinary calcium (uCa) was > or = 4 mg/ kg/24 h on the 7th day. Among NCa patients, 29% of AH-like subjects responded to the CCLT and 71% did not; 50% of RH-like subjects also responded and 50% did not. In HCa patients, 85% of AH and 67% of RH subjects maintained uCa > or = 4 mg/kg/24 h after the CCLT and 15% of AH and 23% of RH subjects did not. However, a significant additional increase in mean uCa was not observed among HCa patients. All patients were submitted to a second evaluation of fasting calciuria (Ca/Cr). A modification of this parameter was noticed in 89% of RH-like and 78% of RH patients. In conclusion, these data suggest the presence of subpopulations of patients sensitive or not to calcium intake, regardless of whether the acute response to a calcium overload test suggested AH or RH. The CCLT disclosed dietary hypercalciuria in 21/58 (36%) of previously NCa patients. In these NCa patients, the ACLT may be replaced by the CCLT. The distinction between AH and RH initially evidenced by the ACLT was not further confirmed. These data suggest that either fasting Ca/Cr is not adequate for subclassification of HCa or that AH and RH represent a different spectrum of the same disease, and that a primary resorptive component should also be considered. PMID:8773335

  15. An Unusual Case of Synchronous Carcinoid of Ovary and Gall Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Rupali; Arora, Raksha; Bhasin, Sangeeta; Khurana, Nita

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal carcinoid is a known phenomenon. We present a rare combination of an ovarian carcinoid synchronous with gallbladder carcinoid. This rare combination has not been reported so far. An asymptomatic 45-years-old perimenopausal lady was diagnosed to have a metastatic ovarian cancer, but on laparotomy she was found to have a primary synchronous metastatic gall bladder as well. On histopathological evaluation she was found to have two separate primary carcinoids. Subsequently the patient received chemotherapy and is completely asymptomatic on follow up. Further research needs to be undertaken and guidelines need to be formulated for management of these cases. PMID:24371533

  16. Ischemic gall bladder perforation: a complication of type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Jha, Neerod K; Kumar, Rajappan A; Ayman, Moataz; Khan, Javed A; Cristaldi, Massimo; Ahene, Charles; Augustin, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Malperfusion of end organs occurs in 20% to 40% patients with acute type A aortic dissection. Because irreversible ischemia is a time-dependent event, expedient diagnosis and treatment are necessary. We herein report successful surgical management of a patient with acute type A aortic dissection causing transient gut ischemia and a rare gall bladder perforation. We implemented one-stage surgical and laparoscopic management approach for the diagnosis and treatment. Increased awareness of this complication and appropriate use of available diagnostic tools may improve the outcome in similar patients. Patients with aortic dissection complicated by visceral ischemia require a prompt sequential and rational multidisciplinary approach for successful management. PMID:23706468

  17. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  18. In-situ monitoring of biological growth on stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Eric; McStay, Daniel; Wakefield, Rachael D.; Sweet, M. A. S.; Jones, M. S.

    1996-11-01

    A Scanning Fluorescence Microscope system for quantifying and mapping biological growth on stone is described. The system uses 488 nm light from an Argon-ion laser to excite the 685 nm fluorescence from the Chlorophyll-a in the algae and uses this as the means of mapping the biological material. The measured 685 nm fluorescence is shown to increase linearly with the quantity of algae on the stone surface. Application of the system to study the effectiveness of biocide treatment for the control of algae on stone is reported.

  19. An Additional Potential Factor for Kidney Stone Formation during Space Flights: Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria): A Case Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Joseph; Griffith, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi due to skeletal calcium liberation and other undefined factors, resulting in stone disease in crewmembers during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, reproduce at a more rapid rate in simulated microgravity conditions and create external shells of calcium phosphate in the form of apatite. The questions arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are niduses for calculi and contribute to the development of clinical stone disease in humans, who possess environmental factors predisposing to the development of urinary calculi and potentially impaired immunological defenses during spaceflight. A case of a urinary calculus passed from an astronaut post-flight with morphological characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles and staining positive for a calcifying nanoparticle unique antigen, is presented.

  20. 3. DETAIL OF END CONDITION, SHOWING TRUSS BEARING ON STONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF END CONDITION, SHOWING TRUSS BEARING ON STONE ENDPOSTS AND ENDPOSTS BEARING ON ABUTMENTS - Fosnaugh Truss Leg Bedstead Bridge, Spanning Scippo Creek at Township Route 128, Stoutsville, Fairfield County, OH

  1. 14. Detail, typical approach span fixed bearing atop stone masonry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail, typical approach span fixed bearing atop stone masonry pier, view to northwest, 210mm lens. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  2. Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic Duran, Christopher Marston, and Michael Lee (l to r). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  3. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  4. Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER field team measuring (Michael Lee and Dominic Duran foreground, Christopher Marston rear). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  5. 18. STONE ARCH BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101, AT BENBOW INN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. STONE ARCH BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101, AT BENBOW INN. SOUTH OF GARBERVILLE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  6. TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOOL CRIB FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING ALUMINUM DOORS, STONE PIER, GYPSUM BOARD-FACED PARTITION AND ORIGINAL TIMBER STRUCTURE - Fort Huachuca, Cavalry Stable, Clarkson Road, Sierra Vista, Cochise County, AZ

  7. 15. DETAIL, MAIN FACADE, ENTRANCE PORCH, STONE BEARING ARCHITECT'S NAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL, MAIN FACADE, ENTRANCE PORCH, STONE BEARING ARCHITECT'S NAME AS SEEN THROUGH SIDE ARCHED OPENING - U.S. Soldiers Home, Scott Building, Rock Creek Church Road & Upshur Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE WORK, AND GATE STOP FROM SOUTHEAST OF NORTHWEST ELEMENTS. - William Enston Home, Entrance Gate, 900 King Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  9. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET PIPE AND STONE COLLAR, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET PIPE AND STONE COLLAR, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Deer Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 5.8 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  13. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  14. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  15. Topological anisotropy of stone-wales waves in graphenic fragments.

    PubMed

    Ori, Ottorino; Cataldo, Franco; Putz, Mihai V

    2011-01-01

    Stone-Wales operators interchange four adjacent hexagons with two pentagon-heptagon 5|7 pairs that, graphically, may be iteratively propagated in the graphene layer, originating a new interesting structural defect called here Stone-Wales wave. By minimization, the Wiener index topological invariant evidences a marked anisotropy of the Stone-Wales defects that, topologically, are in fact preferably generated and propagated along the diagonal of the graphenic fragments, including carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. This peculiar edge-effect is shown in this paper having a predominant topological origin, leaving to future experimental investigations the task of verifying the occurrence in nature of wave-like defects similar to the ones proposed here. Graph-theoretical tools used in this paper for the generation and the propagation of the Stone-Wales defects waves are applicable to investigate isomeric modifications of chemical structures with various dimensionality like fullerenes, nanotubes, graphenic layers, schwarzites, zeolites. PMID:22174641

  16. 128. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of the stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of the stone faced bridge on the bass lake carriage trail. Facing west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  17. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-14

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  18. 6. TERRACED, STONE RETAINING WALLS BEHIND HOUSE No. 16. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TERRACED, STONE RETAINING WALLS BEHIND HOUSE No. 16. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  19. A Biological Stone from a Medieval Cemetery in Poland

    PubMed Central

    G?adykowska-Rzeczycka, Judyta J.; Nowakowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    A review of the literature shows that origination of biological stones as well as their pathogenesis mostly depend on the environmental factors. As a result, the structural spectrum of such calculi and their chemical composition are highly diversified. It is well known that biological stones are formed mostly in the digestive and urinary tracts. However, it has been demonstrated that this kind of stony structure can be also, though rarely, found in circulatory and reproductive systems, skin, mucosa, and tear ducts. Although in palaeopathology, the list of biological stones is enriched by stony tumours and/or discharges, it is very difficult to uncover the small size deposits in excavation material. In the literature such findings, originating from different countries and centuries, are few. The described stone was found among the bones of an adult individual in the medieval cemetery of Gda?sk (Poland). The SEM, X-ray spectrometer and chemical evaluation revealed that it was a bladder calculus. PMID:25275551

  20. 20. Detail, Pier 3, with large stone riprap showing depth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail, Pier 3, with large stone riprap showing depth of scour which has taken place since bridge was completed; view to northwest. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  1. 4. STONE BUILDER'S PLATE CANAL GATES, AND DIVERSION SPILLWAYS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STONE BUILDER'S PLATE CANAL GATES, AND DIVERSION SPILLWAYS. - Canal Road Bridge, Canal Road spanning Delaware Canal Diversion, Locks 22 & 23 in Delaware Canal State Park in Williams Township, Raubsville, Northampton County, PA

  2. Effects of microgravity on renal stone risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y. C.; Cintron, N. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Physiologic changes induced during human exposure to the microgravity environment of space may contribute to an increased potential for renal stone formation. Renal stone risk factors obtained 10 days before flight and immediately after return to earth indicated that calcium oxalate and uric acid stone-forming potential was increased after space flights of 4-10 days. These data describe the need for examining renal stone risk during in-flight phases of space missions. Because of limited availability of space and refrigerated storage on spacecraft, effective methods must be developed for collecting urine samples in-flight and for preserving (or storing) them at temperatures and under conditions commensurate with mission constraints.

  3. 10. FLOOR 1; CENTER POST AND POSTS UNDER STONE BEAMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. FLOOR 1; CENTER POST AND POSTS UNDER STONE BEAMS WHICH SUPPORT BRIDGE BEAMS FOR BRIDGE TREES; WEDGES FOR ADJUSTING HEIGHT OF BRIDGE TREE CAN BE SEEN - Shelter Island Windmill, Manwaring Road, Shelter Island, Suffolk County, NY

  4. 7. Elevation of single arch stone bridge on Laurel Creek ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Elevation of single arch stone bridge on Laurel Creek Road looking N. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Cades Cove Road & Laurel Creek Road, From Townsend Wye to Cades Cove, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  5. Oral Health of Stone Mine Workers of Jodhpur City, Rajasthan, India

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Jitender; Gupta, Sarika; Chand, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational injuries cause major health problems, which the developed, developing, and underdeveloped nations worldwide are facing today. The present study aimed to assess dental caries, periodontal health of stone mine workers, and the relationship between wasting diseases and the years of working experience. Methods The study population comprised 510 men, selected based on the stratified cluster sampling procedure. Clinical oral examinations were carried out, and periodontal disease, dental caries, and wasting diseases were recorded. Results Workers were in the age group of 17–56 years; the prevalence of dental caries in the workers was found to be 74%, with a mean decayed, missing, filled teeth index of 2.89. A periodontal pocket of more than 6 mm was observed in 6% of the workers. Conclusion The oral health of mine workers is in a poor state; steps should be taken so as to provide basic medical and dental care facilities. PMID:25379327

  6. Unlocking the mysteries of diastolic function: deciphering the Rosetta Stone 10 years later.

    PubMed

    Lester, Steven J; Tajik, A Jamil; Nishimura, Rick A; Oh, Jae K; Khandheria, Bijoy K; Seward, James B

    2008-02-19

    It has now been a quarter of a century since the first description by Kitabatake and his associates of the use of echo-Doppler to characterize the transmitral flow velocity curves in various disease states. A decade ago we described the role of echocardiography in the "Evaluation of Diastolic Filling of Left Ventricle in Health and Disease: Doppler Echocardiography Is the Clinician's Rosetta Stone." Over the ensuing decade, advances in echo-Doppler have helped to further decipher the morphologic and physiological expression of cardiovascular disease and unlock additional mysteries of diastology. The purpose of this review is to highlight the developments in echo-Doppler and refinements in our knowledge that have occurred over the past decade that enhance our understanding of diastology. PMID:18279730

  7. A Genetic Polymorphism (rs17251221) in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene (CASR) Is Associated with Stone Multiplicity in Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yii-Her Chou; Peng Yeong Woon; Wei-Chiao Chen; Yu-Wen Hsu; Jer-Ming Chang; Daw-Yang Hwang; Yi-Ching Chiu; Ho-Chang Kuo; Wei-Pin Chang; Ming-Feng Hou; Mu-En Liu; Jan-Gowth Chang; Wei-Chiao Chang; Giuseppe Novelli

    2011-01-01

    Calcium nephrolithiasis is one of the most common causes of renal stones. While the prevalence of this disease has increased steadily over the last 3 decades, its pathogenesis is still unclear. Previous studies have indicated that a genetic polymorphism (rs17251221) in the calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) is associated with the total serum calcium levels. In this study, we collected DNA

  8. Properties of alkali-activated systems with stone powder sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Se Jin Choi; Ssang Sun Jun; Jae Eun Oh; Paulo J. M. Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of stone powder sludge on the microstructure and strength development of alkali-activated\\u000a fly ash and blast furnace slag mixes. Stone powder sludge produced from a crushed aggregate factory was used to replace fly\\u000a ash and granulated blast furnace slag at replacement ratios of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% by mass. The unit weight and compressive

  9. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Stone and Asphalt Industry 

    E-print Network

    Moray, S.; Throop, N.; Seryak, J.; Schmidt, C.; Fisher, C.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01

    President of Engineering Energy & Resource Solutions, Inc. Haverhill, MA Abstract The highly energy-intensive stone mining and crushing industry, grouped with other mining industries, has been one of the focal sectors of the US Department of Energy...’s Industries of the Future (DOE-IOF) initiative. In addition to being highly energy intensive, stone crushing currently produces 42% of the total material consumed by weight in the US, which is mainly used as highway aggregates. Based on GDP...

  10. Building Stone of the United States: The NIST Test Wall

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jaime Raz

    This report explains how the NIST test wall was constructed to study the performance and durability of various building stones under uniform climatic conditions. It was built by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1948 and is currently located at their facility in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Users may read and see pictures of the wall's physical features, its orientation, and search among descriptions and pictures of the various types of stone which are incorporated into the wall.

  11. Effect of fruit stoning on olive oil quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Patumi; S. Terenziani; M. Ridolfi; Giuseppe Fontanazza

    2003-01-01

    Stoning olives has been proposed as an alternative to crushing the whole fruit during the oil extraction process. Seven pairs\\u000a of oils obtained from stoned and nonstoned olives from five different cultivars were evaluated to determine the effect of\\u000a the proposed technology on oil quality. The main organoleptic and physicochemical parameters as well as resistance to oxidation\\u000a showed no obvious

  12. Genetic demixing and evolution in linear stepping stone models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Korolev; Mikkel Avlund; Oskar Hallatschek; David R. Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Results for mutation, selection, genetic drift, and migration in a one-dimensional continuous population are reviewed and extended. The population is described by a continuous limit of the stepping stone model, which leads to the stochastic Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation with additional terms describing mutations. Although the stepping stone model was first proposed for population genetics, it is closely related to ``voter models''

  13. A Carboniferous insect gall: insight into early ecologic history of the Holometabola.

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira, C C; Phillips, T L

    1996-01-01

    Although the prevalence or even occurrence of insect herbivory during the Late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) has been questioned, we present the earliest-known ecologic evidence showing that by Late Pennsylvanian times (302 million years ago) a larva of the Holometabola was galling the internal tissue of Psaronius tree-fern fronds. Several diagnostic cellular and histological features of these petiole galls have been preserved in exquisite detail, including an excavated axial lumen filled with fecal pellets and comminuted frass, plant-produced response tissue surrounding the lumen, and specificity by the larval herbivore for a particular host species and tissue type. Whereas most suggestions over-whelmingly support the evolution of such intimate and reciprocal plant-insect interactions 175 million years later, we provide documentation that before the demise of Pennsylvanian age coal-swamp forests, a highly stereotyped life cycle was already established between an insect that was consuming internal plant tissue and a vascular plant host responding to that herbivory. This and related discoveries of insect herbivore consumption of Psaronius tissues indicate that modern-style herbivores were established in Late Pennsylvanian coal-swamp forests. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607697

  14. Psorinum Therapy in Treating Stomach, Gall Bladder, Pancreatic, and Liver Cancers: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aradeep; Biswas, Jaydip; Chatterjee, Ashim; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu; Mandal, Syamsundar

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively studied the clinical efficacy of an alternative cancer treatment “Psorinum Therapy” in treating stomach, gall bladder, pancreatic and liver cancers. Our study was observational, open level and single arm. The participants' eligibility criteria included histopathology/cytopathology confirmation of malignancy, inoperable tumor, and no prior chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The primary outcome measures of the study were (i) to assess the radiological tumor response (ii) to find out how many participants survived at least 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years and finally 5 years after the beginning of the study considering each type of cancer. Psorinum-6x was administered orally to all the participants up to 0.02?ml/Kg body weight as a single dose in empty stomach per day for 2 years along with allopathic and homeopathic supportive cares. 158 participants (42 of stomach, 40 of gall bladder, 44 of pancreatic, 32 of liver) were included in the final analysis of the study. Complete tumor response occurred in 28 (17.72%) cases and partial tumor response occurred in 56 (35.44%) cases. Double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial should be conducted for further scientific exploration of this alternative cancer treatment. PMID:21197093

  15. Ellagitannins, gallotannins, and gallo-ellagitannins from the galls of Tamarix aphylla.

    PubMed

    Orabi, Mohamed A A; Yoshimura, Morio; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2015-07-01

    Chromatographic separation of an aqueous acetone extract of the galls from Tamarix aphylla using gels resulted in isolation of an ellagitannin, phyllagallin M1 (13), a gallo-ellagitannin, phyllagallin D1 (14), and four gallotannins, phyllagallin M2 (15) and phyllagallins D2-D4 (16-18), in addition to four known ellagitannins and three phenolics of lower molecular weight structurally related to hydrolyzable tannins. The structures of the six new tannins were elucidated based on spectroscopic and chemical data. Among the phenolics, flavogallonic acid dilactone (8), which is presumed to be biogenetically produced by C-C oxidative coupling of an ellagic acid unit with a galloyl residue, shows an exceptional oxidative pattern of gallic acid residues in plants of the family Tamaricaceae. Although the ellagitannin tamarixellagic acid (4) was reported to be a constituent of the galls of T. aphylla, such compounds with anomalous location of the DHDG moiety at O-3 on the glucopyranose core have not been observed among the tannins of tamaricaceous plants. PMID:25987319

  16. Expression of MDR1 mRNA and encoding P-glycoprotein in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gall bladder cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Duchrow, M; Windhövel, U; Kujath, P; Bruch, H P; Broll, R

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and MDR1 mRNA, in gall bladder carcinoma, a chemo-resistant tumour. 26 cases of gall bladder cancer and nine samples of normal gall bladder archival paraffin blocks were investigated for the presence of Pgp protein with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and MDR1 RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Monoclonal antibodies JSB-1 and UIC-2, recognising separate epitopes of Pgp, were used for IHC. For RT-PCR, total RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. After RT, the samples were subjected to nested PCR (NPCR) using primers specific for the MDR1 gene, and evaluated by electrophoresis. In gall bladder carcinoma, the percentage of positive cases expressing Pgp (77% for JSB-1, 69% for UIC-2) and MDR1 mRNA (52%) was significantly higher than those in normal gall bladder. In earlier TNM stages Pgp and MDR1 mRNA were more frequently expressed (non-significant) than in advanced stages. The results of this study suggested that overexpression of MDR1 mRNA and Pgp in gall bladder carcinoma tissue probably is a very important reason why gall bladder cancer is generally not responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:9893638

  17. Biomolecular mechanism of urinary stone formation involving osteopontin.

    PubMed

    Kohri, Kenjiro; Yasui, Takahiro; Okada, Atsushi; Hirose, Masahito; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Taguchi, Kazumi

    2012-12-01

    Urinary stones consist of two phases-an inorganic (mineral) phase and an organic (matrix) phase. Studies on the organic components of kidney stones have been undertaken later than those on the inorganic components. After osteopontin was identified as one of the matrix components, the biomolecular mechanism of urinary stone formation became clearer. It also triggered the development of new preventive treatments. Osteopontin expression is sporadically observed in normal distal tubular cells and is markedly increased in stone-forming kidneys. Calcium oxalate crystals adhering to renal tubular cells are incorporated into cells by the involvement of osteopontin. Stimulation of crystal-cell adhesion impairs the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP) in tubular cells and produces oxidative stress, apoptosis, and osteopontin expression. Macrophages phagocytose and digest a small amount of crystals, but many crystals aggregate into a mass containing osteopontin and epithelial cell debris and are excreted into the renal tubular lumen, becoming nuclei of urinary stones. This biomolecular mechanism is similar to atherosclerotic calcification. Based on these findings, new preventive treatments have been developed. Dietary control such as low-cholesterol intake and the ingestion of antioxidative foods and vegetables have successfully reduced the 5-year recurrence rate. Osteopontin antibodies and cyclosporine A, which blocks the opening of mPTP, have markedly inhibited the expression of osteopontin and urinary stone formation in animal models. PMID:23124115

  18. Renal struvite stones--pathogenesis, microbiology, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Ryan; Choy, Wai Ho; Chew, Ben; Lange, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Infection stones-which account for 10-15% of all urinary calculi-are thought to form in the presence of urease-producing bacteria. These calculi can cause significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated or treated inadequately; optimal treatment involves complete stone eradication in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. The three key principles of treating struvite stones are: removal of all stone fragments, the use of antibiotics to treat the infection, and prevention of recurrence. Several methods to remove stone fragments have been described in the literature, including the use of urease inhibitors, acidification therapy, dissolution therapy, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and anatrophic nephrolithotomy. PCNL is considered to be the gold-standard approach to treating struvite calculi, but adjuncts might be used when deemed necessary. When selecting antibiotics to treat infection, it is necessary to acquire a stone culture or, at the very least, urine culture from the renal pelvis at time of surgery, as midstream urine cultures do not always reflect the causative organism. PMID:24818849

  19. Scalable wavelet-based active network detection of stepping stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joseph I.; Robinson, David J.; Butts, Jonathan W.; Lacey, Timothy H.

    2012-06-01

    Network intrusions leverage vulnerable hosts as stepping stones to penetrate deeper into a network and mask malicious actions from detection. Identifying stepping stones presents a significant challenge because network sessions appear as legitimate traffic. This research focuses on a novel active watermark technique using discrete wavelet transformations to mark and detect interactive network sessions. This technique is scalable, resilient to network noise, and difficult for attackers to discern that it is in use. Previously captured timestamps from the CAIDA 2009 dataset are sent using live stepping stones in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service. The client system sends watermarked and unmarked packets from California to Virginia using stepping stones in Tokyo, Ireland and Oregon. Five trials are conducted in which the system sends simultaneous watermarked samples and unmarked samples to each target. The live experiment results demonstrate approximately 5% False Positive and 5% False Negative detection rates. Additionally, watermark extraction rates of approximately 92% are identified for a single stepping stone. The live experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of discerning watermark traffic as applied to identifying stepping stones.

  20. Second harmonic generation using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves in stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Margaret; Kim, Gun; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Jacobs, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    This research tests the potential application of the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) method using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to nondestructively quantify surface microstructural changes in thin stone. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter (?) has been assessed as a meaningful indicator for characterizing the nonlinearity of civil engineering materials; additionally, Rayleigh waves offer the opportunity to isolate a material's near surface microstructural status. Sandstone was selected for testing due to its relative uniformity and small grain size compared to other stone types; the sample thickness was 2 inches to reflect the minimum panel thickness recommended by the Indiana Limestone Institute. For this research, initially fully non-contact generation and detection techniques are evaluated before a 100kHz wedge transmitter and a 200kHz air-coupled receiver are employed for generation and detection of nonlinear Rayleigh waves. Non-contact transmitters and receivers have advantages such as removing the irregularities associated with coupling as well as not leaving residues, which in stone applications can be considered aesthetically damaging. The experimental results show that the nonlinear parameter, ?, can be effectively isolated using the wedge transmitter and non-contact set up and that too much of the signal strength is lost in the fully non-contact method to extract meaningful results for this stone and stones with slow wave speeds. This indicates that the proposed SHG technique is effective for evaluating the nonlinearity parameter, ?, and can next be applied to characterize near surface microstructural changes in thin applications of dimensioned stone.