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Sample records for gallbladder motor functions

  1. Measurement of gallbladder motor functions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jazrawi, R P

    2003-07-01

    Control of gallbladder motor functions involve a constant interplay between several stimulatory and inhibitory hormones and neurotransmitters. Gallbladder response to a stimulus is complicated involving rapid alternation of emptying and refilling during the postprandial period. Conventional methodology is not capable of evaluating both emptying and refilling in a quantitative manner, and hence previous studies have yielded a large variation in results in health and conflicting results in gallstone patients. There is therefore, a need for improved methodology. Postprandial refilling and turnover of bile are important parameters that need to be assessed when addressing gallbladder motor function and its role in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease. PMID:12974511

  2. Functional gallbladder disorder: gallbladder dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Stephanie L; DiBaise, John K

    2010-06-01

    Functional gallbladder disorder, commonly referred to as gallbladder dyskinesia, is characterized by the occurrence of abdominal pain resembling gallbladder pain but in the absence of gallstones. The diagnosis and management of this condition can be confusing even for the most astute clinician. The aim of this article is to clarify the identification and management of patients with suspected functional gallbladder disorder. PMID:20478492

  3. Functions of the Gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Housset, Chantal; Chrétien, Yues; Debray, Dominique; Chignard, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The gallbladder stores and concentrates bile between meals. Gallbladder motor function is regulated by bile acids via the membrane bile acid receptor, TGR5, and by neurohormonal signals linked to digestion, for example, cholecystokinin and FGF15/19 intestinal hormones, which trigger gallbladder emptying and refilling, respectively. The cycle of gallbladder filling and emptying controls the flow of bile into the intestine and thereby the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. The gallbladder also largely contributes to the regulation of bile composition by unique absorptive and secretory capacities. The gallbladder epithelium secretes bicarbonate and mucins, which both provide cytoprotection against bile acids. The reversal of fluid transport from absorption to secretion occurs together with bicarbonate secretion after feeding, predominantly in response to an adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent pathway triggered by neurohormonal factors, such as vasoactive intestinal peptide. Mucin secretion in the gallbladder is stimulated predominantly by calcium-dependent pathways that are activated by ATP present in bile, and bile acids. The gallbladder epithelium has the capacity to absorb cholesterol and provides a cholecystohepatic shunt pathway for bile acids. Changes in gallbladder motor function not only can contribute to gallstone disease, but also subserve protective functions in multiple pathological settings through the sequestration of bile acids and changes in the bile acid composition. Cholecystectomy increases the enterohepatic recirculation rates of bile acids leading to metabolic effects and an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and small-intestine carcinoid, independently of cholelithiasis. Among subjects with gallstones, cholecystectomy remains a priority in those at risk of gallbladder cancer, while others could benefit from gallbladder-preserving strategies. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol

  4. Gallbladder function before and after fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Morton, John M; Bowers, Steven P; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Mattar, Samer; Bradshaw, W Alan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Herbst, Charles A; McCartney, William; Halkar, Raghuveer K; Smith, C Daniel; Farrell, Timothy M

    2002-01-01

    No study has reported an association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or its therapies and gallbladder function. We compared pre- and postoperative gallbladder function in patients undergoing fundoplication to determine the following: (1) whether patients with chronic GERD have preexisting gallbladder motor dysfunction; (2) whether medical or surgical therapy alters gallbladder function; and (3) whether division of the hepatic branch of the anterior vagus nerve is detrimental to gallbladder motility. Nineteen patients with documented GERD consented to a preoperative cholecystokinin-stimulated technetium hepatobiliary (CCK-HIDA) scan to quantify the gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF). All patients underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. One month after fundoplication, 12 patients completed a repeat CCK-HIDA scan for determination of GBEF, with comparison to the preoperative GBEF. Among patients with preoperative GERD, 11 (58%) of 19 met the scintigraphic criteria for gallbladder dysfunction (GBEF <35%), which is a ratio comparable to that in patients undergoing a CCK-HIDA scan for presumed biliary dyskinesia during the same time period (31 [60%] of 53; P = NS, chi-square test) and exceeds the rate of abnormal GBEF reported in healthy volunteers (3%). Six of seven patients with a low preoperative GBEF who underwent repeat evaluation postoperatively had normalization of the GBEF (P < 0.05, paired t-test). In the 12 patients who underwent postoperative CCK-HIDA scanning, there was no association between preservation or division of the hepatic branch of the anterior vagus nerve and postoperative gallbladder dysfunction (P = NS, chi-square test). Unexpectedly, 58% of patients with GERD demonstrated gallbladder motor dysfunction prior to fundoplication, with improvement to normal occurring in most of those studied postoperatively. These data support controlled trials to determine the effect of chronic GERD and antisecretory therapy on gallbladder and

  5. Gallbladder function and dynamics of bile flow in asymptomatic gallstone disease

    PubMed Central

    Çerçi, Sevim Süreyya; Özbek, Feride Meltem; Çerçi, Celal; Baykal, Bahattin; Eroğlu, Hasan Erol; Baykal, Zeynep; Yıldız, Mustafa; Sağlam, Semahat; Yeşildağ, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of gallbladder stones on motor functions of the gallbladder and the dynamics of bile flow in asymptomatic gallstone disease. METHODS: Quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy was performed to detect the parameters of gallbladder motor function [gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF), gallbladder visualization time (GBVT), gallbladder time to peak activity (GBTmax), gallbladder half emptying time (GBT1/2), and transit time of bile to duodenum (TTBD)] in 24 patients with asymptomatic cholelithiasis who were diagnosed incidentally during routine abdominal ultrasonographic examination and 20 healthy subjects with normal gallbladder. RESULTS: Even though there was no significant difference in the clinical and laboratory parameters between the patient and control groups, all parameters of gallbladder function except TTBD were found to differ significantly between the two groups. GBEF in the patient group was decreased (P = 0.000) and GBVT, GBTmax, GBT1/2 in the patient group were longer (P = 0.000, P = 0.015, P = 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our results showed that even if there were not any clinical and laboratory findings, gallbladder filling and emptying could be impaired in patients with gallstone disease. PMID:19522027

  6. Sonographic Evaluation of Gallbladder Motility in Children with Chronic Functional Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Rakesh; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay; Thapa, BR; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Studies in adults suggest that constipation may not be a purely colonic pathology and may be a component of a generalized gastrointestinal (GI) motor disorder in which proximal GI motility can be impaired. Pediatric data are scarce, and the natural history of the disorder remains undefined. We aimed to evaluate gallbladder motility in a subset of Asian children with chronic functional constipation. Methods Abdominal ultrasound was performed on 105 children, including 55 patients (aged 3 to 13 years) with chronic functional constipation who met the inclusion criteria and 50 age- and gender-matched controls. The gallbladder contractility index was calculated based on the preprandial and postprandial gallbladder areas. Preprandial and postprandial values for gallbladder volume and wall thickness were evaluated. Results The mean value of the contractility index for the patients (15.77±24.68) was significantly lower than the mean value for the controls (43.66±11.58) (p=0.001). The mean postprandial gallbladder volumes and areas were larger in children with gallbladder hypomotility (p<0.05). The mean duration of constipation (4.8 months) was significantly higher (p=0.004) in the children with gall-bladder hypomotility. Conclusions Gallbladder motility is significantly impaired in children with chronic functional constipation. This study contributes to the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, which will enable advancement in and improved management of children with chronic constipation and associated gallbladder hypomotility. PMID:25167798

  7. Evaluation and management of functional biliary pain in patients with an intact gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Dibaise, John K

    2009-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of suspected functional biliary pain in patients with an intact gallbladder remains contentious. Major issues include the lack of a clear definition of what constitutes biliary pain, a poor understanding of its natural history and pathophysiology, and the all too common scenario of the patient who has persistent pain despite surgical removal of the gallbladder. As a consequence, symptoms alone have generally been considered to be unreliable in the diagnosis of gallbladder dysfunction, and this has led to a search for a reliable test to help confirm a clinical suspicion of gallbladder dysfunction prior to the definitive treatment, cholecystectomy. At present, cholecystokinin-cholescintigraphy with a calculation of the gallbladder ejection fraction is the most commonly used test; however, its utility in predicting symptom outcome after cholecystectomy has been questioned. The use of cholecystokinin-cholescintigraphy to determine the appropriateness for cholecystectomy appears to be most useful when performed using a slow infusion of cholecystokinin in a well-selected patient population. However, for reasons explained herein, consideration of cholecystectomy on the basis of high clinical suspicion after adequate follow-up with trials of pharmacological therapies and exclusion of other disease entities, together with counseling the patient on postoperative expectations, may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:19485811

  8. Concomitant gastroparesis occurs in functional gallbladder disease and may negatively impact clinical outcome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gallbladder disease, commonly known as Biliary Dyskinesia (BD), is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic abdominal pain and dyspepsia in adults and children. Similar symptoms may occur in those with Gastroparesis (GP). The potential role and impact of concomitant GP in those with BD...

  9. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  10. Filling of the gallbladder as studied by computer-assisted Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, W.; Kempi, V.

    1984-03-01

    Gallbladder filling was studied using computer-assisted cholescintigraphy in normal subjects who had fasted overnight. The gallbladder tended to visualize earlier than the distal part of the common bile duct. It appeared at approximately the same time regardless of whether or not there was passage of activity into the duodenum. This suggests that filling is not dependent on contraction of the sphincter of Oddi. Sequential images demonstrated that the activity entering the gallbladder rapidly reached the fundus. Time-activity curves showed a gradual buildup of activity in the bile ducts followed by sudden entrance into the gallbladder. Time-activity curves of the gallbladder's proximal and distal parts showed signs of an exchange of activity, suggesting that the gallbladder's motor function is not quiescent during fasting. Gallbladder motility could explain the periodic irregularities on the time-activity curve. These irregularities were smaller but no less frequent after morphine administration.

  11. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gallbladder radionuclide scan is a test that uses radioactive material to check gallbladder function. It is also used to look for bile duct blockage or leak. How the Test is Performed The health care provider will inject ...

  12. Bilobed gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad Tanveer; Qaiser, Bushra; Jamaluddin, Muhammad; Abbas Hussain, S M

    2011-06-01

    We report a rare case of duplication anomaly of gallbladder in a female aged 17 years, who presented with right hypochondrial pain for 3 months. Ultrasound findings suggested multiple stones in gallbladder and per-operatively she was found to have bilobed gallbladder. This case emphasizes the need for complete removal of both gallbladders during initial surgery, as a failure of this may result in recurrence of symptoms and stones and a need for re-exploration. PMID:21711996

  13. Role of oral cholecystography, real-time ultrasound, and CT in evaluation of gallstones and gallbladder function.

    PubMed

    Marzio, L; Innocenti, P; Genovesi, N; Di Felice, F; Napolitano, A M; Contantini, R; Di Giandomenico, E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of oral cholecystography (OCG), real-time ultrasound (RUS), and computed tomography (CT) to detect gallstones and to analyze their size, number, and composition was tested preoperatively in 37 patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy. Gallbladder response to a standard meal was also evaluated by OCG and RUS. Gallstones were analyzed chemically for calcium, cholesterol, and bilirubin content. The results show that RUS is the most valuable test for detecting gallstones and is similar to OCG in measuring their size and number, whereas CT underestimates the stone size. Gallbladder function in terms of contractibility can be evaluated by RUS and OCG, but RUS provides useful information even if the gallbladder is not opacified at OCG. CT is more accurate than OCG in detecting the presence of calcium, and CT attenuation numbers are positively correlated with calcium content of the stone (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01). PMID:1612312

  14. Terminal decline in motor function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Segawa, Eisuke; Buchman, Aron S; Boyle, Patricia A; Hizel, Loren P; Bennett, David A

    2012-12-01

    The study aim was to test the hypothesis that motor function undergoes accelerated decline proximate to death. As part of a longitudinal clinical-pathologic study, 124 older Roman Catholic nuns, priests, and monks completed at least 7 annual clinical evaluations, died, and underwent brain autopsy and uniform neuropathologic examination. Each evaluation included administration of 11 motor tests and 19 cognitive tests from which global measures of motor and cognitive function were derived. The global motor measure (baseline M = 0.82, SD = 0.21) declined a mean 0.024 unit per year (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.032, -0.016) until a mean of 2.46 years (95% CI: -2.870, -2.108) before death when rate of decline increased nearly fivefold to -0.117 unit per year (95% CI: -0.140, -0.097). The global cognitive measure (baseline M = 0.07, SD = 0.45) declined a mean of 0.027-unit per year (95% CI: -0.041, -0.014) until a mean of 2.76 years (95% CI: -3.157, -2.372) before death when rate of decline increased more than 13-fold to -0.371 unit per year (95% CI: -0.443, -0.306). Onset of terminal motor decline was highly correlated with onset of terminal cognitive decline (r = .94, 95% CI: 0.81, 0.99), but rates of motor and cognitive change were not strongly correlated (preterminal r = .20, 95% CI: -0.05, 0.38; terminal r = .34, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.62). Higher level of plaques and tangles was associated with earlier onset of terminal decline in motor function, but no pathologic measures were associated with rate of preterminal or terminal motor decline. The results demonstrate that motor and cognitive functions both undergo a period of accelerated decline in the last few years of life. PMID:22612603

  15. Wandering gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Morales, Angel M; Tyroch, Alan H

    2008-08-01

    A wandering gallbladder typically is attached to surrounding structures only by the cystic duct and its mesentery. Its characteristic propensity for torsion places it at risk for necrosis. A 70-year-old woman admitted to our hospital was found to have a wandering gallbladder. The possible clinical implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:18436179

  16. Gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Kliček, Robert; Kolovrat, Marijan; Loncar, Bozo; Busic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer involving gastrointestinal tract, but it is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80-95% of biliary tract cancers. This tumor is a highly lethal disease with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5% and mean survival mere than 6 months. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis. The percentage of patients diagnosed to have gallbladder cancer after simple cholecystectomy for presumed gallbladder stone disease is 0.5-1.5%. Patients with preoperative suspicion of gallbladder cancer should not be treated by laparoscopy. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities—inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Improved imaging modalities and improved radical aggressive surgical approach in the last decade has improved outcomes and helped prolong survival in patients with gallbladder cancer. The overall 5-year survival for patients with gallbladder cancer who underwent R0 curative resection was from 21% to 69%. In the future, the development of potential diagnostic markers for disease will yield screening opportunities for those at risk either with ethnic susceptibility or known anatomic anomalies of the biliary tract. PMID:25392833

  17. The role of the gallbladder in humans.

    PubMed

    Turumin, J L; Shanturov, V A; Turumina, H E

    2013-01-01

    The basic function of the gallbladder in humans is one of protection. The accumulation of the primary bile acids (cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) in the gallbladder reduces the formation of the secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid), thus diminishing their concentration in the so-called gallbladder-independent enterohepatic circulation and protecting the liver, the stomach mucosa, the gallbladder, and the colon from their toxic hydrophobic effects. The presence or absence of the gallbladder in mammals is a determining factor in the synthesis of hydrophobic or hydrophilic bile acids. Because the gallbladder contracts 5-20 min after food is in the stomach and the "gastric chyme" moves from the stomach to the duodenum 1-3 h later, the function of the gallbladder bile in digestion may be insignificant. The aim of this article was to provide a detailed review of the role of the gallbladder and the mechanisms related to bile formation in humans. PMID:23683886

  18. Dyspraxia, motor function and visual-motor integration in autism.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Chukoskie, L; Zinni, M; Townsend, J; Trauner, D

    2014-08-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  19. Dyspraxia, Motor Function and Visual-Motor Integration in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.; Chukoskie, L.; Zinni, M.; Townsend, J.; Trauner, D.

    2014-01-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  20. Rationales for improving motor function.

    PubMed

    Hummelsheim, H

    1999-12-01

    New findings in basic neuroscience, and the growing knowledge regarding neuroplasticity and motor learning have exerted influence and have provided stimuli for motor rehabilitation research. Repeated motor practice has been identified as crucial for motor recovery. Further novel and scientifically based therapeutic approaches have been developed: constraint-induced movement therapy, electromyogram-initiated neuromuscular stimulation, motor imagery and music therapy are all discussed in the present review. PMID:10676751

  1. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  2. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26520191

  3. Cerebellar Motor Function in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Salman, Michael S.; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM), a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder, involves dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and its most obvious manifestations are motor deficits. This paper reviews cerebellar neuropathology and motor function across several motor systems well studied in SBM in relation to current models of cerebellar motor and timing function. Children and adults with SBM have widespread motor deficits in trunk, upper limbs, eyes, and speech articulators that are broadly congruent with those observed in adults with cerebellar lesions. The structure and function of the cerebellum are correlated with a range of motor functions. While motor learning is generally preserved in SBM, those motor functions requiring predictive signals and precise calibration of the temporal features of movement are impaired, resulting in deficits in smooth movement coordination as well as in the classical cerebellar triad of dysmetria, ataxia, and dysarthria. That motor function in individuals with SBM is disordered in a manner phenotypically similar to that in adult cerebellar lesions, and appears to involve similar deficits in predictive cerebellar motor control, suggests that age-based cerebellar motor plasticity is limited in individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:20652468

  4. Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic

    MedlinePlus

    Laparoscopic gallbladder removal is surgery to remove the gallbladder using a medical device called a laparoscope. ... lets the doctor see inside your belly. Gallbladder removal surgery is done while you are under general ...

  5. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... done instead). Gallbladder cancers are sometimes found by accident after a person has a cholecystectomy for another ... Gallbladder Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Gallbladder Cancer Talking With ...

  6. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... test results. This test is combined with other imaging (such as CT or ultrasound). After the gallbladder ...

  7. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training: a comparison between motor execution and motor imagery of sequential finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2011-03-01

    Motor imagery training, as an effective strategy, has been more and more applied to mental disorders rehabilitation and motor skill learning. Studies on the neural mechanism underlying motor imagery have suggested that such effectiveness may be related to the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery. However, as compared to the studies on motor imagery, the studies on motor imagery training are much fewer. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training and the effectiveness of motor imagery training on motor performance improvement still needs further investigation. Using fMRI, we employed a sequential finger tapping paradigm to explore the functional alterations associated with motor imagery training in both motor execution and motor imagery task. We hypothesized through 14 consecutive days motor imagery training, the motor performance could be improved and the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery would be sustained form pre-training phase to post-training phase. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of motor imagery training in improving motor performance and demonstrated in both pre and post-training phases, motor imagery and motor execution consistently sustained the congruence in functional neuroanatomy, including SMA (supplementary motor cortex), PMA (premotor area); M1( primary motor cortex) and cerebellum. Moreover, for both execution and imagery tasks, a similar functional alteration was observed in fusiform through motor imagery training. These findings provided an insight into the effectiveness of motor imagery training and suggested its potential therapeutic value in motor rehabilitation.

  8. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    on their treatments, is extensive. Consequently, 2008 has been a good year in terms of the useful information gathered for physicians interested in functional GI and motor disorders. PMID:19434861

  9. Ovarian function and gastrointestinal motor activity.

    PubMed

    Palomba, S; Di Cello, A; Riccio, E; Manguso, F; La Sala, G B

    2011-12-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are strictly related to the ovary function. In fact, it is noted that the prevalence of visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gallbladder and biliary tract diseases are significantly higher in women. Furthermore, symptom such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, distension, satiety, bloating, diarrhoa or constipation, frequently appears in relation with pregnancy, luteal phase of the menstrual cycle or perimenopausal and menopausal states. Further support for the contribution of ovarian steroids to functional gastrointestinal disorders comes from studies demonstrating that pharmacological ovariectomy reduces abdominal pain symptoms. Therefore, addressing the influence of sex and sex hormones in the modulation of visceral pain appears critical to develop new strategies of diagnosis and therapy sex-directed for gastro-intestinal disorders. PMID:22322653

  10. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  11. Intraoperative monitoring of motor function by magnetic motor evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Lee, W Y; Hou, W Y; Yang, L H; Lin, S M

    1995-03-01

    Under etomidate anesthesia, motor evoked potentials produced by magnetic stimulation were successfully recorded from 10 thenar muscles and 10 anterior tibial muscles of eight patients who had undergone surgery on the medulla oblongata and the cervical and thoracic spinal cords. Recordings taken before placing the neural tissue at risk were assessed for variability in amplitude and latency. The lower limit in amplitude was approximately one-third (25-43%) of the baseline. The latencies were more difficult to monitor than were the amplitudes. The latency variations were 2.56 +/- 0.50 milliseconds for the hand and 6.84 +/- 1.37 milliseconds for the leg. During surgery, the unilateral recordings of two patients were transiently lost but partially recovered after a pause in the operation. No obvious postoperative weaknesses in the corresponding limbs occurred. One patient, who showed a permanent loss of unilateral recording, had transient monoplegia with a complete recovery. None of the remaining five patients who had amplitudes larger than one-third of the baseline at the end of the operation had additional motor deficits. Our conclusions are that under etomidate anesthesia, the magnetic motor evoked potentials can be convenient and reliable monitors of motor function, that changes in the amplitude may be superior to those in the latency for intraoperative warning, that the criterion for potential neural damage under magnetic motor evoked potential monitoring might be an amplitude reduction of two-thirds of the control value, and that the magnetic stimulation seems to be more sensitive than the electrical stimulation in the monitoring of motor function and also allows more time and opportunities for the motor function to recover. PMID:7753349

  12. Promoting Motor Function by Exercising the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects’ motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises) on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson’s patients), this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function. PMID:24961309

  13. Promoting motor function by exercising the brain.

    PubMed

    Perrey, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects' motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises) on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson's patients), this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function. PMID:24961309

  14. Gallbladder Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the gallbladder change and grow uncontrollably, forming a mass called a tumor. A tumor can ... Gallbladder Cancer - Statistics › f t k e P H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With ...

  15. Recovery of Motor Function After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nikhil; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    The human brain possesses a remarkable ability to adapt in response to changing anatomical (e.g., aging) or environmental modifications. This form of neuroplasticity is important at all stages of life but is critical in neurological disorders such as amblyopia and stroke. This review focuses upon our new understanding of possible mechanisms underlying functional deficits evidenced after adult-onset stroke. We review the functional interactions between different brain regions that may contribute to motor disability after stroke and, based on this information, possible interventional approaches to motor stroke disability. New information now points to the involvement of non-primary motor areas and their interaction with the primary motor cortex as areas of interest. The emergence of this new information is likely to impact new efforts to develop more effective neurorehabilitative interventions using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) that may be relevant to other neurological disorders such as amblyopia. PMID:22415914

  16. Deep networks for motor control functions.

    PubMed

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  17. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  18. Functional coordination of intraflagellar transport motors.

    PubMed

    Ou, Guangshuo; Blacque, Oliver E; Snow, Joshua J; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2005-07-28

    Cilia have diverse roles in motility and sensory reception, and defects in cilia function contribute to ciliary diseases such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). Intraflagellar transport (IFT) motors assemble and maintain cilia by transporting ciliary precursors, bound to protein complexes called IFT particles, from the base of the cilium to their site of incorporation at the distal tip. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this is accomplished by two IFT motors, kinesin-II and osmotic avoidance defective (OSM)-3 kinesin, which cooperate to form two sequential anterograde IFT pathways that build distinct parts of cilia. By observing the movement of fluorescent IFT motors and IFT particles along the cilia of numerous ciliary mutants, we identified three genes whose protein products mediate the functional coordination of these motors. The BBS proteins BBS-7 and BBS-8 are required to stabilize complexes of IFT particles containing both of the IFT motors, because IFT particles in bbs-7 and bbs-8 mutants break down into two subcomplexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, which are moved separately by kinesin-II and OSM-3 kinesin, respectively. A conserved ciliary protein, DYF-1, is specifically required for OSM-3 kinesin to dock onto and move IFT particles, because OSM-3 kinesin is inactive and intact IFT particles are moved by kinesin-II alone in dyf-1 mutants. These findings implicate BBS ciliary disease proteins and an OSM-3 kinesin activator in the formation of two IFT pathways that build functional cilia. PMID:16049494

  19. [Gallbladder contraction and microscopi observation of the gallbladder wall in gallstone patients].

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Zhang, S; Han, T

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of oral cholecystography (OCG), we selected gallstone patients for nontoperative intervention. Their gallbladder function was considered as normal when gallbladder contracted over 50%-75% after a fat meal at 1 hour. We collected 99 gallstone patients and 19 normal controls; gallbladder function was normal in 77 patients and poor in 22. After a fat meal gallbladder volumes were calculated by B ultrasonography. The results showed that both fasting and residual volume in patients with so-called normal contraction were significantly greater than that in the controls (P < 0.001), though the contraction rate was not different. The combination of gallbladder contraction rate measurement and residual volume calculation by ultrasonography was superior over traditional OCG. PMID:7555394

  20. [Functional and motor digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders presented in Digestive Diseases Week (DDW) in 2013. New data were reported on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) and on how they can produce numerous disturbances such as inflammatory bowel disease. These disturbances are associated with somatic functional disease and particularly with fatigue. In addition, new data have emerged on the physiopathology of these disorders, with some studies reporting that environmental factors and events in early infancy can favor their development. Data were also presented on how bile acids can increase susceptibility to diarrhea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and on how the type of food intake can favor the development of symptoms. More data are available on the presence of underlying celiac disease in patients with IBS, which should prompt us to investigate this disease in our patients. Likewise, indiscriminate application of a gluten-free diet in patients with IBS has been shown not to produce a clear improvement. Regarding the physiopathology of functional dyspepsia (FD), results have been presented on how psychological factors can modify gastric accommodation and how this is in turn related to visceral hypersensitivity and gastric emptying. Regarding therapy, mirtazapine can improve symptoms and lead to weight gain in patients with severe FD and substantial weight loss. Results were presented on new drugs for IBS such as ibodutant and on old drugs with new applications such as mesalazine and ebastine. The antinociceptive effect of linaclotide is now better understood and a meta-analysis has shown its effectiveness in IBS with constipation as the main symptom. In patients with constipation, pelvic floor dysynergy can be diagnosed by a simple clinical interview and rectal touch. More data are available on the efficacy of prucalopride (which has been shown to accelerate

  1. Impaired Gallbladder Motility and Increased Gallbladder Wall Thickness in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Yasar; Bozbey, Gulcin; Erim, Tolga; Caklili, Ozge Telci; Ulasoglu, Celal; Senates, Ebubekir; Mutlu, Hasan Huseyin; Mesci, Banu; Doğan, Mehmet Sait; Tasan, Guralp; Enc, Feruze Yilmaz; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Along with the increase in the incidence of NAFLD and associated obesity, an increase in gallbladder disease (GD) has been noted. This has led to the identification of a new disease entity called fatty GD. There is a gap in the literature on the dynamics of gallbladder function in patients with NAFLD. Methods An observational case-control study, a total of 50 patients with biopsy proven NAFLD without gallbladder stone/sludge and 38 healthy comparison subjects were enrolled. Fasting, postprandial gallbladder volumes (PGV), gallbladder ejection fraction (GEF), and fasting gallbladder wall thickness (FGWT) were measured by real-time 2-dimensional ultrasonography. Results Fasting gallbladder wall thickness, fasting gallbladder volumes and PGV were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than control subjects (P < 0.001, P = 0.006, and P < 0.001, respectively). Gallbladder ejection fraction was significantly lower in the NAFLD group than the controls (P = 0.008). The presence of NAFLD was an independent predictor for GEF, PGV, and FGWT. Also, steatosis grade was an independent predictor for GEF, and GEF was significantly lower in the nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) subgroup than the controls. Conclusions Gallbladder dysfunction and increase in gallbladder wall thickness exists in asymptomatic (without stone/sludge and related symptoms) patients with NAFLD and are useful in identifying fatty GD. Measurement of these variables in NAFLD patients may be useful in identifying those at higher risk for GD. PMID:26932908

  2. Cholescintigraphy in gallbladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Colletti, P.M.; Ralls, P.W.; Siegel, M.E.; Halls, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Findings on cholescintigraphy in gallbladder carcinoma are described in five patients. Four patients presenting with acute cholecystitis had nonvisualization of the gallbladder with normal hepatoenteric transit time. One of these had a large portal mass and two had liver metastasis as additional findings. The fifth patient was jaundiced, and showed absence of bowel activity compatible with total biliary obstruction. Both the clinical and scintigraphic findings in gallbladder carcinoma are difficult to separate from findings in cholelithiasis and cholecystitis.

  3. What Is Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other types of cancer, such as adenosquamous carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, small cell carcinomas, and sarcomas, can ... Treatment What`s New in Gallbladder Cancer Research? Other Resources ...

  4. Motor Functions of the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Neeraj J.; Katnani, Husam A.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) and its nonmammalian homolog, the optic tectum, constitute a major node in processing sensory information, incorporating cognitive factors, and issuing motor commands. The resulting action—to orient toward or away from a stimulus—can be accomplished as an integrated movement across oculomotor, cephalomotor, and skeletomotor effectors. The SC also participates in preserving fixation during intersaccadic intervals. This review highlights the repertoire of movements attributed to SC function and analyzes the significance of results obtained from causality-based experiments (microstimulation and inactivation). The mechanisms potentially used to decode the population activity in the SC into an appropriate movement command are also discussed. PMID:21456962

  5. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five BAMF ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine, and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and…

  6. Thinking, Walking, Talking: Integratory Motor and Cognitive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Leisman, Gerry; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue that motor and cognitive processes are functionally related and most likely share a similar evolutionary history. This is supported by clinical and neural data showing that some brain regions integrate both motor and cognitive functions. In addition, we also argue that cognitive processes coincide with complex motor output. Further, we also review data that support the converse notion that motor processes can contribute to cognitive function, as found by many rehabilitation and aerobic exercise training programs. Support is provided for motor and cognitive processes possessing dynamic bidirectional influences on each other. PMID:27252937

  7. Thinking, Walking, Talking: Integratory Motor and Cognitive Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Leisman, Gerry; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue that motor and cognitive processes are functionally related and most likely share a similar evolutionary history. This is supported by clinical and neural data showing that some brain regions integrate both motor and cognitive functions. In addition, we also argue that cognitive processes coincide with complex motor output. Further, we also review data that support the converse notion that motor processes can contribute to cognitive function, as found by many rehabilitation and aerobic exercise training programs. Support is provided for motor and cognitive processes possessing dynamic bidirectional influences on each other. PMID:27252937

  8. Gallbladder removal - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... and kidney tests) Chest x-ray or electrocardiogram ( EKG ), for some patients Several x-rays of the ... Procedure You may stay in the hospital for 3 to 5 days after open gallbladder removal. During ...

  9. Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 55. Read More Acute cholecystitis Chronic cholecystitis Gallbladder removal - open Gallstones Patient Instructions Bland diet Surgical wound care - open When you have nausea and vomiting ...

  10. Gallbladder aspirate from a dog.

    PubMed

    Neel, Jennifer A; Tarigo, Jaime; Grindem, Carol B

    2006-12-01

    A 7-year-old, male, castrated, Labrador Retriever with a history of pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease presented for vomiting and anorexia. Serum biochemistry findings were indicative of cholestasis, hepatocellular insult, and decreased hepatic function. Ultrasound examination showed sediment and gas within the gallbladder, and a diagnosis of emphysematous cholecystitis was made. Emergency gallbladder resection was performed. Cytologic examination of bile fluid collected at surgery showed a mixed population of bacteria (bactibilia) together with fungal organisms consistent with Cyniclomyces guttulatus (previously known as Saccharomycopsis guttulatus). Similar fungal organisms were seen on a fecal smear. Bacteria cultured were normal gastrointestinal flora, supporting ascending infection; the fungal organisms were interpreted as incidental. Histopathology of the gallbladder indicated active (suppurative) and chronic (lymphocytic) cholecystitis and sections of liver tissue had evidence of chronic liver disease. A positive liver culture indicated concurrent bacterial hepatitis or cholangiohepatitis. Despite supportive care, the dog continued to decline and was euthanized 30 days later. Necropsy results confirmed end stage liver disease, but an initiating cause was not found. This case highlights the role of bactibilia in the development of acute cholecystitis and the unique cytologic appearance of C guttulatus as an incidental finding in bile fluid. PMID:17123257

  11. Effect of pirenzepine on gallbladder emptying in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Fitzpatrick, M.L.; Anagnostides, A.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of the selective antimuscarinic agent, pirenzepine, on gallbladder function was studied in six healthy volunteers, using /sup 99m/Tc HIDA (N-(2,6-diethylthenyl) carbamoylmethyl iminodiacetic acid) hepatobiliary scanning. Pirenzepine, in doses that inhibit gastric acid secretion, did not alter gallbladder emptying responses to sham feeding stimulation or to a test meal.

  12. Spontaneous gallbladder perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, T.C.; Miller, C.; Weaver, R.

    1989-05-01

    Acute gallbladder perforation is an infrequent, although not uncommon, complication of cholecystitis. It is rarely diagnosed preoperatively and the delay in making the definitive diagnosis usually accounts for the increased incidence of morbidity and mortality associated with this complication. A case of a 92-year-old patient in whom acute gallbladder perforation was suspected peroperatively at ultrasonography of the abdomen and confirmed by technetium-99m disofenin radionuclide biliary scan is reported.

  13. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  14. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-01-01

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  15. General Information about Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Gallbladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gallbladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Evaluation of Esophageal Motor Function With High-resolution Manometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For several decades esophageal manometry has been the test of choice to evaluate disorders of esophageal motor function. The recent introduction of high-resolution manometry for the study of esophageal motor function simplified performance of esophageal manometry, and revealed previously unidentified patterns of normal and abnormal esophageal motor function. Presentation of pressure data as color contour plots or esophageal pressure topography led to the development of new tools for analyzing and classifying esophageal motor patterns. The current standard and still developing approach to do this is the Chicago classification. While this methodical approach is improving our diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders, it currently does not address all motor abnormalities. We will explore the Chicago classification and disorders that it does not address. PMID:23875094

  17. Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics. PMID:25175928

  18. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  19. Gallbladder torsion with acute cholecystitis and gross necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Bencsath, Kalman

    2014-01-01

    A 92-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of worsening right-sided abdominal pain. On examination she had right mid-abdominal tenderness. Laboratory studies demonstrated leukocytosis with normal liver function tests. A CT of the abdomen was remarkable for a large fluid collection in the right abdomen and no discernible gallbladder in the gallbladder fossa. An ultrasound confirmed the suspicion of a distended, floating gallbladder. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The gallbladder was found to have volvulised in a counter -clockwise manner around its pedicle, with gross necrosis of the gallbladder. She underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Pathological examination revealed acute necrotising calculus cholecystitis. PMID:24862426

  20. Motor Cortex Activity During Functional Motor Skills: An fNIRS Study.

    PubMed

    Nishiyori, Ryota; Bisconti, Silvia; Ulrich, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of brain activity during motor task performance have been limited to fine motor movements due to technological constraints presented by traditional neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) offers a promising method by which to overcome these constraints and investigate motor performance of functional motor tasks. The current study used fNIRS to quantify hemodynamic responses within the primary motor cortex in twelve healthy adults as they performed unimanual right, unimanual left, and bimanual reaching, and stepping in place. Results revealed that during both unimanual reaching tasks, the contralateral hemisphere showed significant activation in channels located approximately 3 cm medial to the C3 (for right-hand reach) and C4 (for left-hand reach) landmarks. Bimanual reaching and stepping showed activation in similar channels, which were located bilaterally across the primary motor cortex. The medial channels, surrounding Cz, showed significantly higher activations during stepping when compared to bimanual reaching. Our results extend the viability of fNIRS to study motor function and build a foundation for future investigation of motor development in infants during nascent functional behaviors and monitor how they may change with age or practice. PMID:26243304

  1. Restoring motor function using optogenetics and neural engraftment.

    PubMed

    Bryson, J Barney; Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Lieberam, Ivo; Greensmith, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Controlling muscle function is essential for human behaviour and survival, thus, impairment of motor function and muscle paralysis can severely impact quality of life and may be immediately life-threatening, as occurs in many cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Repairing damaged spinal motor circuits, in either SCI or ALS, currently remains an elusive goal. Therefore alternative strategies are needed to artificially control muscle function and thereby enable essential motor tasks. This review focuses on recent advances towards restoring motor function, with a particular focus on stem cell-derived neuronal engraftment strategies, optogenetic control of motor function and the potential future translational application of these approaches. PMID:27016703

  2. Motor network structure and function are associated with motor performance in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hans-Peter; Gorges, Martin; Grön, Georg; Kassubek, Jan; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Süßmuth, Sigurd D; Wolf, Robert Christian; Orth, Michael

    2016-03-01

    In Huntington's disease, the relationship of brain structure, brain function and clinical measures remains incompletely understood. We asked how sensory-motor network brain structure and neural activity relate to each other and to motor performance. Thirty-four early stage HD and 32 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor, and intrinsic functional connectivity MRI. Diffusivity patterns were assessed in the cortico-spinal tract and the thalamus-somatosensory cortex tract. For the motor network connectivity analyses the dominant M1 motor cortex region and for the basal ganglia-thalamic network the thalamus were used as seeds. Region to region structural and functional connectivity was examined between thalamus and somatosensory cortex. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was higher in HD than controls in the basal ganglia, and lower in the external and internal capsule, in the thalamus, and in subcortical white matter. Between-group axial and radial diffusivity differences were more prominent than differences in FA, and correlated with motor performance. Within the motor network, the insula was less connected in HD than in controls, with the degree of connection correlating with motor scores. The basal ganglia-thalamic network's connectivity differed in the insula and basal ganglia. Tract specific white matter diffusivity and functional connectivity were not correlated. In HD sensory-motor white matter organization and functional connectivity in a motor network were independently associated with motor performance. The lack of tract-specific association of structure and function suggests that functional adaptation to structural loss differs between participants. PMID:26762394

  3. [Application of feedback techniques in motor function rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoying; Hou, Wensheng; Zheng, Xiaolin; Peng, Chenglin

    2008-10-01

    Feedback is an important way of information transmission in motor function output. Movement-related information can be transmitted as proprioceptive, haptic, visual and/or audial information to the central nervous system for control and modification of the temporal and spatial precision of motor output. Here presented is a systematic discussion on the principle, technique and effect for some typical motor function rehabilitation methods such as treatment based on EMG feedback, robot-aided movement therapy, high-level perceptional feedback and motor training effect with 3-D virtual reality environment. PMID:19024479

  4. Testosterone improves motor function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E; Thomas, D; Burnet, R

    2006-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) there is increasing evidence that sex steroids such as estradiol and testosterone modulate, either as a positive or negative effect, the clinical expression of a variety of movement disorders involving the nigrostriatum. Testosterone deficiency is common in the older male population and has an increased prevalence in parkinsonian patients. Testosterone therapy has been shown to improve the non-motor symptoms of PD but evidence for a direct effect of testosterone on motor symptoms is lacking. This case report demonstrates a significant improvement in the resting tremor and fine motor control after testosterone administration in a parkinsonian patient with testosterone deficiency (1 nmol/L). Motor symptom change was shown by serial assessment of the patient's handwriting, self-reporting using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and measurement of resting tremor amplitude by an accelerometer. The improvement in motor symptoms correlated with serum testosterone levels. The use of testosterone replacement in those men with decreased levels may improve the motor symptoms as well as increase general wellbeing. PMID:16410216

  5. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    PubMed

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport. PMID:17463181

  6. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Terasawa, Shun; Takahashi, Hiroto; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2010-03-26

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s{sup -1}, meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  7. Gallbladder filling and post-ceruletide emptying in prairie dogs and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, G T; Turner, F E

    1988-05-01

    The filling and emptying characteristics of the gallbladder in prairie dogs and rabbits were studied to assess the importance of the residual bile in the pathogenesis of gallstones. In prairie dogs under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, a significantly larger fraction (p = 0.001) of hepatic bile entered the gallbladder (87 +/- 8%) than the intestine during fasting and very little bile emptied (0-3% ejection fraction) following ceruletide infusion. In rabbits under similar anesthesia, only a small fraction of hepatic bile entered the gallbladder (4 +/- 2%) during fasting, and the gallbladder emptied almost completely (85% ejection fraction) following ceruletide infusion. The resultant higher residual bile in the prairie dog gallbladder and lower residual bile in the rabbit gallbladder may explain why gallstones form so readily in prairie dogs but not in rabbits when fed a lithogenic diet. These similarities and differences in gallbladder function must be taken into account when considering any animal as a model for gallstone formation. PMID:3412728

  8. Motor Function and Social Participation in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Bart, Orit

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on the associations between individual variations in children's motor abilities and individual differences in social participation and play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play behavior patterns of 88 kindergarten children were observed, and a battery of standard assessments of basic motor functions was administered. The findings…

  9. Oral-Motor Function and Feeding Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Oral Motor Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence based as well as infant driven and family focused. In the context of anticipated maturation of…

  10. Cholesterol gallstone disease: focusing on the role of gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Kong, Jing; Wu, Shuodong

    2015-02-01

    Gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most common biliary tract diseases worldwide in which both genetic and environmental factors have roles in its pathogenesis. Biliary cholesterol supersaturation from metabolic defects in the liver is traditionally seen as the main pathogenic factor. Recently, there have been renewed investigative interests in the downstream events that occur in gallbladder lithogenesis. This article focuses on the role of the gallbladder in the pathogenesis of cholesterol GSD (CGD). Various conditions affecting the crystallization process are discussed, such as gallbladder motility, concentrating function, lipid transport, and an imbalance between pro-nucleating and nucleation inhibiting proteins. PMID:25502177

  11. Ultrasonography in acute gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Soiva, M; Pamilo, M; Päivänsalo, M; Taavitsainen, M; Suramo, I

    1988-01-01

    The files of patients with acute cholecystitis from two large university hospitals from the years 1978-1985 were employed to find the cases with acute gallbladder perforation for this study. Only those patients (n = 9) were selected for the analysis of sonographic signs of acute gallbladder perforation who had less than 48 hours of symptoms before sonography, and were operated upon within 24 hours of the sonography. Patients (n = 10) with non-complicated acute cholecystitis and identical in regard to the duration of the symptoms and the timing of the sonography and the operation formed a control group. The sonographic findings in patients with gallbladder perforation were pericholecystic fluid collections, free peritoneal fluid, disappearance of the gallbladder wall echoes, focal highly echogenic areas with acoustic shadows in the gallbladder, and an inhomogeneous, generally echo-poor gallbladder wall. PMID:2964842

  12. Factors affecting gallbladder motility: drugs.

    PubMed

    Marzio, L

    2003-07-01

    Various drugs and medications that inhibit or stimulate gallbladder contraction and basal tone in humans are described. Active gallbladder contraction may be achieved using synthetic hormones such as cholecystokinin, caerulein and motilin, cholinomimetic drugs such as bethanecol, prostigmine, and erythromycin due to its motilin-like effect. Furthermore, cisapride and cholestyramine, may have some excitatory activity on the gallbladder muscle. Intravenous amino acids also induce gallbladder contraction through the release of cholecystokinin. Inhibition of gallbladder contraction induced by a meal, or reduction of the basal fasting tone may be achieved by using atropine and other cholinergics, and by inhibitory hormones such as somatostatin, the nitric acid releaser arginine, the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, and progesterone. Other drugs such as trimebutine, loperamide and ondansetron may negatively affect gallbladder contraction. PMID:12974504

  13. Functions and mechanics of dynein motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anthony J.; Kon, Takahide; Knight, Peter J.; Sutoh, Kazuo; Burgess, Stan A.

    2014-01-01

    Fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, dyneins generate force and movement on microtubules in a wealth of biological processes, including ciliary beating, cell division and intracellular transport. The large mass and complexity of dynein motors have made elucidating their mechanisms a sizable task. Yet, through a combination of approaches, including X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule assays and biochemical experiments, important progress has been made towards understanding how these giant motor proteins work. From these studies, a model for the mechanochemical cycle of dynein is emerging, in which nucleotide-driven flexing motions within the AAA+ ring of dynein alter the affinity of its microtubule-binding stalk and reshape its mechanical element to generate movement. PMID:24064538

  14. Obesity Reduces Cognitive and Motor Functions across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuanming; Chan, John S. Y.; Ren, Lijie; Yan, Jin H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to a sedentary lifestyle, more and more people are becoming obese nowadays. In addition to health-related problems, obesity can also impair cognition and motor performance. Previous results have shown that obesity mainly affects cognition and motor behaviors through altering brain functions and musculoskeletal system, respectively. Many factors, such as insulin/leptin dysregulation and inflammation, mediate the effect of obesity and cognition and motor behaviors. Substantial evidence has suggested exercise to be an effective way to improve obesity and related cognitive and motor dysfunctions. This paper aims to discuss the association of obesity with cognition and motor behaviors and its underlying mechanisms. Following this, mechanisms of exercise to improve obesity-related dysfunctions are described. Finally, implications and future research direction are raised. PMID:26881095

  15. Hand motor recovery after stroke: tuning the orchestra to improve hand motor function.

    PubMed

    Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2006-03-01

    The motor deficits after stroke are not only the manifestation of the injured brain region, but rather the expression of the ability of the rest of the brain to maintain function. After a lesion in the primary motor cortex, parallel motor circuits might be activated to generate some alternative input to the spinal motoneurons. These parallel circuits may originate from areas such as the contralateral, undamaged primary motor area, bilateral premotor areas, bilateral supplementary motor areas, bilateral somatosensory areas, cerebellum, and basal ganglia. Most importantly, the efferent, cortico-spinal output pathways must be preserved for a desired behavioral result. Most of the recovery of function after a stroke may represent actual relearning of the skills with the injured brain. The main neural mechanisms underlying this relearning process after stroke involve shifts of distributed contributions across a specific neural network (fundamentally the network engaged in skill learning in the healthy). If these notions are indeed correct, then neuromodulatory approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, targeting these parallel circuits might be useful to limit injury and promote recovery after a stroke. This paper reviews the stroke characteristics that can predict a good recovery and compensations across brain areas that can be implemented after a stroke to accelerate motor function recovery. PMID:16633016

  16. Correlative imaging in gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Willekens, I; Goethals, L R; Brussaard, C; Verdries, D; de Mey, J

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a relatively rare malignant epithelial neoplasm, arising from gallbladder mucosa. It is the fifth most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the most common biliary tract cancer. Early diagnosis remains difficult, because clinical symptoms are sparse and non-specific, often resulting in advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis. The most common feature of gallbladder carcinoma on different imaging modalities is focal wall thickening, associated with a large eccentric tumor mass. In this case we report the imaging characteristics of gallbladder carcinoma on ultrasound, MDCT and 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:25597210

  17. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  18. Gallbladder disease in children.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, David H; Harmon, Carroll M

    2016-08-01

    Biliary disease in children has changed over the past few decades, with a marked rise in incidence-perhaps most related to the parallel rise in pediatric obesity-as well as a rise in cholecystectomy rates. In addition to stone disease (cholelithiasis), acalculous causes of gallbladder pain such as biliary dyskinesia, also appear to be on the rise and present diagnostic and treatment conundrums to surgeons. PMID:27521713

  19. Visual and motor functions in graphically gifted savants.

    PubMed

    Hermelin, B; Pring, L; Heavey, L

    1994-08-01

    Savant artists represent a conundrum to our understanding of the nature of high level specific talents as well as to the concept of general intellectual impairment. In the present paper, we are particularly concerned with the relationship between general perceptual-motor functions in relation to drawing aptitude. Drawing is by definition a perceptual-motor operation, yet mental handicap tends to be associated with some degree of impairment in this area. The following study seeks to isolate such aspects of performance on general perceptual-motor skills that might be associated with drawing ability, and may thus be regarded as building blocks underlying the manifestation of graphic talent. The results are discussed in terms of the relationships between graphic talent, non-verbal intelligence and visual-motor functions. PMID:7991749

  20. Arsenic Exposure and Motor Function among Children in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Faruque; Wasserman, Gail A.; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Liu, Xinhua; Slavkovich, Vesna; Siddique, Abu B.; Sultana, Rebeka; Sultana, Ruksana; Islam, Tariqul; Levy, Diane; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Khan, Khalid; Kline, Jennie; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several reports indicate that drinking water arsenic (WAs) and manganese (WMn) are associated with children’s intellectual function. Very little is known, however, about possible associations with other neurologic outcomes such as motor function. Methods: We investigated the associations of WAs and WMn with motor function in 304 children in Bangladesh, 8–11 years of age. We measured As and Mn concentrations in drinking water, blood, urine, and toenails. We assessed motor function with the Bruininks-Oseretsky test, version 2, in four subscales—fine manual control (FMC), manual coordination (MC), body coordination (BC), and strength and agility—which can be summarized with a total motor composite score (TMC). Results: Log-transformed blood As was associated with decreases in TMC [β = –3.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): –6.72, –0.54; p < 0.01], FMC (β = –1.68; 95% CI: –3.19, –0.18; p < 0.05), and BC (β = –1.61; 95% CI: –2.72, –0.51; p < 0.01), with adjustment for sex, school attendance, head circumference, mother’s intelligence, plasma ferritin, and blood Mn, lead, and selenium. Other measures of As exposure (WAs, urinary As, and toenail As) also were inversely associated with motor function scores, particularly TMC and BC. Square-transformed blood selenium was positively associated with TMC (β = 3.54; 95% CI: 1.10, 6.0; p < 0.01), FMC (β = 1.55; 95% CI: 0.40, 2.70; p < 0.005), and MC (β = 1.57; 95% CI: 0.60, 2.75; p < 0.005) in the unadjusted models. Mn exposure was not significantly associated with motor function. Conclusion: Our research demonstrates an adverse association of As exposure and a protective association of Se on motor function in children. PMID:21742576

  1. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Martin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) – is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay. PMID:24994971

  2. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system. PMID:26972317

  3. How to image the gallbladder in suspected cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, K.I.; Doubilet, P.

    1988-11-01

    As a result of important advances in medical imaging, the oral cholecystogram is no longer the primary test of gallbladder function and anatomy. Real-time ultrasonography and cholescintigraphy, both highly sensitive and specific tests, are the two major methods for assessing gallbladder pathology. Oral cholecystography, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, and percutaneous gallbladder puncture serve as supplementary tests. Decisions about which test to use depend on the kind of gallbladder disease that is suspected as well as the estimated likelihood of the disease before the information is obtained from the procedure. Thus, ultrasonography is the test of choice for chronic cholecystitis, with oral cholecystography reserved for situations in which the diagnosis is uncertain after ultrasonography. When acute cholecystitis is suspected, ultrasonography is also the test of choice in most patients, and cholescintigraphy is used to resolve uncertainty. 103 references.

  4. Motor function in microgravity: movement in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity provides unique, though experimentally challenging, opportunities to study motor control. A traditional research focus has been the effects of linear acceleration on vestibular responses to angular acceleration. Evidence is accumulating that the high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not affected by transitions from a 1 g linear force field to microgravity (<1 g); however, it appears that the three-dimensional organization of the VOR is dependent on gravitoinertial force levels. Some of the observed effects of microgravity on head and arm movement control appear to depend on the previously undetected inputs of cervical and brachial proprioception, which change almost immediately in response to alterations in background force levels. Recent studies of post-flight disturbances of posture and locomotion are revealing sensorimotor mechanisms that adjust over periods ranging from hours to weeks.

  5. Palliative Therapy for Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... based on the extent of gallbladder cancer Palliative therapy for gallbladder cancer Palliative therapy is treatment given to help control or reduce ... to advance quickly, doctors try to use palliative therapies that are less likely to affect a person’s ...

  6. [Development of motoricity as functional-neurologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Göllnitz, G

    1970-01-01

    Movement is one of the characteristic features of a living organism. The movements of human beings are controlled by the brain via the nervous system. Disturbances in the development of the brain therefore also manifest themselves in the organization and course of motoricity. The normal and pathological development of the child--from birth through to maturation--therefore also shows itself in the differentiation of motoricity and psychomotoricity. In the first three years of life the organization of motor coordination is even the most reliable indicator of normal somatic and psychic development and of the functional capacity of the central nervous system. The author discuss at length: The development of tonicity. The diagnostically most significant reflex mechanisms of neonates; time of occurrence and disappearance within the framework of the integration of voluntary movements. Motometric studies for determining the various coordinative capacities, the discussion centering on: The motor functions of the maturation test. Examinations of small children using the methods developed by Griffith, Brunet-Lézine. Metric scale according to Oseretzky, mimic scale according to Kwint. Disturbances of writing motoricity. Coordinative examinations on juveniles and adolescents. The motor diagnosis may be carried out without the need for using a larger number of apparatus and instruments and--provided broad methods of examination and longitudinal-section controls are employed--permits to obtain results, the reliability of which is not at present surpassed by those obtained using any other method. PMID:5006291

  7. Ocular Motor Function in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Seyyed Amir Hossein; Jafarzadeh, Sadegh; Haddadi Aval, Majid; Hosseinabadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with bilateral weakness (BW) have many difficulties in gaze stability that interfere with their normal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate ocular motor functions in patients with BW to better understand the problem of gaze instability in these patients. Materials and Methods: Patients were referred from the Otolaryngology Department for Vestibular Assessment to our clinic between November 2014 and March 2015. We assessed ocular motor function (gaze, saccade, and smooth pursuit) in patients over the age of 18 years with BW, as verified by a caloric test. Results: Seventy-eight patients completed all the tests. The mean age of patients was 51.9 (±15.9) years, and 47 (60%) were female. Abnormal results were found in five (6.4%), 32 (41%), and seven (9%) patients with respect to gaze, smooth pursuit, and saccade, respectively. There were positive but relatively weak relationships between age and ocular motor results. Conclusion: Patients with BW suffer from dizziness and unsteadiness. These patients have abnormal function in ocular motor (especially smooth pursuit) tests. The ocular motor dysfunction is responsible for gaze instability in static positions such as standing. PMID:27429945

  8. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and diagnosis, it is intended for use for infants through young adults. An expert panel of 17 physical therapists and 13 occupational therapists refined the content by responding to a standard questionnaire comprised of questions which asked whether each item should be included, is clearly worded, should be reordered higher or lower, is functionally relevant, and is easily discriminated. Ratings of content validity exceeded the criterion except for two items which may represent different perspectives of physical and occupational therapists. The UEGMS was modified using the quantitative and qualitative feedback from the questionnaires. For reliability, five raters scored videotaped motor performances of ten children. Coefficients for inter-rater (0.94) and intra-rater (0.95) reliability were high. The results provide evidence of content validity and reliability of the UEGMS for assessment of upper extremity gross motor skill. PMID:21599568

  9. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  10. Distance training for the restoration of motor function.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, H; Hermens, H J

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on distance training for the restoration of motor function. Computerized literature searches were performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl and Cochrane databases. Articles that met the criteria for inclusion were divided into three general areas concerning the type of training in relation to motor functions--muscle/joint, balance and cognition. From the publications identified in the literature search, 11 articles met the selection criteria. Six were related to muscle/joint functions, four to balance functions and one to cognitive functions. The articles were graded according to the strength of the scientific evidence they offered. The review revealed some promising applications of distance motor training, such as virtual reality (VR) and robotic devices. The strength of the evidence from these studies was poor, however, probably because the technology is relatively new. In contrast to the studies using VR and robotic devices, those using electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback showed a good to fair strength of scientific evidence. This can be explained by the substantial history of research on the restoration of motor function through the use of EMG biofeedback techniques. When implemented in clinical practice, these applications could reduce the pressure on scarce health-care resources. PMID:15068640

  11. MicroRNA expression and its implications for diagnosis and therapy of gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianxiong; Law, Priscilla T.Y.; Chan, Matthew T.V.; Wu, William K.K.

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common biliary tract malignancy with poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs of 19–23 nucleotides in length, which regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional and translational levels. Several studies have demonstrated aberrant expression of miRNAs in gallbladder cancer tissues. Recent evidences also demonstrated that specific miRNAs are functionally involved in gallbladder cancer development through modulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we explore the possibilities of using miRNAs as prognostic, diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets in gallbladder cancer. PMID:26040010

  12. Gallbladder mucocoele: A review.

    PubMed

    Smalle, Tesh M; Cahalane, Alane K; Köster, Liza S

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder mucocoele (GBM) is an abnormal, intraluminal accumulation of inspissated bile and/or mucous within the gallbladder. Older, small- to medium-breed dogs seem to be predisposed, but no sex predilection has been identified. Clinical signs are often non-specific and include vomiting, lethargy, anorexia, abdominal pain, icterus and polyuria-polydipsia. Results of a complete blood count may be unremarkable, but serum biochemistry usually reveals increased liver enzymes. The ultrasonographic appearance is diagnostic and well described in the literature. Surgical intervention for the treatment of GBM remains the therapeutic gold standard, with short- and long-term survival for biliary surgery being 66%. The worst outcome is seen in those dogs requiring cholecystoenterostomy. With GBM becoming an apparently increasingly common cause of extrahepatic biliary disease in canines, it is essential that clinicians become familiar with the current literature pertaining to this condition. Numerous predisposing factors are highlighted in this review article and the role of certain endocrinopathies (e.g. hyperadrenocorticism and hypothyroidism) in the development of GBM is touched upon. Furthermore, the aetiopathogenesis of this disease is discussed with reference to the latest literature. Cholecystectomy remains the treatment of choice, but other options are considered based on a current literature review. PMID:26824341

  13. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  14. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the…

  15. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy study on microstructure of gallbladder mucosa in pig.

    PubMed

    Prozorowska, Ewelina; Jackowiak, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    The present light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on porcine gallbladder mucosa provide a description of the microstructures of great functional importance such as mucosal folds, the epithelium, glands, and lymphatic nodules. The results showed the regional structural differences of the porcine gallbladder wall. Depending on the part of the gallbladder, three types of mucosal structures were described: simple and branched folds and mucosal crypts. An important structural feature found in the mucosa is connected with the structural variety of type of mucosal folds, which change from simple located in the neck, to most composed, i.e., branched or joined, in the polygonal crypts toward the fundus of the gallbladder. The morphometric analysis showed statistically significantly differences in the form and size of the folds and between the fundus, body, and neck of the gallbladder. Differences in the size of mucosal epithelium are discussed in terms of processes of synthesis and secretion of glycoproteins. Regional, species-specific differences in morphology of mucosal subepithelial glands, i.e., their secretory units and openings, and intensity of mucus secretion were described. Our results on the pig gallbladder show adaptation and/or specialization in particular areas of the mucosa for (1) secretion of mucus in the neck or body of gallbladder and (2) for cyclic volume changes, especially in the fundus of gallbladder. The description of the microstructures of mucosa in the porcine gallbladder could be useful as reference data for numerous experiments on the bile tract in the pig. PMID:25604381

  16. Aerobic Exercise Improves Cognition and Motor Function Poststroke

    PubMed Central

    Quaney, Barbara M.; Boyd, Lara A.; McDowd, Joan M.; Zahner, Laura H.; He, Jianghua; Mayo, Matthew S.; Macko, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits impede stroke recovery. Aerobic exercise (AEX) improves cognitive executive function (EF) processes in healthy individuals, although the learning benefits after stroke are unknown. Objective To understand AEX-induced improvements in EF, motor learning, and mobility poststroke. Methods Following cardiorespiratory testing, 38 chronic stroke survivors were randomized to 2 different groups that exercised 3 times a week (45-minute sessions) for 8 weeks. The AEX group (n = 19; 9 women; 10 men; 64.10 ± 12.30 years) performed progressive resistive stationary bicycle training at 70% maximal heart rate, whereas the Stretching Exercise (SE) group (n = 19; 12 women; 7 men; 58.96 ± 14.68 years) performed stretches at home. Between-group comparisons were performed on the change in performance at “Post” and “Retention” (8 weeks later) for neuropsychological and motor function measures. Results Vo2max significantly improved at Post with AEX (P = .04). AEX also improved motor learning in the less-affected hand, with large effect sizes (Cohen’s d calculation). Specifically, AEX significantly improved information processing speed on the serial reaction time task (SRTT; ie, “procedural motor learning”) compared with the SE group at Post (P = .024), but not at Retention. Also, at Post (P = .038), AEX significantly improved predictive force accuracy for a precision grip task requiring attention and conditional motor learning of visual cues. Ambulation and sit-to-stand transfers were significantly faster in the AEX group at Post (P = .038), with balance control significantly improved at Retention (P = .041). EF measurements were not significantly different for the AEX group. Conclusion AEX improved mobility and selected cognitive domains related to motor learning, which enhances sensorimotor control after stroke. PMID:19541916

  17. Developmental changes in motor cortex activity as infants develop functional motor skills.

    PubMed

    Nishiyori, Ryota; Bisconti, Silvia; Meehan, Sean K; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive research examining overt behavioral changes of motor skills in infants, the neural basis underlying the emergence of functional motor control has yet to be determined. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to record hemodynamic activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) from 22 infants (11 six month-olds, 11 twelve month-olds) as they reached for an object, and stepped while supported over a treadmill. Based on the developmental systems framework, we hypothesized that as infants increased goal-directed experience, neural activity shifts from a diffused to focal pattern. Results showed that for reaching, younger infants showed diffuse areas of M1 activity that became focused by 12 months. For elicited stepping, younger infants produced much less M1 activity which shifted to diffuse activity by 12 months. Thus, the data suggest that as infants gain goal-directed experience, M1 activity emerges, initially showing a diffuse area of activity, becoming refined as the behavior stabilizes. Our data begin to document the cortical activity underlying early functional skill acquisition. PMID:27096281

  18. Sonographic measurement of gallbladder volume.

    PubMed

    Dodds, W J; Groh, W J; Darweesh, R M; Lawson, T L; Kishk, S M; Kern, M K

    1985-11-01

    Sonographic images of the gallbladder enable satisfactory approximation of gallbladder volume using the sum-of-cylinders method. The sum-of-cylinder measurements, however, are moderately cumbersome and time consuming to perform. In this investigation, in vitro and in vivo testing was done to determine that a simple ellipsoid method applied to sonographic gallbladder images yields reasonable volume approximations that are comparable to the volumes calculated by the sum-of-cylinders method. Findings from a water-bath experiment showed that measurement of gallbladder volume by the ellipsoid method closely approximated the true volume with a mean difference of about 1.0 ml. The results of in vivo studies in five volunteers demonstrated that the gallbladder contracted substantially after a fatty meal and that volumes calculated by the ellipsoid and sum-of-cylinders methods were nearly identical. Thus, a simple ellipsoid method, requiring negligible time, may be used to approximate satisfactory gallbladder volume for clinical or investigative studies. PMID:3901703

  19. Neuropsychological function in children with primary complex motor stereotypies

    PubMed Central

    MAHONE, E. MARK; RYAN, MATTHEW; FERENC, LISA; MORRIS-BERRY, CHRISTINA; SINGER, HARVEY S.

    2014-01-01

    AIM Complex motor stereotypies (CMS) are patterned, repetitive, rhythmic, and involuntary movements that persist over time. They are divided into two subgroups dependent on the presence of other developmental problems: ‘primary’ (development is otherwise typical) or ‘secondary’ (associated with autism, intellectual disability, or sensory deficits). There are no currently published studies that examine neuropsychological function in children with primary CMS. This case–control study examines whether children with primary CMS manifest neurobehavioral deficits. METHOD Fifty-seven children with primary CMS (32 males, 25 females; mean age 6y 8mo, SD 2y 4mo, range 4–12y) with negative screens for autism and 57 comparison participants (32 males, 25 females; mean age 6y 6mo, SD 2y 1mo) completed neuropsychological assessments of IQ, reading ability, attention, language, and motor and executive functions. Parents completed ratings of their child’s repetitive movement severity. RESULTS The CMS group performed significantly less well than comparison participants on motor skills and IQ tests (both p<0.01), although IQ was consistently in the average range. One-third of the CMS group showed signs of developmental motor coordination difficulties. Parent report of stereotypy severity was significantly associated with parent report of inattention and executive dysfunction. INTERPRETATION Children with primary CMS were found to have largely intact neuropsychological profiles. Stereotypy severity appears to be associated with executive dysfunction. Although motor difficulties were observed in children with CMS, these were not correlated with parent report of symptom severity. PMID:24814517

  20. Interregional compensatory mechanisms of motor functioning in progressing preclinical neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Elisa; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Peter, Jessica; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Frackowiak, Richard S.J.; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding brain reserve in preclinical stages of neurodegenerative disorders allows determination of which brain regions contribute to normal functioning despite accelerated neuronal loss. Besides the recruitment of additional regions, a reorganisation and shift of relevance between normally engaged regions are a suggested key mechanism. Thus, network analysis methods seem critical for investigation of changes in directed causal interactions between such candidate brain regions. To identify core compensatory regions, fifteen preclinical patients carrying the genetic mutation leading to Huntington's disease and twelve controls underwent fMRI scanning. They accomplished an auditory paced finger sequence tapping task, which challenged cognitive as well as executive aspects of motor functioning by varying speed and complexity of movements. To investigate causal interactions among brain regions a single Dynamic Causal Model (DCM) was constructed and fitted to the data from each subject. The DCM parameters were analysed using statistical methods to assess group differences in connectivity, and the relationship between connectivity patterns and predicted years to clinical onset was assessed in gene carriers. In preclinical patients, we found indications for neural reserve mechanisms predominantly driven by bilateral dorsal premotor cortex, which increasingly activated superior parietal cortices the closer individuals were to estimated clinical onset. This compensatory mechanism was restricted to complex movements characterised by high cognitive demand. Additionally, we identified task-induced connectivity changes in both groups of subjects towards pre- and caudal supplementary motor areas, which were linked to either faster or more complex task conditions. Interestingly, coupling of dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor area was more negative in controls compared to gene mutation carriers. Furthermore, changes in the connectivity pattern of gene carriers

  1. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Altermann, Caroline D. C.; Martins, Alexandre S.; Carpes, Felipe P.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Background With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. Objectives To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase). The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. Results The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. Conclusions For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills. PMID:24839046

  2. Normal gallbladder scintigraphy in acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohrt, H.J.; Posalaky, I.P.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Normal gallbladder scintigraphy occurs in 2 to 5% of reported patients with acute cholecystitis. Gallbladder visualization is found in patients with acalculous cholecystitis and in those with recent relief of cystic duct obstruction but persistence of inflammation. A patient is reported who had clinical and pathologic findings of acute cholecystitis but normal gallbladder visualization. This reemphasizes that the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis cannot be excluded by normal gallbladder scintigraphy.

  3. Non-coding RNAs as emerging molecular targets of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tekcham, Dinesh Singh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-08-15

    Gallbladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of biliary tract with aggressive pathophysiology, now emerging as a global health issue. Although minority of gallbladder cancer patients could receive such curative resection due to late diagnosis, this increases the survival rate. Lack of potential target molecule (s) for early diagnosis, better prognosis and effective therapy of gallbladder cancer has triggered investigators to look for novel technological or high throughput approaches to identify potential biomarker for gallbladder cancer. Intervention of non-coding RNAs in gallbladder cancer has been revealed recently. Non-coding RNAs are now widely implicated in cancer. Recent reports have revealed association of non-coding RNAs (microRNAs or miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs) with gallbladder cancer. Here, we present an updated overview on the biogenesis, mechanism of action, role of non-coding RNAs, the identified cellular functions in gallbladder tumorigenesis, their prognostic & therapeutic potentials (efficacies) and future significance in developing effective biomarker(s), in future, for gallbladder. PMID:27131889

  4. Successful laparoscopic management of duplicate gallbladder: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Al Rawahi, Aziza; Al Azri, Yahya; Al Jabri, Salah; Alfadli, Abdulrazaq; Al Aghbari, Suad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gallbladder duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. Recognition of this anomaly and its various types is important since it can complicate a simple hepatobiliary surgical procedure. Presentation of case We report a case of a 42 year old female who presented a 6 year history of intermittent right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Her basic blood investigations including liver function tests were normal. Pre-operative imaging revealed a cystic lesion communicating with biliary tree representing duplicated gallbladder. She subsequently underwent successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The operative challenges were more than those anticipated at the usual laparoscopic gallbladder procedures. After six months follow up the patient remained asymptomatic. Discussion Preoperative diagnosis plays a crucial role in planning surgery, and preventing possible biliary injuries or re-operation if accessory gallbladder has been overlooked during initial surgery. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the imaging modality of choice for suspected duplicate gallbladder. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for duplicate gallbladder is a challenging operation and should be performed with meticulous dissection of the cysto-hepatic triangle. Conclusion Gallbladder anomalies should be anticipated in the presence of a cystic lesion reported around the gallbladder. The laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains feasible for intervention and should be done by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon. PMID:27002289

  5. Congenital absence of the gallbladder and the cystic duct.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Zenebe

    2002-04-01

    A 47 years old female with congenital absence of the gallbladder and the cystic duct was presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by exploratory laparatomy, common duct tube cholangiography, and ultrasonography. Most of the operated cases of congenital absence of the gallbladder are symptomatic, and they get relief after common duct exploration. Although the biliary tree is normal on inspection at exploration, it is believed that the symptomatology may have root in congenital abnormality of function. Treatment of the agenesis of the gallbladder as described in earlier days has been discussed. In the present situation, specially in a country like Ethiopia where long time care of internal drains is a worrisome problem, and a major point for concern, the author believes choledocho-enteric anastomosis to be a good solution. PMID:12240579

  6. Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingli; Li, Peihong; Mao, Zhibang; Qi, Xiang; Zou, Jun; Yu, Zhusheng

    2014-01-01

    Motor function changes in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia. These changes are often ignored by clinicians owing to the extent of motor disability of the affected hand. Finger tapping frequency and Lind-mark hand function score showed that the motor function of unaffected hands in stroke patients was poorer than that of a healthy control hand. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation treatment, motor function of the unaffected hand of stroke patients was obviously improved. Therefore, attention should also be paid to motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia during rehabilitation. PMID:25221586

  7. Gallbladder Agenesis with Refractory Choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, Jamie; Patel, Kevin; Aadam, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of the gallbladder is a rare anomaly which is usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. In some cases, however, patients are symptomatic. Common symptoms include right upper quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Jaundice is present in some symptomatic cases and is due to associated choledocholithiasis (Fiaschetti et al. 2009). In this case, a 63-year-old female presents with jaundice and episodic right upper quadrant abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. Bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase were found to be markedly elevated. Upper endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed choledocholithiasis, and the patient required multiple endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) sessions before successful extraction of all stones. Subsequent surgical exploration revealed congenital agenesis of the gallbladder. Although this is a rare finding, patients with agenesis of the gallbladder are at increased risk of developing de novo choledocholithiasis which may be challenging to extract. PMID:26185691

  8. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Lotti, Fiorenza; Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization. We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH) and unaffected hemisphere (UH) by measuring resting and active motor threshold (AMT) and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI), to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. AMT differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p = 0.004), not in females (p > 0.200), and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p = 0.033 and p = 0.042). LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery. PMID:26858590

  9. Porcelain gallbladder: ultrasound and CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.A.; Jacobs, R.; Katz, J.; Costello, P.

    1984-07-01

    Nine patients with calcification of the gallbladder wall (porcelain gallbladder) were analyzed by ultrasound and the appearance correlated with the CT, radiographic, clinical, and surgical findings. Three distinct patterns were identified: (a) a hyperechoic similunar structure with acoustic shadowing posteriorly, simulating a stone-filled gallbladder devoid of bile, which was seen in 5 patients; (b) a biconvex, curvilinear echogenic structure with variable acoustic shadowing, seen in all 3 patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder; and (c) an irregular clump of echoes with posterior acoustic shadowing, seen in 1 patient. Potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of gallbladder calcification are presented, and the association between calcification and cancer is emphasized.

  10. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. PMID:23018122

  11. Gallbladder cancer: epidemiology and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hundal, Rajveer; Shaffer, Eldon A

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer, though generally considered rare, is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80%–95% of biliary tract cancers. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis, often proving fatal. Its carcinogenesis follows a progression through a metaplasia–dysplasia–carcinoma sequence. This comprehensive review focuses on and explores the risks, management, and outcomes for primary gallbladder carcinoma. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities – inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Age, female sex, congenital biliary tract anomalies, and a genetic predisposition represent important risk factors that are immutable. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Mortality rates closely follow incidence; those countries with the highest prevalence of gallstones experience the greatest mortality from gallbladder cancer. Vague symptoms often delay the diagnosis of gallbladder cancer, contributing to its overall progression and poor outcome. Surgery represents the only potential for cure. Some individuals are fortunate to be incidentally found to have gallbladder cancer at the time of cholecystectomy being performed for cholelithiasis. Such an early diagnosis is imperative as a late presentation connotes advanced staging, nodal involvement, and possible recurrence following attempted resection. Overall mean survival is a mere 6 months, while 5-year survival rate is only 5%. The dismal prognosis, in part, relates to the gallbladder lacking a serosal layer adjacent to the liver, enabling hepatic invasion and metastatic progression. Improved imaging modalities are helping to diagnose patients at an earlier

  12. Psychometric Comparisons of Three Measures for Assessing Motor Functions in Preschoolers with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuang, Y-P.; Su, C-Y.; Huang, M-H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficit in motor performance is common in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). A motor function measure with sound psychometric properties is indispensable for clinical and research use. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of three commonly used clinical measures for assessing motor function in…

  13. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  14. A mechatronic device for the rehabilitation of ankle motor function.

    PubMed

    Bucca, Giuseppe; Bezzolato, Alberto; Bruni, Stefano; Molteni, Franco

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the main results from a research aiming at the design of an electromechanical actuator for use in the rehabilitation of ankle motor function in patients suffering due to neurological diseases. Motivations for the research project are discussed within the framework of the application of mechatronic concepts for rehabilitation practice. The entire design process is then described, from the definition of project targets through the mechanical concept and control design steps until design validation by means of numerical simulations and tests on a prototype. PMID:20524738

  15. Ciliobrevins as tools for studying dynein motor function

    PubMed Central

    Roossien, Douglas H.; Miller, Kyle E.; Gallo, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Dyneins are a small class of molecular motors that bind to microtubules and walk toward their minus ends. They are essential for the transport and distribution of organelles, signaling complexes and cytoskeletal elements. In addition dyneins generate forces on microtubule arrays that power the beating of cilia and flagella, cell division, migration and growth cone motility. Classical approaches to the study of dynein function in axons involve the depletion of dynein, expression of mutant/truncated forms of the motor, or interference with accessory subunits. By necessity, these approaches require prolonged time periods for the expression or manipulation of cellular dynein levels. With the discovery of the ciliobrevins, a class of cell permeable small molecule inhibitors of dynein, it is now possible to acutely disrupt dynein both globally and locally. In this review, we briefly summarize recent work using ciliobrevins to inhibit dynein and discuss the insights ciliobrevins have provided about dynein function in various cell types with a focus on neurons. We temper this with a discussion of the need for studies that will elucidate the mechanism of action of ciliobrevin and as well as the need for experiments to further analyze the specificity of ciliobreviens for dynein. Although much remains to be learned about ciliobrevins, these small molecules are proving themselves to be valuable novel tools to assess the cellular functions of dynein. PMID:26217180

  16. The role of TRPP2 in agonist-induced gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xingguo; Fu, Jie; Song, Kai; Xue, Nairui; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Luo, Huilai; He, Wenzhu; Pan, Xiang; Shen, Bing; Du, Juan

    2016-04-01

    TRPP2 channel protein belongs to the superfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and is widely expressed in various tissues, including smooth muscle in digestive gut. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPP2 can mediate Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) stores. However, the functional role of TRPP2 in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction still remains unclear. In this study, we used Ca(2+) imaging and tension measurements to test agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increase and smooth muscle contraction of guinea pig gallbladder, respectively. When TRPP2 protein was knocked down in gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pig, carbachol (CCh)-evoked Ca(2+) release and extracellular Ca(2+) influx were reduced significantly, and gallbladder contractions induced by endothelin 1 and cholecystokinin were suppressed markedly as well. CCh-induced gallbladder contraction was markedly suppressed by pretreatment with U73122, which inhibits phospholipase C to terminate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3) production, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB), which inhibits IP3 recepor (IP3R) to abolish IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. To confirm the role of Ca(2+) release in CCh-induced gallbladder contraction, we used thapsigargin (TG)-to deplete Ca(2+) stores via inhibiting sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and eliminate the role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry on the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. Preincubation with 2 μmol L(-1) TG significantly decreased the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. In addition, pretreatments with U73122, 2APB or TG abolished the difference of the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction between TRPP2 knockdown and control groups. We conclude that TRPP2 mediates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and has an essential role in agonist-induced gallbladder muscle contraction. PMID:26660312

  17. Dissociated functional connectivity profiles for motor and attention deficits in acute right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Antonello; Ramsey, Lenny; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Siegel, Joshua S; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Strube, Michael J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Shulman, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Strokes often cause multiple behavioural deficits that are correlated at the population level. Here, we show that motor and attention deficits are selectively associated with abnormal patterns of resting state functional connectivity in the dorsal attention and motor networks. We measured attention and motor deficits in 44 right hemisphere-damaged patients with a first-time stroke at 1-2 weeks post-onset. The motor battery included tests that evaluated deficits in both upper and lower extremities. The attention battery assessed both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits. Summary measures for motor and attention deficits were identified through principal component analyses on the raw behavioural scores. Functional connectivity in structurally normal cortex was estimated based on the temporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent signals measured at rest with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Any correlation between motor and attention deficits and between functional connectivity in the dorsal attention network and motor networks that might spuriously affect the relationship between each deficit and functional connectivity was statistically removed. We report a double dissociation between abnormal functional connectivity patterns and attention and motor deficits, respectively. Attention deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity within the dorsal attention network than motor networks, while motor deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity patterns within the motor networks than dorsal attention network. These findings indicate that functional connectivity patterns in structurally normal cortex following a stroke link abnormal physiology in brain networks to the corresponding behavioural deficits. PMID:27225794

  18. Agenesis of the gallbladder with adipose tissue in the gallbladder fossa.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Yong; Shen, Guo-Liang; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Agenesis of the gallbladder with normal bile ducts is a rare anomaly. More cases have been reported preoperatively because of the increased awareness of this entity. However some cases remain difficult to diagnosis. We report such a case. A symptomatic male patient (age 45) was diagnosed with chronic atrophic cholecystitis and cholecystlithiasis by ultrasonography and computed tomography scan. The images revealed solid tissue in the gallbladder fossa. However, during laparoscopic exploration no gallbladder or ectopic gallbladder was found. Only adipose tissue and the gallbladder artery were identified during the operation. Gallbladder agenesis was diagnosed postoperatively. It still remains a challenge to determine surgical intervention in these cases. PMID:20583414

  19. Combined motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promotes corticospinal system functional and structural plasticity and motor function after injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Amer, Alzahraa; Ryan, Daniel; Martin, John H

    2016-03-01

    An important strategy for promoting voluntary movements after motor system injury is to harness activity-dependent corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity. We combine forelimb motor cortex (M1) activation with co-activation of its cervical spinal targets in rats to promote CST sprouting and skilled limb movement after pyramidal tract lesion (PTX). We used a two-step experimental design in which we first established the optimal combined stimulation protocol in intact rats and then used the optimal protocol in injured animals to promote CST repair and motor recovery. M1 was activated epidurally using an electrical analog of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). The cervical spinal cord was co-activated by trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) that was targeted to the cervical enlargement, simulated from finite element method. In intact rats, forelimb motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were strongly facilitated during iTBS and for 10 min after cessation of stimulation. Cathodal, not anodal, tsDCS alone facilitated MEPs and also produced a facilitatory aftereffect that peaked at 10 min. Combined iTBS and cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) produced further MEP enhancement during stimulation, but without further aftereffect enhancement. Correlations between forelimb M1 local field potentials and forelimb electromyogram (EMG) during locomotion increased after electrical iTBS alone and further increased with combined stimulation (iTBS+c-tsDCS). This optimized combined stimulation was then used to promote function after PTX because it enhanced functional connections between M1 and spinal circuits and greater M1 engagement in muscle contraction than either stimulation alone. Daily application of combined M1 iTBS on the intact side and c-tsDCS after PTX (10 days, 27 min/day) significantly restored skilled movements during horizontal ladder walking. Stimulation produced a 5.4-fold increase in spared ipsilateral CST terminations. Combined neuromodulation achieves optimal motor

  20. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  1. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  2. Gallbladder cancer: expert consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Aloia, Thomas A; Járufe, Nicolas; Javle, Milind; Maithel, Shishir K; Roa, Juan C; Adsay, Volkan; Coimbra, Felipe J F; Jarnagin, William R

    2015-08-01

    An American Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (AHPBA)-sponsored consensus meeting of expert panellists was convened on 15 January 2014 to review current evidence on the management of gallbladder carcinoma in order to establish practice guidelines. In summary, within high incidence areas, the assessment of routine gallbladder specimens should include the microscopic evaluation of a minimum of three sections and the cystic duct margin; specimens with dysplasia or proven cancer should be extensively sampled. Provided the patient is medically fit for surgery, data support the resection of all gallbladder polyps of >1.0 cm in diameter and those with imaging evidence of vascular stalks. The minimum staging evaluation of patients with suspected or proven gallbladder cancer includes contrasted cross-sectional imaging and diagnostic laparoscopy. Adequate lymphadenectomy includes assessment of any suspicious regional nodes, evaluation of the aortocaval nodal basin, and a goal recovery of at least six nodes. Patients with confirmed metastases to N2 nodal stations do not benefit from radical resection and should receive systemic and/or palliative treatments. Primary resection of patients with early T-stage (T1b-2) disease should include en bloc resection of adjacent liver parenchyma. Patients with T1b, T2 or T3 disease that is incidentally identified in a cholecystectomy specimen should undergo re-resection unless this is contraindicated by advanced disease or poor performance status. Re-resection should include complete portal lymphadenectomy and bile duct resection only when needed to achieve a negative margin (R0) resection. Patients with preoperatively staged T3 or T4 N1 disease should be considered for clinical trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Following R0 resection of T2-4 disease in N1 gallbladder cancer, patients should be considered for adjuvant systemic chemotherapy and/or chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26172135

  3. Combinatorial Motor Training Results in Functional Reorganization of Remaining Motor Cortex after Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Jones, Theresa A; Kozlowski, Dorothy A; Adkins, DeAnna L

    2016-04-15

    Cortical reorganization subsequent to post-stroke motor rehabilitative training (RT) has been extensively examined in animal models and humans. However, similar studies focused on the effects of motor training after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are lacking. We previously reported that after a moderate/severe TBI in adult male rats, functional improvements in forelimb use were accomplished only with a combination of skilled forelimb reach training and aerobic exercise, with or without nonimpaired forelimb constraint. Thus, the current study was designed to examine the relationship between functional motor cortical map reorganization after experimental TBI and the behavioral improvements resulting from this combinatorial rehabilitative regime. Adult male rats were trained to proficiency on a skilled reaching task, received a unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) over the forelimb area of the caudal motor cortex (CMC). Three days post-CCI, animals began RT (n = 13) or no rehabilitative training (NoRT) control procedures (n = 13). The RT group participated in daily skilled reach training, voluntary aerobic exercise, and nonimpaired forelimb constraint. This RT regimen significantly improved impaired forelimb reaching success and normalized reaching strategies, consistent with previous findings. RT also enlarged the area of motor cortical wrist representation, derived by intracortical microstimulation, compared to NoRT. These findings indicate that sufficient RT can greatly improve motor function and improve the functional integrity of remaining motor cortex after a moderate/severe CCI. When compared with findings from stroke models, these findings also suggest that more intense RT may be needed to improve motor function and remodel the injured cortex after TBI. PMID:26421759

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for gallbladder cancer? What are the key statistics about gallbladder cancer? The American Cancer Society’s estimates ... advanced it is when it is found. For statistics on survival rates, see “ Survival statistics for gallbladder ...

  5. Physical activity, motor function, and white matter hyperintensity burden in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingyun; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E.; Turner, Arlener D.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David A.; Buchman, Aron S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that physical activity modifies the association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and motor function in healthy older persons without dementia. Methods: Total daily activity (exercise and nonexercise physical activity) was measured for up to 11 days with actigraphy (Actical; Philips Respironics, Bend, OR) in 167 older adults without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Eleven motor performances were summarized into a previously described global motor score. WMH volume was expressed as percent of intracranial volume. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, education, and sex, were performed with total WMH volume as the predictor and global motor score as the outcome. Terms for total daily physical activity and its interaction with WMH volume were then added to the model. Results: Higher WMH burden was associated with lower motor function (p = 0.006), and total daily activity was positively associated with motor function (p = 0.002). Total daily activity modified the association between WMH and motor function (p = 0.007). WMH burden was not associated with motor function in persons with high activity (90th percentile). By contrast, higher WMH burden remained associated with lower motor function in persons with average (50th percentile; estimate = −0.304, slope = −0.133) and low (10th percentile; estimate = −1.793, slope = −0.241) activity. Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity may reduce the effect of WMH burden on motor function in healthy older adults. PMID:25762710

  6. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  7. Laparoscopic cancer surgery. Lessons from gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Wade, T P; Comitalo, J B; Andrus, C H; Goodwin, M N; Kaminski, D L

    1994-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) may inhibit the discovery of unsuspected gallbladder cancer, and the effect of LC on the prognosis of gallbladder cancer is unknown. We present two cases of unsuspected gallbladder cancer removed laparoscopically and report the discovery of peritoneal tumor implantation at the umbilical port site 21 days after LC. Although gallbladder carcinoma flow cytometry has been reported to be of prognostic value by Japanese investigators, this technique did not distinguish herein between an invasive adenocarcinoma and carcinoma in situ. A cellular doubling time of 56 h was calculated from one tumor. When unsuspected invasive gallbladder cancer is found after LC, laparoscopic port sites should be inspected at reoperation and, at a minimum, the port site through which the gallbladder was removed should be widely excised. This demonstration of cancer recurrence in laparoscopic port sites may limit the application of laparoscopy to elective cancer resection. PMID:8059312

  8. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  9. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy for a period of 1 year. [Results] The correlation between physical therapy frequency and Gross Motor Function Measure scores for crawling and kneeling, standing, walking, running and jumping, and rolling, and the Gross Motor Function Measure total score was significant. The differences in gross motor function according to physical therapy frequency were significant for crawling, kneeling, standing, and Gross Motor Function Measure total score. The differences in gross motor function according to frequency of physical therapy were significant for standing in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level V. [Conclusion] Intensive physical therapy was more effective for improving gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In particular, crawling and kneeling, and standing ability showed greater increases with intensive physical therapy. PMID:27390440

  10. Insulin resistance causes human gallbladder dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Nakeeb, Attila; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E; Kissebah, Ahmed H; Pitt, Henry A

    2006-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are known risk factors for the development of gallstones. A growing body of animal and human data has correlated insulin resistance with organ dysfunction. The relationship among obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and abnormal gallbladder motility remains unclear. Therefore, we designed a study to investigate the association among obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and gallbladder dysmotility. One hundred ninety-two healthy adult nondiabetic volunteers were studied. Gallbladder ultrasounds were performed before and after a standardized fatty meal. A gallbladder ejection fraction (EF) was calculated, and an EF of < 25% was considered abnormal. Serum was analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, cholecystokinin, leptin, glucose, and insulin. The homeostasis assessment model (HOMA) was used to determine insulin resistance. The volunteers had a mean age of 38 years (range, 18-77), and 55% were female. Thirty subjects (15%) had gallstones and were excluded from the study. Thirty subjects (19%) had abnormal gallbladder motility (EF < 25%). In lean subjects (n = 96) fasting glucose was significantly increased in the 16 subjects with gallbladder EF < 25% versus the 80 subjects with gallbladder EF > 25% (109 +/- 20 mg/dl versus 78 +/- 2 mg/dl, P < 0.05). Similarly, the HOMA index was significantly greater in subjects with gallbladder EF < 25% versus gallbladder EF >25% (3.3 +/- 1.2 versus 2.0 +/- 0.2, P < 0.05). In obese subjects (n = 66), fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance were not associated with a gallbladder EF < 25%. These data suggest that in lean, nondiabetic volunteers without gallstones, gallbladder dysmotility is associated with an elevated fasting glucose as well as a high index of insulin resistance. We conclude that insulin resistance alone may be responsible for gallbladder dysmotility that may result in acalculous cholecystitis or gallstone formation. PMID:16843864

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Gallbladder Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2012-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a rather uncommon disease, when it gives symptoms it has usually reached an incurable stage. Therefore, every attempt must be made to find the asymptomatic stages and look for premalignant gallbladder polyps. Even if gallbladder cancer is a rare disease, gallbladder polyps are common, only a few polyps develop to cancer. This makes gallbladder polyps another problem: which are the polyps that must be surgically removed, which shall be followed-up, or for how long? The author used the keyword “gallbladder polypsn” in PubMed and reviewed the scientific literatures published from January 2000 to December 2011. The present review article has summarized almost all respects of gallbladder polyp, including the risk factors, clinical diagnosis and management, and comments made from the author, in which clinical treatments are recommended. It is author's purpose that the 11-year-knowledge about gallbladder polyps summarized from all worlds’ literatures is enough to know how clinicians will handle the next patient with gallbladder polyp. PMID:22655278

  12. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  13. Motor cortex excitability changes within 8 hours after ischaemic stroke may predict the functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Profice, P; Saturno, E; Pilato, F; Tonali, P

    1999-06-01

    Motor evoked potentials after magnetic transcranial stimulation and the excitability of the motor cortex to increasing magnetic stimulus intensities were evaluated in six patients with hemiparesis after ischaemic stroke within 8 hours after stroke. The latencies of motor evoked potentials were normal in all patients. After stimulation of the ischaemic hemisphere we obtained responses comparable with the contralateral ones in two patients (mean NIH score 2 (SD 0)) and this group was completely asymptomatic after 15 days (NIH score 0). In four patients the excitability of the motor cortex involved by the ischaemia was reduced and magnetic motor threshold was higher than that of the spared motor cortex. This finding was associated with a poor motor recovery and the NIH score after 15 days was unchanged (NIH score 1.75 (SD 1.5)). The present data suggest that the evaluation of the excitability of motor cortex may offer a mean of predicting functional outcome following stroke. PMID:10461555

  14. Pediatric aquatic therapy on motor function and enjoyment in children diagnosed with cerebral palsy of various motor severities.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Liu, Wen-Yu; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of pediatric aquatic therapy on motor function, enjoyment, activities of daily living, and health-related quality of life for children with spastic cerebral palsy of various motor severities. Children with spastic cerebral palsy were assigned to a pediatric aquatic therapy group (n = 11; mean age = 85.0 ± 33.1 months; male : female = 4 : 7) or a control group (n = 13; mean age = 87.6 ± 34.0 months; male : female = 9 : 4). The statistic results indicate that the pediatric aquatic therapy group had greater average 66-item Gross Motor Function Measure following intervention than the control group (η(2) = 0.308, P = .007), even for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System level IV (5.0 vs 1.3). The pediatric aquatic therapy group had higher Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale scores than the control group at post-treatment (P = .015). These findings demonstrate that pediatric aquatic therapy can be an effective and alternative therapy for children with cerebral palsy even with poor Gross Motor Function Classification System level. PMID:24907137

  15. Functional connectivity in the resting-state motor networks influences the kinematic processes during motor sequence learning

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Laura; Palmaro, Eleonora; Teodorescu, Roxana; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Bove, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies support the involvement of the cerebello-cortical and striato-cortical motor loops in motor sequence learning. Here, we investigated whether the gain of motor sequence learning could depend on a priori resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) between motor areas and structures belonging to these circuits. Fourteen healthy subjects underwent a resting-state fMRI session. Afterward, they were asked to reproduce a verbally-learned sequence of finger opposition movements as fast and accurate as possible. All subjects increased their movement rate with practice, by reducing touch duration and/or inter tapping interval. The rsFC analysis showed that at rest left and right M1 and left and right supplementary motor cortex (SMA) were mainly connected with other motor areas. The covariate analysis taking into account the different kinematic parameters indicated that the subjects achieving greater movement rate increase were those showing stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the right lobule VIII of the cerebellum. Notably, the subjects with greater inter tapping interval reduction showed stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the association nuclei of the thalamus. Conversely, the regression analysis with the right M1 and SMA seeds showed only few significant clusters for the different covariates not located in the cerebellum and thalamus. No common clusters were found between right M1 and SMA. All these findings indicate important functional connections at rest of those neural circuits responsible of motor learning improvement, involving the motor areas related to the hemisphere directly controlling the finger movements, the thalamus and the cerebellum. PMID:25328043

  16. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Huaming

    molecules were required to bind to one short dsDNA molecule. The inhibitive curve of Walker B mutant gp16 analyzed by binomial distribution model showed that one inactive mutant gp16 in the gp16 ring could block the function of the motor and the stoichiometry of gp16 was six. These findings facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanism of viral DNA packaging: a novel viral DNA packaging model "push through a one-way valve" was proposed. In this model, the connector functioned as a valve to allow DNA to enter but prevented it from sliding out during DNA packaging; the six subunits in the gp16 ring acted sequentially to push DNA into the connector channel. ATP binding of gp16 induced a conformation change with a high affinity for dsDNA. Then, the ATP was hydrolyzed which resulted in the movement of subdomains in this individual gp16 subunit and DNA was pushed forward, followed by the double helix of dsDNA being brought forward to the adjacent subunit in the gp16 ring. The elucidation of the viral DNA packaging mechanism holds great potential for developing artificial motors for delivering drugs and other molecular cargos.

  17. Double gallbladder completely enclosed in a cystogastric fold of peritoneum

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Surendran, Sudarshan; Jetti, Raghu; Kumar, Naveen; Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Double gallbladder is one of the rare congenital anomalies of the gallbladder. Failure to detect an accessory gallbladder hampers diagnosis and treatment of cholecystitis, which might result in recurrent attacks of cholecystitis. In addition, presence of peritoneal folds extending from the stomach and duodenum to the gallbladder is very rare. Here we report the presence of a double gallbladder enclosed in a cystogastric fold of the peritoneum. During cadaveric dissection, we observed a cystogastric peritoneal fold that extended from the lesser curvature of the stomach and the first part of the duodenum to the gallbladder. The left end of the peritoneal fold merged with the lesser omentum. It enclosed two gallbladders: the main gallbladder and a small accessory gallbladder. The accessory gallbladder was a small pouch with its fundus attached to the main gallbladder by fibrous tissue, and its duct opened into the main cystic duct. PMID:24987550

  18. Functional MRI evidence for fine motor praxis dysfunction in children with persistent speech disorders

    PubMed Central

    Redle, Erin; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas; Tsevat, Rebecca K.; Eikenberry, Sarah; Lewis, Barbara; Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Tkach, Jean; Holland, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Children with persistent speech disorders (PSD) often present with overt or subtle motor deficits; the possibility that speech disorders and motor deficits could arise from a shared neurological base is currently unknown. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine the brain networks supporting fine motor praxis in children with PSD and without clinically identified fine motor deficits. Methods This case-control study included 12 children with PSD (mean age 7.42 years, 4 female) and 12 controls (mean age 7.44 years, 4 female). Children completed behavioral evaluations using standardized motor assessments and parent reported functional measures. During fMRI scanning, participants completed a cued finger tapping task contrasted passive listening. A general linear model approach identified brain regions associated with finger tapping in each group and regions that differed between groups. The relationship between regional fMRI activation and fine motor skill was assessed using a regression analysis. Results Children with PSD had significantly poorer results for rapid speech production and fine motor praxis skills, but did not differ on classroom functional skills. Functional MRI results showed that children with PSD had significantly more activation in the cerebellum during finger tapping. Positive correlations between performance on a fine motor praxis test and activation multiple cortical regions were noted for children with PSD but not for controls. Conclusions Over-activation in the cerebellum during a motor task may reflect a subtle abnormality in the non-speech motor neural circuitry in children with PSD. PMID:25481413

  19. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  20. A Strategy for Embedding Functional Motor and Early Numeracy Skill Instruction into Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.; Eddins, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges educators face when attempting to find a balance between both functional and academic skill instruction for students with severe, multiple disabilities including motor impairments. The authors describe a strategy that employs embedded instruction of early numeracy and functional motor skills during physical…

  1. Design and application of a new series of gallbladder endoscopes that facilitate gallstone removal without gallbladder excision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Tie; Huang, Wan-Chao; Luo, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Yang-De

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, some Chinese doctors have proposed a new concept, gallstone removal without gallbladder excision, along with transition of the medical model. As there is no specialized endoscope for gallstone removal without gallbladder excision, we designed and produced a new series of gallbladder endoscopes and accessories that have already been given a Chinese invention patent (No. ZL200810199041.2). The design of these gallbladder endoscopes was based on the anatomy and physiology of the gallbladder, characteristics of gallbladder disease, ergonomics, and industrial design. This series of gallbladder endoscopes underwent clinical trials in two hospitals appointed by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The clinical trials showed that surgeries of gallstones, gallbladder polyps, and cystic duct calculus could be smoothly performed with these products. In summary, this series of gallbladder endoscopes is safe, reliable, and effective for gallstone removal without gallbladder excision. This note comprehensively introduces the research and design of this series of gallbladder endoscopes.

  2. The influence of motor expertise on the brain activity of motor task performance: A meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the influence of long-term motor training on the brain activity of motor processes, but the findings are inconsistent. To clarify how acquiring motor expertise induces cortical reorganization during motor task performance, the current study conducted a quantitative meta-analysis on 26 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that investigate motor task performance in people with long-term motor training experience (e.g., athletes, musicians, and dancers) and control participants. Meta-analysis of the brain activation in motor experts and novices showed similar effects in the bilateral frontal and parietal regions. The meta-analysis on the contrast between motor experts and novices indicated that experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) than did novices in motor execution and prediction tasks. In motor observation tasks, experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9) and left precentral gyrus (BA 6) than novices. On the contrary, novices had stronger effects in the right motor areas and basal ganglia as compared with motor experts. These results indicate that motor experts have effect increases in brain areas involved in action planning and action comprehension, and suggest that intensive motor training might elaborate the motor representation related to the task performance. PMID:25450866

  3. Duplication of the Gallbladder. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Desolneux, G.; Mucci, S.; Lebigot, J.; Arnaud, J. P.; Hamy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication is a rare anatomic malformation, which can now be detected by preoperative imaging study. We report a case of a symptomatic duplicated gallbladder, successfully treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This anomaly is important to know for surgeons because of associated anatomical variations of main bile duct and hepatic artery and increased risk of common bile duct injury. PMID:19997514

  4. Effects of peptide YY on gallbladder motility

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, R.L.; Roslyn, J.J.; Taylor, I.L.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of peptide YY (PYY) on cholecystokinin-stimulated gallbladder contraction were investigated in the prairie dog model. Twelve animals underwent laparotomy with catheter placement into the gallbladder and common bile duct (vent). The gallbladder was continuously perfused with (/sup 14/C)polyethylene glycol-labeled lactated Ringer at 0.03 ml/min, and vent effluent was collected at 2.5-min intervals. All animals received 20 min of intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP), 2.5 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/, immediately followed by 60-min infusions of either lactated Ringer (LR) or synthetic PYY, 10 or 50 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/. When LR was infused after CCK-OP, gallbladder filling increased by 15.4 +/- 10.5% with minimal changes in gallbladder pressure. Infusion of PYY/sub 10/ resulted in a significant increase in gallbladder volume and filling with a significant decrease in intragallbladder pressure. Similar findings were noted with PYY/sub 50/. These data indicate that synthetic PYY significantly augments gallbladder filling after CCK-OP-stimulated gallbladder contraction. These finding, coupled with the observation that PYY inhibits pancreatic secretion, suggest that this peptide may be the anti-CCK hormone and may have an important role in regulating biliary activity postprandially.

  5. Cholescintigraphy: gallbladder nonvisualization secondary to neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Rosen, P.R.; Nusynowitz, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Whereas the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis is characterized by nonvisualization of the gallbladder with Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives, nonvisualization is not specific for acute cholecystitis. The first reported case of nonvisualization of the gallbladder due to neoplasm is added to an expanding list of causes of nonvisualization other than the more frequent causes: acute and chronic cholecystitis.

  6. Ultrasonic evaluation of gallbladder emptying with ceruletide: comparison to oral cholecystography with fatty meal.

    PubMed

    Muraca, M; Cianci, V; Miconi, L; Vilei, M T

    1994-01-01

    Assessment of gallbladder function is required prior to nonsurgical treatment of gallstones. In order to develop a practical and reproducible method of evaluation, gallbladder emptying was studied by ultrasound (US) in 55 gallstone patients after intramuscular administration of ceruletide (0.3 micrograms/kg). In 27 of these subjects, the US procedure was compared to oral cholecystography (OCG) with fatty meal. Maximal percent gallbladder contraction was reached 30 min after ceruletide in all patients. Maximal percent contractions were 47.5 +/- 27.7 during US with ceruletide and 33.9 +/- 16.3 during OCG with fatty meal (p = 0.03). A significant linear relationship was found between the results obtained with the two different procedures (r = 0.57; p = 0.002). Serial US determinations of gallbladder emptying were performed in 16 patients. Individual variation was below 20% in 11 subjects, and in five subjects it ranged between 20 and 40%. Minor, self-limiting side effects were observed in 13 patients. US determination of gallbladder emptying after ceruletide appears to be a practical and reliable method to assess gallbladder function. PMID:8019351

  7. Differential regional effects of octreotide on human gastrointestinal motor function.

    PubMed Central

    von der Ohe, M R; Camilleri, M; Thomforde, G M; Klee, G G

    1995-01-01

    The effects of octreotide on regional motor function in the human gut are unclear. In a randomised, blinded study the effects of octreotide (50 micrograms, subcutaneously, three times daily) and placebo on gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit, and colonic motility and tone were assessed in 12 healthy volunteers whose colon had been cleansed. Octreotide accelerated initial gastric emptying (p = 0.05), inhibited small bowel transit (p < 0.01), and reduced ileocolonic bolus transfers (p < 0.05). Colonic transit was unaltered by octreotide; the postprandial colonic tonic response was inhibited (p < 0.05 v placebo), whereas colonic phasic pressure activity was increased by octreotide (p < 0.05 v placebo). These data support the use of octreotide in diarrhoeal states but not in diseases that cause small bowel stasis and bacterial overgrowth. Simultaneous measurements of colonic transit, tone, and phasic contractility are valid in studying the effects of pharmacological changes and may be applicable to the study of the human colon in health and disease. PMID:7797125

  8. Physiotherapy for functional motor disorders: a consensus recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Glenn; Stone, Jon; Matthews, Audrey; Brown, Melanie; Sparkes, Chris; Farmer, Ross; Masterton, Lindsay; Duncan, Linsey; Winters, Alisa; Daniell, Laura; Lumsden, Carrie; Carson, Alan; David, Anthony S; Edwards, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with functional motor disorder (FMD) including weakness and paralysis are commonly referred to physiotherapists. There is growing evidence that physiotherapy is an effective treatment, but the existing literature has limited explanations of what physiotherapy should consist of and there are insufficient data to produce evidence-based guidelines. We aim to address this issue by presenting recommendations for physiotherapy treatment. Methods A meeting was held between physiotherapists, neurologists and neuropsychiatrists, all with extensive experience in treating FMD. A set of consensus recommendations were produced based on existing evidence and experience. Results We recommend that physiotherapy treatment is based on a biopsychosocial aetiological framework. Treatment should address illness beliefs, self-directed attention and abnormal habitual movement patterns through a process of education, movement retraining and self-management strategies within a positive and non-judgemental context. We provide specific examples of these strategies for different symptoms. Conclusions Physiotherapy has a key role in the multidisciplinary management of patients with FMD. There appear to be specific physiotherapy techniques which are useful in FMD and which are amenable to and require prospective evaluation. The processes involved in referral, treatment and discharge from physiotherapy should be considered carefully as a part of a treatment package. PMID:25433033

  9. Relationship between dressing and motor function in stroke patients: a study with partial correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takaaki; Sato, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamane, Kazuhiro; Otsuki, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Tozato, Fusae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to elucidate which motor functions are most or more important for dressing performance before and after rehabilitation. [Subjects] Seventy-nine first episode stroke patients in a hospital convalescent rehabilitation ward. [Methods] The relationships between motor function of the affected upper and lower limbs, unaffected side function, trunk function, balance, cognitive function, and independence level in dressing were examined at admission and discharge using partial correlation analysis. [Results] Independence level of dressing correlated with motor function of the affected upper limb and balance at admission, but correlated only with balance at discharge. [Conclusion] Balance function was strongly associated with level of dressing independence. The effect of gross motor function of the affected upper and lower limbs on the level of independence in dressing may thus be smaller than originally expected. Enhanced balance ability can be important for learning single-handed actions of self-dressing during rehabilitation. PMID:26834349

  10. Relationship between dressing and motor function in stroke patients: a study with partial correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takaaki; Sato, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamane, Kazuhiro; Otsuki, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Tozato, Fusae

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to elucidate which motor functions are most or more important for dressing performance before and after rehabilitation. [Subjects] Seventy-nine first episode stroke patients in a hospital convalescent rehabilitation ward. [Methods] The relationships between motor function of the affected upper and lower limbs, unaffected side function, trunk function, balance, cognitive function, and independence level in dressing were examined at admission and discharge using partial correlation analysis. [Results] Independence level of dressing correlated with motor function of the affected upper limb and balance at admission, but correlated only with balance at discharge. [Conclusion] Balance function was strongly associated with level of dressing independence. The effect of gross motor function of the affected upper and lower limbs on the level of independence in dressing may thus be smaller than originally expected. Enhanced balance ability can be important for learning single-handed actions of self-dressing during rehabilitation. PMID:26834349

  11. Impact of a Community-Based Programme for Motor Development on Gross Motor Skills and Cognitive Function in Preschool Children from Disadvantaged Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Catherine E.; Achmat, Masturah; Forbes, Jared; Lambert, Estelle V.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the studies were to assess the impact of the Little Champs programme for motor development on (1) the gross motor skills, and (2) cognitive function of children in the programme. In study 1, 118 children from one Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, and in study 2, 83…

  12. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ye-chen; Liu, Han-qiu; Hua, Xu-yun; Shen, Yun-dong; Xu, Wen-dong; Xu, Jian-guang; Gu, Yu-dong

    2016-01-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  13. Poor motor function is associated with reduced sensory processing after stroke.

    PubMed

    Campfens, S Floor; Zandvliet, Sarah B; Meskers, Carel G M; Schouten, Alfred C; van Putten, Michel J A M; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to regain motor function after stroke depends on the intactness of motor and sensory pathways. In this study, we evaluated afferent sensory pathway information transfer and processing after stroke with the coherence between cortical activity and a position perturbation (position-cortical coherence, PCC). Eleven subacute stroke survivors participated in this study. Subjects performed a motor task with the affected and non-affected arm while continuous wrist position perturbations were applied. Cortical activity was measured using EEG. PCC was calculated between position perturbation and EEG at the contralateral and ipsilateral sensorimotor area. The presence of PCC was quantified as the number of frequencies where PCC is larger than zero across the sensorimotor area. All subjects showed significant contralateral PCC in affected and non-affected wrist tasks. Subjects with poor motor function had a reduced presence of contralateral PCC compared with subjects with good motor function in the affected wrist tasks. Amplitude of significant PCC did not differ between subjects with good and poor motor function. Our results show that poor motor function is associated with reduced sensory pathway information transfer and processing in subacute stroke subjects. Position-cortical coherence may provide additional insight into mechanisms of recovery of motor function after stroke. PMID:25651979

  14. [New findings on the morphology and motor function of basal ganglia].

    PubMed

    Marković, L; Berić, A; Marinković, R

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents results of new investigations on morphology and motor function of basal ganglia, which point to the fact that their dimensions are individual and not correlated with the dimension of the corresponding hemisphere. Basal ganglia motor function is studied on the basis of disturbances which occur if they are damaged, both in sick people and experimental animals. Analysis of recorded single-neuron activity, in animals and in patients undergoing special surgical procedures, is especially instructive for understanding this function. According to new insights there are at least five multiple neuronal regions: motor, oculomotor, limbic, dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbitofrontal region. Morphologic and functional studies partly disagree in interpreting connections among these regions. On the basis of functional studies it is considered that parallelism and functional separation exist, while on the basis of morphologic studies it is considered that at the level of basal ganglia output convergence occurs. New insights speak about parallelism and convergence at the same time. It is thought that inside basal ganglia motor region there are two divided systems, direct and indirect, which direct the output impulses towards talamus. The direct leads to facilitation of cortically started movements, and the indirect to suppression of unwanted motor behavior. On the basis of literature data we can conclude that basal ganglia support cortically generated movements, participate in sequential movements, suppress unwanted motor activity and in altered circumstances stop the course of started motor sequences allowing new, adequate motor activity. PMID:8926943

  15. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153-160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493-1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289-2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989-994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400-404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526-2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769-771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. PMID:25995349

  16. Pathophysiology of motor functions in prolonged manned space flights.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, I B; Kreidich YuV; Oganov, V S; Koserenko, O P

    1981-01-01

    The influence of weightlessness on different parts of the motor system have been studied in crew members of 140 and 175 days space flights. It has been shown that weightlessness affects all parts of the motor system including (i) the leg and trunk muscles, in which severe atonia, a decrease of strength and an increase of electromyographic cost of contraction have been observed, (ii) the proprioceptive elements and the spinal reflex mechanisms in which decreased thresholds accompanied by decreases of maximal amplitude of reflexes and disturbances in cross reflex mechanisms have been found. and (iii) the central mechanisms that control characteristics of postural and locomotor activities. The intensities and durations of disturbances of different parts of the motor system did not correlate to each other, but did correlate with prophylactic activity during space flight. The data suggest a different nature of disturbances caused by weightlessness in different parts of the motor system. PMID:11543096

  17. MIBG Activity in the Gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Zhuang, Hongming

    2016-07-01

    Whole-body I-MIBG images were acquired in a 12-year-old girl who had metastatic malignant paraganglioma to assess the extent of the metastases. Image quality was suboptimal because of diffusely increased muscle activity, which was related to the labetalol the patient took to control her blood pressure. Despite the suboptimal images, a subtle activity in the lower border of the liver was noted, along with known lesions in the sacrum and upper chest. Further SPECT/CT images localized this activity in the gallbladder. PMID:26914576

  18. Overexpression of survival motor neuron improves neuromuscular function and motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Bradley J.; Alfazema, Neza; Sheean, Rebecca K.; Sleigh, James N.; Davies, Kay E.; Horne, Malcolm K.; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy results from diminished levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein in spinal motor neurons. Low levels of SMN also occur in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and genetic reduction of SMN levels exacerbates the phenotype of transgenic SOD1G93A mice. Here, we demonstrate that SMN protein is significantly reduced in the spinal cords of patients with sporadic ALS. To test the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS, we overexpressed SMN in 2 different strains of SOD1G93A mice. Neuronal overexpression of SMN significantly preserved locomotor function, rescued motor neurons, and attenuated astrogliosis in spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice. Despite this, survival was not prolonged, most likely resulting from SMN mislocalization and depletion of gems in motor neurons of symptomatic mice. Our results reveal that SMN upregulation slows locomotor deficit onset and motor neuron loss in this mouse model of ALS. However, disruption of SMN nuclear complexes by high levels of mutant SOD1, even in the presence of SMN overexpression, might limit its survival promoting effects in this specific mouse model. Studies in emerging mouse models of ALS are therefore warranted to further explore the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS. PMID:24210254

  19. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  20. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Alessandro G.; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J.; Edwards, A. David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level–dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. PMID:26491066

  1. Gallbladder Tuberculosis: CT Findings with Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiu-Fang; Qiu, Ling-Ling; Shen, Jian; Dong, Fei; Chen, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of gallbladder tuberculosis (TB) and to correlate them with pathologic findings. Materials and Methods There were seven patients (M:F = 3:4; mean age, 46.3 years; age range, 32 to 78 years) in whom gallbladder TB was eventually diagnosed. All of them underwent cross-sectional imaging with CT, a pathologic examination and a retrospective review. CT imaging evaluation was done in each case, including the findings of a mass versus nodule, wall thickening (uniform or irregular) and the enhancement patterns (homogeneous or heterogeneous). Results All the cases of gallbladder TB revealed the following three different CT findings: micronodular lesion of the gallbladder wall (n = 1), a thickened wall (n = 4) and a gallbladder mass (n = 2). There were three cases of homogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including homogeneous enhancement with nodular lesion, homogeneous uniform thickness enhancement and homogeneous thickness enhancement in one case each, and these cases pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with a little caseating necrosis in one case and tuberculous granuloma with rich fibrous tissue, but little or no evident caseating necrosis in two cases. Four cases of heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including heterogeneous uniform-thickness enhancement in two cases, heterogeneous enhancement with a local mass lesion in one case and heterogeneous enhancement with a mass that replaced the gallbladder in one case; in these cases, pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with marked caseation or liquefaction necrosis in three cases and tuberculous granuloma by fibrous and calcifications accompanied by caseating necrosis in one case. Among the seven cases of gallbladder TB, six cases were accompanied by abdominal extra-gallbladder TB, including abdominal lymph node TB in five cases and hepatic TB in four cases. Conclusion Gallbladder TB has various CT manifestations, and the enhanced CT findings

  2. Surgical resection of splenic metastasis from the adenosquamous gallbladder carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Masashi; Aoki, Hideki; Kunitomo, Tomoyoshi; Mushiake, Yutaka; Kanaya, Nobuhiko; Yasuhara, Isao; Arata, Takashi; Katsuda, Kou; Tanakaya, Kohji; Takeuchi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Splenic metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely rare. Specific anatomical, histological, and functional properties of spleen are believed to be responsible for the rarity of solitary splenic metastasis. Presentation of case We present the case of a 62-year-old female who developed metachronous splenic metastasis of adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder. We performed central bisegmentectomy of the liver for gallbladder carcinoma. The patient subsequently presented 3 months later with isolated splenic metastasis and liver metastasis. Splenectomy and partial hepatectomy was performed at this time. Histological examination confirmed metastatic adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder. No signs of recurrence were observed at 3 months after the second surgery. Discussion Although splenectomy provides a potential means of radical treatment in patients with isolated splenic metastases, it should be performed with caution as splenic metastatic lesions may represent the initial clinical manifestation of systemic metastases at multiple sites. In this case, radical surgery was performed following the confirmation of no new unresectable metastatic lesions or systemic dissemination. Conclusion This is the first report on the adenosquamous splenic metastasis from the gallbladder carcinoma. Curative resection may be the treatment of choice for prolonging survival in patients with the splenic metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26852359

  3. High DBC1 (CCAR2) expression in gallbladder carcinoma is associated with favorable clinicopathological factors

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyu Yeoun; Cho, Hyuck; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Bae, Go Eun; Lim, Jun Uk; Sung, Ji-Youn; Park, Yong-Koo; Kim, Youn Wha; Lee, Juhie

    2015-01-01

    There have been several studies on gallbladder carcinogenesis, and mutations of the KRAS, TP53, and CDKN2A genes have been reported in gallbladder carcinoma. The DBC1 gene (deleted in breast cancer 1) was initially cloned from region 8p21, which was homozygously deleted in breast cancer. DBC1 has been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and death. The functional role of DBC1 in normal cells and the role of DBC1 loss in cancer are not entirely clear. And DBC1 expression and its clinical implications in gallbladder carcinoma have yet to be thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated DBC1 expression in 104 gallbladder carcinoma tissues in relation to survival and other prognostic factors via immunohistochemical analysis. DBC1 expression was divided into two categories: high DBC1 expression was observed in 32/104 cases (30.8%) and low expression in 72/104 cases (69.2%). High DBC1 expression correlated significantly with favorable clinicopathologic variables. Furthermore, in survival analysis, the high-DBC1 expression group showed a better survival rate compared to the low-DBC1 expression group. In conclusion, high DBC1 expression is associated with several favorable clinicopathologic factors in gallbladder carcinoma. These findings suggest that loss of DBC1 expression plays a role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26617872

  4. Motor Cortical Functional Geometry in Cerebral Palsy and its Relationship to Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, T.M.; Sawaki, L.; Burdette, J. H.; Cabrera, N.; Kolaski, K.; Smith, B.P.; O’Shea, T. M.; Koman, L. A.; Wittenberg, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate motor cortical map patterns in children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), and the relationships between motor cortical geometry and motor function in CP. Methods Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to map motor cortical representations of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in 13 children with CP (age 9–16 years, 6 males.) The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Melbourne upper extremity function were used to quantify motor ability. Results In the hemiplegic participants (N=7), the affected (right) FDI cortical representation was mapped on the ipsilateral (N=4), contralateral (N=2), or bilateral (N=1) cortex. Participants with diplegia (N=6) showed either bilateral (N=2) or contralateral (N=4) cortical hand maps. The FDI and TA motor map center-of-gravity mediolateral location ranged from 2–8 cm and 3–6 cm from the midline, respectively. Among diplegics, more lateral FDI representation locations were associated with lower Melbourne scores, i.e. worse hand motor function (Spearman’s Rho = −0.841, p=0.036) Conclusions Abnormalities in TMS-derived motor maps cut across the clinical classifications of hemiplegic and diplegic CP. The lateralization of the upper and lower extremity motor representation demonstrates reorganization after insults to the affected hemispheres of both diplegic and hemiplegic children. Significance The current study is a step towards defining the relationship between changes in motor maps and functional impairments in CP. These results suggest the need for further work to develop improved classification schemes that integrate clinical, radiologic, and neurophysiologic measures in CP. PMID:22153667

  5. Gross Motor Function Classification System: impact and utility.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher; Bartlett, Doreen

    2004-01-01

    In summary, the GMFCS has had, and continues to have, a major effect on the health care of children with CP. The number of citations of the GMFCS has been increasing every year, and the classification system has had good uptake internationally and across the spectrum of health professionals for use in research design and clinical practice by providing a system for clearly communicating about children's gross motor function. The utility of diagnostic labels such as diplegia has been questioned. However, although by definition CP is a disorder of posture and movement, the movement disability is often only one of the neurodevelopmental problems for many children with CP. When a complete description of a child's clinical presentation is required we recommend that the GMFCS be used together with the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe classification indicating the type and topography of movement impairment. When appropriate the clinical profile will similarly be enhanced with details of other impairments and disabilities such as epilepsy or sensory, learning, feeding, or emotional disturbance. The observations in this annotation are constrained by the amount of information in the public domain. Although these sources adequately represent the effect of the GMFCS on research design, they are less likely to inform us of how the GMFCS is being used in administration, clinical practice, or education. It is not yet clear whether information is being used for these purposes or in assisting with case load management, as intended by the developers. By its localized nature, such information might remain difficult to gauge. We would therefore be interested to hear from others who are using the system for these or any other purposes. PMID:14974650

  6. Recovery of motor and cognitive function after cerebellar lesions in a songbird – role of estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Zhen, Yin; White, Stephanie; Schlinger, Barney A.; Day, Lainy B.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to its key role in complex motor function, the cerebellum is increasingly recognized to have a role in cognition. Songbirds are particularly good models for the investigation of motor and cognitive processes but little is known about the role of the songbird cerebellum in these processes. To explore cerebellar function in a songbird, we lesioned the cerebellum of adult female zebra finches and examined the effects on a spatial working memory task and on motor function during this task. There is evidence for steroid synthesis in the songbird brain and neurosteroids may have an impact on some forms of neural plasticity in adult songbirds. We therefore hypothesized that neurosteroids would affect motor and cognitive function after a cerebellar injury. We found that cerebellar lesions produced deficits in motor and cognitive aspects of a spatial task. In line with our prediction, birds in which estrogen synthesis was blocked had impaired performance in our spatial task compared with those that had estrogen synthesis blocked but estrogen replaced. There was no clear effect of estrogen replacement on motor function. We also found that lesions induced expression of the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase in reactive astrocytes and Bergmann glia around a cerebellar lesion. These data suggest that the cerebellum of songbirds mediates both motor and cognitive function and that estrogens may improve the recovery of cognitive aspects of cerebellar function after injury. PMID:19302157

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Neurofeedback-guided Motor Imagery Training and Motor Training for Parkinson’s Disease: Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Leena; Morris, Monica Busse; Brosnan, Meadhbh; Turner, Duncan L.; Morris, Huw R.; Linden, David E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback (NF) uses feedback of the patient’s own brain activity to self-regulate brain networks which in turn could lead to a change in behavior and clinical symptoms. The objective was to determine the effect of NF and motor training (MOT) alone on motor and non-motor functions in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in a 10-week small Phase I randomized controlled trial. Methods: Thirty patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD; Hoehn and Yahr I-III) and no significant comorbidity took part in the trial with random allocation to two groups. Group 1 (NF: 15 patients) received rt-fMRI-NF with MOT. Group 2 (MOT: 15 patients) received MOT alone. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorder Society—Unified PD Rating Scale-Motor scale (MDS-UPDRS-MS), administered pre- and post-intervention “off-medication”. The secondary outcome measures were the “on-medication” MDS-UPDRS, the PD Questionnaire-39, and quantitative motor assessments after 4 and 10 weeks. Results: Patients in the NF group were able to upregulate activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA) by using motor imagery. They improved by an average of 4.5 points on the MDS-UPDRS-MS in the “off-medication” state (95% confidence interval: −2.5 to −6.6), whereas the MOT group improved only by 1.9 points (95% confidence interval +3.2 to −6.8). The improvement in the intervention group meets the minimal clinically important difference which is also on par with other non-invasive therapies such as repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). However, the improvement did not differ significantly between the groups. No adverse events were reported in either group. Interpretation: This Phase I study suggests that NF combined with MOT is safe and improves motor symptoms immediately after treatment, but larger trials are needed to explore its superiority over active control conditions. PMID:27375451

  8. On the Relationship between Motor Performance and Executive Functioning in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, E.; Houwen, S.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have motor problems and higher-order cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to examine the motor skills and executive functions in school-age children with borderline and mild ID. The second aim was to investigate the relationship between the two performance…

  9. Fine Motor Skills and Executive Function Both Contribute to Kindergarten Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Claire E.; Brock, Laura L.; Murrah, William M.; Bell, Lindsay H.; Worzalla, Samantha L.; Grissmer, David; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of executive function (EF) and multiple aspects of fine motor skills to achievement on 6 standardized assessments in a sample of middle-socioeconomic status kindergarteners. Three- and 4-year-olds' (n = 213) fine and gross motor skills were assessed in a home visit before kindergarten, EF was measured at fall…

  10. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  11. Relationship between Motor Skill Competency and Executive Function in Children with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schott, N.; Holfelder, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest that children with Down's syndrome (DS), a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, demonstrate motor problems and cognitive deficits. The first aim of this study was to examine motor skills and executive functions (EFs) in school-age children with DS. The second aim was to investigate the relationship…

  12. Stimulation through Simulation? Motor Imagery and Functional Reorganization in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Frey, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    A key factor influencing reorganization of function in damaged neural networks of the adult brain is stimulation. How to stimulate motor areas of patients with paralyses is a formidable challenge. One possibility is to use internal movement simulations, or motor imagery, as an alternative to conventional therapeutic interventions that require…

  13. An Examination of the Relationship between Motor Coordination and Executive Functions in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoli, Daniela; Piek, Jan P.; Kane, Robert; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Research suggests important links between motor coordination and executive functions. The current study examined whether motor coordination predicts working memory, inhibition, and switching performance, extending previous research by accounting for attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology and other confounding factors,…

  14. Unusual presentation of gallbladder perforation

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, G.; Adam, J.; Abdul-Aal, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gall bladder perforation is associated with high mortality rates and therefore must be recognised and managed promptly. We present an unusual presentation of spontaneous gall bladder perforation. Case presentation An elderly lady with multiple medical co-morbidities was admitted with sepsis following a fall. Initial assessment lead to a diagnosis of pneumonia, however a rapidly expanding right flank mass was incidentally noted during routine nursing care. Imaging studies were inconclusive, however incision and drainage of the mass revealed bile stained pus draining cutaneously from an acutely inflamed gallbladder. The patient made a good recovery following surgery, and was discharged with outpatient follow-up. Discussion Despite focussed post-hoc history taking she denied any prodromal symptoms of cholecystitis. In addition to reporting an unusual cause for a common presentation, we highlight the importance of a full body examination in the context of sepsis, regardless of whether the source has been identified. In addition, we advocate that surgical intervention in sepsis should not be delayed by imaging in cases where an abscess is suspected. Conclusions Percutaneous abscesses arising from the gallbladder are a rare but potentially serious consequence of acute cholecystitis, and may present in a wide variety of locations. Therefore it is imperative to conduct a full body inspection in the septic patient, even when a source has been identified. PMID:26686488

  15. Epidemiology and molecular pathology of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Ponce, E C; Miquel, J F; Muñoz, N; Herrero, R; Ferrecio, C; Wistuba, I I; Alonso de Ruiz, P; Aristi Urista, G; Nervi, F

    2001-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is usually associated with gallstone disease, late diagnosis, unsatisfactory treatment, and poor prognosis. We report here the worldwide geographical distribution of gallbladder cancer, review the main etiologic hypotheses, and provide some comments on perspectives for prevention. The highest incidence rate of gallbladder cancer is found among populations of the Andean area, North American Indians, and Mexican Americans. Gallbladder cancer is up to three times higher among women than men in all populations. The highest incidence rates in Europe are found in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia. Incidence rates in other regions of the world are relatively low. The highest mortality rates are also reported from South America, 3.5-15.5 per 100,000 among Chilean Mapuche Indians, Bolivians, and Chilean Hispanics. Intermediate rates, 3.7 to 9.1 per 100,000, are reported from Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Brazil. Mortality rates are low in North America, with the exception of high rates among American Indians in New Mexico (11.3 per 100,000) and among Mexican Americans. The main associated risk factors identified so far include cholelithiasis (especially untreated chronic symptomatic gallstones), obesity, reproductive factors, chronic infections of the gallbladder, and environmental exposure to specific chemicals. These suspected factors likely represent promoters of carcinogenesis. The main limitations of epidemiologic studies on gallbladder cancer are the small sample sizes and specific problems in quantifying exposure to putative risk factors. The natural history of gallbladder disease should be characterized to support the allocation of more resources for early treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disease in high-risk populations. Secondary prevention of gallbladder cancer could be effective if supported by cost-effective studies of prophylactic cholecystectomy among asymptomatic gallstone patients in high-risk areas. PMID:11760569

  16. Impact of tactile function on upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lauren E; Harris, Elizabeth C; Auld, Megan L; Johnston, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of, and relationship between tactile dysfunction and upper limb motor function in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) compared to typical developing (TD) children. Participants were 36 children aged 6-12 years. Presence of DCD (n=20) or TD (n=16) was confirmed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, second edition. All children participated in a comprehensive assessment of tactile registration (Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments); tactile spatial perception (Single Point Localisation (SPL) and two-point discrimination (2PD)); haptic perception (Stereognosis); speed of simple everyday manual tasks (Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF)); and handwriting speed and accuracy (Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting (ETCH)). Compared to TD children, children with DCD demonstrated poorer localisation of touch in the non-dominant hand (p=0.04), slower speed of alphabet writing (p<0.05) and less legible handwriting (p<0.01), but no difference in speed of simple everyday manual tasks (JTTHF: p>0.05). Regression analysis showed that spatial tactile perception (SPL) predicted handwriting legibility (ETCH: r=0.11) and speed of functional tasks (JTTHF: r=0.33). These results suggest that tactile function, specifically single point localisation, should be a primary tactile assessment employed to determine reasons for upper limb motor difficulties experienced by children with DCD. PMID:26299639

  17. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K.; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z.; Shneider, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations. PMID:26842965

  18. Kinesin molecular motor Eg5 functions during polypeptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Kristen M.; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Woolford, John L.; Saunders, William S.

    2011-01-01

    The kinesin-related molecular motor Eg5 plays roles in cell division, promoting spindle assembly. We show that during interphase Eg5 is associated with ribosomes and is required for optimal nascent polypeptide synthesis. When Eg5 was inhibited, ribosomes no longer bound to microtubules in vitro, ribosome transit rates slowed, and polysomes accumulated in intact cells, suggesting defects in elongation or termination during polypeptide synthesis. These results demonstrate that the molecular motor Eg5 associates with ribosomes and enhances the efficiency of translation. PMID:21795388

  19. Gallbladder Tuberculosis Mimicking Gallbladder Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Wang, Kai; Liu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder tuberculosis (GT) is extremely rare, and it is difficult to differentiate from other gallbladder diseases, such as gallbladder carcinoma and Xanthogranulomatous Cholecystitis. A correct preoperative diagnosis of GT is difficult. The final diagnosis is usually made postoperatively according to surgical biopsy. Here, we report a case of a patient who underwent surgery with the preoperative diagnosis of gallbladder carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and present the process of differential diagnosis between two or more conditions that share similar signs or symptoms. PMID:27200195

  20. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Volz, L. J.; Rehme, A. K.; Michely, J.; Nettekoven, C.; Eickhoff, S. B.; Fink, G. R.; Grefkes, C.

    2016-01-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1–16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis. PMID:26980614

  1. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Volz, L J; Rehme, A K; Michely, J; Nettekoven, C; Eickhoff, S B; Fink, G R; Grefkes, C

    2016-06-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1-16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis. PMID:26980614

  2. Acai fruit improves motor and cognitive function in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and ne...

  3. Functional organization and restoration of the brain motor-execution network after stroke and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sahil; Butler, Andrew J.; Drake, Daniel; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cortical areas of the human brain motor system interact coherently in the low frequency range (<0.1 Hz), even in the absence of explicit tasks. Following stroke, cortical interactions are functionally disturbed. How these interactions are affected and how the functional organization is regained from rehabilitative treatments as people begin to recover motor behaviors has not been systematically studied. We recorded the intrinsic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals from 30 participants: 17 young healthy controls and 13 aged stroke survivors. Stroke participants underwent mental practice (MP) or both mental practice and physical therapy (MP+PT) within 14–51 days following stroke. We investigated the network activity of five core areas in the motor-execution network, consisting of the left primary motor area (LM1), the right primary motor area (RM1), the left pre-motor cortex (LPMC), the right pre-motor cortex (RPMC) and the supplementary motor area (SMA). We discovered that (i) the network activity dominated in the frequency range 0.06–0.08 Hz for all the regions, and for both able-bodied and stroke participants (ii) the causal information flow between the regions: LM1 and SMA, RPMC and SMA, RPMC and LM1, SMA and RM1, SMA and LPMC, was reduced significantly for stroke survivors (iii) the flow did not increase significantly after MP alone and (iv) the flow among the regions during MP+PT increased significantly. We also found that sensation and motor scores were significantly higher and correlated with directed functional connectivity measures when the stroke-survivors underwent MP+PT but not MP alone. The findings provide evidence that a combination of mental practice and physical therapy can be an effective means of treatment for stroke survivors to recover or regain the strength of motor behaviors, and that the spectra of causal information flow can be used as a reliable biomarker for evaluating rehabilitation in stroke survivors. PMID

  4. Differences in motor and cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease with and without orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Hohler, Anna D; Zuzuárregui, José-Rafael P; Katz, Douglas I; Depiero, T Joy; Hehl, Christina L; Leonard, Alissa; Allen, Valerie; Dentino, Jill; Gardner, Maura; Phenix, Heidi; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2012-05-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often present with orthostatic hypotension (OH) as a result of the dysautonomia associated with the disease or as a side effect of the dopaminergic medications used to treat the disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in motor and cognitive function in patients with PD with and without OH. Forty-four patients with a diagnosis of PD were evaluated and stratified by the presence of OH based on orthostatic blood pressure recordings. Both groups underwent assessments of motor and cognitive function. OH was present in 17 of 44 patients (39%) with PD. These patients with OH had significantly lower scores in gross motor, balance, and cognitive function (p < .05). No significant difference between groups was found in the finger tapping scores. These results suggest that patients with PD should be routinely screened for OH as it commonly occurs and may negatively impact gross motor, balance, and cognitive function. PMID:22191544

  5. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations with Tremor and Motor Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentialy neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and han...

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  7. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-29

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people's cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents' academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = -0.023, 95% confidence interval = -0.031, -0.015) and obesity (B = -0.025, 95% confidence interval = -0.039, -0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement. PMID:23277558

  8. Evidence for cerebellar motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-05-27

    Functional reorganization of the motor system following brain damage has been studied extensively in stroke patients, in which not only the cerebrum but also the cerebellum (Cbll) undergoes substantial reorganization. However, the role of Cbll in motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients remains poorly investigated. Because brain damages in brain tumor patients occur much more slowly than in stroke patients, the neural mechanisms for motor functional reorganization might differ between these two disease conditions. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated whether Cbll constitutes the neural substrates for motor functional reorganization in eighteen supratentorial brain tumor patients who exhibited no clinical signs of paresis. The patients and normal volunteers underwent a unilateral hand movement task. In the patients, the locus of primary sensory motor (SM1) activation during contralesional hand movement was significantly displaced by the tumor, suggesting functional compromise and/or reorganization in the central sulcus region. In addition, their contralesional Cbll activation during contralesional hand movement was substantially increased as compared to normal controls. The finding represents the first conclusive evidence that Cbll is involved in the motor-related functional reorganization in patients with brain tumor. PMID:27102144

  9. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Young, Brittany M.; Walton, Leo M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E.; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID

  10. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Young, Brittany M; Walton, Leo M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain-computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients' upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients' motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients' motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID:25964753

  11. Case report: imaging of a bilobed gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, C; Derchi, L E; Pastorino, C; Cittadini, G

    1993-08-01

    Imaging of the gallbladder demonstrates a wide range of anatomical variants, including anomalies in location, number and shape. Duplication anomalies are quite rare and are characterized by a large variety of configurations depending on the size and degree of fusion of the two lobes, and on the number and disposition of the cystic ducts. We present a case of a deeply cleft, bilobed gallbladder imaged by computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US) and oral cholecystography (OCG). The anomaly consisted of complete duplication of the body and fundus into two distinct and separated lobes both of which entered a single infundibulum. Awareness of congenital gallbladder variants may help in recognizing and correctly classifying gallbladder abnormalities, thus preventing misdiagnoses. PMID:7719690

  12. Symptomatic “H” Type Duplex Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Radha Govind; Srinivasa Reddy, Thallu Venkata; Swamy Balachandar, Tirupporur Govinda; Palaniswamy, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication with an incidence at autopsy of about 1 in 4000 is important in clinical practice, because it may cause some clinical, surgical, and diagnostic problems. Preoperative identification of this rare anomaly avoids biliary injuries and the other consequences of missed diagnosis. In this report, we present a case of ductular type duplex gallbladder diagnosed preoperatively by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and ultrasound and managed successfully by laparoscopy. PMID:21605535

  13. Inverted liver with suprahepatic, anteriorly displaced gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, Harold; Ahmad, Usman

    2010-01-01

    A suprahepatic, anteriorly displaced gallbladder in association with an inverted liver is an extremely rare congenital anomaly. We report the clinical and radiologic findings associated with a 78-year-old woman presenting with shortness of breath, desaturation, hypercapnia and hypoxemia. An abnormal chest radiograph demonstrated right hemi-diaphragmatic elevation consistent with a possible eventration. Subsequent imaging by computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an inverted liver with an anteriorly displaced, suprahepatic gallbladder. PMID:20666167

  14. Motor function predicts parent-reported musculoskeletal pain in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Chantel C; Krach, Linda E; Rivard, Patrick F; Belew, John L; Symons, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between pain and motor function is not well understood, especially for children and adolescents with communication and motor impairments associated with cerebral palsy (CP). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a predictive relationship between motor function and musculoskeletal pain exists in children with CP. METHODS: Following informed consent, caregivers of 34 pediatric patients with CP (mean [± SD] age 9.37±4.49 years; 80.0% male) completed pain- and function-related measures. Parents completed the Dalhousie Pain Interview and the Brief Pain Inventory based on a one-week recall to determine whether pain had been experienced in the past week, its general description, possible cause, duration, frequency, intensity and interference with daily function. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to classify the motor involvement of the child based on their functional ability and their need for assistive devices for mobility. RESULTS: GMFCS level significantly predicted parent-reported musculoskeletal pain frequency (P<0.02), duration (P=0.05) and intensity (P<0.01). Duration of pain was significantly related to interference with activities of daily living (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Children with CP with greater motor involvement, as indexed by GMFCS level, may be at risk for increased pain (intensity, frequency and duration) that interfers with activities of daily living. The clinical index of suspicion should be raised accordingly when evaluating children with developmental disability who cannot self-report reliably. PMID:24308022

  15. Ultrasonography of gallbladder abnormalities due to schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joachim; Azoulay, Daniel; Dong, Yi; Holtfreter, Martha C; Akpata, Robert; Calderaro, Julien; El-Scheich, Tarik; Breuer, Matthias; Neumayr, Andreas; Hatz, Christoph; Kircheis, Gerald; Botelho, Monica C; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2016-08-01

    After malaria, schistosomiasis remains the most important tropical parasitic disease in large parts of the world. Schistosomiasis has recently re-emerged in Southern Europe. Intestinal schistosomiasis is caused by most Schistosoma (S.) spp. pathogenic to humans and leads to chronic inflammation and fibrosis of the colon as well as to liver fibrosis. Gallbladder abnormalities usually occur in patients with advanced hepatic portal fibrosis due to Schistosoma mansoni infection. Occasionally, gallbladder abnormalities have been seen also in children and occurring without associated overt liver abnormalities.The specific S. mansoni-induced gallbladder abnormalities detectable by ultrasound include typical hyperechogenic wall thickening with external gallbladder wall protuberances. The luminal wall surface is smooth. The condition is usually clinically silent although some cases of symptomatic cholecystitis have been described. The ultrasonographic Murphy response is negative. Gallbladder contractility is impaired but sludge and calculi occur rarely. Contrary to other trematodes such as liver flukes, S. mansoni does not obstruct the biliary tract. Advanced gallbladder fibrosis is unlikely to reverse after therapy. PMID:27169865

  16. Decoding post-stroke motor function from structural brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Rondina, Jane M; Filippone, Maurizio; Girolami, Mark; Ward, Nick S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research based on neuroimaging data has benefited from machine learning methods, which have the ability to provide individualized predictions and to account for the interaction among units of information in the brain. Application of machine learning in structural imaging to investigate diseases that involve brain injury presents an additional challenge, especially in conditions like stroke, due to the high variability across patients regarding characteristics of the lesions. Extracting data from anatomical images in a way that translates brain damage information into features to be used as input to learning algorithms is still an open question. One of the most common approaches to capture regional information from brain injury is to obtain the lesion load per region (i.e. the proportion of voxels in anatomical structures that are considered to be damaged). However, no systematic evaluation has yet been performed to compare this approach with using patterns of voxels (i.e. considering each voxel as a single feature). In this paper we compared both approaches applying Gaussian Process Regression to decode motor scores in 50 chronic stroke patients based solely on data derived from structural MRI. For both approaches we compared different ways to delimit anatomical areas: regions of interest from an anatomical atlas, the corticospinal tract, a mask obtained from fMRI analysis with a motor task in healthy controls and regions selected using lesion-symptom mapping. Our analysis showed that extracting features through patterns of voxels that represent lesion probability produced better results than quantifying the lesion load per region. In particular, from the different ways to delimit anatomical areas compared, the best performance was obtained with a combination of a range of cortical and subcortical motor areas as well as the corticospinal tract. These results will inform the appropriate methodology for predicting long term motor outcomes from early post

  17. Functional near infrared spectroscopy of the sensory and motor brain regions with simultaneous kinematic and EMG monitoring during motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; de Campos, Ana Carolina; Stanley, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    There are several advantages that functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) presents in the study of the neural control of human movement. It is relatively flexible with respect to participant positioning and allows for some head movements during tasks. Additionally, it is inexpensive, light weight, and portable, with very few contraindications to its use. This presents a unique opportunity to study functional brain activity during motor tasks in individuals who are typically developing, as well as those with movement disorders, such as cerebral palsy. An additional consideration when studying movement disorders, however, is the quality of actual movements performed and the potential for additional, unintended movements. Therefore, concurrent monitoring of both blood flow changes in the brain and actual movements of the body during testing is required for appropriate interpretation of fNIRS results. Here, we show a protocol for the combination of fNIRS with muscle and kinematic monitoring during motor tasks. We explore gait, a unilateral multi-joint movement (cycling), and two unilateral single-joint movements (isolated ankle dorsiflexion, and isolated hand squeezing). The techniques presented can be useful in studying both typical and atypical motor control, and can be modified to investigate a broad range of tasks and scientific questions. PMID:25548919

  18. Altered structural and functional connectivity between the bilateral primary motor cortex in unilateral subcortical stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuang-Shi; Ning, Yan-Zhe; Fu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Han, Xiao; Cui, Fang-Yuan; Ren, Yi; Zou, Yi-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A large number of functional imaging studies have focused on the understanding of motor-related neural activities after ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge is still limited in the structural and functional changes of the interhemispheric connections of the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1s) and their potential influence on motor function recovery following stroke. Twenty-four stroke patients with right hemispheric subcortical infarcts and 25 control subjects were recruited to undergo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Structural impairments between the bilateral M1s were measured by fractional anisotropy. Functional changes of the bilateral M1s were assessed via M1-M1 resting-state functional connectivity. Task-evoked activation analysis was applied to identify the roles of the bilateral hemispheres in motor function recovery. Compared with control subjects, unilateral subcortical stroke patients revealed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity between the bilateral M1s. Stroke patients also revealed higher activations in multiple brain regions in both hemispheres and that more regions were located in the contralesional hemisphere. This study increased our understanding of the structural and functional alterations between the bilateral M1s that occur in unilateral subcortical stroke and provided further evidence for the compensatory role played by the contralesional hemisphere for these alterations during motor function recovery. PMID:27495109

  19. Prediction of functional outcome by motor capability after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lazar, R B; Yarkony, G M; Ortolano, D; Heinemann, A W; Perlow, E; Lovell, L; Meyer, P R

    1989-11-01

    The relationship between early motor status and functional outcome after spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated prospectively in 52 quadriplegic and 26 paraplegic patients. Motor status was measured within 72 hours of injury and quantified with the Motor Index Score (MIS). Functional status was evaluated with the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). A senior physical therapist completed the MIS and the MBI when each patient was admitted to the spinal cord intensive care unit and every 30 days during rehabilitation. Early motor function was correlated with average daily improvement in functional status including self-care and mobility (p = .001). The initial MIS strongly correlated with functional status of quadriplegics at admission (p = .001), at 60 days, and at rehabilitation discharge (p = .001). In paraplegics, the overall MBI at admission, after 60 days of rehabilitation, and at discharge was not correlated with early motor function. However, the MIS correlated significantly with the MBI self-care subscore at 60 days and at discharge (p = .01), but not with the mobility subscore. The initial MIS was also significantly correlated to functional status at discharge in patients with complete lesions (p = .001), but was not related to functional status at discharge in patients with incomplete lesions. The MIS appears to be a useful tool in predicting function during rehabilitation, although individual differences in ambulation, particularly for patients with paraplegia, limit the predictive utility of this index. PMID:2818153

  20. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening

    PubMed Central

    Burunat, Iballa; Brattico, Elvira; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Sams, Mikko; Toiviainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception. PMID:26422790

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of functional domains in primary motor cortex in rhesus macaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-02-01

    Functional detection in primate brains has particular advantages because of the similarity between non-human primate brain and human brain and the potential for relevance to a wide range of conditions such as stroke and Parkinson's disease. In this research, we used photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique to detect functional changes in primary motor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. We observed strong increases in photoacoustic signal amplitude during both passive and active forelimb movement, which indicates an increase in total hemoglobin concentration resulting from activation of primary motor cortex. Further, with PAI approach, we were able to obtain depthresolved functional information from primary motor cortex. The results show that PAI can reliably detect primary motor cortex activation associated with forelimb movement in rhesus macaques with a minimal-invasive approach.

  2. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening.

    PubMed

    Burunat, Iballa; Brattico, Elvira; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Sams, Mikko; Toiviainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception. PMID:26422790

  3. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes. PMID:27072290

  4. Functional improvement after motor training is correlated with synaptic plasticity in rat thalamus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuchuan; Li, Jie; Lai, Qin; Azam, Salman; Rafols, José A; Diaz, Fernando G

    2002-12-01

    The goals of this study were to determine whether functional outcome after motor training in rats was linked to synaptic plasticity in thalamus, and whether the Rota-rod apparatus, widely used to test motor function, could be used as an easy and quantitative motor skill training procedure. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 39) were evaluated under three training conditions: 1. Movement requiring balance and coordination skills on Rota-rod; 2. simple exercise on treadmill; 3. nontrained controls. Motor function was evaluated by a series of motor tests (foot fault placing, parallel bar crossing, rope and ladder climbing) before and 14 or 28 days after training procedure. Synaptic strength in brain was assessed by synaptophysin immunocytochemistry. After 14 days of training, Rota-rod-trained animals significantly (p < 0.01) improved motor performance, compared to treadmill and nontrained animals. Animals with up to 28 days of simple exercises on the treadmill did not show a significantly improved performance on most motor tasks, except for an improvement in foot fault placing. Intensive synaptophysin immunoreactivity was present in the right but not the left mediodorsal and ventromedial nuclei of thalamus in Rota-rod-trained rats at 14 and 28 days, and in treadmill-trained rats at 28 days. The data suggested that functional outcome is effectively improved by motor skill training rather than by simple exercises, and this may be related, at least partially, to uniquely lateralized synaptogenesis in the thalamus. Both Rota-rod and treadmill could be quantitatively used in rats for motor training of different complexity. PMID:12500709

  5. Long-term Outcome of Motor Function in a Child with Moyamoya Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Seok

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This observational study provides a retrospective description of changes in motor function of a 10 year old child who suffered from motor weakness caused by Moyamoya disease (MMD) over an approximately 3 year follow-up observation period. [Methods] The child was diagnosed as MMD due to multifocal encephalomalacia in both frontal and parietal cortices. After the ischemic attack, the child received physical therapy the based on stroke rehabilitation, including muscle strengthening exercises, training of functional activity/ADL, and neurodevelopmental treatment. [Results] The child's MRI showed areas of ischemic infarction in both the frontal and parietal lobes. Steno-occlusive findings for both the anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery were observed on cerebral angiography. Regarding changes of motor function during the three-year follow-up, significant improvements, in the Motricity index, Modified Brunnstrom Classification, manual function test, and functional ambulatory category were observed. [Conclusion] The basic motor function and functional abilities of the child showed improvement with conservative treatment over approximately three years. The functional motor ability of children with MMD may be similar to the recovery progression of pediatric stroke patients, if there is no re-occurrence of ischemia. PMID:24409040

  6. Differential susceptibility to motor impulsivity among functional subtypes of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Scott A; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Claassen, Daniel O; Wooten, George F; Manning, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Parkinson’s disease patients with predominant postural instability and gait difficulties (PIGD) may experience unique cognitive difficulties compared to patients with tremor predominant (TD) symptoms. PIGD patients are also at high risk for falling, and some of the worst fallers seem to react impulsively to their environment. We tested the hypothesis that PIGD patients show poorer control over motor impulses compared to TD patients. Methods 34 PD participants were divided into predominant PIGD (n=17) or TD (n=17) functional subtypes based on their presenting symptoms in their optimally treated motor state. All participants performed a speeded reaction task that quantified motor impulsivity and the proficiency of inhibiting prepotent motor impulses. Results The groups showed similar reaction times, but compared to TD patients, PIGD patients made significantly more impulsive motor errors. Notably, when the initial impulsive erroneous response was avoided, PIGD and TD groups were similar in their ability to suppress the incorrect motor impulse from further interfering with the selection of a correct action. Conclusions PD patients with PIGD predominant symptoms show greater susceptibility to acting on prepotent motor impulses compared to TD patients. This finding may have direct implications for fall risk and also points to dissociable neurocognitive pathologies in TD and PIGD subtypes. Clinically, the use of specific cognitive instruments to assess the expression and inhibition of motor impulses may help identify PD patients who have difficulty ‘thinking before they leap’ and are at high risk of falling. PMID:22917670

  7. So close yet so far: Motor anomalies impacting on social functioning in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Casartelli, Luca; Molteni, Massimo; Ronconi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Difficulties in the social domain and motor anomalies have been widely investigated in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, they have been generally considered as independent, and therefore tackled separately. Recent advances in neuroscience have hypothesized that the cortical motor system can play a role not only as a controller of elementary physical features of movement, but also in a complex domain as social cognition. Here, going beyond previous studies on ASD that described difficulties in the motor and in the social domain separately, we focus on the impact of motor mechanisms anomalies on social functioning. We consider behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging findings supporting the idea that motor cognition is a critical "intermediate phenotype" for ASD. Motor cognition anomalies in ASD affect the processes of extraction, codification and subsequent translation of "external" social information into the motor system. Intriguingly, this alternative "motor" approach to the social domain difficulties in ASD may be promising to bridge the gap between recent experimental findings and clinical practice, potentially leading to refined preventive approaches and successful treatments. PMID:26855233

  8. Determinants of Functional Disability in Huntington’s Disease: Role of Cognitive and Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Christopher A.; Pantelyat, Alex; Kogan, Jane; Brandt, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of Huntington’s disease is notable for a triad of motor, cognitive and emotional features. All HD patients eventually become occupationally disabled; however the factors that render HD patients unable to maintain employment have not been extensively studied. This review begins by discussing the clinical triad of HD, highlighting the distinction in the motor disorder between involuntary movements such as chorea, and voluntary movement impairment, with the latter contributing more to functional disability. Cognitive disorder clearly contributes to disability, though the relative contribution compared to motor is difficult to unravel, especially since many of the tests used to asses “cognition” have a strong motor component. The role of emotional changes in disability needs more study. The literature on contributions to functional disability, driving impairment and nursing home placement is reviewed. Relevant experience is presented from the longstanding JHU HD observational study on motor vs cognitive onset, and on cognitive and motor features at the time when individuals discontinued working. Finally, we briefly review government policies in several countries on disability determination. We interpret the data from our own studies and from the literature to indicate that there is usually a close relationship between cognitive and motor dysfunction, and that it is critical to take both into consideration in determining disability. PMID:25216368

  9. Functional Measurement of Respiratory Muscle Motor Behaviors Using Transdiaphragmatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Greising, Sarah M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm muscle must be able to generate sufficient forces to accomplish a range of ventilatory and non-ventilatory behaviors throughout life. Measurements of transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) can be conducted during eupnea, hypoxia (10 % O2)-hypercapnia (5 % CO2), chemical airway stimulation (i.e., sneezing), spontaneously occurring deep breaths (i.e., sighs), sustained airway or tracheal occlusion, and maximal efforts elicited via bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation, representing the full range of motor behaviors available by the diaphragm muscle. We provide detailed methods on the in vivo measurements of Pdi in mice. PMID:27492181

  10. IPLEX Administration Improves Motor Neuron Survival and Ameliorates Motor Functions in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Luchetti, Andrea; Saieva, Luciano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; de Leonibus, Elvira; Filareto, Antonio; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Novelli, Giuseppe; Musarò, Antonio; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder and the first genetic cause of death in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein that induce selective loss of α-motor neurons (MNs) in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive muscle atrophy and consequent respiratory failure. To date, no effective treatment is available to counteract the course of the disease. Among the different therapeutic strategies with potential clinical applications, the evaluation of trophic and/or protective agents able to antagonize MNs degeneration represents an attractive opportunity to develop valid therapies. Here we investigated the effects of IPLEX (recombinant human insulinlike growth factor 1 [rhIGF-1] complexed with recombinant human IGF-1 binding protein 3 [rhIGFBP-3]) on a severe mouse model of SMA. Interestingly, molecular and biochemical analyses of IGF-1 carried out in SMA mice before drug administration revealed marked reductions of IGF-1 circulating levels and hepatic mRNA expression. In this study, we found that perinatal administration of IPLEX, even if does not influence survival and body weight of mice, results in reduced degeneration of MNs, increased muscle fiber size and in amelioration of motor functions in SMA mice. Additionally, we show that phenotypic changes observed are not SMN-dependent, since no significant SMN modification was addressed in treated mice. Collectively, our data indicate IPLEX as a good therapeutic candidate to hinder the progression of the neurodegenerative process in SMA. PMID:22669476

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Handedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ashe, James; Hendrich, Kristy; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Merkle, Hellmut; Ugurbil, Kamil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    1993-07-01

    A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements in both right-handed (C/I mean area of activation = 36.8) and left-handed (C/I = 29.9) subjects, the left motor cortex was activated substantially during ipsilateral movements in left-handed subjects (C/I = 5.4) and even more so in right-handed subjects (C/I = 1.3).

  12. From Zebrafish to Mammal: Functional Evolution of Prestin, the Motor Protein of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Okoruwa, Oseremen E.; Zhang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells. It belongs to a distinct anion transporter family called solute carrier protein 26A, or SLC26A. Members of this family serve two fundamentally distinct functions. Although most members transport different anion substrates across a variety of epithelia, prestin (SLC26A5) is unique, functioning as a voltage-dependent motor protein. Recent evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are electrogenic divalent/chloride anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. These studies appear to suggest that prestin was evolved from an anion transporter. We examined the motor and transport functions of prestin and its orthologs from four different species in the vertebrate lineage, to gain insights of how these two physiological functions became distinct. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC), and transporter function were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells using voltage-clamp and anion uptake techniques. Zebrafish and chicken prestins both exhibited weak NLC, with peaks significantly shifted in the depolarization (right) direction. This was contrasted by robust NLC with peaks left shifted in the platypus and gerbil. The platypus and gerbil prestins retained little transporter function compared with robust anion transport capacities in the zebrafish and chicken orthologs. Somatic motility was detected only in the platypus and gerbil prestins. There appears to be an inverse relationship between NLC and anion transport functions, whereas motor function appears to have emerged only in mammalian prestin. Our results suggest that motor function is an innovation of therian prestin and is concurrent with diminished transporter capabilities. PMID:21047933

  13. From zebrafish to mammal: functional evolution of prestin, the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L; Tang, Jie; Okoruwa, Oseremen E; Zhang, Qian; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2011-01-01

    Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells. It belongs to a distinct anion transporter family called solute carrier protein 26A, or SLC26A. Members of this family serve two fundamentally distinct functions. Although most members transport different anion substrates across a variety of epithelia, prestin (SLC26A5) is unique, functioning as a voltage-dependent motor protein. Recent evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are electrogenic divalent/chloride anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. These studies appear to suggest that prestin was evolved from an anion transporter. We examined the motor and transport functions of prestin and its orthologs from four different species in the vertebrate lineage, to gain insights of how these two physiological functions became distinct. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC), and transporter function were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells using voltage-clamp and anion uptake techniques. Zebrafish and chicken prestins both exhibited weak NLC, with peaks significantly shifted in the depolarization (right) direction. This was contrasted by robust NLC with peaks left shifted in the platypus and gerbil. The platypus and gerbil prestins retained little transporter function compared with robust anion transport capacities in the zebrafish and chicken orthologs. Somatic motility was detected only in the platypus and gerbil prestins. There appears to be an inverse relationship between NLC and anion transport functions, whereas motor function appears to have emerged only in mammalian prestin. Our results suggest that motor function is an innovation of therian prestin and is concurrent with diminished transporter capabilities. PMID:21047933

  14. Functional Diversification of Motor Neuron-specific Isl1 Enhancers during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Park, Chungoo; Jeong, Yongsu; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2015-01-01

    Functional diversification of motor neurons has occurred in order to selectively control the movements of different body parts including head, trunk and limbs. Here we report that transcription of Isl1, a major gene necessary for motor neuron identity, is controlled by two enhancers, CREST1 (E1) and CREST2 (E2) that allow selective gene expression of Isl1 in motor neurons. Introduction of GFP reporters into the chick neural tube revealed that E1 is active in hindbrain motor neurons and spinal cord motor neurons, whereas E2 is active in the lateral motor column (LMC) of the spinal cord, which controls the limb muscles. Genome-wide ChIP-Seq analysis combined with reporter assays showed that Phox2 and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex bind to E1 and drive hindbrain and spinal cord-specific expression of Isl1, respectively. Interestingly, Lhx3 alone was sufficient to activate E1, and this may contribute to the initiation of Isl1 expression when progenitors have just developed into motor neurons. E2 was induced by onecut 1 (OC-1) factor that permits Isl1 expression in LMCm neurons. Interestingly, the core region of E1 has been conserved in evolution, even in the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate with primitive motor neurons. All E1 sequences from lamprey to mouse responded equally well to Phox2a and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex. Conversely, E2, the enhancer for limb-innervating motor neurons, was only found in tetrapod animals. This suggests that evolutionarily-conserved enhancers permit the diversification of motor neurons. PMID:26447474

  15. Functional Diversification of Motor Neuron-specific Isl1 Enhancers during Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Park, Chungoo; Jeong, Yongsu; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2015-10-01

    Functional diversification of motor neurons has occurred in order to selectively control the movements of different body parts including head, trunk and limbs. Here we report that transcription of Isl1, a major gene necessary for motor neuron identity, is controlled by two enhancers, CREST1 (E1) and CREST2 (E2) that allow selective gene expression of Isl1 in motor neurons. Introduction of GFP reporters into the chick neural tube revealed that E1 is active in hindbrain motor neurons and spinal cord motor neurons, whereas E2 is active in the lateral motor column (LMC) of the spinal cord, which controls the limb muscles. Genome-wide ChIP-Seq analysis combined with reporter assays showed that Phox2 and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex bind to E1 and drive hindbrain and spinal cord-specific expression of Isl1, respectively. Interestingly, Lhx3 alone was sufficient to activate E1, and this may contribute to the initiation of Isl1 expression when progenitors have just developed into motor neurons. E2 was induced by onecut 1 (OC-1) factor that permits Isl1 expression in LMCm neurons. Interestingly, the core region of E1 has been conserved in evolution, even in the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate with primitive motor neurons. All E1 sequences from lamprey to mouse responded equally well to Phox2a and the Isl1-Lhx3 complex. Conversely, E2, the enhancer for limb-innervating motor neurons, was only found in tetrapod animals. This suggests that evolutionarily-conserved enhancers permit the diversification of motor neurons. PMID:26447474

  16. What's New in Gallbladder Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for gallbladder cancer What’s new in gallbladder cancer research and treatment? Research into ... Chemotherapy and radiation therapy Researchers are looking at new ways of increasing the effectiveness of radiation therapy . ...

  17. The contributions of balance to gait capacity and motor function in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Young Dong; Yang, Byung Il; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Kang Sung; Kim, Eun Ja; Hwang, Byong Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the contributions of balance to gait and motor function in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three outpatients participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Gait ability was assessed using the functional ambulation category, self-paced 10-m walking speed, and fastest 10-m walking speed. Standing balance and trunk control measures included the Berg Balance Scale and the Trunk Impairment Scale. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. [Results] Balance was the best predictor of the FAC, self-paced walking speed, and fastest walking speed, accounting for 57% to 61% of the variances. Additionally, the total score of TIS was the only predictor of the motor function of the lower limbs and the dynamic balance of TIS was a predictor of the motor function of the upper limbs, accounting for 41% and 29% of the variance, respectively. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated the relative contribution of standing balance and trunk balance to gait ability and motor function. They show that balance has a high power of explanation of gait ability and that trunk balance is a determinant of motor function rather than gait ability. PMID:27390395

  18. The contributions of balance to gait capacity and motor function in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Young Dong; Yang, Byung Il; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Kang Sung; Kim, Eun Ja; Hwang, Byong Yong

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the contributions of balance to gait and motor function in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three outpatients participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Gait ability was assessed using the functional ambulation category, self-paced 10-m walking speed, and fastest 10-m walking speed. Standing balance and trunk control measures included the Berg Balance Scale and the Trunk Impairment Scale. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. [Results] Balance was the best predictor of the FAC, self-paced walking speed, and fastest walking speed, accounting for 57% to 61% of the variances. Additionally, the total score of TIS was the only predictor of the motor function of the lower limbs and the dynamic balance of TIS was a predictor of the motor function of the upper limbs, accounting for 41% and 29% of the variance, respectively. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated the relative contribution of standing balance and trunk balance to gait ability and motor function. They show that balance has a high power of explanation of gait ability and that trunk balance is a determinant of motor function rather than gait ability. PMID:27390395

  19. Cell proliferation in the human gallbladder epithelium: effect of distension.

    PubMed Central

    Putz, P; Willems, G

    1979-01-01

    DNA synthesis activity in the epithelium of the human gallbladder was studied through in vitro labelling of mucosal specimens with 3H-thymidine and autoradiography. The specimens were taken at the time of a surgical operation. Eight 'normal' gallbladders and six distended gallbladders from patients with carcinomatous obstruction of the common bile duct were examined. Proliferative activity was very low in the normal and significantly higher in the distended gallbladders. Images Figure PMID:437558

  20. Role of bacteria in carcinogenesis, with special reference to carcinoma of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Gopal; Gulati, Anil K; Shukla, Vijay K

    2010-01-01

    Carcinoma of the gallbladder (CaGB) is the fifth commonest gastrointestinal tract cancer and is endemic in several countries. The interplay of genetic susceptibility, infections, and life style factors has been proposed to be responsible for carcinogenesis of gallbladder. Persistence of infection leading to chronic inflammation, and production of certain toxins and metabolites with carcinogenic potentials, by certain bacteria has been speculated to be involved in the transformation of the gallbladder epithelium. Therefore, any bacteria that have evolved to acquire both of the above carcinogenic mechanisms can cause cancer. Salmonella typhi has been found to be prominently associated with CaGB. Chronic typhoid carriage (persistence) and production of mediators of chronic inflammation and a genotoxic toxin (cytotoxic distending toxin, CdtB) are also known for this bacterium. Furthermore, the natural concentrating function of the gallbladder might amplify the carcinogenic effect of the mediators of carcinogenesis. In addition to S. typhi, certain species of Helicobacter (H. bilis and H. hepaticus) and Escherichia coli have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. As the isolation rate is very poor with the presently available culture techniques, the existence of bacteria in a viable but non-cultivable state is quite likely; therefore, sensitive and specific molecular techniques might reveal the etiological role of bacterial infection in gallbladder carcinogenesis. If bacteria are found to be causing cancers, then eradication of such infections might help in reducing the incidence of some cancers. PMID:21086555

  1. Shifting Prevalence of Gallbladder Polyps in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated the population-adjusted prevalence of gallbladder polyps (GBP). This study aimed to evaluate the changes in GBP prevalence and risk factors at a single health screening center in Korea from 2002 to 2012. Of 48,591 adults who underwent health screening between 2002 and 2012, 14,250 age- and gender-matched subjects were randomly selected to evaluate prevalence. Risk factors were analyzed between the GBP-positive and GBP-negative groups during 2002-2004 (Period A) and 2010-2012 (Period B). The annual prevalence of GBP over the 11-yr period was 5.4%. Annual prevalence increased from 3.8% in Period A to 7.1% in Period B. Male gender and obesity were independent risk factors for GBP in both periods. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity was a risk factor for GBP in Period A but not in Period B. The risk factors for GBP changed from HBsAg positivity to lipid profile abnormalities. Other variables including age, hypertension, diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, chronic hepatitis C virus infection, and liver function tests did not correlate with GBP. In conclusion, GBP prevalence is increasing and risk factors for GBP have changed in Korea. More attention should be paid to this issue in the future. PMID:25246743

  2. Gallbladder carcinoma: Prognostic factors and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Thorsten Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of gallbladder carcinoma is poor, and the overall 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. In early-stage disease, a 5-year survival rate up to 75% can be achieved if stage-adjusted therapy is performed. There is wide geographic variability in the frequency of gallbladder carcinoma, which can only be explained by an interaction between genetic factors and their alteration. Gallstones and chronic cholecystitis are important risk factors in the formation of gallbladder malignancies. Factors such as chronic bacterial infection, primary sclerosing cholangitis, an anomalous junction of the pancreaticobiliary duct, and several types of gallbladder polyps are associated with a higher risk of gallbladder cancer. There is also an interesting correlation between risk factors and the histological type of cancer. However, despite theoretical risk factors, only a third of gallbladder carcinomas are recognized preoperatively. In most patients, the tumor is diagnosed by the pathologist after a routine cholecystectomy for a benign disease and is termed ‘‘incidental or occult gallbladder carcinoma’’ (IGBC). A cholecystectomy is performed frequently due to the minimal invasiveness of the laparoscopic technique. Therefore, the postoperative diagnosis of potentially curable early-stage disease is more frequent. A second radical re-resection to complete a radical cholecystectomy is required for several IGBCs. However, the literature and guidelines used in different countries differ regarding the radicality or T-stage criteria for performing a radical cholecystectomy. The NCCN guidelines and data from the German registry (GR), which records the largest number of incidental gallbladder carcinomas in Europe, indicate that carcinomas infiltrating the muscularis propria or beyond require radical surgery. According to GR data and current literature, a wedge resection with a combined dissection of the lymph nodes of the hepatoduodenal ligament is adequate for T1b and T2

  3. Alcohol hangover: type and time-extension of motor function impairments.

    PubMed

    Karadayian, Analía G; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-06-15

    Alcohol hangover is defined as the unpleasant next-day state following an evening of excessive alcohol consumption. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. During hangover cognitive functions and subjective capacities are affected along with inefficiency, reduced productivity, absenteeism, driving impairments, poor academic achievement and reductions in motor coordination. The aim of this work was to study the type and length of motor and exploratory functions from the beginning to the end of the alcohol hangover. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Motor performance, walking deficiency, motor strength, locomotion and exploratory activity were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2 h up to 20 h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Motor performance was 80% decreased at the onset of hangover (p<0.001). Hangover mice exhibited a reduced motor performance during the next 16 h (p<0.01). Motor function was recovered 20 h after hangover onset. Hangover mice displayed walking deficiencies from the beginning to 16 h after hangover onset (p<0.05). Moreover, mice suffering from a hangover, exhibited a significant decrease in neuromuscular strength during 16 h (p<0.001). Averaged speed and total distance traveled in the open field test and the exploratory activity on T-maze and hole board tests were reduced during 16 h after hangover onset (p<0.05). Our findings demonstrate a time-extension between 16 to 20 h for hangover motor and exploratory impairments. As a whole, this study shows the long lasting effects of alcohol hangover. PMID:23557691

  4. Epidemiology of Gallbladder Disease: Cholelithiasis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stinton, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of the gallbladder are common and costly. The best epidemiological screening method to accurately determine point prevalence of gallstone disease is ultrasonography. Many risk factors for cholesterol gallstone formation are not modifiable such as ethnic background, increasing age, female gender and family history or genetics. Conversely, the modifiable risks for cholesterol gallstones are obesity, rapid weight loss and a sedentary lifestyle. The rising epidemic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome predicts an escalation of cholesterol gallstone frequency. Risk factors for biliary sludge include pregnancy, drugs like ceftiaxone, octreotide and thiazide diuretics, and total parenteral nutrition or fasting. Diseases like cirrhosis, chronic hemolysis and ileal Crohn's disease are risk factors for black pigment stones. Gallstone disease in childhood, once considered rare, has become increasingly recognized with similar risk factors as those in adults, particularly obesity. Gallbladder cancer is uncommon in developed countries. In the U.S., it accounts for only ~ 5,000 cases per year. Elsewhere, high incidence rates occur in North and South American Indians. Other than ethnicity and female gender, additional risk factors for gallbladder cancer include cholelithiasis, advancing age, chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the gallbladder, congenital biliary abnormalities, and diagnostic confusion over gallbladder polyps. PMID:22570746

  5. [Diffuse thickening of the gallbladder wall. Clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A A; Orlova, Iu N

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the causes thickening of the gallbladder wall. It was shown that thickening of the wall of the gallbladder may be primary and secondary. Submitted by illustrations showing the thickening of the wall of the gall bladder in various diseases of the gallbladder. PMID:20623952

  6. Functional Analysis Identified Habit Reversal Components for the Treatment of Motor Tics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Harpole, Lauren Lestremau; Sterling, Heather E.; Perry, Erin J.; Burton, Britney; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This study included brief functional analyses and treatment for motor tics exhibited by two children with Tourette Syndrome. Brief functional analyses were conducted in an outpatient treatment center and results were used to develop individualized habit reversal procedures. Treatment data were collected in clinic for one child and in clinic and…

  7. Executive and Visuo-Motor Function in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachse, Michael; Schlitt, Sabine; Hainz, Daniela; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Schirman, Shella; Walter, Henrik; Poustka, Fritz; Bolte, Sven; Freitag, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    This study broadly examines executive (EF) and visuo-motor function in 30 adolescent and adult individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in comparison to 28 controls matched for age, gender, and IQ. ASD individuals showed impaired spatial working memory, whereas planning, cognitive flexibility, and inhibition were spared.…

  8. The Role of the Pediatric Cerebellum in Motor Functions, Cognition, and Behavior: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S; Tsai, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the pediatric cerebellum to locomotion, ocular motor control, speech articulation, cognitive function, and behavior modulation. Hypotheses on cerebellar function are discussed. Clinical features in patients with cerebellar disorders are outlined. Cerebellar abnormalities in cognitive and behavioral disorders are detailed. PMID:27423796

  9. Spontaneous gallbladder perforation in a child secondary to a gallbladder cyst: a rare presentation and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Badru, F; Litton, T; Puckett, Y; Bansal, S; Guzman, M; Vane, D; Villalona, G A

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous gallbladder perforation is rare in children. The etiology of gallbladder perforation varies greatly and is often unknown. Identified causes include infection, congenital, stones or choledochal cysts. Presently there are only five reported cases of spontaneous gallbladder perforation in children in the English literature. As such, the optimal method of diagnosis and management remains controversial. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl who presented with peritonitis secondary to spontaneous gallbladder perforation. PMID:27062138

  10. Structural and functional evaluation of cortical motor areas in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cosottini, Mirco; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Piazza, Selina; Diciotti, Stefano; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mascalchi, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    The structural and functional data gathered with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques about the brain cortical motor damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are controversial. In fact some structural MRI studies showed foci of gray matter (GM) atrophy in the precentral gyrus, even in the early stage, while others did not. Most functional MRI (fMRI) studies in ALS reported hyperactivation of extra-primary motor cortices, while contradictory results were obtained on the activation of the primary motor cortex. We aimed to investigate the cortical motor circuitries in ALS patients by a combined structural and functional approach. Twenty patients with definite ALS and 16 healthy subjects underwent a structural examination with acquisition of a 3D T1-weighted sequence and fMRI examination during a maximal force handgrip task executed with the right-hand, the left-hand and with both hands simultaneously. The T1-weighted images were analyzed with Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) that showed several clusters of reduced cortical GM in ALS patients compared to controls including the pre and postcentral gyri, the superior, middle and inferior frontal gyri, the supplementary motor area, the superior and inferior parietal cortices and the temporal lobe, bilaterally but more extensive on the right side. In ALS patients a significant hypoactivation of the primary sensory motor cortex and frontal dorsal premotor areas as compared to controls was observed. The hypoactivated areas matched with foci of cortical atrophy demonstrated by VBM. The fMRI analysis also showed an enhanced activation in the ventral premotor frontal areas and in the parietal cortex pertaining to the fronto-parietal motor circuit which paralleled with disease progression rate and matched with cortical regions of atrophy. The hyperactivation of the fronto-parietal circuit was asymmetric and prevalent in the left hemisphere. VBM and fMRI identified structural and functional markers of an extended

  11. Motor imagery ability in children with congenital hemiplegia: effect of lesion side and functional level.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline; Reid, Susan M; Reddihough, Dinah S; Anderson, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    In addition to motor execution problems, children with hemiplegia have motor planning deficits, which may stem from poor motor imagery ability. This study aimed to provide a greater understanding of motor imagery ability in children with hemiplegia using the hand rotation task. Three groups of children, aged 8-12 years, participated: right hemiplegia (R-HEMI; N=21), left hemiplegia (L-HEMI; N=19) and comparisons (N=21). All groups conformed to biomechanical limitations of the task, supporting the use of motor imagery, and all showed the expected response-time trade-off for angle. The general slowing of responses in the HEMI groups did not reach significance compared to their peers. The L-HEMI group were less accurate than the comparison group while the R-HEMI group were more variable in their performance. These results appeared to be linked to functional level. Using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Composite, children were classified as low or normal functioning - of the seven classified as low function, six were in the L-HEMI group. Accuracy was lower in the low function subgroup, but this failed to reach significance with an adjusted critical value. However, there was a strong correlation between function level and mean accuracy. This indicates that motor imagery performance may be more closely linked to function level than to the neural hemisphere that has been damaged in cases of congenital hemiplegia. Function level may be linked to the site or extent of neural damage or the level of cortical reorganisation experienced and more attention should be paid to neural factors in future research. PMID:21131176

  12. Stimulus electrodiagnosis and motor and functional evaluations during ulnar nerve recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luciane F. R. M.; Oliveira, Nuno M. L.; Pelet, Danyelle C. S.; Cunha, Agnes F. S.; Grecco, Marco A. S.; Souza, Luciane A. P. S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distal ulnar nerve injury leads to impairment of hand function due to motor and sensorial changes. Stimulus electrodiagnosis (SE) is a method of assessing and monitoring the development of this type of injury. OBJECTIVE: To identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic parameters to evaluate ulnar nerve recovery and to correlate these parameters (Rheobase, Chronaxie, and Accommodation) with motor function evaluations. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of ten patients submitted to ulnar neurorrhaphy and evaluated using electrodiagnosis and motor assessment at two moments of neural recovery. A functional evaluation using the DASH questionnaire (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) was conducted at the end to establish the functional status of the upper limb. RESULTS: There was significant reduction only in the Chronaxie values in relation to time of injury and side (with and without lesion), as well as significant correlation of Chronaxie with the motor domain score. CONCLUSION: Chronaxie was the most sensitive SE parameter for detecting differences in neuromuscular responses during the ulnar nerve recovery process and it was the only parameter correlated with the motor assessment. PMID:26786072

  13. Disruption of functional organization within the primary motor cortex in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Mary Beth; Joel, Suresh E; Muschelli, John; Barber, Anita D; Caffo, Brian S; Pekar, James J; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that motor impairments are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), relate to the social and communicative deficits at the core of the diagnosis and may reflect abnormal connectivity within brain networks underlying motor control and learning. Parcellation of resting-state functional connectivity data using spectral clustering approaches has been shown to be an effective means of visualizing functional organization within the brain but has most commonly been applied to explorations of normal brain function. This article presents a parcellation of a key area of the motor network, the primary motor cortex (M1), a key area of the motor control network, in adults, typically developing (TD) children and children with ASD and introduces methods for selecting the number of parcels, matching parcels across groups and testing group differences. The parcellation is based solely on patterns of connectivity between individual M1 voxels and all voxels outside of M1, and within all groups, a gross dorsomedial to ventrolateral organization emerged within M1 which was left-right symmetric. Although this gross organizational scheme was present in both groups of children, statistically significant group differences in the size and segregation of M1 parcels within regions of the motor homunculus corresponding to the upper and lower limbs were observed. Qualitative comparison of the M1 parcellation for children with ASD with that of younger and older TD children suggests that these organizational differences, with a lack of differentiation between lower limb/trunk regions and upper limb/hand regions, may be due, at least in part, to a delay in functional specialization within the motor cortex. PMID:23118015

  14. Personal experience with narrated events modulates functional connectivity within visual and motor systems during story comprehension.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ho Ming; Mar, Raymond A; Xu, Yisheng; Liu, Siyuan; Wagage, Suraji; Braun, Allen R

    2015-04-01

    Past experience of everyday life activities, which forms the basis of our knowledge about the world, greatly affects how we understand stories. Yet, little is known about how this influence is instantiated in the human brain. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how past experience facilitates functional connectivity during the comprehension of stories rich in perceptual and motor details. We found that comprehenders' past experience with the scenes and actions described in the narratives selectively modulated functional connectivity between lower- and higher-level areas within the neural systems for visual and motor processing, respectively. These intramodal interactions may play an important role in integrating personal knowledge about a narrated situation with an evolving discourse representation. This study provides empirical evidence consistent with the idea that regions related to visual and motor processing are involved in the reenactment of experience as proposed by theories of embodied cognition. PMID:25545633

  15. Differences in somatosensory and motor improvement during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Knorr, Christin; Preul, Christoph; Meissner, Winfried; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Temporary functional deafferentation is of interest to become an additional tool in neurorehabilitative treatments. Temporary functional deafferentation is known to improve sensory and motor outcomes in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. The present study soughts to indicate differences in the efficiency of pharmacologically induced temporary functional deafferentation between chronic stroke patients and matched healthy subjects. 46 chronic stroke patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were deafferented on one forearm by an anesthetic cream. Somatosensory performance was assessed using von-Frey Hair testing and Grating orientation task; motor performance was assessed by means of a shape-sorter-drum task. Grating orientation task and shape-sorter-drum task were significantly improved during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Von-Frey Hair testing revealed no improvement of absolute tactile thresholds during temporary functional deafferentation in both groups. Furthermore, the stroke patients showed deficits at baseline measurement in all assessments except the von-Frey Hair test. Temporary functional deafferentation of a forearm by an anesthetic cream results in improvements of motor performance and somatosensory discrimination in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is reasonable to test in a next step whether temporary functional deafferentation might become an additional tool in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients. PMID:23735321

  16. Metastatic gallbladder adenosquamous carcinoma to the skin†

    PubMed Central

    Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Santana, André; Dias, André Roncon

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis (CM) is an uncommon manifestation of visceral malignancies. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the gallbladder is a rare variation in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), associated with worse prognosis. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with an inflamed lump on her abdominal wall. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large mass from the gallbladder invading the abdominal wall. She underwent liver resection with regional lymphadenectomy. Pathology analysis revealed a 12-cm pT3N0 GBC. Hospital discharge occurred at post-operative Day 20. She recurred and died 10 months after surgery. Survival after the diagnosis of CM is dismal. The present case was a diagnostic trap. First, the patient's skin lesion presented as a cutaneous abscess and biopsy revealed a squamous cell cancer. A CT scan suggested a continuous mass involving the abdominal wall. CM was only suspected during surgery when no continuity between the tumour and the abdominal wall was identified. PMID:25480835

  17. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  18. Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin Sisters

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed “gallbladder agenesis.” Moreover, her older identical twin sister had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality. PMID:26925274

  19. Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin Sisters.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed "gallbladder agenesis." Moreover, her older identical twin sister had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality. PMID:26925274

  20. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease dissociates mood and motor circuits: a functional MRI case study.

    PubMed

    Stefurak, Taresa; Mikulis, David; Mayberg, Helen; Lang, Anthony E; Hevenor, Stephanie; Pahapill, Peter; Saint-Cyr, Jean; Lozano, Andres

    2003-12-01

    Behavioral disturbances have been reported with subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD). We report correlative functional imaging (fMRI) of mood and motor responses induced by successive right and left DBS. A 36-year-old woman with medically refractory PD and a history of clinically remitted depression underwent uncomplicated implantation of bilateral STN DBS. High-frequency stimulation of the left electrode improved motor symptoms. Unexpectedly, right DBS alone elicited several reproducible episodes of acute depressive dysphoria. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) imaging was carried out with sequential individual electrode stimulation. The electrode on the left was within the inferior STN, whereas the right electrode was marginally superior and lateral to the intended STN target within the Fields of Forel/zona incerta. fMRI image analysis (Analysis of Functional NeuroImages, AFNI) contrasting OFF versus ON stimulation identified significant lateralized blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes with DBS (P < 0.001). Left DBS primarily showed changes in motor regions: increases in premotor and motor cortex, ventrolateral thalamus, putamen, and cerebellum as well as decreases in sensorimotor/supplementary motor cortex. Right DBS showed similar but less extensive change in motor regions. More prominent were the unique increases in superior prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate (Brodmann's area [BA] 24), anterior thalamus, caudate, and brainstem, and marked widespread decreases in medial prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10). The mood disturbance resolved spontaneously in 4 weeks despite identical stimulation parameters. Transient depressive mood induced by subcortical DBS stimulation was correlated with changes in mesolimbic cortical structures. This case provides new evidence supporting cortical segregation of motor and nonmotor cortico-basal ganglionic systems that may converge in close proximity

  1. Septate gallbladder in the laparoscopic era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nitin R; Joshipura, Vismit P; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P; Soni, Harshad N

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy facing a surgeon during cholecystectomy is challenging as it involves complex relationship between the gallbladder, hepatic artery and extra-hepatic billiary tree. We report a case of septate gall bladder which was successfully treated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In this paper, we also discuss the embryology and characteristics of this rare anomaly. Lack of awareness, non-specific symptoms, signs and inadequacy of imaging methods are possible reasons for the reported problem of overlooking of this entity. Complete identification and removal of gallbladder is mandatory, as a remnant may result in recurrence of symptoms or stones. PMID:19547674

  2. Effects of motor vehicle exhaust on male reproductive function and associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is consistently associated with various diseases and subsequent death among children, adult, and elderly people worldwide. Motor vehicle exhaust contributes to a large proportion of the air pollution present. The motor vehicle exhaust systems emit a variety of toxic components, including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, ozone, particulate matter, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Several epidemiological studies and laboratory studies have demonstrated that these components are potentially mutagenic, carcinogenic, and endocrine disrupting agents. However, their impact on male reproductive function and associated proteins is not very clear. Therefore, a comprehensive review on the effects of motor vehicle exhaust on male reproductive function and associated proteins is needed to better understand the risks of exhaust exposure for men. We found that motor vehicle exhaust can cause harmful effects on male reproductive functions by altering organ weights, reducing the spermatozoa qualities, and inducing oxidative stress. Remarkably, motor vehicle exhaust exposure causes significant changes in the expression patterns of proteins that are key components involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis. In conclusion, this review helps to describe the risks of vehicle exhaust exposure and its relationship to potential adverse effects on the male reproduction system. PMID:25329744

  3. Where did the motor function of the cerebellum come from?

    PubMed

    Coco, Marinella; Perciavalle, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Until the end of 18th century, the role of the cerebellum remained obscure. The turning point occurred when Luigi Galvani showed that muscle contraction is due to electricity and Alessandro Volta produced the battery, an apparatus based on the pairing of silver and zinc plates separated by brine soaked paper disks, capable to generate electricity. Luigi Rolando, at beginning of 19th century, was impressed by these two observations. He thought that, since the brain generates the movement, it must contain a device generating electricity. As a battery, it should be formed by overlapping disks and the cerebellum for Rolando seemed to be the right structure for such a characteristic laminar organization. He argued that, if the cerebellum is the battery that produces electricity for muscle activity, its removal would produce paralysis. Consequently, Rolando removed the cerebellum in a young goat and observed that the animal, before dying, could no longer stand up. He concluded that the cerebellum is a motor structure as it generates the electricity which produces the movement. The conclusions of Rolando were criticized by Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens who observed that animals undergoing cerebellectomy were still able to move, even if with problems of balance. Flourens concluded that the role of the cerebellum "is to put in order or to coordinate movements wanted by certain parts of the nervous system, excited by others". It was necessary to wait up to 1891 when Luigi Luciani, observing a dog survived the cerebellectomy, described a triad of symptoms (asthenia, atony and astasis), unquestionably of cerebellar origin. PMID:26331053

  4. Mental representation and mental practice: experimental investigation on the functional links between motor memory and motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Frank, Cornelia; Land, William M; Popp, Carmen; Schack, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on mental representation of complex action has revealed distinct differences in the structure of representational frameworks between experts and novices. More recently, research on the development of mental representation structure has elicited functional changes in novices' representations as a result of practice. However, research investigating if and how mental practice adds to this adaptation process is lacking. In the present study, we examined the influence of mental practice (i.e., motor imagery rehearsal) on both putting performance and the development of one's representation of the golf putt during early skill acquisition. Novice golfers (N = 52) practiced the task of golf putting under one of four different practice conditions: mental, physical, mental-physical combined, and no practice. Participants were tested prior to and after a practice phase, as well as after a three day retention interval. Mental representation structures of the putt were measured, using the structural dimensional analysis of mental representation. This method provides psychometric data on the distances and groupings of basic action concepts in long-term memory. Additionally, putting accuracy and putting consistency were measured using two-dimensional error scores of each putt. Findings revealed significant performance improvements over the course of practice together with functional adaptations in mental representation structure. Interestingly, after three days of practice, the mental representations of participants who incorporated mental practice into their practice regime displayed representation structures that were more similar to a functional structure than did participants who did not incorporate mental practice. The findings of the present study suggest that mental practice promotes the cognitive adaptation process during motor learning, leading to more elaborate representations than physical practice only. PMID:24743576

  5. Mental Representation and Mental Practice: Experimental Investigation on the Functional Links between Motor Memory and Motor Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Cornelia; Land, William M.; Popp, Carmen; Schack, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on mental representation of complex action has revealed distinct differences in the structure of representational frameworks between experts and novices. More recently, research on the development of mental representation structure has elicited functional changes in novices' representations as a result of practice. However, research investigating if and how mental practice adds to this adaptation process is lacking. In the present study, we examined the influence of mental practice (i.e., motor imagery rehearsal) on both putting performance and the development of one's representation of the golf putt during early skill acquisition. Novice golfers (N = 52) practiced the task of golf putting under one of four different practice conditions: mental, physical, mental-physical combined, and no practice. Participants were tested prior to and after a practice phase, as well as after a three day retention interval. Mental representation structures of the putt were measured, using the structural dimensional analysis of mental representation. This method provides psychometric data on the distances and groupings of basic action concepts in long-term memory. Additionally, putting accuracy and putting consistency were measured using two-dimensional error scores of each putt. Findings revealed significant performance improvements over the course of practice together with functional adaptations in mental representation structure. Interestingly, after three days of practice, the mental representations of participants who incorporated mental practice into their practice regime displayed representation structures that were more similar to a functional structure than did participants who did not incorporate mental practice. The findings of the present study suggest that mental practice promotes the cognitive adaptation process during motor learning, leading to more elaborate representations than physical practice only. PMID:24743576

  6. The relation between measures of cognitive and motor functioning in 5- to 6-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Tino; Hughes, Charmayne M L

    2016-07-01

    Specific relations between executive functions (working memory capacity, planning and problem-solving, inhibitory control) and motor skill performance (anticipatory motor planning, manual dexterity) were examined in 5- to 6-year-old children (N = 40). Results showed that the two motor skill components were not correlated. Additionally, it was found that response planning performance was a significant predictor of anticipatory motor planning performance, whereas inhibitory control and working memory capacity measures were significant predictors of manual dexterity scores. Taken together, these results suggest that cognitive and motor skills are linked, but that manual dexterity and anticipatory motor planning involve different specialized skills. The current study provides support for specific relations between cognitive and motor performance, which has implications for early childhood cognitive-motor training and intervention programs. PMID:25820330

  7. Tumor-host interactions in the gallbladder suppress distal angiogenesis and tumor growth: involvement of transforming growth factor beta1.

    PubMed

    Gohongi, T; Fukumura, D; Boucher, Y; Yun, C O; Soff, G A; Compton, C; Todoroki, T; Jain, R K

    1999-10-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors produced by a primary tumor can create a systemic anti-angiogenic environment and maintain metastatic tumor cells in a state of dormancy. We show here that the gallbladder microenvironment modulates the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, a multifunctional cytokine that functions as an endogenous anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor in a cranial window preparation. We found that a wide variety of human gallbladder tumors express TGF-beta1 irrespective of histologic type. We implanted a gel impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor or Mz-ChA-2 tumor in the cranial windows of mice without tumors or mice with subcutaneous or gallbladder tumors to study angiogenesis and tumor growth at a secondary site. Angiogenesis, leukocyte-endothelial interaction in vessels and tumor growth in the cranial window were substantially inhibited in mice with gallbladder tumors. The concentration of TGF-beta1 in the plasma of mice with gallbladder tumors was 300% higher than that in the plasma of mice without tumors or with subcutaneous tumors. In contrast, there was no difference in the plasma levels of other anti- and pro-angiogenic factors. Treatment with neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1 reversed both angiogenesis suppression and inhibition of leukocyte rolling induced by gallbladder tumors. TGF-beta1 also inhibited Mz-ChA-2 tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the production of anti-angiogenesis/proliferation factors is regulated by tumor-host interactions. PMID:10502827

  8. Oleanolic acid induces mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest in gallbladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huai-Feng; Wang, Xu-An; Xiang, Shan-Shan; Hu, Yun-Ping; Jiang, Lin; Shu, Yi-Jun; Li, Mao-Lan; Wu, Xiang-Song; Zhang, Fei; Ye, Yuan-Yuan; Weng, Hao; Bao, Run-Fa; Cao, Yang; Lu, Wei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA), a naturally occurring triterpenoid, exhibits potential antitumor activity in many tumor cell lines. Gallbladder carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, and is a highly aggressive tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. Unfortunately, the effects of OA on gallbladder carcinoma are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of OA on gallbladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. The results showed that OA inhibits proliferation of gallbladder cancer cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner on MTT and colony formation assay. A flow cytometry assay revealed apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest in GBC-SD and NOZ cells. Western blot analysis and a mitochondrial membrane potential assay demonstrated that OA functions through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Moreover, this drug inhibited tumor growth in nude mice carrying subcutaneous NOZ tumor xenografts. These data suggest that OA inhibits proliferation of gallbladder cancer cells by regulating apoptosis and the cell cycle process. Thus, OA may be a promising drug for adjuvant chemotherapy in gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26109845

  9. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    PubMed

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (<2cm). HFI possesses uniform inertial and force transmission properties across the workspace, and has low friction (.05-.30N). HFI's RF noise levels, in addition, are within a 3 Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration. PMID:24110643

  10. Combining Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Gray Matter Volumetry to Investigate Motor Functioning in Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Yang, Ya-ru; Li, Hui-jun; Lu, Xue-song; Shi, Yong-mei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Hua-jun; Teng, Gao-jun; Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairment after stroke is related to the integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST). However, considerable variability in motor impairment remains unexplained. To increase the accuracy in evaluating long-term motor function after ischemic stroke, we tested the hypothesis that combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and gray matter (GM) volumetry can better characterize long-term motor deficit than either method alone in patients with chronic stroke. We recruited 31 patients whose Medical Research Council strength grade was ≤ 3/5 in the extensor muscles of the affected upper extremity in the acute phase. We used the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer (UE-FM) assessment to evaluate motor impairment, and as the primary outcome variable. We computed the fractional anisotropy ratio of the entire CST (CSTratio) and the volume of interest ratio (VOIratio), between ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres, to explain long-term motor impairment. The results showed that CSTratio, VOIratio of motor-related brain regions, and VOIratio in the temporal lobe were correlated with UE-FM. A multiple regression model including CSTratio and VOIratio of the caudate nucleus explained 40.7% of the variability in UE-FM. The adjusted R2 of the regression model with CSTratio as an independent variable was 29.4%, and that of using VOIratio of the caudate nucleus as an independent variable was 23.1%. These results suggest that combining DTI and GM volumetry may achieve better explanation of long-term motor deficit in stroke patients, than using either measure individually. This finding may provide guidance in determining optimal neurorehabilitative interventions. PMID:25965398