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Sample records for galter health sciences

  1. Case study: the Health SmartLibrary* experiences in web personalization and customization at the Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, James; Frisque, Michelle; Hunt, Steve; Walton, Linda; Handler, Jonathan; Gillam, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Question: How can the user's access to health information, especially full-text articles, be improved? The solution is building and evaluating the Health SmartLibrary (HSL). Setting: The setting is the Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Method: The HSL was built on web-based personalization and customization tools: My E-Resources, Stay Current, Quick Search, and File Cabinet. Personalization and customization data were tracked to show user activity with these value-added, online services. Main Results: Registration data indicated that users were receptive to personalized resource selection and that the automated application of specialty-based, personalized HSLs was more frequently adopted than manual customization by users. Those who did customize customized My E-Resources and Stay Current more often than Quick Search and File Cabinet. Most of those who customized did so only once. Conclusion: Users did not always take advantage of the services designed to aid their library research experiences. When personalization is available at registration, users readily accepted it. Customization tools were used less frequently; however, more research is needed to determine why this was the case. PMID:20428276

  2. Environmental Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Alan; Smith, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes an environmental health science technology curriculum designed to provide technicians in the areas of air, water and wastewater analyses, treatment plant operators, public health enforcement officers, and pollution inspectors. (GS)

  3. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  4. Physics of Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  5. Standards for Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, E. Ray

    1982-01-01

    Discusses service standards (level of excellence or adequacy in performance of library service) and their incorporation in the accreditation process for hospital library service and academic health sciences libraries. The certification program developed for health sciences librarians by the Medical Library Association is reviewed. Fifty-nine…

  6. Education for Health Sciences Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is provided of education for health sciences librarianship by considering its development, current status, and possible future evolution. Discusses the role of the professional association in providing a credentialing program for its members. Resources for the study of health sciences librarianship are appended. Contains 50 references.…

  7. Health Science. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The central theme of this book is that each person is responsible for his or her own physical well-being. It offers factual knowledge of which forms of behavior are beneficial and why and emphasizes the need for positive motivation toward healthful living. The major categories covered in 24 chapters are: (1) emotional and neurological health; (2)…

  8. High School Health Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This curriculum guide contains units of study for high school health science courses in Iowa. The first section is a competency outline for three topics: introduction to health care; nurse aide/orderly; and rehabilitation aide. For each competency, the following information is provided: objectives; suggested learning activities; resources; and…

  9. USGS Science Serves Public Health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.

    2010-01-01

    Human health so often depends on the health of the environment and wildlife around us. The presence of naturally occurring or human environmental contaminants and the emergence of diseases transferred between animals and humans are growing concerns worldwide. The USGS is a source of natural science information vital for understanding the quantity and quality of our earth and living resources. This information improves our understanding not only of how human activities affect environmental and ecological health, but also of how the quality of our environment and wildlife in turn affects human health. USGS is taking a leadership role in providing the natural science information needed by health researchers, policy makers, and the public to safeguard public health

  10. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  11. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertise a Job Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information Whether you're a high school student ... this rewarding, challenging profession. What is a health sciences or medical librarian? What do they do? Health ...

  12. Physics With Health Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urone, Paul Peter

    1985-09-01

    An accessible, algebra-based text covering the introductory physics necessary for applied health and nursing. Presentation integrates health science applications throughout. Excellent illustrations support the exposition. Chapters contain over 100 worked examples, over 450 review questions, and more than 550 end-of-chapter problems graded according to difficulty. Offers discussion of the latest applications such as ionizing radiation and radiation doses, nuclear imaging techniques, CT scanners, ultrasound techniques, artificial hearts, and laser surgery.

  13. TELEVISION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRANT, THEO. S.; MERRILL, IRVING R.

    A MAJOR MEDICAL CENTER CONDUCTED A SERIES OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES CONCERNED WITH THE USE OF CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION INSTRUCTION IN THE CURRICULUMS OF MEDICINE, DENTISTRY, PHARMACY, AND NURSING. THE SIX STUDIES REPORTED WERE (1) OVER 300 HEALTH SCIENCE TELEVISION PRESENTATIONS WERE PRODUCED, PRESENTED TO STUDENTS, AND EVALUATED. REPORTS WERE MADE…

  14. Marketing the Health Sciences Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, O. Gene

    The basic activities of marketing are discussed, including gathering information and determining needs, designing a program around the elements of the marketing mix, and managing the marketing program. Following a general discussion, applications of the marketing concepts to a health sciences library are described. The administrator of the health…

  15. Health Sciences: A Dissertation Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This expanded listing includes many of the dissertations and Masters theses previously listed in the catalog, doctoral dissertations in the Health and Behavioral Sciences. The psychology titles have been placed in a separate publication. Titles in this catalog are listed alphabetically by author under 35 key subject headings. Doctoral…

  16. Women's Health and Complexity Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Explores how changes in conceptual frameworks in science, from reductionism to complexity; an outgrowth of the chaos theory that views parts in relation to one another, the entity they form, and the environment, must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. (SLD)

  17. Health sciences librarians and mental health laws.

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, F R

    1978-01-01

    Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, O'Connor v. Donaldson and Bounds v. Smith, hold important implications for health sciences librarians serving in mental health facilities. The first, O'Connor, with its many ancillary holdings, puts mental health personnel on notice that patients have certain basic rights, which courts all over the country will now be required to enforce. In Bounds the court has ruled that prison authorities must assist prison inmates in preparing and filing legal papers. The ruling will most likely benefit all mentally disabled prisoners, and future litigation may expand this category to include: (1) persons committed under the criminal code, (2) persons under involuntary commitment not related to the criminal code, and (3) persons voluntarily committed. A selective annotated bibliography, consisting of background readings in mental health and the law, basic rights, law library materials, and mental health legal services, has been compiled to help librarians establish and develop legal collections in anticipation of court decisions that will expand the conditions of Bounds to include all mentally disabled patients. PMID:361117

  18. Environmental health discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in environmental health. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; animal and human subjects; and research and development. This document summarizes the history and current status of the program elements, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies scientific priorities, and defines critical questions in the three disciplines: (1) Barophysiology, (2) Toxicology, and (3) Microbiology. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Officers and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational research and development activities, both intramural and extramural, in this area. The document is divided into sections addressing these three disciplines.

  19. Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Elizabeth; Renauld, Mia; Edelstein, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social science research has been central in documenting and analyzing community discovery of environmental exposure and consequential processes. Collaboration with environmental health science through team projects has advanced and improved our understanding of environmental health and justice. Objective We sought to identify diverse methods and topics in which social scientists have expanded environmental health understandings at multiple levels, to examine how transdisciplinary environmental health research fosters better science, and to learn how these partnerships have been able to flourish because of the support from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Methods We analyzed various types of social science research to investigate how social science contributes to environmental health. We also examined NIEHS programs that foster social science. In addition, we developed a case study of a community-based participation research project in Akwesasne in order to demonstrate how social science has enhanced environmental health science. Results Social science has informed environmental health science through ethnographic studies of contaminated communities, analysis of spatial distribution of environmental injustice, psychological experience of contamination, social construction of risk and risk perception, and social impacts of disasters. Social science–environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. Conclusions A transdisciplinary approach for environmental health practice has emerged that engages the social sciences to paint a full picture of the consequences of contamination so that policy makers, regulators, public health officials, and other stakeholders can better ameliorate impacts and prevent future exposure. Citation Hoover E, Renauld M, Edelstein MR, Brown P. 2015. Social

  20. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Question: What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? Data Sources: The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. Study Selection: All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. Data Extraction: A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. Main Results: The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. Conclusion: The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored. PMID:12398244

  1. The Educational Role of Health Sciences Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Jocelyn A.; Sayre, Jean Williams

    1993-01-01

    Considers the expanding educational role of health sciences librarians in both academic centers and in hospitals resulting from influences of new educational models and new technology. Topics addressed include undergraduate health sciences education; continuing education; new technology and medical informatics; library educational programs;…

  2. Systems Science Methods in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Douglas A.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems abound in public health. Complex systems are made up of heterogeneous elements that interact with one another, have emergent properties that are not explained by understanding the individual elements of the system, persist over time and adapt to changing circumstances. Public health is starting to use results from systems science studies to shape practice and policy, for example in preparing for global pandemics. However, systems science study designs and analytic methods remain underutilized and are not widely featured in public health curricula or training. In this review we present an argument for the utility of systems science methods in public health, introduce three important systems science methods (system dynamics, network analysis, and agent-based modeling), and provide three case studies where these methods have been used to answer important public health science questions in the areas of infectious disease, tobacco control, and obesity. PMID:22224885

  3. Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Toby L; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students' spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students' spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students' success. PMID:25404167

  4. Political Science Theory for Public Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Community health educators are well versed in the behavior sciences, including intervention theories. However, most public health professionals are not familiar with the policy theories related to political advocacy. Because health educators are engaging in policy advocacy more frequently, and as a result of the profession including policy…

  5. Health Science and the Young Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Marion B.; Oberteuffer, Delbert

    This book provides material to design and carry out a health science program at the elementary level with outcomes which are clearly defined and measurably effective. Chapter one describes health problems that justify the school health program. In chapters two and three the processes of curriculum and the sources of data that are basic to…

  6. On the Health of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Harold G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the present status of science as an industrialized-affluent culture resting upon a public woefully lacking in scientific background and scientists with activities taken in by nihilism. Suggests all scientists actively work together through teaching, talk, and behavior to counter the forces of anti-science and nihilism. (CC)

  7. Managing Health and Safety in Science Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Discusses strategies for managing health and safety within science departments. Emphasizes the importance of risk assessment for both pupil activities and those carried out by technicians. Stresses the role of training and the need for security. (MM)

  8. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries. Images PMID:10550027

  9. Managing Health and Safety in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Since science in primary schools is very safe, the coordinator's role in respect of health and safety can be a relatively modest one and integrated with other parts of the job. In this article, the author outlines the role of the science coordinator and sources of advice.

  10. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  11. Remote Users of Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Phyllis C.; Wright, Barbara A.; Waugh, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the variety of innovations in service models implemented over the last 25 years that health-sciences librarians have initiated to extend library services and information to remote users. Trends in health-care-management systems, education initiatives, the rise in consumerism, and expectations of new categories of users are discussed.…

  12. Health Hazards in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenk, Barbara Scherr

    Designed for high school science teachers, the document warns of potential health threats of performing certain experiments and using certain chemicals or chemical combinations in their courses. Following a rationale for more carefully considering health dangers, the document gives suggestions on what can be done by teachers. Reports such as a…

  13. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  14. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  15. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  16. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  17. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  18. Health, Wellbeing and Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Giovanni; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    For social interventions aimed at improving nutrition behavior evidence from randomized trials is essential but cannot be the only approach of research activities. Interventions on dietary habits require considerations on food security, economic and environmental sustainability, and a broad meaning of wellbeing which includes, but also goes beyond, health effects. The model of research in nutrition requires a new consideration of observational studies, mainly through different analytical models. Nutrition and food studies need research programs where medical (nutrition and health), psychology (how we behave), economics (how resources are used and their impact on wellbeing) and sociology (how social determinant shape behavior) collaborate. PMID:25785783

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Basic Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathey, Barbara; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in a set of nine learning modules designed to instruct nursing and allied health students in a variety of biological topics. The first module, by Barbara Cathey, discusses cell growth and the proliferation of cells in benign and malignant tumors. The second module, by Eugene Volz, describes the…

  20. Integrating oral health into the interdisciplinary health sciences curriculum.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C; Aghazadeh-Sanai, Nona; Mohammed, Shan; Fulmer, Terry T

    2014-10-01

    Oral health inequities for older adults warrant new models of interprofessional education and collaborative practice. The Innovations in Interprofessional Oral Health: Technology, Instruction, Practice and Service curricular model at Bouvé College of Health Sciences aims to transform health professions education and primary care practice to meet global and local oral health challenges. Innovations in simulation and experiential learning help to advance interprofessional education and integrate oral health care as an essential component of comprehensive primary health care. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly clinic is an exemplary model of patient-centeredness and interprofessional collaborative practice for addressing unmet oral health needs of its patient population. PMID:25201545

  1. Instructional multimedia computing in the health sciences.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P

    1992-01-01

    This article focuses on the development and utilization of interactive videodisc (IVD) and multimedia instruction in the health sciences. The characteristics of IVD and multimedia are outlined and the four levels of IVD systems that can be used in health science education are described. The advantages of utilization of videodisc or multimedia materials are presented, as well as instructional approaches. Potential applications such as simulations, tutorials, role-modeling, and drill-and-practice are described. Research findings, levels of curricular integration, instructional delivery, and courseware networking are also described. The article concludes with suggestions for institutional development of IVD materials or the incorporation of off-the-shelf programs into health science curricula. PMID:1400275

  2. Comparison of health risk behavior, awareness, and health benefit beliefs of health science and non-health science students: An international study.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa; Yung, Tony K C; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Rehman, Rehana

    2016-06-01

    This study determines the differences in health risk behavior, knowledge, and health benefit beliefs between health science and non-health science university students in 17 low and middle income countries. Anonymous questionnaire data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of 13,042 undergraduate university students (4,981 health science and 8,061 non-health science students) from 17 universities in 17 countries across Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Results indicate that overall, health science students had the same mean number of health risk behaviors as non-health science university students. Regarding addictive risk behavior, fewer health science students used tobacco, were binge drinkers, or gambled once a week or more. Health science students also had a greater awareness of health behavior risks (5.5) than non-health science students (4.6). Linear regression analysis found a strong association with poor or weak health benefit beliefs and the health risk behavior index. There was no association between risk awareness and health risk behavior among health science students and an inverse association among non-health science students. PMID:26538523

  3. Health/Science: Objectives Guide. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The guide, one of a series of documents on Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students, presents a continuum of objectives in the areas of health and science which should be taught in grades 9-12 and which represent minimal competencies for independent living.…

  4. Women and health sciences librarianship: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R K

    1977-01-01

    In biomedical libraries, as in other areas of librarianship, women continue to be underrepresented in administrative positions. This paper reviews some of the factors contributing to the present situation and discusses implications and suggested courses of action for health sciences librarians. PMID:884344

  5. Computer Clinical Simulations in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gary L; Keith, Kenneth D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the key characteristics of clinical simulation, some developmental foundations, two current research studies, and some implications for the future of health science education. Investigations of the effects of computer-based simulation indicate that acquisition of decision-making skills is greater than with noncomputerized simulations.…

  6. Teaching Health and Safety through Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and investigative work has been an integral element in the teaching of science in schools for many years. Although students have always been taught to work safely, there is now a more general requirement that they will be taught about health and safety and how it should be implemented. That is, they must understand something of the…

  7. Teaching Computer Science to Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In 1971 the National Library of Medicine underwrote the promotion of computer technology integration into clinical medicine by providing graduate-level training for faculty members in the health sciences. The experience of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in the implementation of an NLM training grant is reported. (MLW)

  8. HSOCLCUG: A Network of Health Sciences Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Amy D.; Estrada, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the activities of the Health Sciences OCLC User Group, which was organized to establish a forum for communication; provide information about National Library of Medicine cataloging rules in OCLC; maintain close relations with the National Library of Medicine and the Medical Libraries Association; and represent its constituency to OCLC.…

  9. Science academy statements on water, health, and science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    Several days prior to the Group of 8 (G8) summit of nations on 26-27 May in Deauville, France, science academies from those nations and five others issued joint statements calling for the governments to take actions regarding water and health as well as science education. The water and health statement indicates that nearly 3 billion people will be living in water-scarce countries by 2050 and that 2.6 billion already lack access to proper sanitation and nearly 900 million lack access to a clean water supply. The statement calls for developing basic infrastructure for sanitation, promoting education to change the behavior of populations regarding water supply, funding research and development to identify pathogens, and improving water management and hygiene standards, among other measures.

  10. The New Knowledge Environment: Quality Initiatives in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Reviews changes in health sciences libraries, including the evolving role of health sciences librarians, education and training of health sciences librarians, rethinking reference services, impact on quality health care, improving the value of information, virtual libraries, National Library of Medicine initiatives, and quality initiatives. (LRW)

  11. Objectivity and ethics in environmental health science.

    PubMed

    Wing, Steve

    2003-11-01

    During the past several decades, philosophers of science and scientists themselves have become increasingly aware of the complex ways in which scientific knowledge is shaped by its social context. This awareness has called into question traditional notions of objectivity. Working scientists need an understanding of their own practice that avoids the naïve myth that science can become objective by avoiding social influences as well as the reductionist view that its content is determined simply by economic interests. A nuanced perspective on this process can improve research ethics and increase the capacity of science to contribute to equitable public policy, especially in areas such as environmental and occupational health, which have direct implications for profits, regulation, legal responsibility, and social justice. I discuss research into health effects of the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, as an example of how scientific explanations are shaped by social concepts, norms, and preconceptions. I describe how a scientific practice that developed under the influence of medical and nuclear physics interacted with observations made by exposed community members to affect research questions, the interpretation of evidence, inferences about biological mechanisms in disease causation, and the use of evidence in litigation. By considering the history and philosophy of their disciplines, practicing researchers can increase the rigor, objectivity, and social responsibility of environmental health science. PMID:14594636

  12. Objectivity and ethics in environmental health science.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Steve

    2003-01-01

    During the past several decades, philosophers of science and scientists themselves have become increasingly aware of the complex ways in which scientific knowledge is shaped by its social context. This awareness has called into question traditional notions of objectivity. Working scientists need an understanding of their own practice that avoids the naïve myth that science can become objective by avoiding social influences as well as the reductionist view that its content is determined simply by economic interests. A nuanced perspective on this process can improve research ethics and increase the capacity of science to contribute to equitable public policy, especially in areas such as environmental and occupational health, which have direct implications for profits, regulation, legal responsibility, and social justice. I discuss research into health effects of the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, as an example of how scientific explanations are shaped by social concepts, norms, and preconceptions. I describe how a scientific practice that developed under the influence of medical and nuclear physics interacted with observations made by exposed community members to affect research questions, the interpretation of evidence, inferences about biological mechanisms in disease causation, and the use of evidence in litigation. By considering the history and philosophy of their disciplines, practicing researchers can increase the rigor, objectivity, and social responsibility of environmental health science. PMID:14594636

  13. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  14. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2013 Dietary Supplements Red Yeast ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  15. Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says Share: September 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  16. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2016 © Thinkstock Clinical Guidelines, Scientific ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  17. Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says Share: January 2014 Mindfulness Meditation Mindfulness meditation ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  18. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says Share: April 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  19. [Fair use of tests in health sciences].

    PubMed

    Espelt, Albert; Viladrich, Carme; Doval, Eduardo; Aliaga, Joan; García-Rueda, Rebeca; Tárrega, Salomé

    2014-01-01

    Standardized measurement instruments (tests) have become an essential tool in health sciences. The concept of equity in the development, adaptation and administration of psychometric tests was first introduced in "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" published in 1999 by the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education. Despite its importance, this concept has been scarcely used in epidemiology and public health. Consequently, this methodological note aims to explain the concept of equity in testing and to provide tools and indications to detect and solve their inequitable use. PMID:24928357

  20. Computer Applications in Health Science Education.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, computer application development has experienced exponential growth, not only in the number of publications but also in the scope or contexts that have benefited from its use. In health science training, and medicine specifically, the gradual incorporation of technological developments has transformed the teaching and learning process, resulting in true "educational technology". The goal of this paper is to review the main features involved in these applications and highlight the main lines of research for the future. The results of peer reviewed literature published recently indicate the following features shared by the key technological developments in the field of health science education: first, development of simulation and visualization systems for a more complete and realistic representation of learning material over traditional paper format; second, portability and versatility of the applications, adapted for an increasing number of devices and operative systems; third, increasing focus on open source applications such as Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). PMID:26254251

  1. Implementing Twitter in a health sciences library.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Colleen; Graham, Jamie; Morton-Owens, Emily G

    2010-10-01

    The NYU Health Sciences Libraries created an account on Twitter, a microblogging service, as a new outreach tool marketed to students, faculty, and staff. The team used Twitter to promote resources, events, and news. Twitter is a part of a pipeline of information that also includes the library's Web site and Facebook. Although it is difficult to measure the effectiveness of a social networking tool, the overhead of using Twitter is so low that it merits consideration. PMID:21058176

  2. [Social Sciences and Humanities in Health in ABRASCO: the construction of social theory in health.

    PubMed

    Ianni, Aurea Maria Zöllner; Spadacio, Cristiane; Barboza, Renato; Alves, Olga Sofia Fabergé; Viana, Sabrina Daniela Lopes; Rocha, Ane Talita

    2014-11-01

    The development of recent social thinking in health in Brazil is associated with the establishment of the Public Health field and the Brazilian Association of Graduate Studies in Public Health (ABRASCO). The area of Social Sciences in Health was created together with the founding of ABRASCO. This article presents the main aspects related to the establishment and institutionalization of Social Sciences in Health in ABRASCO, based on interviews with its presidents and the coordinators of the Social Sciences Committees from 1995 to 2011. The interviews allowed capturing and analyzing the context in which this field was established and its relevance and history in Public Health as a whole, grouped in five analytical categories: (1) the development of Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health; (2) interdisciplinarity in Public Health; (3) the contribution of Social Sciences to Public Health; (4) Social Sciences in Health and the "traditional" Social Sciences; and (5) challenges for Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health. PMID:25493984

  3. The Health Physics Society Science Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2001-03-01

    The South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society (STC) maintains a program of education for science teachers, grades 4-12. This program, originally funded by the U.S. Department of Energy but now supported by STC, is intended to teach fundamentals of radiation and radiation safety at a level suitable for comprehension by lay persons. Course topics include Fundamentals of Radiation, Cellular Biology and Radiation Health Effects, Exposure to Radiation in Modern Life, Radioactive Waste, and Radiation Safety. The 8-hour course is usually given on Saturdays at locations in Texas as requested by educational or other groups. Classes of up to 25 teacher-students are ideal. Lesson plans, reference materials, a video tape, software, and a radiation detector are provided to each participant. To schedule a workshop in your area, contact alevans@swbell.net or David Fogle, david.fogle@tdh.state.tx.us.

  4. Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Walter W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences is to encourage minority collegiate and junior and senior high school students to pursue careers in biomedical and public health sciences. The objectives of the Symposium are to: (1) Provide information to participants concerning biomedical and public health science careers in government, academe and industry; (2) Provide information to minority students about training activities necessary to pursue a biomedical or public health science career and the fiscal support that one can obtain for such training; and (3) Provide opportunities for participating minority biomedical and public health role models to interact with participants.

  5. A Paradigm for the Next Millenium: Health Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Lewis

    1991-01-01

    Described is a curriculum for a new multidisciplinary science-Health Information Science-that incorporates aspects of computer science, cognitive psychology, bioengineering, biomedical visualization, medicine, dentistry, anthropology, mathematics, library science, and the visual arts. The situation of the medical illustration profession is…

  6. Weight Loss and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Complementary and Integrative Approaches: What the Science Says Share: January 2015 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  7. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be a Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU ...

  8. Health Science Career Education for Minority Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nancy J.; Cohen, Ellen J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a health science career education program in which eighth- and ninth-grade minority students fulfill their science requirement by attending lecture and laboratory sessions at a Manhattan medical center and working individually with a professional. (DC)

  9. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's third annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified fourteen libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. Three of five new library buildings are freestanding structures where the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. The two other new facilities are for separately administered units where the library is a major tenant. Nine projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Six projects are in projected, predesign, or design stages or are awaiting funding approval. This paper describes four projects that illustrate technology's growing effect on librarians and libraries. They are designed to accommodate change, a plethora of electronic gear, and easy use of technology. Outwardly, they do not look much different than many other modern buildings. But, inside, the changes have been dramatic although they have evolved slowly as the building structure has been adapted to new conditions. Images PMID:8251970

  10. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L T

    1991-01-01

    Librarians were asked to submit information for an annual architectural feature on projected, partially funded, architect selected, nearly designed, bid completed, under construction, almost finished, or recently completed library construction. Thirty-two health sciences libraries reported expansion, construction of new facilities, or construction planning. Seven building programs were identified as projected, or in predesign or design stages. Five projects were new, stand-alone structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Nine projects were part of new construction for several separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. Eleven projects involved additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven projects are presented as illustrative of current library construction. Images PMID:1998824

  11. Design Strategy for Flexible Health Sciences Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John; Best, Gordon

    1970-01-01

    A statistical analysis of spatial allocations in university teaching hospitals and medical schools in three countries supports the hypothesis that on the “macro” level of major functional zones there is a considerable degree of invariance in space ratios, despite wide divergence in size, organization, and operating policies. On the basis of these findings a model is developed that makes it possible to predict, from a variety of indicators of space “needs,” the total area of a health sciences facility defined by levels of support servicing. The outputs of the model are seen as the inputs to a design strategy for potentially flexible medical facilities served by a communication lattice capable of indefinite extension. Images Fig. 9 PMID:5494269

  12. Nottingham Health Science Biobank: a sustainable bioresource.

    PubMed

    Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Thomson, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Nottingham Health Science Biobank (NHSB) was established in 2011 by a 3-year "pump priming" grant from the United Kingdom National Institute of Health Research. Before biobanking operations began, NHSB commissioned a financial report on the full costs of biobanking and worked with key stakeholders and external consultants to develop a business plan with the aim of achieving financial and operational sustainability. The plan included: scanning published information, telephone interviews with commercial companies, Freedom of Information Requests, dialogue with prospective customers, and a market analysis of global trends in the use of human tissue samples in research. Our financial report provided a comprehensive and structured costing template for biobanking and confirmed the absolute requirement to ensure cost-efficient processes, careful staff utilization, and maximization of sample turnover. Together with our external consultants, we developed a business model responsive to global interest in healthcare founded on i) identification of key therapeutic areas that mapped to the strengths of the NHSB; ii) a systematic approach to identifying companies operating in these therapy areas; iii) engagement with noncommercial stakeholders to agree strategically aligned sample collection with the aim of ensuring the value of our tissue resource. By adopting this systematic approach to business modelling, the NHSB has achieved sustainability after less than 3 years of operation. PMID:25340939

  13. Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

  14. How We Treated Our Clients' Need for Remote Access through a Single Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Kurt I.; Frisque, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors relate how they developed a software that provides solutions to their library system needs. The authors work at the Galter Health Sciences Library of the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, located in downtown Chicago. The library serves the medical school's faculty, staff, residents, students, and…

  15. Health in the Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum: Full Circle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Virginia; Kettler, Mary C.; Brown, Elfrieda F.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of documents from 19 college home economics/family and consumer sciences programs demonstrated the evolution of health core curriculum from emphasis on sanitation, nutrition, and food preparation to hospital-related health care. Today's emphasis on health care costs and wellness has shifted emphasis to home health care and prevention. (SK)

  16. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Division of Extramural Research... Division. Organizing Institute: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dates and Times:...

  17. Who Is Using the Web for Science and Health Information?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the growth of public access to computers and the Web; identifies individuals from a national sample of adults who have sought specific information from the Web; identifies individuals who have searched for science or health information; and constructs two models to predict Web use for science and health information. (Author/LRW)

  18. The impact of economic issues on Nigerian health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Belleh, G S; Akhigbe, O O

    1991-01-01

    Economic issues are among the most important factors affecting health sciences libraries in Nigeria. These issues are influenced by the political, cultural, geographic, and demographic characteristics of the country. Significant economic issues are the dependence of the national economy on a single commodity, large foreign debt and spiraling inflation, stringent foreign exchange control measures, and inadequate realization by authorities of the role and importance of health sciences libraries. With shrinking budgets, resources, and staff, health sciences libraries can neither grow nor afford library automation. Health sciences librarians must take initiatives for cooperative activities to increase and make the most of resources, pursue nontraditional methods of fund-raising, educate authorities about the role and importance of libraries, and develop and implement a plan for the development and growth of health sciences libraries in the country. PMID:1884083

  19. Sustaining librarian vitality: embedded librarianship model for health sciences libraries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    With biomedical information widely accessible from anywhere at any time, health sciences libraries have become less centralized, and they are challenged to stay relevant and vital to the mission and strategic goals of their home institution. One solution is to embed librarians at strategic points in health professions' education, research, and patient care. This article discusses a proposed five-level model of embedded librarianship within the context of health sciences libraries and describes different roles, knowledge, and skills desirable for health sciences librarians working as embedded librarians. PMID:23869633

  20. Behavioral science perspectives on health hazard/health risk appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M H; Janz, N K

    1987-01-01

    Health-promotion efforts often employ HRA as a device for providing an individual with quantitative information about the consequences of personal health-related behaviors and as an attempt to motivate the client to adopt recommendations directed at establishing a healthier lifestyle. From a behavioral science perspective, the HRA approach and process contain elements that (at least in retrospective analysis) appear to be founded in relevant bodies of theory. First, HRA seems to be a reasonably efficient mechanism for transmitting information relative to associations between personal health behaviors and mortality risks. Moreover, while general knowledge and advice about the untoward consequences of risk factors (such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, etc.) are currently widespread, HRA provides new and specific information: the client's own relative risks. Some individuals who voluntarily participate in HRA bring to the experience an already high level of readiness to take action; for them, the technique may constitute the final necessary stimulus or "cue to action" [12]. Referring to a "borrowing from the future" phenomenon, Green points out that "some educational efforts are really only triggers to behavior that would have changed eventually anyway" [44, p. 159]. Thus, where motivation is sufficiently high, receipt of HRA feedback information may by itself be capable of inducing behavior change. Second, the focus on awareness and personalization of mortality risk fits well with most theoretical formulations concerning attitudes and beliefs involved in health-related decision making. Although the emphasis on mortality and often distant negative outcomes is problematic, increasing the client's perception of personal vulnerability is a psychologically defensible approach, and fear arousal can generate attitude change (although questions of appropriate level, duration of effects obtained, acceptability, etc. still need to be resolved). Third, HRA might be

  1. A profile of health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, S C; Anand, S K

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken by the World Health Organization of health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia. It includes information on clientele, budget, personnel, collections, lending policy, dissemination of information, and reference services. The survey indicates that the collections in most of the health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia are deficient and that services provided to readers are inadequate. Recommendations for improvement are outlined. PMID:354704

  2. Appy Hour: Health Sciences Professionals Learn About Apps.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Tallie; Gregory, Joan M; Shipman, Jean P

    2016-01-01

    Appy Hour is a recurring event hosted by an academic health sciences library featuring apps that are informally presented and demonstrated by invited speakers. The audience is encouraged to ask questions during the presentation of the featured app(s). This event provides learning and networking opportunities for health sciences faculty, staff, students, and health care professionals. This article illustrates the process for hosting the event, shares lessons learned, and discusses possible future directions to gain a wider audience. PMID:27391175

  3. Health and Behavioral/Social Sciences in Health Services Administration Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This final report summarizes a nationwide effort to determine appropriate health and behavioral sciences curricula components for graduate programs in health administration. Chapters 1 through 3 summarize the background, methodology, and findings of the project. Chapter 4 presents an analysis of health sciences and behavioral/social science…

  4. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p < .05 and for the HD case r = .700, p < .01. The SPs scored students higher than the other raters. Students' self-assessments were most closely aligned with the investigator. Effects were apparent due to case. Content validity was gathered in the process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates

  5. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  6. The flipped classroom: practices and opportunities for health sciences librarians.

    PubMed

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" instructional model is being introduced into medical and health sciences curricula to provide greater efficiency in curriculum delivery and produce greater opportunity for in-depth class discussion and problem solving among participants. As educators employ the flipped classroom to invert curriculum delivery and enhance learning, health sciences librarians are also starting to explore the flipped classroom model for library instruction. This article discusses how academic and health sciences librarians are using the flipped classroom and suggests opportunities for this model to be further explored for library services. PMID:25316072

  7. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  8. Selection for preservation: considerations for the health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D T; McClure, L W

    1989-01-01

    Just as no health sciences library can afford to collect every work on a subject, neither can any health sciences library afford to preserve every item that is added to its collection. In decision making for collection development, health sciences libraries apply a set of selection criteria. Those same criteria have direct application in selection for preservation decisions. This paper summarizes the literature of selection for preservation, describes the scholarly record of biomedicine, and presents criteria for selection for preservation decisions. The preservation priorities statement for microfilming of monographs and serials in the National Library of Medicine collection is included as an appendix. PMID:2758182

  9. [Various necessary steps in clarification of relationships between health care science, medical science and nursing science].

    PubMed

    Barbosa da Silva, A

    1991-01-01

    The article asserts that a scientific discipline is defined by both its object of research or knowledge (domain) and its specific or adequate method. An appropriate definition should fulfill other necessary conditions implicit in certain fundamental rules of definition, e.g., a definition should not be too narrow or too broad. It should also respect well established uses of language, in which the concept to be defined may already have a given meaning. In Scandinavia there are three words used for the Science of Health Care. "Vårdvetenskap" e.g., is used both in Sweden and Finland. In Finland it is used to convey the view that care is essential to Man, and a holistic concept of Man/Health. So demarcated, Vårdvetenskapen complements Medicine which ontologically reduces Man to biochemistry and sickness to disease. To fulfill this function the Science of health Care should be humanistic and interdisciplinary, and not purely empirico-positivistic like Medicine. PMID:1842325

  10. Environmental health science at the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Bright, Patricia R.

    2013-01-01

    USGS environmental health science focuses on the environment-health interface. Research characterizes the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, as well as the factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents and the resulting toxicologic or infectious disease. The mission of USGS in environmental health science is to contribute scientific information to environmental, natural resource, agricultural, and public-health managers, who use that information to support sound decisionmaking. Coordination with partners and stakeholders will enable USGS to focus on the highest priority environmental health issues, to make relevant, timely, and useable contributions, and to become a “partner of first choice” for environmental health science.

  11. The Health Sciences Library Network in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accart, Jean-Philippe

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of libraries in Russia focuses on science and medical libraries. Topics addressed include historical background; library science education; a consortium formed to build national databases and disseminate information; producers of scientific and medical information; international cooperation; interlibrary loans; the Russian Medical…

  12. The Outlook in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell

    2009-01-01

    Never before has the demand for health care professionals been as great as it is now. But the supply of qualified domestic graduates is not expected to keep up with this demand, thus creating a shortage in most fields. Although the need in nursing is well documented, just as great a need exists in other health care fields: home health aides,…

  13. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  14. Systems science: a good investment for the public's health.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Patricia L; Kaplan, Robert M

    2013-10-01

    This supplement of Health Education & Behavior showcases the current state of the field of systems science applications in health promotion and public health. Behind this work lies a steady stream of public dollars at the federal level. This perspective details nearly a decade of investment by the National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. These investments have included funding opportunity announcements, training programs, developing resources for researchers, cross-disciplinary fertilization, and publication. While much progress has been made, continuing investment is needed in the future to ensure the viability and sustainability of this young but increasingly important field. PMID:24084406

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  16. A First Course in Biostatistics for Health Sciences Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harraway, J. A.; Sharples, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the content of a course on introductory biostatistics for health science students. Emphasizes the way in which study design and critical evaluation of research are developed in tandem with statistical methodology. (Author/MM)

  17. Habermasian knowledge interests: epistemological implications for health sciences.

    PubMed

    Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Muñoz Terrón, José María; Aranda Torres, Cayetano

    2015-04-01

    The Habermasian concept of 'interest' has had a profound effect on the characterization of scientific disciplines. Going beyond issues unrelated to the theory itself, intra-theoretical interest characterizes the specific ways of approaching any science-related discipline, defining research topics and methodologies. This approach was developed by Jürgen Habermas in relation to empirical-analytical sciences, historical-hermeneutics sciences, and critical sciences; however, he did not make any specific references to health sciences. This article aims to contribute to shaping a general epistemological framework for health sciences, as well as its specific implications for the medical and nursing areas, via an analysis of the basic knowledge interests developed by Habermas. PMID:25644235

  18. Culture, Health, and Science: A Multidisciplinary Liberal Arts Alternative to the Public Health Major.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn M; Knight, Sabina; Gubrium, Aline C

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2003 call by the Institute of Medicine to educate undergraduates in public health, various models have emerged for incorporating public health into the liberal arts and sciences. One model is a professionalized public health major that uses core public health competencies to prepare a workforce of health professionals. A second model offers a broad-based public health major rooted in liberal arts principles, resisting the utilitarian trend toward human capital formation. A third model resists even the label of "public health," preferring instead to introduce undergraduates to many ways of analyzing human health and healing. The multidisciplinary Culture, Health, and Science Program, based on six key commitments for preparing liberal arts students to analyze health and respond to global health challenges, is offered as an alternative to the public health major. PMID:26857453

  19. Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: Science Teachers' Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordheim, Lena; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Flottorp, Signe; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Critical appraisal skills are necessary to navigate the numerous contradictory and pseudo-scientific claims in the popular media. Health and science education in schools is essential for promoting these skills in students. The purpose of this paper is to explore lower secondary school science teachers' perceptions and reported practices…

  20. Connecting Science, Health, and Technology through Authentic Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Bardwell, Genevieve; Hu, Jun

    1999-01-01

    Describes an academic-enrichment program that targets underrepresented secondary students and strives to increase their competence in science and technology, potential for leadership, allegiance to local communities, and interest in post-secondary careers in the health sciences. Contains 22 references. (WRM)

  1. Recent Developments Bearing Upon National Policy in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Several recent, substantial reports are examined that, taken together, point the way toward a constructive reformulation of health sciences policy. Private, public, and Congressional reports suggest the high quality of the bioscience effort as well as the need to broaden traditional concepts to include centrally the sciences associated with public…

  2. Population Health: Challenges for Science and Society

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, David

    2007-01-01

    The emphasis on risk factor intervention at the individual level has predominated in efforts to reduce mortality and promote health. Interest in social and other nonmedical interventions, particularly socioeconomic status (SES) influences, has increased in recent years. This article focuses on the interaction of social structure and socioeconomic status with other influences in complex pathways to affect health, and their contribution to health disparities. It examines both social class as an explanation of health differences and competing hypotheses concerning prenatal and early nutrition and cognitive capacity. Although education is associated with income, wealth, occupation, and other SES indicators and may not be the most important SES determinant, it influences a variety of pathways to health outcomes and offers strategic leverage for intervention because of social and political consensus on its value beyond health. PMID:17718667

  3. 78 FR 26793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  4. Health Technology Assessment – science or art?

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    The founding disciplines of HTA are clearly scientific, and have been firmly based among the natural sciences. However, common definitions of HTA indicate that HTA is something more than the “pure application of science”. This article investigates whether this “something” also makes HTA an art. The question of whether HTA is a science or an art is pursued in two specific and historically rich directions. The first is whether HTA is an art in the same way that medicine is described as an art. It has been argued extensively that medicine is based on two different and partly incompatible cultures, i.e., the natural sciences and humanities. Medicine is based on disciplines within the natural sciences, while its value judgments have been placed in the humanities camp. This dichotomy is present in HTA as well, and the first part of the investigation illustrates how HTA is an art in terms of its inherent and constitutive value-judgments. The second part of the science/art-scrutiny leads us to the ancient (Hippocratic) concept of art, téchne, where we find an etymological and a conceptual link between HTA and art. It demonstrates HTA is not an arbitrary process, even though it involves value judgments and relates complex decision making processes. As an art (téchne) HTA has a specific subject matter, requires inquiry and mastery of general rational principles, and is oriented to a specific end. In conclusion, the science-or-art-question makes sense in two specific perspectives, illustrating that HTA is a science based art. This has implications for the practice of HTA, for its education, and for the status of its results. PMID:23935761

  5. ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This resource provides an annotated list of print and electronic biomedical and health-related reference sources, including Internet resources and digital image collections. Readers will find relevant research, clinical, and consumer health information resources. The emphasis is on resources within the United States, with a few representative…

  6. Science and social responsibility in public health.

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Douglas L; McKeown, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsible for actions taken. A deeper meaning of responsibility corresponds to commitment to the pursuit and achievement of a valued end. Epidemiologists are committed to the scientific study of health and disease in human populations and to the application of scientific knowledge to improve the public's health. Responsibility is also closely linked to reliability. Responsible professionals reliably perform the tasks they set for themselves as well as the tasks society expects them to undertake. The defining axiom for our approach is that the health of the public is a social good we commit ourselves to pursue, thus assuming an obligation to contribute to its achievement. Epidemiologists cannot claim to be committed to public health as a social good and not accept the responsibility of ensuring that the knowledge gained in their roles as scientists is used to achieve that good. The social responsibilities of environmental health researchers are conspicuous in the environmental justice movement, for example, in community-based participatory research. Responsibility is an ethical concept particularly well suited to frame many key aspects of the ethics of our profession. PMID:14602514

  7. Health Sciences Education in California, 1983-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    The adequacy of health sciences education enrollment levels in California is reviewed in the context of the 1981 Health Manpower Plan. After reviewing the Plan, attention is focused on two continuing problems among the issues: medical residencies and attrition in the nursing profession. New issues that receive extensive treatment in the 1981 Plan…

  8. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions…

  9. Learning from Longitudinal Research in Criminology and the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderstaay, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews longitudinal research within criminology and the health sciences on the relationship between reading and criminal, delinquent, or antisocial behavior. Longitudinal research in criminology, medicine, and psychology examines the role of reading within a broad set of interactive processes, connecting literacy to public health via…

  10. Preparing tomorrow's health sciences librarians: feasibility and marketing studies.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Friedman, C P; Lipscomb, C E; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1996-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is devising and evaluating five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. These models fit into a continual learning process from the initial professional preparation to lifelong learning opportunities. Three of them enhance existing degree and certificate programs in the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) with a health sciences specialization, and two are new programs for working information professionals. The approaches involve partnerships among SILS, the Health Sciences Library, and the program in Medical Informatics. The planning process will study the feasibility of the proposed programs, test the marketability of the models to potential students and employers, and make recommendations about implementation. PMID:8913557

  11. Science for Reducing Health Inequalities Emerges From Social Justice Movements.

    PubMed

    Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Although the health sciences have investigated economic and social inequalities in morbidity and mortality for hundreds of years, health inequalities persist and are, by some measures, increasing. This is not simply a situation in which the knowledge exists but is not implemented. Rather, science in general and epidemiology in particular have focused on quantifying the effects of specific agents considered in isolation. This approach is powerful, but, in the absence of ecological concepts that connect parts and wholes, contributes to maintaining health inequalities. By joining movements for human rights and social justice, health scientists can identify research questions that are relevant to public health, develop methods that are appropriate to answering those questions, and contribute to efforts to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26936957

  12. Secondary Education Through Health -- environmental health curriculum: A Superfund science literacy outreach project

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Inner-city high school students are disproportionately affected by health problems that stem from environmental conditions. Also, they are not adequately prepared in Science -- especially in the concepts, methods, and procedures of environmental-health science research -- and are generally unaware of the career opportunities in this field. A Superfund program was developed to increase Science literacy and expand career knowledge in environmental health among a cohort of minority high school students from New York City. The year-round program features lectures, laboratory tours, seminars, investigations, and research taught by faculty and Superfund investigators at Mount Sinai`s Environmental Health Sciences Center. The students made remarkable progress in terms of gaining environmental health knowledge, laboratory and scientific research skills, and awareness of environmental health careers.

  13. [Scientific output in the health sciences in Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Sisa, Iván; Espinel, Mauricio; Fornasini, Marco; Mantilla, Gonzalo

    2011-10-01

    This cross-sectional study describes the characteristics and trends of health sciences-related studies published in Ecuador from 1999-2009. Its objective is to contribute to the design and implementation of a research and development policy whose work is centered on the country's health priorities. Bibliometric indicators of production applied to publications in health sciences in Ecuador were used for the analysis. The publications were from the LILACS and MEDLINE databases. It was found that 625 articles were published from 1999-2009, primarily in the clinical-surgical areas (60%), followed by epidemiology (17.4%), basic sciences (14.1%), and health systems (8.5%). Only 4.3% and 7.2% of the production in this period was related to the primary causes of morbidity and mortality, respectively. It was found that private institutions generated more health research than public institutions, and hospitals (public, private, and mixed) produced a higher percentage than universities. The analysis showed that there was limited scientific production in health sciences in Ecuador during the study period, with a slight increase in the last two years that may be due in part to greater investment in research and development by the National Secretariat of Science and Technology (SENACYT). Investment increased from 0.20% to 0.44% of gross domestic product between 2006 and 2009. PMID:22124698

  14. Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  15. Advancing Global Health – The Need for (Better) Social Science

    PubMed Central

    Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In his perspective "Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health," Ooms argues that actions taken in the field of global health are dependent not only on available resources, but on the normative premise that guides how these resources are spent. This comment sets out how the application of a predominately biomedical positivist research tradition in global health, has potentially limited understanding of the value judgements underlying decisions in the field. To redress this critical social science, including health policy analysis has much to offer, to the field of global health including on questions of governance. PMID:27239873

  16. The economics of academic health sciences libraries: cost recovery in the era of big science.

    PubMed

    Williams, T L; Lemkau, H L; Burrows, S

    1988-10-01

    With launching of Sputnik by the Soviet Union in the late 1950s, science and technology became a high priority in the United States. During the two decades since, health sciences libraries have experienced changes in almost all aspects of their operations. Additionally, recent developments in medical care and in medical education have had major influences on the mission of health science libraries. In the unending struggle to keep up with new technologies and services, libraries have had to support increasing demands while they receive a decreasing share of the health care dollar. This paper explores the economic challenges faced by academic health sciences libraries and suggests measures for augmenting traditional sources of funding. The development of marketing efforts, institutional memberships, and fee-based services by the Louis Calder Memorial Library, University of Miami School of Medicine, is presented as a case study. PMID:3224223

  17. How Superstition Won and Science Lost. Popularizing Science and Health in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, John C.

    This book studies the history of changing patterns in the dissemination, or popularization of scientific findings, to the general public since 1830. It focuses on three different areas of science: (1) health; (2) psychology; and (3) the natural sciences. The document explores the ways in which this process of popularization has deteriorated. It…

  18. Health metrics and evaluation: strengthening the science.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher J L; Frenk, Julio

    2008-04-01

    With the growing importance of health in the global agenda comes the responsibility to develop a scientific foundation of metrics and evaluation. The scope of this emerging field can be viewed in terms of key topics, including health outcomes, other social outcomes related to health systems, health services, resource inputs, evaluations of programmes and systems, and analyses to support policy choice. It can also be defined in terms of key activities that are needed to strengthen the scientific basis of the field: development of new methods, instruments, software, and hardware; setting global norms and standards for data collection; increasing the availability of high-quality primary data; systematic analysis and synthesis of existing datasets; strengthening national capacity to obtain, analyse, and use data; and reporting and disseminating results. We explore in depth topics with major scientific challenges and institutional and cultural barriers that are slowing the development of the field. Cutting across the various topical areas and disciplinary approaches to these problems are some common scientific issues, including limited comparability of measurement, uncorrected known biases in data, no standard approach to missing data, unrealistic uncertainty estimates, and the use of disease models that have not been properly validated. Only through concerted action will it be possible to assure the production, reproduction, and use of knowledge that is crucial to the advancement of global health. PMID:18395581

  19. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    PubMed

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative. PMID:25349542

  20. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors

    PubMed Central

    Tooey, Mary Joan (M.J.); Arnold, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative. PMID:25349542

  1. Statistical Sources for Health Science Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weise, Frieda

    This continuing education course syllabus presents information on the collection of vital and health statistics, lists of agencies or organizations involved in statistical collection and/or dissemination, annotated bibliographies of statistical sources, and guidelines for accessing statistical information. Topics covered include: (1) the reporting…

  2. Health Science Education in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    Concern surrounding the status of health education in elementary schools centers around (1) a lack of agreement concerning content, scope, and sequence, (2) its interdisciplinary character, (3) poor teacher preparation, and (4) reliance on incidental teaching and learning situations. Improvement depends upon: (1) defining the areas of concern for…

  3. Library Research Manual: The Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Emily Montez; Dale, Roland, Ed.

    This independent study workbook is intended to acquaint students of the nursing and allied health professions with the use of Douglas Library of the Chicago State University and to introduce a search strategy for gathering information for research papers. Consisting of nine instructional chapters, the workbook provides information on the card…

  4. Health: The Science of Human Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Charles R.; And Others

    This book examines human health behavior as a lifetime process of adaptation and response to internally and externally demanding environments. Beginning with conception, this book follows the family life cycle from "seed to sod" and beyond. From considerations of conception it moves to birth, growth and development, disease, life style,…

  5. Applying Nutrition Science to the Public's Health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a bewildering array of nutrition information available to the public and to professionals. Nutrition messages are often conflicting, confusing, and often simply rhetoric. More consumer research is needed to understand more fully the best way to communicate health messages, recommendations, ...

  6. Feasibility and marketing studies of health sciences librarianship education programs.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, C E; Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Cogdill, K W; Friedman, C P; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1999-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill evaluated five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. Three of the models enhanced existing degree and certificate programs, and two were new programs for working information professionals. Models were developed with input from experts and a Delphi study; the marketability of the models was tested through surveys of potential students and employers; and recommendations were made as a guide to implementation. The results demonstrated a demand for more specialized curricula and for retraining opportunities. Marketing data showed a strong interest from potential students in a specialized master's degree, and mid-career professionals indicated an interest in postmaster's programs that provided the ability to maintain employment. The study pointed to the opportunity for a center of excellence in health sciences information education to enable health sciences librarians to respond to their evolving roles. PMID:9934529

  7. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  8. The Inherent Drawbacks of the Pressure to Publish in Health Sciences: Good or Bad Science.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of scientific publications- it is the era of "hunting the article". This commentary discusses the drawbacks of the pressure to publish that certainly contribute to the 'dark side' of science. In fact, health science career progression greatly relies on the number of scientific publications a researcher has, and in many cases these may be more valorized than the health services provided. Of course, scientific publications help to develop the skills of health care professionals, but as Einstein highlighted " not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts". PMID:26594336

  9. The Inherent Drawbacks of the Pressure to Publish in Health Sciences: Good or Bad Science

    PubMed Central

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of scientific publications– it is the era of “hunting the article”. This commentary discusses the drawbacks of the pressure to publish that certainly contribute to the ‘dark side’ of science. In fact, health science career progression greatly relies on the number of scientific publications a researcher has, and in many cases these may be more valorized than the health services provided. Of course, scientific publications help to develop the skills of health care professionals, but as Einstein highlighted “ not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts”. PMID:26594336

  10. Improving Health with Science: Exploring Community-Driven Science Education in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leak, Anne Emerson

    This study examines the role of place-based science education in fostering student-driven health interventions. While literature shows the need to connect science with students' place and community, there is limited understanding of strategies for doing so. Making such connections is important for underrepresented students who tend to perceive learning science in school as disconnected to their experiences out of school (Aikenhead, Calabrese-Barton, & Chinn, 2006). To better understand how students can learn to connect place and community with science and engineering practices in a village in Kenya, I worked with community leaders, teachers, and students to develop and study an education program (a school-based health club) with the goal of improving knowledge of health and sanitation in a Kenyan village. While students selected the health topics and problems they hoped to address through participating in the club, the topics were taught with a focus on providing opportunities for students to learn the practices of science and health applications of these practices. Students learned chemistry, physics, environmental science, and engineering to help them address the health problems they had identified in their community. Surveys, student artifacts, ethnographic field notes, and interview data from six months of field research were used to examine the following questions: (1) In what ways were learning opportunities planned for using science and engineering practices to improve community health? (2) In what ways did students apply science and engineering practices and knowledge learned from the health club in their school, homes, and community? and (3) What factors seemed to influence whether students applied or intended to apply what they learned in the health club? Drawing on place-based science education theory and community-engagement models of health, process and structural coding (Saldana, 2013) were used to determine patterns in students' applications of their

  11. Genetics in Population Health Science: Strategies and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Translational research is needed to leverage discoveries from the frontiers of genome science to improve public health. So far, public health researchers have largely ignored genetic discoveries, and geneticists have ignored important aspects of population health science. This mutual neglect should end. In this article, we discuss 3 areas where public health researchers can help to advance translation: (1) risk assessment: investigate genetic profiles as components in composite risk assessments; (2) targeted intervention: conduct life-course longitudinal studies to understand when genetic risks manifest in development and whether intervention during sensitive periods can have lasting effects; and (3) improved understanding of environmental causation: collaborate with geneticists on gene–environment interaction research. We illustrate with examples from our own research on obesity and smoking. PMID:23927511

  12. Genetics in population health science: strategies and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-10-01

    Translational research is needed to leverage discoveries from the frontiers of genome science to improve public health. So far, public health researchers have largely ignored genetic discoveries, and geneticists have ignored important aspects of population health science. This mutual neglect should end. In this article, we discuss 3 areas where public health researchers can help to advance translation: (1) risk assessment: investigate genetic profiles as components in composite risk assessments; (2) targeted intervention: conduct life-course longitudinal studies to understand when genetic risks manifest in development and whether intervention during sensitive periods can have lasting effects; and (3) improved understanding of environmental causation: collaborate with geneticists on gene-environment interaction research. We illustrate with examples from our own research on obesity and smoking. PMID:23927511

  13. 75 FR 18837 - Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health; Privacy Act of 1974; Report of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health..., Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health. ACTION: Notice... minority health information to public and professional audiences. In support of this purpose, this...

  14. Oral health knowledge and behavior among male health sciences college students in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, Jassem; Honkala, Eino; Honkala, Sisko

    2003-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Health auxiliary personnel have an important role in oral health promotion when they graduate and start working in the health care system. This study aims to find out oral health knowledge and oral health behavior of male Health Sciences College students. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all students at the male Health Sciences College in Kuwait (N = 153) during the academic year 2001/2002. The students filled the anonymous questionnaire in the class after the lecture. The response rate was 84% (n = 128). The questions consisted information on the general background, oral health behavior and oral health knowledge. RESULTS: Oral health knowledge seemed to be limited and very few background factors were associated with it. More than half of the students had visited a dentist during the previous 12 months, but only one third of students were brushing twice a day or more often. CONCLUSIONS: It may be concluded that the male Health Sciences College students seemed to have appropriate knowledge on some oral health topics, but limited knowledge on the others. Their toothbrushing practices are still far behind the international recommendation (twice a day) and also the knowledge, why it should be done so frequently also very limited. PMID:12735791

  15. 75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... explore opportunities to enhance NOAA's ongoing ocean health efforts and their impacts on ecosystem and... roles in addressing ocean health issues? (2) What are the right ocean health science questions, products and services for NOAA? (3) Are there additional ocean health science issues that should be included...

  16. Web-based technologies for health sciences reference and instruction.

    PubMed

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    New web-based instructional technologies provide health sciences librarians with tools to enhance delivery of reference services, reinforce library instruction, and facilitate outreach activities. Of the many emerging, new web technologies recently available to health information professionals, 12 resources are presented in this article to explain the value these tools bring to informational and instructional settings to enhance demonstration, facilitate collaborative activities, encourage communication, and evaluate learning/understanding. PMID:25023016

  17. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  18. A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-Level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbrick, Jodi Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who…

  19. OCLC Utilization in Health Sciences Libraries. CE 35, Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Patti

    This syllabus for a continuing education course describes the OCLC system and considers how it can be used by health science libraries. The general governance and administrative structure of OCLC and its network affiliates are detailed, and the OCLC subsystems--online union catalog, serials, interlibrary loan, and acquisitions--and their major…

  20. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 64 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2007-2008, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 240,955 volumes, spent a total of $240,019,298, and employed 2,304…

  1. Management of Circulation Functions in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodnett, Diane M.

    Designed for both experienced professionals and new librarians, this continuing education course syllabus presents a detailed outline of the functions, operations, and management of circulation departments in health sciences libraries. It is noted that emphasis is placed on providing a framework for decision making rather than on providing…

  2. West Virginia University's Health Sciences and Technology Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Ann; Dooley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the Health Sciences and Technology Academy, an outreach and engagement program by West Virginia University to encourage higher education faculty members and administrators, public school teachers, and community leaders to assume the responsibility of mentoring high school students. The primary goal is to increase the college…

  3. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 65 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2006-2007, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 244,188 volumes, spent a total of $244,188,020, and employed 2,395 FTE…

  4. Science for Health Literacy: It's Never Been so Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Marcus; Woods-Townsend, Kathryn; Griffiths, Janice; Christodoulou, Andri; Byrne, Jenny; Bay, Jacquie; Godfrey, Keith; Inskip, Hazel; Hanson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a project called "LifeLab," developed by researchers at the Education School, Faculty of Medicine and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Southampton (UK), to promote a science-oriented approach to health literacy among teenagers. The main purposes of "LifeLab" are: (1) to improve…

  5. Health Science Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Applied Tech., Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary and postsecondary level as part of the health science education component of Florida's comprehensive vocational…

  6. Handbook for Teachers of Health Science Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.; Cooper, Mitch

    This guide is intended as a central source of information for teacher-coordinators and school administrators who are responsible for implementing health science technology education (HSTE) programs in Texas. Section I contains various introductory materials, including an outline of qualifications for HSTE teachers and information on professional…

  7. Selection of Computer Files for Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Jeanene C.; Goddard, Catherine F.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the selection and evaluation of locally mounted computer files for health sciences libraries, including informational programs such as bibliographic and factual databases; computer-assisted instruction programs; and expert systems. Topics addressed include print sources; database sources; selection criteria, including content and cost;…

  8. Reconciling Statistical and Systems Science Approaches to Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward H.; Rahmandad, Hazhir; Shoham, David A.; Hammond, Ross; Huang, Terry T. -K.; Wang, Youfa; Mabry, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    Although systems science has emerged as a set of innovative approaches to study complex phenomena, many topically focused researchers including clinicians and scientists working in public health are somewhat befuddled by this methodology that at times appears to be radically different from analytic methods, such as statistical modeling, to which…

  9. Applied social and behavioral science to address complex health problems.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Allegrante, John P; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Clark, Noreen M; Windsor, Richard C; Zimmerman, Marc A; Green, Lawrence W

    2011-11-01

    Complex and dynamic societal factors continue to challenge the capacity of the social and behavioral sciences in preventive medicine and public health to overcome the most seemingly intractable health problems. This paper proposes a fundamental shift from a research approach that presumes to identify (from highly controlled trials) universally applicable interventions expected to be implemented "with fidelity" by practitioners, to an applied social and behavioral science approach similar to that of engineering. Such a shift would build on and complement the recent recommendations of the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research and require reformulation of the research-practice dichotomy. It would also require disciplines now engaged in preventive medicine and public health practice to develop a better understanding of systems thinking and the science of application that is sensitive to the complexity, interactivity, and unique elements of community and practice settings. Also needed is a modification of health-related education to ensure that those entering the disciplines develop instincts and capacities as applied scientists. PMID:22011425

  10. Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Critical Thinking at a Health Sciences University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowles, Joie; Morgan, Christine; Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The fostering of critical thinking skills has become an expectation of faculty, especially those teaching in the health sciences. The manner in which critical thinking is defined by faculty impacts how they will address the challenge to promote critical thinking among their students. This study reports the perceptions of critical thinking held by…

  12. Tufts Health Sciences Database: Lessons, Issues, and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mary Y.; Albright, Susan A.; Alkasab, Tarik; Damassa, David A.; Wang, Paul J.; Eaton, Elizabeth K.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a seven-year experience with developing the Tufts Health Sciences Database, a database-driven information management system that combines the strengths of a digital library, content delivery tools, and curriculum management. Identifies major effects on teaching and learning. Also addresses issues of faculty development, copyright and…

  13. The Use of Hospital Health Science Libraries; A Methodological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleg, Marilyn C.; Pings, Vern M.

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a method to provide facts about the clientele and use of one type of health science library, the hospital medical library. The method was tested in two hospital libraries, Harper Hospital, Detroit, and Hurley Hospital, Flint. The study was divided into four levels of data collecting and…

  14. Evaluating the Science of Discovery in Complex Health Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Cameron D.; Best, Allan; Mortimer, Sharon; Huerta, Timothy; Buchan, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Complex health problems such as chronic disease or pandemics require knowledge that transcends disciplinary boundaries to generate solutions. Such transdisciplinary discovery requires researchers to work and collaborate across boundaries, combining elements of basic and applied science. At the same time, calls for more interdisciplinary health…

  15. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. Method: An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Results: Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. Conclusions: The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for “community” building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections. PMID:20428277

  16. Ethical Issues of Scientific Inquiry in Health Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This monograph contains 13 papers on the ethics of planning, conducting, and reporting research in health sciences education. It includes four background papers and nine perspective papers. The titles are: (1) "The Imperative for Ethical Conduct in Scientific Inquiry" (Steve M. Dorman); (2) "Fundamental Principles of Ethical Research in Health…

  17. Health Science One and Two: First Two Years of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, John; Nichols, Michele; Camp, Cynthia; Hartwick, Erin; Mortensen, Jennifer; Beck, Laurie; LaNeve, Shannon; Sutter, Nancy; Ryan, Dennis; Wright, Carla; Castro, Patricia; Bell, Hilary; Sella, Gina; Smith, Vicki; Wyatt, Garry

    2010-01-01

    The development of skill standards for Health Science was a result of a collaborative effort involving the Nevada Department of Education and a writing team with extensive experience in both teaching and in the field. The skill standards presented in this report features a framework for students interested in pursuing careers in healthcare and…

  18. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  19. The Internet Compendium: Subject Guides to Health and Science Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis; And Others

    This guide describes and evaluates the Internet's health and science resources by subject. It offers information on a multitude of listservs; Usenet newsgroups; forums; electronic journals; topical mailing lists; text archives; Freenets; bulletin boards; FAQs; newsletters; real-time chats; databases; and library catalogs. From alternative medicine…

  20. Health Sciences Librarians and Education: Clinical Librarianship, Consortia, Extraterrestial Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Polly; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Three speeches presented by a panel of health science librarians discuss: (1) clinical medical librarianship, with a definition and descriptions of programs in several medical school libraries; (2) consortia, including a definition and reasons for their development; and (3) use of telecommunications for sharing medical information. (MBR)

  1. Continuing Education of Health Sciences Librarians: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qureshi, Azra

    This study examines continuing education and professional development of 210 health sciences librarians affiliated with 70 academic medical libraries in the United States, which has the most advanced system of education in librarianship in the world. Of the 102 respondents, the largest categories were library directors/administrators and public…

  2. Changes in Information Delivery Since 1960 in Health Science Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Louise

    1974-01-01

    An overview of information needs and services in the health sciences since 1960, with emphasis on the services of the National Library of Medicine and some other recent government-funded systems for information dissemination. Includes an extensive list of references. (LS)

  3. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    PubMed Central

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-01-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

  4. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  5. Preparing health science students for interdisciplinary professional practice.

    PubMed

    Cleak, Helen; Williamson, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a number of lecturers from different clinical schools within the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University embarked on the development of a new interdisciplinary professional practice subject to be undertaken by all final-year undergraduate health science students. The subject was designed to better prepare students for their first professional appointment by introducing them to the concepts of interdisciplinary teamwork, the health care context, and the challenges and constraints that organizational contexts present. This report details the background of the project, the consultation and development that took place in the design of the subject, and implementation of the subject. The uniqueness of the project is explained by the number of disciplines involved, the online delivery, and the focus on a set of generic graduate attributes for health science students. It is hoped that students who have undertaken this subject will have a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals and the context in which they will be working by grappling with many real-life professional issues that they will face when they graduate and enter the workforce. PMID:17941408

  6. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises.

    PubMed

    Colf, Leremy A; Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  7. Biological and Health Sciences: Report of the Project 2061 Phase I Biological and Health Sciences Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary

    This is one of five panel reports that have been prepared as part of the first phase of Project 2061, a long-term, multipurpose undertaking of the American Association for the Advancement of Science designed to help reform science, mathematics, and technology education in the United States. Major sections included are: (1) "Rationale"; (2) "A…

  8. Effect of Federal programs on health sciences libraries.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R A

    1987-01-01

    The radical changes and improvements in health sciences libraries during the last quarter century have been primarily achieved through the leadership of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in the application of technology and in the creation of a biomedical communications network. This article describes principal programs and activities of the National Library of Medicine and their effects on health sciences libraries: the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS), implementation of the Medical Library Assistance Act (MLAA), and defense of "fair use" of copyrighted material. The article briefly summarizes more recent Federal activities which directly affect access to and dissemination of health information and concludes with a summary of problems for which solutions must be found if health sciences libraries are to be prepared to meet the future. It is clear from comparing the programs described with current government attitudes that, although the Federal government has promoted advancement in the dissemination of biomedical information in the past, this trend is reversing, and Federal funding to libraries is decreasing while the cost of accessing information is increasing. PMID:10301370

  9. 75 FR 48979 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 75 FR 82033 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  11. 75 FR 68367 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  12. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied, Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 78 FR 42968 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-07-18

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  14. 75 FR 55807 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  15. 76 FR 58521 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

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  16. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  17. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  18. 76 FR 21387 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  19. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  20. 75 FR 41506 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  1. 77 FR 43849 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  2. 78 FR 27410 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  3. 75 FR 20371 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  4. 78 FR 51734 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-08-21

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  5. 75 FR 63844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  6. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  7. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  8. 75 FR 46950 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  9. 76 FR 5594 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 75 FR 41505 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-07-16

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  11. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-06-16

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  12. 77 FR 33472 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 76 FR 27653 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  14. 78 FR 13358 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...

  15. 75 FR 7487 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  16. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Approaches for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: What the Science Says Share: July 2015 © Tom Le Goff/Digital ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  18. Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says Share: March 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  19. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park, NC... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park,...

  20. Health Policy and Management: in praise of political science

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Health systems have entered a third era embracing whole systems thinking and posing complex policy and management challenges. Understanding how such systems work and agreeing what needs to be put in place to enable them to undergo effective and sustainable change are more pressing issues than ever for policy-makers. The theory-policy-practice-gap and its four dimensions, as articulated by Chinitz and Rodwin, is acknowledged. It is suggested that insights derived from political science can both enrich our understanding of the gap and suggest what changes are needed to tackle the complex challenges facing health systems. PMID:26029899

  1. The ergonomics/human factors approach to health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Bube, J L

    1985-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals scant information on the application of ergonomics to health sciences libraries. Ergonomics research has identified and validated many genuine health hazards in business offices and industrial settings. While appearing innocuous, the library environment is affected by these hazards. As sophisticated technology and machinery are introduced into libraries, the human factors must be considered. This paper examines the hazards of the library environment as identified through ergonomics research and makes recommendations for alleviating or eliminating these dangers. PMID:3161572

  2. Renovation and expansion of an academic health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    Horres, M M; Hitt, S

    1984-01-01

    Planning is described for the renovation, expansion, and principal design features of the Health Sciences Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The three-and-a-half-year construction project resulted in the addition of three floors over the existing building and a complete renovation of the original floor space. An architectural summary provides statistics on project costs and building capacities. Images PMID:6743879

  3. The Academic Health Sciences Library and Serial Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jo Ann

    1974-01-01

    A review of efforts to formulate basic medical journal lists and a report of a survey of subscriptions held in academic health science libraries is presented. The subscriptions held by thirty-seven libraries were analyzed to determine those held by 60-100% of the sample. A comparison of those titles subscribed to by 90-100% of the sample reveals that most of these titles appear in the lists formulated by other studies. PMID:4466506

  4. Health Science Libraries of National, State, and Local Medical Organizations

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    This second survey of medical society-sponsored libraries has been expanded to include national association libraries in allied medical fields, as well as special libraries which do not fall into categories established for the MLA survey of health science libraries. A total of fifty-eight libraries in this subset have been identified, and selected characteristics have been measured. Observations are made concerning methodology, user population, and services. PMID:6041830

  5. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda. PMID:24860264

  6. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects*

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda. PMID:24860264

  7. Medical and Health Sciences Division research report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Medical and Health Sciences Division conducts research programs relevant to neoplastic, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular diseases. Basic biological science, nuclear medicine, and epidemiology provide an integrated approach to solving biomedical problems directly related to occupational medicine and environmental health effects. The central theme of this research is focused on both the mechanisms and risk assessments of diseases caused by accidental exposure to chemical toxicants derived from fossil and synthetic fuels or to radiation. A major reorganizational change made this past year restructured the division into two branches. The environmental and health sciences branch contains a cancer and pulmonary research section, an interdisciplinary task group section, a cardiovascular research section, and a research support section. The radiation and nuclear medicine branch consists of a radiation and nuclear medicine section and an occupational epidemiology section. In addition, special task groups have been created to provide an interdisciplinary team approach in certain research efforts. Information included in this booklet summarizes research results and related activities for the period from October 1, 1979, to September 30, 1980.

  8. Musical mnemonics in health science: a first look.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Matthew M

    2013-01-01

    Song, with its memory enhancement potential and ability to engage, has been employed as a learning tool in some academic settings. Of the countless learning environments, health science may seem the most atypical setting for the musical mnemonic, and yet it may be the most suitable for its application. With medicine's robust history of student-made mnemonics, it only seems natural that learners and instructors alike have begun to experiment with song meant to educate and entertain, primarily imparting them through popular media-sharing sites. This initial assessment of song in health science is meant to highlight notions of efficacy, audience, and use through an informal survey of 10 user-made YouTube musical mnemonics. Two of these mnemonics were co-created by the author, while the remaining eight were identified via select search terms and significant viewer numbers. Resulting YouTube data infers that instructors play a major role in the use of musical mnemonics in health science education. User comments indicate that some students have found value in mnemonic songs, helping them recall information during assessments. More robust research methods, like Q-method, meta-analysis, and opinion mining, can further confirm the value and role of musical mnemonics as they pertain to medicine and healthcare. PMID:23110356

  9. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bethany A.; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. “Early career” health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, “I have demonstrated this competency.” Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the “Health Sciences Information Services” competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the “Research, Analysis, and Interpretation” competency. Conclusions These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies

  10. Understanding health systems, health economies and globalization: the need for social science perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between globalization and health calls for research from many disciplinary and methodological perspectives. This editorial gives an overview of the content trajectory of the interdisciplinary journal ‘Globalization and Health’ over the first six years of production, 2005 to 2010. The findings show that bio-medical and population health perspectives have been dominant but that social science perspectives have become more evident in recent years. The types of paper published have also changed, with a growing proportion of empirical studies. A special issue on ‘Health systems, health economies and globalization: social science perspectives’ is introduced, a collection of contributions written from the vantage points of economics, political science, psychology, sociology, business studies, social policy and research policy. The papers concern a range of issues pertaining to the globalization of healthcare markets and governance and regulation issues. They highlight the important contribution that can be made by the social sciences to this field, and also the practical and methodological challenges implicit in the study of globalization and health. PMID:22938504

  11. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation. This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation. The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania), Acorn Technologies (South Africa), Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa), the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar), the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya), and Niprisan’s development by Nigeria’s National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria). All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems. For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While this is a long

  12. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Al-Bader, Sara; Masum, Hassan; Simiyu, Ken; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation.This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation.The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania), Acorn Technologies (South Africa), Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa), the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar), the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya), and Niprisan's development by Nigeria's National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria).All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems.For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While this is a long-term strategy

  13. Changes in Elementary Student Perceptions of Science, Scientists, and Science Careers after Participating in a Curricular Module on Health and Veterinary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Soo Yeon; Parker, Loran Carleton; Adedokun, Omolola; Mennonno, Ann; Wackerly, Amy; San Miguel, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examined to what extent a curriculum module that uses animal and human health scientists and science concepts to portray science and scientists in a relevant and authentic manner could enhance elementary students' aspiration for science careers, attitudes to science, positive perceptions of scientists, and perceived relevance of…

  14. The marriage of art and science in health care.

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Pole, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper invites the reader to consider the marriage of art and science as antidote to much epidemic disease, for our greater personal and societal health. The history of arts medicine is reviewed, identifying its persisting although often tenuous link with health care from pre-history to the present. The author describes his personal encounter with art at the bedside, and how it led to his establishing a comprehensive artist-in-residence program at his university hospital. The scientific evidence underscoring the efficacy of art-making for physical and psychological health are outlined, together with the physiological and biochemical data. The author describes his own program, and offers examples of healing art in action. PMID:11249236

  15. Public health as a catalyst for interprofessional education on a health sciences campus.

    PubMed

    Uden-Holman, Tanya M; Curry, Susan J; Benz, Loretta; Aquilino, Mary Lober

    2015-03-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) has existed in various formats for several decades, the need for IPE recently has taken on renewed interest and momentum. Public health has a critical role to play in furthering IPE, yet schools of public health are often underrepresented in IPE initiatives. The University of Iowa College of Public Health is serving as a catalyst for IPE activities on our health sciences campus, which includes colleges of dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health. IPE-related activities have included campus visit by IPE leaders, administration of the Survey of Critical Elements for Implementing IPE, administration of the Interprofessional Learning Opportunities Inventory survey, the development of a comprehensive strategic plan, and the pilot of an IPE course for all first-year prelicensure students and Master of Health Administration students. Although more work is needed to more fully integrate IPE into the curriculum, success to date of the University of Iowa IPE initiative demonstrates that public health can play a critical role as a convener and catalyst for IPE curricular innovations on a health sciences campus. PMID:25706001

  16. Systemic Hydration: Relating Science to Clinical Practice in Vocal Health

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Naomi A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Study Design Literature Review Methods Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology and biomechanics. Results The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest amongst multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production, however the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and in some cases offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. Conclusions A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function, however greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. PMID:24880674

  17. 77 FR 74198 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council....

  18. 78 FR 47715 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee, July 24, 2013, 08:00...

  19. 78 FR 35637 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  20. 78 FR 64516 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  1. Achieving Equity through Critical Science Agency: An Ethnographic Study of African American Students in a Health Science Career Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart &…

  2. Experiences of undergraduate African health sciences students: A hermeneutic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Inyama, Davis; Williams, Allison; McCauley, Kay

    2015-06-01

    While efforts have been made to understand the experiences of African students in predominantly white environments, the experiences of African students in clinical placement areas have rarely been explored. This paper is a report on a study designed to address the gap in educational research on the experiences of African health sciences students in clinical placements in predominantly white environments. Interviews adopting an open approach to conversations were conducted with nine African students from three health disciplines at one metropolitan university in Australia between 2012 and 2013. Interview transcripts were analyzed using philosophical hermeneutics, where shared meanings were arrived at by employing key Gadamerian hermeneutic components. Findings revealed a number of factors that had a direct effect on the meaning students derived from their clinical placement experiences. These, as revealed in the interlinked domains of body, space, relationships, and time included difference, acceptance, resilience, and cultural sensitivity. Insights from this study may lead to the adoption of strategies designed to improve the experiences of African students studying health sciences in predominantly white environments. PMID:24942056

  3. Developing E-science and Research Services and Support at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Layne M.; Butler, John T.; Johnston, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of e-science and research support services in the Health Sciences Libraries (HSL) within the Academic Health Center (AHC) at the University of Minnesota (UMN). A review of the broader e-science initiatives within the UMN demonstrates the needs and opportunities that the University Libraries face while building knowledge, skills, and capacity to support e-research. These experiences are being used by the University Libraries administration and HSL to apply support for the growing needs of researchers in the health sciences. Several research areas that would benefit from enhanced e-science support are described. Plans to address the growing e-research needs of health sciences researchers are also discussed. PMID:23585706

  4. Reconciling statistical and systems science approaches to public health.

    PubMed

    Ip, Edward H; Rahmandad, Hazhir; Shoham, David A; Hammond, Ross; Huang, Terry T-K; Wang, Youfa; Mabry, Patricia L

    2013-10-01

    Although systems science has emerged as a set of innovative approaches to study complex phenomena, many topically focused researchers including clinicians and scientists working in public health are somewhat befuddled by this methodology that at times appears to be radically different from analytic methods, such as statistical modeling, to which the researchers are accustomed. There also appears to be conflicts between complex systems approaches and traditional statistical methodologies, both in terms of their underlying strategies and the languages they use. We argue that the conflicts are resolvable, and the sooner the better for the field. In this article, we show how statistical and systems science approaches can be reconciled, and how together they can advance solutions to complex problems. We do this by comparing the methods within a theoretical framework based on the work of population biologist Richard Levins. We present different types of models as representing different tradeoffs among the four desiderata of generality, realism, fit, and precision. PMID:24084395

  5. Has the time come for big science in wildlife health?

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Jonathan Mark

    2013-12-01

    The consequences of wildlife emerging diseases are global and profound with increased burden on the public health system, negative impacts on the global economy, declines and extinctions of wildlife species, and subsequent loss of ecological integrity. Examples of health threats to wildlife include Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes a cutaneous fungal infection of amphibians and is linked to declines of amphibians globally; and the recently discovered Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans, the etiologic agent of white nose syndrome which has caused precipitous declines of North American bat species. Of particular concern are the novel pathogens that have emerged as they are particularly devastating and challenging to manage. A big science approach to wildlife health research is needed if we are to make significant and enduring progress in managing these diseases. The advent of new analytical models and bench assays will provide us with the mathematical and molecular tools to identify and anticipate threats to wildlife, and understand the ecology and epidemiology of these diseases. Specifically, new molecular diagnostic techniques have opened up avenues for pathogen discovery, and the application of spatially referenced databases allows for risk assessments that can assist in targeting surveillance. Long-term, systematic collection of data for wildlife health and integration with other datasets is also essential. Multidisciplinary research programs should be expanded to increase our understanding of the drivers of emerging diseases and allow for the development of better disease prevention and management tools, such as vaccines. Finally, we need to create a National Fish and Wildlife Health Network that provides the operational framework (governance, policies, procedures, etc.) by which entities with a stake in wildlife health cooperate and collaborate to achieve optimal outcomes for human, animal, and ecosystem health. PMID:24136386

  6. Interdisciplinary Environmental-health Science Throughout Disaster Lifecycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Morman, S. A.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Potential human health effects from exposures to hazardous disaster materials and environmental contamination are common concerns following disasters. Using several examples from US Geological Survey environmental disaster responses (e.g., 2001 World Trade Center, mine tailings spills, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, 2007-2013 wildfires, 2011 Gulf oil spill, 2012 Hurricane Sandy, 2013 Colorado floods) and disaster scenarios (2011 ARkStorm, 2013 SAFRR tsunami) this presentation will illustrate the role for collaborative earth, environmental, and health science throughout disaster lifecycles. Pre-disaster environmental baseline measurements are needed to help understand environmental influences on pre-disaster health baselines, and to constrain the magnitude of a disaster's impacts. During and following disasters, there is a need for interdisciplinary rapid-response and longer-term assessments that: sample and characterize the physical, chemical, and microbial makeup of complex materials generated by the disasters; fingerprint material sources; monitor, map, and model dispersal and evolution of disaster materials in the environment; help understand how the materials are modified by environmental processes; and, identify key characteristics and processes that influence the exposures and toxicity of disaster materials to humans and the living environment. This information helps emergency responders, public health experts, and cleanup managers: 1) identify short- and long-term exposures to disaster materials that may affect health; 2) prioritize areas for cleanup; and 3) develop appropriate disposal solutions or restoration uses for disaster materials. By integrating lessons learned from past disasters with geospatial information on vulnerable sources of natural or anthropogenic contaminants, the environmental health implications of looming disasters or disaster scenarios can be better anticipated, which helps enhance preparedness and resilience. Understanding economic costs of

  7. Health sciences librarians, patient contact, and secondary traumatic stress*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Rachel W.; McCrillis, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in health sciences librarians (HSLs) who have direct contact with traumatized individuals and their families. Methods: A twenty-five-item survey and the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS) were distributed via email to three Medical Library Association email discussion lists. Results: A total of fifty-five HSLs responded to the survey. Survey results indicate moderate levels of STS and variability of symptoms among participants. Conclusions: Library and employee assistance program managers should be aware of the emotional toll of patient and/or family contact for HSLs. PMID:25918488

  8. Tibetan medicine: a complementary science of optimal health.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Joseph J; Blackhall, Leslie J; Rapgay, Lobsang

    2009-08-01

    Traditional medical systems are challenging because their theories and practices strike many conventionally trained physicians and researchers as incomprehensible. Should modern medicine dismiss them as unscientific, view them as sources of alternatives hidden in a matrix of superstition, or regard them as complementary sciences of medicine? We make the latter argument using the example of Tibetan medicine. Tibetan medicine is based on analytic models and methods that are rationally defined, internally coherent, and make testable predictions, meeting current definitions of "science." A ninth century synthesis of Indian, Chinese, Himalayan, and Greco-Persian traditions, Tibetan medicine is the most comprehensive form of Eurasian healthcare and the world's first integrative medicine. Incorporating rigorous systems of meditative self-healing and ascetic self-care from India, it includes a world-class paradigm of mind/body and preventive medicine. Adapting the therapeutic philosophy and contemplative science of Indian Buddhism to the quality of secular life and death, it features the world's most effective systems of positive and palliative healthcare. Based on qualitative theories and intersubjective methods, it involves predictions and therapies shown to be more accurate and effective than those of modern medicine in fields from physiology and pharmacology to neuroscience, mind/body medicine, and positive health. The possibility of complementary sciences follows from the latest view of science as a set of tools--instruments of social activity based on learned agreement in aims and methods--rather than as a monolith of absolute truth. Implications of this pluralistic outlook for medical research and practice are discussed. PMID:19743556

  9. New library buildings: the Health Sciences Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, R B

    1979-01-01

    The new Health Sciences Library of Memorial University of Newfoundland is described and illustrated. A library facility that forms part of a larger health sciences center, this is a medium-sized academic health sciences library built on a single level. Along with a physical description of the library and its features, the concepts of single-level libraries, phased occupancy, and the project management approach to building a large health center library are discussed in detail. Images PMID:476319

  10. Conceptualising population health: from mechanistic thinking to complexity science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic interpretation of reality can be traced to the influential work by René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton. Their theories were able to accurately predict most physical phenomena relating to motion, optics and gravity. This paradigm had at least three principles and approaches: reductionism, linearity and hierarchy. These ideas appear to have influenced social scientists and the discourse on population health. In contrast, Complexity Science takes a more holistic view of systems. It views natural systems as being 'open', with fuzzy borders, constantly adapting to cope with pressures from the environment. These are called Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). The sub-systems within it lack stable hierarchies, and the roles of agency keep changing. The interactions with the environment and among sub-systems are non-linear interactions and lead to self-organisation and emergent properties. Theoretical frameworks such as epi+demos+cracy and the ecosocial approach to health have implicitly used some of these concepts of interacting dynamic sub-systems. Using Complexity Science we can view population health outcomes as an emergent property of CAS, which has numerous dynamic non-linear interactions among its interconnected sub-systems or agents. In order to appreciate these sub-systems and determinants, one should acquire a basic knowledge of diverse disciplines and interact with experts from different disciplines. Strategies to improve health should be multi-pronged, and take into account the diversity of actors, determinants and contexts. The dynamic nature of the system requires that the interventions are constantly monitored to provide early feedback to a flexible system that takes quick corrections. PMID:21247500

  11. 78 FR 59042 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  12. 77 FR 9673 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Investigator, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, 111...

  13. Inside outreach: a challenge for health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Jane; Berryman, Donna; Harger, Nancy; Julian, Paul; Peterson, Nancy; Spinner, Margaret; Varney, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Like medical and health sciences libraries throughout the country, the Lamar Soutter Library (LSL) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School is dealing with ever-increasing outreach needs in times of diminishing funding. With the goal of reshaping the library's outreach program to better serve our patron groups, the Outreach Study Group was formed to investigate existing models of outreach. Methods: The group initially examined the current literature and subsequently conducted a nationwide survey of medical and health sciences libraries to identify trends in outreach. This article details the methods used for the survey, including establishing criteria for selecting participants, determining the focus, and developing and conducting the survey. Results: Of the 40 libraries invited to participate, 63% completed the survey. An analysis of the data revealed successes, problems, and trends. The group's conclusions led to recommendations for the LSL's future outreach efforts. Conclusions: Analysis of the data revealed key findings in the areas of strategic planning, funding, and evaluation. A thoughtful definition of outreach ensures that outreach activities are expressions of the library's mission. Funding shifts require flexible programs. Evaluation provides data necessary to create new programs, sustain successful ones, and avoid repeating mistakes. PMID:16059422

  14. [The approach of sciences of complexity in health services administration].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Historically, health services administration has been managed under a Taylorist, Fayolist, humanist and bureaucratic focus approach. However, today dynamic and competitive behaviors that require others approaches in management are developing. Because of the social, scientific and technological changes that are occurring, it is necessary to abandon hierarchical and authoritarian schemes, "up and down" lines, prescriptive rules and order line up must be left behind. Health services administration is an adapted complex system that is not proportional, neither predictable in direction or magnitude. A new proposal is to focus on the sciences of complexity, where the social factors, materials, economics, human and ethics coincide with order and disorder, reason and unreason, and in which we must accept that the phenomenon that emerges creates different organizing different structures from the addition or subtraction of components. There is distance in the process of cause and direct effect. The mirage from the sciences of complexity are trans-disciplinary and we have accepted this in others branches of knowledge, such as quantum physics, non-linear mathematics and cybernetics, so we have to accept the influence of entropy, non-entropy, attractors, the theory of chaos and fractals. PMID:23693104

  15. Governing GMOs in the USA: science, law and public health.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Controversy surrounds the production and consumption of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Proponents argue that GMO food sources represent the only viable solution to food shortages in an ever-growing global population. Science reports no harm from GMO use and consumption so far. Opponents fear the potentially negative impact that GMO development and use could have on the environment and consumers, and are concerned about the lack of data on the long-term effects of GMO use. We discuss the development of GMO food sources, the history of legislation and policy for the labeling requirements of GMO food products, and the health, environmental, and legal rationale for and against GMO food labeling. The Food and Drug Administration regulates food with GMOs within a coordinated framework of federal agencies. Despite mounting scientific evidence that GMO foods are substantially equivalent to traditionally bred food sources, debate remains over the appropriateness of GMO food labeling. In fact, food manufacturers have mounted a First Amendment challenge against Vermont's passage of a law that requires GMO labeling. Mandatory GMO labeling is not supported by science. Compulsory GMO labels may not only hinder the development of agricultural biotechnology, but may also exacerbate the misconception that GMOs endanger people's health. PMID:26536836

  16. The health sciences librarian as Internet navigator and interpreter.

    PubMed Central

    Warling, B N; Stave, C D

    1995-01-01

    Over the past several years, thousands of networked information resources have become available to individuals and institutions with access to the Internet. Unfortunately, the dizzying array of computing and networking environments often frustrates end users' attempts to navigate the Internet. Librarians have begun to take responsibility not only for instructing users in the use of basic network tools such as file transfer, remote log-in, and electronic mail, but also for answering questions concerning network access and even information system design. The authors show how, by continuing to adapt to this new and volatile environment, health sciences librarians find themselves playing increasingly important roles in shaping the information policies and practices of their institutions. To illustrate these new roles, the authors review the experiences of health sciences librarians at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Diego. These institutions have varying and complex networking environments, and their biomedical libraries have taken lead roles in clarifying and interpreting their particular Internet features. PMID:8547896

  17. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  18. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity.

    PubMed

    Valantine, Hannah A; Collins, Francis S

    2015-10-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation's population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation's health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity's impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  19. Translating Family-Focused Prevention Science into Public Health Impact

    PubMed Central

    Spoth, Richard L.; Schainker, Lisa M.; Hiller-Sturmhöefel, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Underage drinking is a pervasive problem in the United States, with serious consequences for youth, families, communities, and society as a whole. Family-focused preventive interventions for children and adolescents have shown potential for reducing underage drinking and other problem behaviors. Research findings indicate that clear advances have been made, in terms of both the number of evidence-based interventions available, and in the quality of the methods used to evaluate them. To fully reap the benefits of such preventive interventions and achieve public health impact, the findings of family-focused preventive intervention science must be translated into real-world, community practices. This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors—effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation. Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors. A model for community–university partnerships has been developed that potentially can facilitate the dissemination and public health impact of universal interventions to prevent underage drinking and other problem behaviors. This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention. PMID:22330218

  20. Venture funding for science-based African health innovation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While venture funding has been applied to biotechnology and health in high-income countries, it is still nascent in these fields in developing countries, and particularly in Africa. Yet the need for implementing innovative solutions to health challenges is greatest in Africa, with its enormous burden of communicable disease. Issues such as risk, investment opportunities, return on investment requirements, and quantifying health impact are critical in assessing venture capital’s potential for supporting health innovation. This paper uses lessons learned from five venture capital firms from Kenya, South Africa, China, India, and the US to suggest design principles for African health venture funds. Discussion The case study method was used to explore relevant funds, and lessons for the African context. The health venture funds in this study included publicly-owned organizations, corporations, social enterprises, and subsidiaries of foreign venture firms. The size and type of investments varied widely. The primary investor in four funds was the International Finance Corporation. Three of the funds aimed primarily for financial returns, one aimed primarily for social and health returns, and one had mixed aims. Lessons learned include the importance of measuring and supporting both social and financial returns; the need to engage both upstream capital such as government risk-funding and downstream capital from the private sector; and the existence of many challenges including difficulty of raising capital, low human resource capacity, regulatory barriers, and risky business environments. Based on these lessons, design principles for appropriate venture funding are suggested. Summary Based on the cases studied and relevant experiences elsewhere, there is a case for venture funding as one support mechanism for science-based African health innovation, with opportunities for risk-tolerant investors to make financial as well as social returns. Such funds should

  1. Social Networking Addiction among Health Sciences Students in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Addiction to social networking sites (SNSs) is an international issue with numerous methods of measurement. The impact of such addictions among health science students is of particular concern. This study aimed to measure SNS addiction rates among health sciences students at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: In April 2014, an anonymous English-language six-item electronic self-reporting survey based on the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale was administered to a non-random cohort of 141 medical and laboratory science students at SQU. The survey was used to measure usage of three SNSs: Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California, USA), YouTube (YouTube, San Bruno, California, USA) and Twitter (Twitter Inc., San Francisco, California, USA). Two sets of criteria were used to calculate addiction rates (a score of 3 on at least four survey items or a score of 3 on all six items). Work-related SNS usage was also measured. Results: A total of 81 students completed the survey (response rate: 57.4%). Of the three SNSs, YouTube was most commonly used (100%), followed by Facebook (91.4%) and Twitter (70.4%). Usage and addiction rates varied significantly across the three SNSs. Addiction rates to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, respectively, varied according to the criteria used (14.2%, 47.2% and 33.3% versus 6.3%, 13.8% and 12.8%). However, addiction rates decreased when work-related activity was taken into account. Conclusion: Rates of SNS addiction among this cohort indicate a need for intervention. Additionally, the results suggest that addiction to individual SNSs should be measured and that work-related activities should be taken into account during measurement. PMID:26357556

  2. Teaching Environmental Health Science for Informed Citizenship in the Science Classroom and Afterschool Clubs.

    PubMed

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M; Hundal, Savreen; Kramer, Judy F; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2012-08-01

    In the era of growing concerns about human-induced climate change and sustainable development, it is important for the schools to prepare students for meaningful engagement with environmental policies that will determine the future of our society. To do this, educators need to face a number of challenges. These include deciding on the science knowledge and skills needed for informed citizenship, identifying teaching practices for fostering such knowledge and skills, and finding ways to implement new practices into the tightly packed existing curriculum. This paper describes two collaborative efforts between the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and University of Maryland College of Education that attempt to meet these challenges. The focus of both projects is on helping students develop information seeking and evaluation and argumentation skills, and applying them to complex socio-scientific issues that have bearing on students' daily lives. The first effort involves co-designing an afterschool environmental health club curriculum with an interdisciplinary team of middle school teachers. The second effort is the development and implementation of a week-long school drinking water quality debate activity in a high school environmental science classroom. Both projects center on Tox Town, an NLM web resource that introduces students to environmental health issues in everyday environments. The paper describes successes and challenges of environmental health curriculum development, including teachers' and researchers' perception of contextual constraints in the club and classroom setting, tensions inherent in co-design, and students' experience with socio-scientific argumentation. PMID:24382985

  3. Teaching Environmental Health Science for Informed Citizenship in the Science Classroom and Afterschool Clubs

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M.; Hundal, Savreen; Kramer, Judy F.; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2013-01-01

    In the era of growing concerns about human-induced climate change and sustainable development, it is important for the schools to prepare students for meaningful engagement with environmental policies that will determine the future of our society. To do this, educators need to face a number of challenges. These include deciding on the science knowledge and skills needed for informed citizenship, identifying teaching practices for fostering such knowledge and skills, and finding ways to implement new practices into the tightly packed existing curriculum. This paper describes two collaborative efforts between the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and University of Maryland College of Education that attempt to meet these challenges. The focus of both projects is on helping students develop information seeking and evaluation and argumentation skills, and applying them to complex socio-scientific issues that have bearing on students’ daily lives. The first effort involves co-designing an afterschool environmental health club curriculum with an interdisciplinary team of middle school teachers. The second effort is the development and implementation of a week-long school drinking water quality debate activity in a high school environmental science classroom. Both projects center on Tox Town, an NLM web resource that introduces students to environmental health issues in everyday environments. The paper describes successes and challenges of environmental health curriculum development, including teachers’ and researchers’ perception of contextual constraints in the club and classroom setting, tensions inherent in co-design, and students’ experience with socio-scientific argumentation. PMID:24382985

  4. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human

  5. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  6. 78 FR 32259 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to July 15, 2013, 5:00 p.m... on May 20, 2013, 78 FR 97. The meeting notice is amended to change the location of the meeting...

  7. 78 FR 17219 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  8. 78 FR 39739 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  9. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 78 FR 25754 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...