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Sample records for galter health sciences

  1. Case study: the Health SmartLibrary* experiences in web personalization and customization at the Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, James; Frisque, Michelle; Hunt, Steve; Walton, Linda; Handler, Jonathan; Gillam, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Question: How can the user's access to health information, especially full-text articles, be improved? The solution is building and evaluating the Health SmartLibrary (HSL). Setting: The setting is the Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Method: The HSL was built on web-based personalization and customization tools: My E-Resources, Stay Current, Quick Search, and File Cabinet. Personalization and customization data were tracked to show user activity with these value-added, online services. Main Results: Registration data indicated that users were receptive to personalized resource selection and that the automated application of specialty-based, personalized HSLs was more frequently adopted than manual customization by users. Those who did customize customized My E-Resources and Stay Current more often than Quick Search and File Cabinet. Most of those who customized did so only once. Conclusion: Users did not always take advantage of the services designed to aid their library research experiences. When personalization is available at registration, users readily accepted it. Customization tools were used less frequently; however, more research is needed to determine why this was the case. PMID:20428276

  2. Environmental Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Alan; Smith, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Describes an environmental health science technology curriculum designed to provide technicians in the areas of air, water and wastewater analyses, treatment plant operators, public health enforcement officers, and pollution inspectors. (GS)

  3. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  4. Physics of Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  5. Standards for Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, E. Ray

    1982-01-01

    Discusses service standards (level of excellence or adequacy in performance of library service) and their incorporation in the accreditation process for hospital library service and academic health sciences libraries. The certification program developed for health sciences librarians by the Medical Library Association is reviewed. Fifty-nine…

  6. Education for Health Sciences Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is provided of education for health sciences librarianship by considering its development, current status, and possible future evolution. Discusses the role of the professional association in providing a credentialing program for its members. Resources for the study of health sciences librarianship are appended. Contains 50 references.…

  7. Health Science. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The central theme of this book is that each person is responsible for his or her own physical well-being. It offers factual knowledge of which forms of behavior are beneficial and why and emphasizes the need for positive motivation toward healthful living. The major categories covered in 24 chapters are: (1) emotional and neurological health; (2)…

  8. High School Health Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This curriculum guide contains units of study for high school health science courses in Iowa. The first section is a competency outline for three topics: introduction to health care; nurse aide/orderly; and rehabilitation aide. For each competency, the following information is provided: objectives; suggested learning activities; resources; and…

  9. USGS Science Serves Public Health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.

    2010-01-01

    Human health so often depends on the health of the environment and wildlife around us. The presence of naturally occurring or human environmental contaminants and the emergence of diseases transferred between animals and humans are growing concerns worldwide. The USGS is a source of natural science information vital for understanding the quantity and quality of our earth and living resources. This information improves our understanding not only of how human activities affect environmental and ecological health, but also of how the quality of our environment and wildlife in turn affects human health. USGS is taking a leadership role in providing the natural science information needed by health researchers, policy makers, and the public to safeguard public health

  10. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  11. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertise a Job Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information Whether you're a high school student ... this rewarding, challenging profession. What is a health sciences or medical librarian? What do they do? Health ...

  12. Physics With Health Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urone, Paul Peter

    1985-09-01

    An accessible, algebra-based text covering the introductory physics necessary for applied health and nursing. Presentation integrates health science applications throughout. Excellent illustrations support the exposition. Chapters contain over 100 worked examples, over 450 review questions, and more than 550 end-of-chapter problems graded according to difficulty. Offers discussion of the latest applications such as ionizing radiation and radiation doses, nuclear imaging techniques, CT scanners, ultrasound techniques, artificial hearts, and laser surgery.

  13. Health Sciences: A Dissertation Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This expanded listing includes many of the dissertations and Masters theses previously listed in the catalog, doctoral dissertations in the Health and Behavioral Sciences. The psychology titles have been placed in a separate publication. Titles in this catalog are listed alphabetically by author under 35 key subject headings. Doctoral…

  14. Marketing the Health Sciences Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, O. Gene

    The basic activities of marketing are discussed, including gathering information and determining needs, designing a program around the elements of the marketing mix, and managing the marketing program. Following a general discussion, applications of the marketing concepts to a health sciences library are described. The administrator of the health…

  15. Women's Health and Complexity Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Explores how changes in conceptual frameworks in science, from reductionism to complexity; an outgrowth of the chaos theory that views parts in relation to one another, the entity they form, and the environment, must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. (SLD)

  16. TELEVISION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRANT, THEO. S.; MERRILL, IRVING R.

    A MAJOR MEDICAL CENTER CONDUCTED A SERIES OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES CONCERNED WITH THE USE OF CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION INSTRUCTION IN THE CURRICULUMS OF MEDICINE, DENTISTRY, PHARMACY, AND NURSING. THE SIX STUDIES REPORTED WERE (1) OVER 300 HEALTH SCIENCE TELEVISION PRESENTATIONS WERE PRODUCED, PRESENTED TO STUDENTS, AND EVALUATED. REPORTS WERE MADE…

  17. Health sciences librarians and mental health laws.

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, F R

    1978-01-01

    Two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, O'Connor v. Donaldson and Bounds v. Smith, hold important implications for health sciences librarians serving in mental health facilities. The first, O'Connor, with its many ancillary holdings, puts mental health personnel on notice that patients have certain basic rights, which courts all over the country will now be required to enforce. In Bounds the court has ruled that prison authorities must assist prison inmates in preparing and filing legal papers. The ruling will most likely benefit all mentally disabled prisoners, and future litigation may expand this category to include: (1) persons committed under the criminal code, (2) persons under involuntary commitment not related to the criminal code, and (3) persons voluntarily committed. A selective annotated bibliography, consisting of background readings in mental health and the law, basic rights, law library materials, and mental health legal services, has been compiled to help librarians establish and develop legal collections in anticipation of court decisions that will expand the conditions of Bounds to include all mentally disabled patients. PMID:361117

  18. Environmental health discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in environmental health. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; animal and human subjects; and research and development. This document summarizes the history and current status of the program elements, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies scientific priorities, and defines critical questions in the three disciplines: (1) Barophysiology, (2) Toxicology, and (3) Microbiology. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Officers and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational research and development activities, both intramural and extramural, in this area. The document is divided into sections addressing these three disciplines.

  19. Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Elizabeth; Renauld, Mia; Edelstein, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social science research has been central in documenting and analyzing community discovery of environmental exposure and consequential processes. Collaboration with environmental health science through team projects has advanced and improved our understanding of environmental health and justice. Objective We sought to identify diverse methods and topics in which social scientists have expanded environmental health understandings at multiple levels, to examine how transdisciplinary environmental health research fosters better science, and to learn how these partnerships have been able to flourish because of the support from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Methods We analyzed various types of social science research to investigate how social science contributes to environmental health. We also examined NIEHS programs that foster social science. In addition, we developed a case study of a community-based participation research project in Akwesasne in order to demonstrate how social science has enhanced environmental health science. Results Social science has informed environmental health science through ethnographic studies of contaminated communities, analysis of spatial distribution of environmental injustice, psychological experience of contamination, social construction of risk and risk perception, and social impacts of disasters. Social science–environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. Conclusions A transdisciplinary approach for environmental health practice has emerged that engages the social sciences to paint a full picture of the consequences of contamination so that policy makers, regulators, public health officials, and other stakeholders can better ameliorate impacts and prevent future exposure. Citation Hoover E, Renauld M, Edelstein MR, Brown P. 2015. Social

  20. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Question: What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? Data Sources: The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. Study Selection: All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. Data Extraction: A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. Main Results: The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. Conclusion: The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored. PMID:12398244

  1. The Educational Role of Health Sciences Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Jocelyn A.; Sayre, Jean Williams

    1993-01-01

    Considers the expanding educational role of health sciences librarians in both academic centers and in hospitals resulting from influences of new educational models and new technology. Topics addressed include undergraduate health sciences education; continuing education; new technology and medical informatics; library educational programs;…

  2. Systems Science Methods in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Douglas A.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems abound in public health. Complex systems are made up of heterogeneous elements that interact with one another, have emergent properties that are not explained by understanding the individual elements of the system, persist over time and adapt to changing circumstances. Public health is starting to use results from systems science studies to shape practice and policy, for example in preparing for global pandemics. However, systems science study designs and analytic methods remain underutilized and are not widely featured in public health curricula or training. In this review we present an argument for the utility of systems science methods in public health, introduce three important systems science methods (system dynamics, network analysis, and agent-based modeling), and provide three case studies where these methods have been used to answer important public health science questions in the areas of infectious disease, tobacco control, and obesity. PMID:22224885

  3. Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Toby L; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students' spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students' spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students' success. PMID:25404167

  4. Political Science Theory for Public Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Community health educators are well versed in the behavior sciences, including intervention theories. However, most public health professionals are not familiar with the policy theories related to political advocacy. Because health educators are engaging in policy advocacy more frequently, and as a result of the profession including policy…

  5. Health Science and the Young Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Marion B.; Oberteuffer, Delbert

    This book provides material to design and carry out a health science program at the elementary level with outcomes which are clearly defined and measurably effective. Chapter one describes health problems that justify the school health program. In chapters two and three the processes of curriculum and the sources of data that are basic to…

  6. On the Health of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Harold G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the present status of science as an industrialized-affluent culture resting upon a public woefully lacking in scientific background and scientists with activities taken in by nihilism. Suggests all scientists actively work together through teaching, talk, and behavior to counter the forces of anti-science and nihilism. (CC)

  7. Managing Health and Safety in Science Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Discusses strategies for managing health and safety within science departments. Emphasizes the importance of risk assessment for both pupil activities and those carried out by technicians. Stresses the role of training and the need for security. (MM)

  8. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries. Images PMID:10550027

  9. Managing Health and Safety in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Since science in primary schools is very safe, the coordinator's role in respect of health and safety can be a relatively modest one and integrated with other parts of the job. In this article, the author outlines the role of the science coordinator and sources of advice.

  10. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  11. Health Hazards in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenk, Barbara Scherr

    Designed for high school science teachers, the document warns of potential health threats of performing certain experiments and using certain chemicals or chemical combinations in their courses. Following a rationale for more carefully considering health dangers, the document gives suggestions on what can be done by teachers. Reports such as a…

  12. Remote Users of Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Phyllis C.; Wright, Barbara A.; Waugh, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the variety of innovations in service models implemented over the last 25 years that health-sciences librarians have initiated to extend library services and information to remote users. Trends in health-care-management systems, education initiatives, the rise in consumerism, and expectations of new categories of users are discussed.…

  13. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  14. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  15. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  16. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  17. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing...

  18. Health, Wellbeing and Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Giovanni; Agostoni, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    For social interventions aimed at improving nutrition behavior evidence from randomized trials is essential but cannot be the only approach of research activities. Interventions on dietary habits require considerations on food security, economic and environmental sustainability, and a broad meaning of wellbeing which includes, but also goes beyond, health effects. The model of research in nutrition requires a new consideration of observational studies, mainly through different analytical models. Nutrition and food studies need research programs where medical (nutrition and health), psychology (how we behave), economics (how resources are used and their impact on wellbeing) and sociology (how social determinant shape behavior) collaborate. PMID:25785783

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Basic Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathey, Barbara; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in a set of nine learning modules designed to instruct nursing and allied health students in a variety of biological topics. The first module, by Barbara Cathey, discusses cell growth and the proliferation of cells in benign and malignant tumors. The second module, by Eugene Volz, describes the…

  20. Instructional multimedia computing in the health sciences.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P

    1992-01-01

    This article focuses on the development and utilization of interactive videodisc (IVD) and multimedia instruction in the health sciences. The characteristics of IVD and multimedia are outlined and the four levels of IVD systems that can be used in health science education are described. The advantages of utilization of videodisc or multimedia materials are presented, as well as instructional approaches. Potential applications such as simulations, tutorials, role-modeling, and drill-and-practice are described. Research findings, levels of curricular integration, instructional delivery, and courseware networking are also described. The article concludes with suggestions for institutional development of IVD materials or the incorporation of off-the-shelf programs into health science curricula. PMID:1400275

  1. Integrating oral health into the interdisciplinary health sciences curriculum.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C; Aghazadeh-Sanai, Nona; Mohammed, Shan; Fulmer, Terry T

    2014-10-01

    Oral health inequities for older adults warrant new models of interprofessional education and collaborative practice. The Innovations in Interprofessional Oral Health: Technology, Instruction, Practice and Service curricular model at Bouvé College of Health Sciences aims to transform health professions education and primary care practice to meet global and local oral health challenges. Innovations in simulation and experiential learning help to advance interprofessional education and integrate oral health care as an essential component of comprehensive primary health care. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly clinic is an exemplary model of patient-centeredness and interprofessional collaborative practice for addressing unmet oral health needs of its patient population. PMID:25201545

  2. Comparison of health risk behavior, awareness, and health benefit beliefs of health science and non-health science students: An international study.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa; Yung, Tony K C; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Rehman, Rehana

    2016-06-01

    This study determines the differences in health risk behavior, knowledge, and health benefit beliefs between health science and non-health science university students in 17 low and middle income countries. Anonymous questionnaire data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of 13,042 undergraduate university students (4,981 health science and 8,061 non-health science students) from 17 universities in 17 countries across Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Results indicate that overall, health science students had the same mean number of health risk behaviors as non-health science university students. Regarding addictive risk behavior, fewer health science students used tobacco, were binge drinkers, or gambled once a week or more. Health science students also had a greater awareness of health behavior risks (5.5) than non-health science students (4.6). Linear regression analysis found a strong association with poor or weak health benefit beliefs and the health risk behavior index. There was no association between risk awareness and health risk behavior among health science students and an inverse association among non-health science students. PMID:26538523

  3. Health/Science: Objectives Guide. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The guide, one of a series of documents on Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students, presents a continuum of objectives in the areas of health and science which should be taught in grades 9-12 and which represent minimal competencies for independent living.…

  4. Teaching Health and Safety through Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and investigative work has been an integral element in the teaching of science in schools for many years. Although students have always been taught to work safely, there is now a more general requirement that they will be taught about health and safety and how it should be implemented. That is, they must understand something of the…

  5. Women and health sciences librarianship: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R K

    1977-01-01

    In biomedical libraries, as in other areas of librarianship, women continue to be underrepresented in administrative positions. This paper reviews some of the factors contributing to the present situation and discusses implications and suggested courses of action for health sciences librarians. PMID:884344

  6. Computer Clinical Simulations in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gary L; Keith, Kenneth D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the key characteristics of clinical simulation, some developmental foundations, two current research studies, and some implications for the future of health science education. Investigations of the effects of computer-based simulation indicate that acquisition of decision-making skills is greater than with noncomputerized simulations.…

  7. Teaching Computer Science to Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In 1971 the National Library of Medicine underwrote the promotion of computer technology integration into clinical medicine by providing graduate-level training for faculty members in the health sciences. The experience of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in the implementation of an NLM training grant is reported. (MLW)

  8. HSOCLCUG: A Network of Health Sciences Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Amy D.; Estrada, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the activities of the Health Sciences OCLC User Group, which was organized to establish a forum for communication; provide information about National Library of Medicine cataloging rules in OCLC; maintain close relations with the National Library of Medicine and the Medical Libraries Association; and represent its constituency to OCLC.…

  9. Science academy statements on water, health, and science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    Several days prior to the Group of 8 (G8) summit of nations on 26-27 May in Deauville, France, science academies from those nations and five others issued joint statements calling for the governments to take actions regarding water and health as well as science education. The water and health statement indicates that nearly 3 billion people will be living in water-scarce countries by 2050 and that 2.6 billion already lack access to proper sanitation and nearly 900 million lack access to a clean water supply. The statement calls for developing basic infrastructure for sanitation, promoting education to change the behavior of populations regarding water supply, funding research and development to identify pathogens, and improving water management and hygiene standards, among other measures.

  10. The New Knowledge Environment: Quality Initiatives in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Reviews changes in health sciences libraries, including the evolving role of health sciences librarians, education and training of health sciences librarians, rethinking reference services, impact on quality health care, improving the value of information, virtual libraries, National Library of Medicine initiatives, and quality initiatives. (LRW)

  11. Objectivity and ethics in environmental health science.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Steve

    2003-01-01

    During the past several decades, philosophers of science and scientists themselves have become increasingly aware of the complex ways in which scientific knowledge is shaped by its social context. This awareness has called into question traditional notions of objectivity. Working scientists need an understanding of their own practice that avoids the naïve myth that science can become objective by avoiding social influences as well as the reductionist view that its content is determined simply by economic interests. A nuanced perspective on this process can improve research ethics and increase the capacity of science to contribute to equitable public policy, especially in areas such as environmental and occupational health, which have direct implications for profits, regulation, legal responsibility, and social justice. I discuss research into health effects of the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, as an example of how scientific explanations are shaped by social concepts, norms, and preconceptions. I describe how a scientific practice that developed under the influence of medical and nuclear physics interacted with observations made by exposed community members to affect research questions, the interpretation of evidence, inferences about biological mechanisms in disease causation, and the use of evidence in litigation. By considering the history and philosophy of their disciplines, practicing researchers can increase the rigor, objectivity, and social responsibility of environmental health science. PMID:14594636

  12. Objectivity and ethics in environmental health science.

    PubMed

    Wing, Steve

    2003-11-01

    During the past several decades, philosophers of science and scientists themselves have become increasingly aware of the complex ways in which scientific knowledge is shaped by its social context. This awareness has called into question traditional notions of objectivity. Working scientists need an understanding of their own practice that avoids the naïve myth that science can become objective by avoiding social influences as well as the reductionist view that its content is determined simply by economic interests. A nuanced perspective on this process can improve research ethics and increase the capacity of science to contribute to equitable public policy, especially in areas such as environmental and occupational health, which have direct implications for profits, regulation, legal responsibility, and social justice. I discuss research into health effects of the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, as an example of how scientific explanations are shaped by social concepts, norms, and preconceptions. I describe how a scientific practice that developed under the influence of medical and nuclear physics interacted with observations made by exposed community members to affect research questions, the interpretation of evidence, inferences about biological mechanisms in disease causation, and the use of evidence in litigation. By considering the history and philosophy of their disciplines, practicing researchers can increase the rigor, objectivity, and social responsibility of environmental health science. PMID:14594636

  13. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  14. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2013 Dietary Supplements Red Yeast ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  15. Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Chronic Pain: What the Science Says Share: September 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  16. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2016 © Thinkstock Clinical Guidelines, Scientific ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  17. Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complementary Health Approaches for Smoking Cessation: What the Science Says Share: January 2014 Mindfulness Meditation Mindfulness meditation ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  18. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says Share: April 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  19. [Fair use of tests in health sciences].

    PubMed

    Espelt, Albert; Viladrich, Carme; Doval, Eduardo; Aliaga, Joan; García-Rueda, Rebeca; Tárrega, Salomé

    2014-01-01

    Standardized measurement instruments (tests) have become an essential tool in health sciences. The concept of equity in the development, adaptation and administration of psychometric tests was first introduced in "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" published in 1999 by the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education. Despite its importance, this concept has been scarcely used in epidemiology and public health. Consequently, this methodological note aims to explain the concept of equity in testing and to provide tools and indications to detect and solve their inequitable use. PMID:24928357

  20. Computer Applications in Health Science Education.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, computer application development has experienced exponential growth, not only in the number of publications but also in the scope or contexts that have benefited from its use. In health science training, and medicine specifically, the gradual incorporation of technological developments has transformed the teaching and learning process, resulting in true "educational technology". The goal of this paper is to review the main features involved in these applications and highlight the main lines of research for the future. The results of peer reviewed literature published recently indicate the following features shared by the key technological developments in the field of health science education: first, development of simulation and visualization systems for a more complete and realistic representation of learning material over traditional paper format; second, portability and versatility of the applications, adapted for an increasing number of devices and operative systems; third, increasing focus on open source applications such as Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). PMID:26254251

  1. Implementing Twitter in a health sciences library.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Colleen; Graham, Jamie; Morton-Owens, Emily G

    2010-10-01

    The NYU Health Sciences Libraries created an account on Twitter, a microblogging service, as a new outreach tool marketed to students, faculty, and staff. The team used Twitter to promote resources, events, and news. Twitter is a part of a pipeline of information that also includes the library's Web site and Facebook. Although it is difficult to measure the effectiveness of a social networking tool, the overhead of using Twitter is so low that it merits consideration. PMID:21058176

  2. [Social Sciences and Humanities in Health in ABRASCO: the construction of social theory in health.

    PubMed

    Ianni, Aurea Maria Zöllner; Spadacio, Cristiane; Barboza, Renato; Alves, Olga Sofia Fabergé; Viana, Sabrina Daniela Lopes; Rocha, Ane Talita

    2014-11-01

    The development of recent social thinking in health in Brazil is associated with the establishment of the Public Health field and the Brazilian Association of Graduate Studies in Public Health (ABRASCO). The area of Social Sciences in Health was created together with the founding of ABRASCO. This article presents the main aspects related to the establishment and institutionalization of Social Sciences in Health in ABRASCO, based on interviews with its presidents and the coordinators of the Social Sciences Committees from 1995 to 2011. The interviews allowed capturing and analyzing the context in which this field was established and its relevance and history in Public Health as a whole, grouped in five analytical categories: (1) the development of Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health; (2) interdisciplinarity in Public Health; (3) the contribution of Social Sciences to Public Health; (4) Social Sciences in Health and the "traditional" Social Sciences; and (5) challenges for Social Sciences and the Humanities in Health. PMID:25493984

  3. The Health Physics Society Science Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2001-03-01

    The South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society (STC) maintains a program of education for science teachers, grades 4-12. This program, originally funded by the U.S. Department of Energy but now supported by STC, is intended to teach fundamentals of radiation and radiation safety at a level suitable for comprehension by lay persons. Course topics include Fundamentals of Radiation, Cellular Biology and Radiation Health Effects, Exposure to Radiation in Modern Life, Radioactive Waste, and Radiation Safety. The 8-hour course is usually given on Saturdays at locations in Texas as requested by educational or other groups. Classes of up to 25 teacher-students are ideal. Lesson plans, reference materials, a video tape, software, and a radiation detector are provided to each participant. To schedule a workshop in your area, contact alevans@swbell.net or David Fogle, david.fogle@tdh.state.tx.us.

  4. Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Walter W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences is to encourage minority collegiate and junior and senior high school students to pursue careers in biomedical and public health sciences. The objectives of the Symposium are to: (1) Provide information to participants concerning biomedical and public health science careers in government, academe and industry; (2) Provide information to minority students about training activities necessary to pursue a biomedical or public health science career and the fiscal support that one can obtain for such training; and (3) Provide opportunities for participating minority biomedical and public health role models to interact with participants.

  5. A Paradigm for the Next Millenium: Health Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Lewis

    1991-01-01

    Described is a curriculum for a new multidisciplinary science-Health Information Science-that incorporates aspects of computer science, cognitive psychology, bioengineering, biomedical visualization, medicine, dentistry, anthropology, mathematics, library science, and the visual arts. The situation of the medical illustration profession is…

  6. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Kids' Pages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be a Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU ...

  7. Weight Loss and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Complementary and Integrative Approaches: What the Science Says Share: January 2015 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  8. Health Science Career Education for Minority Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nancy J.; Cohen, Ellen J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a health science career education program in which eighth- and ninth-grade minority students fulfill their science requirement by attending lecture and laboratory sessions at a Manhattan medical center and working individually with a professional. (DC)

  9. Design Strategy for Flexible Health Sciences Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John; Best, Gordon

    1970-01-01

    A statistical analysis of spatial allocations in university teaching hospitals and medical schools in three countries supports the hypothesis that on the “macro” level of major functional zones there is a considerable degree of invariance in space ratios, despite wide divergence in size, organization, and operating policies. On the basis of these findings a model is developed that makes it possible to predict, from a variety of indicators of space “needs,” the total area of a health sciences facility defined by levels of support servicing. The outputs of the model are seen as the inputs to a design strategy for potentially flexible medical facilities served by a communication lattice capable of indefinite extension. Images Fig. 9 PMID:5494269

  10. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's third annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified fourteen libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. Three of five new library buildings are freestanding structures where the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. The two other new facilities are for separately administered units where the library is a major tenant. Nine projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Six projects are in projected, predesign, or design stages or are awaiting funding approval. This paper describes four projects that illustrate technology's growing effect on librarians and libraries. They are designed to accommodate change, a plethora of electronic gear, and easy use of technology. Outwardly, they do not look much different than many other modern buildings. But, inside, the changes have been dramatic although they have evolved slowly as the building structure has been adapted to new conditions. Images PMID:8251970

  11. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L T

    1991-01-01

    Librarians were asked to submit information for an annual architectural feature on projected, partially funded, architect selected, nearly designed, bid completed, under construction, almost finished, or recently completed library construction. Thirty-two health sciences libraries reported expansion, construction of new facilities, or construction planning. Seven building programs were identified as projected, or in predesign or design stages. Five projects were new, stand-alone structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Nine projects were part of new construction for several separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. Eleven projects involved additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven projects are presented as illustrative of current library construction. Images PMID:1998824

  12. Nottingham Health Science Biobank: a sustainable bioresource.

    PubMed

    Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Thomson, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Nottingham Health Science Biobank (NHSB) was established in 2011 by a 3-year "pump priming" grant from the United Kingdom National Institute of Health Research. Before biobanking operations began, NHSB commissioned a financial report on the full costs of biobanking and worked with key stakeholders and external consultants to develop a business plan with the aim of achieving financial and operational sustainability. The plan included: scanning published information, telephone interviews with commercial companies, Freedom of Information Requests, dialogue with prospective customers, and a market analysis of global trends in the use of human tissue samples in research. Our financial report provided a comprehensive and structured costing template for biobanking and confirmed the absolute requirement to ensure cost-efficient processes, careful staff utilization, and maximization of sample turnover. Together with our external consultants, we developed a business model responsive to global interest in healthcare founded on i) identification of key therapeutic areas that mapped to the strengths of the NHSB; ii) a systematic approach to identifying companies operating in these therapy areas; iii) engagement with noncommercial stakeholders to agree strategically aligned sample collection with the aim of ensuring the value of our tissue resource. By adopting this systematic approach to business modelling, the NHSB has achieved sustainability after less than 3 years of operation. PMID:25340939

  13. Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

  14. Health in the Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum: Full Circle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Virginia; Kettler, Mary C.; Brown, Elfrieda F.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of documents from 19 college home economics/family and consumer sciences programs demonstrated the evolution of health core curriculum from emphasis on sanitation, nutrition, and food preparation to hospital-related health care. Today's emphasis on health care costs and wellness has shifted emphasis to home health care and prevention. (SK)

  15. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Division of Extramural Research... Division. Organizing Institute: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dates and Times:...

  16. How We Treated Our Clients' Need for Remote Access through a Single Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Kurt I.; Frisque, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors relate how they developed a software that provides solutions to their library system needs. The authors work at the Galter Health Sciences Library of the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, located in downtown Chicago. The library serves the medical school's faculty, staff, residents, students, and…

  17. Who Is Using the Web for Science and Health Information?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the growth of public access to computers and the Web; identifies individuals from a national sample of adults who have sought specific information from the Web; identifies individuals who have searched for science or health information; and constructs two models to predict Web use for science and health information. (Author/LRW)

  18. The impact of economic issues on Nigerian health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Belleh, G S; Akhigbe, O O

    1991-01-01

    Economic issues are among the most important factors affecting health sciences libraries in Nigeria. These issues are influenced by the political, cultural, geographic, and demographic characteristics of the country. Significant economic issues are the dependence of the national economy on a single commodity, large foreign debt and spiraling inflation, stringent foreign exchange control measures, and inadequate realization by authorities of the role and importance of health sciences libraries. With shrinking budgets, resources, and staff, health sciences libraries can neither grow nor afford library automation. Health sciences librarians must take initiatives for cooperative activities to increase and make the most of resources, pursue nontraditional methods of fund-raising, educate authorities about the role and importance of libraries, and develop and implement a plan for the development and growth of health sciences libraries in the country. PMID:1884083

  19. Sustaining librarian vitality: embedded librarianship model for health sciences libraries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    With biomedical information widely accessible from anywhere at any time, health sciences libraries have become less centralized, and they are challenged to stay relevant and vital to the mission and strategic goals of their home institution. One solution is to embed librarians at strategic points in health professions' education, research, and patient care. This article discusses a proposed five-level model of embedded librarianship within the context of health sciences libraries and describes different roles, knowledge, and skills desirable for health sciences librarians working as embedded librarians. PMID:23869633

  20. Behavioral science perspectives on health hazard/health risk appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M H; Janz, N K

    1987-01-01

    Health-promotion efforts often employ HRA as a device for providing an individual with quantitative information about the consequences of personal health-related behaviors and as an attempt to motivate the client to adopt recommendations directed at establishing a healthier lifestyle. From a behavioral science perspective, the HRA approach and process contain elements that (at least in retrospective analysis) appear to be founded in relevant bodies of theory. First, HRA seems to be a reasonably efficient mechanism for transmitting information relative to associations between personal health behaviors and mortality risks. Moreover, while general knowledge and advice about the untoward consequences of risk factors (such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, etc.) are currently widespread, HRA provides new and specific information: the client's own relative risks. Some individuals who voluntarily participate in HRA bring to the experience an already high level of readiness to take action; for them, the technique may constitute the final necessary stimulus or "cue to action" [12]. Referring to a "borrowing from the future" phenomenon, Green points out that "some educational efforts are really only triggers to behavior that would have changed eventually anyway" [44, p. 159]. Thus, where motivation is sufficiently high, receipt of HRA feedback information may by itself be capable of inducing behavior change. Second, the focus on awareness and personalization of mortality risk fits well with most theoretical formulations concerning attitudes and beliefs involved in health-related decision making. Although the emphasis on mortality and often distant negative outcomes is problematic, increasing the client's perception of personal vulnerability is a psychologically defensible approach, and fear arousal can generate attitude change (although questions of appropriate level, duration of effects obtained, acceptability, etc. still need to be resolved). Third, HRA might be

  1. A profile of health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, S C; Anand, S K

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken by the World Health Organization of health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia. It includes information on clientele, budget, personnel, collections, lending policy, dissemination of information, and reference services. The survey indicates that the collections in most of the health sciences libraries in Southeast Asia are deficient and that services provided to readers are inadequate. Recommendations for improvement are outlined. PMID:354704

  2. Appy Hour: Health Sciences Professionals Learn About Apps.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Tallie; Gregory, Joan M; Shipman, Jean P

    2016-01-01

    Appy Hour is a recurring event hosted by an academic health sciences library featuring apps that are informally presented and demonstrated by invited speakers. The audience is encouraged to ask questions during the presentation of the featured app(s). This event provides learning and networking opportunities for health sciences faculty, staff, students, and health care professionals. This article illustrates the process for hosting the event, shares lessons learned, and discusses possible future directions to gain a wider audience. PMID:27391175

  3. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p < .05 and for the HD case r = .700, p < .01. The SPs scored students higher than the other raters. Students' self-assessments were most closely aligned with the investigator. Effects were apparent due to case. Content validity was gathered in the process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates

  4. Health and Behavioral/Social Sciences in Health Services Administration Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This final report summarizes a nationwide effort to determine appropriate health and behavioral sciences curricula components for graduate programs in health administration. Chapters 1 through 3 summarize the background, methodology, and findings of the project. Chapter 4 presents an analysis of health sciences and behavioral/social science…

  5. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  6. The flipped classroom: practices and opportunities for health sciences librarians.

    PubMed

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" instructional model is being introduced into medical and health sciences curricula to provide greater efficiency in curriculum delivery and produce greater opportunity for in-depth class discussion and problem solving among participants. As educators employ the flipped classroom to invert curriculum delivery and enhance learning, health sciences librarians are also starting to explore the flipped classroom model for library instruction. This article discusses how academic and health sciences librarians are using the flipped classroom and suggests opportunities for this model to be further explored for library services. PMID:25316072

  7. Selection for preservation: considerations for the health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D T; McClure, L W

    1989-01-01

    Just as no health sciences library can afford to collect every work on a subject, neither can any health sciences library afford to preserve every item that is added to its collection. In decision making for collection development, health sciences libraries apply a set of selection criteria. Those same criteria have direct application in selection for preservation decisions. This paper summarizes the literature of selection for preservation, describes the scholarly record of biomedicine, and presents criteria for selection for preservation decisions. The preservation priorities statement for microfilming of monographs and serials in the National Library of Medicine collection is included as an appendix. PMID:2758182

  8. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  9. [Various necessary steps in clarification of relationships between health care science, medical science and nursing science].

    PubMed

    Barbosa da Silva, A

    1991-01-01

    The article asserts that a scientific discipline is defined by both its object of research or knowledge (domain) and its specific or adequate method. An appropriate definition should fulfill other necessary conditions implicit in certain fundamental rules of definition, e.g., a definition should not be too narrow or too broad. It should also respect well established uses of language, in which the concept to be defined may already have a given meaning. In Scandinavia there are three words used for the Science of Health Care. "Vårdvetenskap" e.g., is used both in Sweden and Finland. In Finland it is used to convey the view that care is essential to Man, and a holistic concept of Man/Health. So demarcated, Vårdvetenskapen complements Medicine which ontologically reduces Man to biochemistry and sickness to disease. To fulfill this function the Science of health Care should be humanistic and interdisciplinary, and not purely empirico-positivistic like Medicine. PMID:1842325

  10. The Health Sciences Library Network in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accart, Jean-Philippe

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of libraries in Russia focuses on science and medical libraries. Topics addressed include historical background; library science education; a consortium formed to build national databases and disseminate information; producers of scientific and medical information; international cooperation; interlibrary loans; the Russian Medical…

  11. Environmental health science at the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Bright, Patricia R.

    2013-01-01

    USGS environmental health science focuses on the environment-health interface. Research characterizes the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, as well as the factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents and the resulting toxicologic or infectious disease. The mission of USGS in environmental health science is to contribute scientific information to environmental, natural resource, agricultural, and public-health managers, who use that information to support sound decisionmaking. Coordination with partners and stakeholders will enable USGS to focus on the highest priority environmental health issues, to make relevant, timely, and useable contributions, and to become a “partner of first choice” for environmental health science.

  12. The Outlook in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell

    2009-01-01

    Never before has the demand for health care professionals been as great as it is now. But the supply of qualified domestic graduates is not expected to keep up with this demand, thus creating a shortage in most fields. Although the need in nursing is well documented, just as great a need exists in other health care fields: home health aides,…

  13. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  14. Systems science: a good investment for the public's health.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Patricia L; Kaplan, Robert M

    2013-10-01

    This supplement of Health Education & Behavior showcases the current state of the field of systems science applications in health promotion and public health. Behind this work lies a steady stream of public dollars at the federal level. This perspective details nearly a decade of investment by the National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. These investments have included funding opportunity announcements, training programs, developing resources for researchers, cross-disciplinary fertilization, and publication. While much progress has been made, continuing investment is needed in the future to ensure the viability and sustainability of this young but increasingly important field. PMID:24084406

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  16. A First Course in Biostatistics for Health Sciences Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harraway, J. A.; Sharples, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the content of a course on introductory biostatistics for health science students. Emphasizes the way in which study design and critical evaluation of research are developed in tandem with statistical methodology. (Author/MM)

  17. Habermasian knowledge interests: epistemological implications for health sciences.

    PubMed

    Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Muñoz Terrón, José María; Aranda Torres, Cayetano

    2015-04-01

    The Habermasian concept of 'interest' has had a profound effect on the characterization of scientific disciplines. Going beyond issues unrelated to the theory itself, intra-theoretical interest characterizes the specific ways of approaching any science-related discipline, defining research topics and methodologies. This approach was developed by Jürgen Habermas in relation to empirical-analytical sciences, historical-hermeneutics sciences, and critical sciences; however, he did not make any specific references to health sciences. This article aims to contribute to shaping a general epistemological framework for health sciences, as well as its specific implications for the medical and nursing areas, via an analysis of the basic knowledge interests developed by Habermas. PMID:25644235

  18. Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: Science Teachers' Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordheim, Lena; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Flottorp, Signe; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Critical appraisal skills are necessary to navigate the numerous contradictory and pseudo-scientific claims in the popular media. Health and science education in schools is essential for promoting these skills in students. The purpose of this paper is to explore lower secondary school science teachers' perceptions and reported practices…

  19. Connecting Science, Health, and Technology through Authentic Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Bardwell, Genevieve; Hu, Jun

    1999-01-01

    Describes an academic-enrichment program that targets underrepresented secondary students and strives to increase their competence in science and technology, potential for leadership, allegiance to local communities, and interest in post-secondary careers in the health sciences. Contains 22 references. (WRM)

  20. Recent Developments Bearing Upon National Policy in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Several recent, substantial reports are examined that, taken together, point the way toward a constructive reformulation of health sciences policy. Private, public, and Congressional reports suggest the high quality of the bioscience effort as well as the need to broaden traditional concepts to include centrally the sciences associated with public…

  1. Culture, Health, and Science: A Multidisciplinary Liberal Arts Alternative to the Public Health Major.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn M; Knight, Sabina; Gubrium, Aline C

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2003 call by the Institute of Medicine to educate undergraduates in public health, various models have emerged for incorporating public health into the liberal arts and sciences. One model is a professionalized public health major that uses core public health competencies to prepare a workforce of health professionals. A second model offers a broad-based public health major rooted in liberal arts principles, resisting the utilitarian trend toward human capital formation. A third model resists even the label of "public health," preferring instead to introduce undergraduates to many ways of analyzing human health and healing. The multidisciplinary Culture, Health, and Science Program, based on six key commitments for preparing liberal arts students to analyze health and respond to global health challenges, is offered as an alternative to the public health major. PMID:26857453

  2. Population Health: Challenges for Science and Society

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, David

    2007-01-01

    The emphasis on risk factor intervention at the individual level has predominated in efforts to reduce mortality and promote health. Interest in social and other nonmedical interventions, particularly socioeconomic status (SES) influences, has increased in recent years. This article focuses on the interaction of social structure and socioeconomic status with other influences in complex pathways to affect health, and their contribution to health disparities. It examines both social class as an explanation of health differences and competing hypotheses concerning prenatal and early nutrition and cognitive capacity. Although education is associated with income, wealth, occupation, and other SES indicators and may not be the most important SES determinant, it influences a variety of pathways to health outcomes and offers strategic leverage for intervention because of social and political consensus on its value beyond health. PMID:17718667

  3. Health Technology Assessment – science or art?

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    The founding disciplines of HTA are clearly scientific, and have been firmly based among the natural sciences. However, common definitions of HTA indicate that HTA is something more than the “pure application of science”. This article investigates whether this “something” also makes HTA an art. The question of whether HTA is a science or an art is pursued in two specific and historically rich directions. The first is whether HTA is an art in the same way that medicine is described as an art. It has been argued extensively that medicine is based on two different and partly incompatible cultures, i.e., the natural sciences and humanities. Medicine is based on disciplines within the natural sciences, while its value judgments have been placed in the humanities camp. This dichotomy is present in HTA as well, and the first part of the investigation illustrates how HTA is an art in terms of its inherent and constitutive value-judgments. The second part of the science/art-scrutiny leads us to the ancient (Hippocratic) concept of art, téchne, where we find an etymological and a conceptual link between HTA and art. It demonstrates HTA is not an arbitrary process, even though it involves value judgments and relates complex decision making processes. As an art (téchne) HTA has a specific subject matter, requires inquiry and mastery of general rational principles, and is oriented to a specific end. In conclusion, the science-or-art-question makes sense in two specific perspectives, illustrating that HTA is a science based art. This has implications for the practice of HTA, for its education, and for the status of its results. PMID:23935761

  4. 78 FR 26793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  5. ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This resource provides an annotated list of print and electronic biomedical and health-related reference sources, including Internet resources and digital image collections. Readers will find relevant research, clinical, and consumer health information resources. The emphasis is on resources within the United States, with a few representative…

  6. Science and social responsibility in public health.

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Douglas L; McKeown, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsible for actions taken. A deeper meaning of responsibility corresponds to commitment to the pursuit and achievement of a valued end. Epidemiologists are committed to the scientific study of health and disease in human populations and to the application of scientific knowledge to improve the public's health. Responsibility is also closely linked to reliability. Responsible professionals reliably perform the tasks they set for themselves as well as the tasks society expects them to undertake. The defining axiom for our approach is that the health of the public is a social good we commit ourselves to pursue, thus assuming an obligation to contribute to its achievement. Epidemiologists cannot claim to be committed to public health as a social good and not accept the responsibility of ensuring that the knowledge gained in their roles as scientists is used to achieve that good. The social responsibilities of environmental health researchers are conspicuous in the environmental justice movement, for example, in community-based participatory research. Responsibility is an ethical concept particularly well suited to frame many key aspects of the ethics of our profession. PMID:14602514

  7. Health Sciences Education in California, 1983-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    The adequacy of health sciences education enrollment levels in California is reviewed in the context of the 1981 Health Manpower Plan. After reviewing the Plan, attention is focused on two continuing problems among the issues: medical residencies and attrition in the nursing profession. New issues that receive extensive treatment in the 1981 Plan…

  8. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions…

  9. Learning from Longitudinal Research in Criminology and the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderstaay, Steven L.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews longitudinal research within criminology and the health sciences on the relationship between reading and criminal, delinquent, or antisocial behavior. Longitudinal research in criminology, medicine, and psychology examines the role of reading within a broad set of interactive processes, connecting literacy to public health via…

  10. Preparing tomorrow's health sciences librarians: feasibility and marketing studies.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Friedman, C P; Lipscomb, C E; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1996-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is devising and evaluating five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. These models fit into a continual learning process from the initial professional preparation to lifelong learning opportunities. Three of them enhance existing degree and certificate programs in the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) with a health sciences specialization, and two are new programs for working information professionals. The approaches involve partnerships among SILS, the Health Sciences Library, and the program in Medical Informatics. The planning process will study the feasibility of the proposed programs, test the marketability of the models to potential students and employers, and make recommendations about implementation. PMID:8913557

  11. Science for Reducing Health Inequalities Emerges From Social Justice Movements.

    PubMed

    Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Although the health sciences have investigated economic and social inequalities in morbidity and mortality for hundreds of years, health inequalities persist and are, by some measures, increasing. This is not simply a situation in which the knowledge exists but is not implemented. Rather, science in general and epidemiology in particular have focused on quantifying the effects of specific agents considered in isolation. This approach is powerful, but, in the absence of ecological concepts that connect parts and wholes, contributes to maintaining health inequalities. By joining movements for human rights and social justice, health scientists can identify research questions that are relevant to public health, develop methods that are appropriate to answering those questions, and contribute to efforts to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26936957

  12. [Scientific output in the health sciences in Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Sisa, Iván; Espinel, Mauricio; Fornasini, Marco; Mantilla, Gonzalo

    2011-10-01

    This cross-sectional study describes the characteristics and trends of health sciences-related studies published in Ecuador from 1999-2009. Its objective is to contribute to the design and implementation of a research and development policy whose work is centered on the country's health priorities. Bibliometric indicators of production applied to publications in health sciences in Ecuador were used for the analysis. The publications were from the LILACS and MEDLINE databases. It was found that 625 articles were published from 1999-2009, primarily in the clinical-surgical areas (60%), followed by epidemiology (17.4%), basic sciences (14.1%), and health systems (8.5%). Only 4.3% and 7.2% of the production in this period was related to the primary causes of morbidity and mortality, respectively. It was found that private institutions generated more health research than public institutions, and hospitals (public, private, and mixed) produced a higher percentage than universities. The analysis showed that there was limited scientific production in health sciences in Ecuador during the study period, with a slight increase in the last two years that may be due in part to greater investment in research and development by the National Secretariat of Science and Technology (SENACYT). Investment increased from 0.20% to 0.44% of gross domestic product between 2006 and 2009. PMID:22124698

  13. Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  14. Secondary Education Through Health -- environmental health curriculum: A Superfund science literacy outreach project

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Inner-city high school students are disproportionately affected by health problems that stem from environmental conditions. Also, they are not adequately prepared in Science -- especially in the concepts, methods, and procedures of environmental-health science research -- and are generally unaware of the career opportunities in this field. A Superfund program was developed to increase Science literacy and expand career knowledge in environmental health among a cohort of minority high school students from New York City. The year-round program features lectures, laboratory tours, seminars, investigations, and research taught by faculty and Superfund investigators at Mount Sinai`s Environmental Health Sciences Center. The students made remarkable progress in terms of gaining environmental health knowledge, laboratory and scientific research skills, and awareness of environmental health careers.

  15. The economics of academic health sciences libraries: cost recovery in the era of big science.

    PubMed

    Williams, T L; Lemkau, H L; Burrows, S

    1988-10-01

    With launching of Sputnik by the Soviet Union in the late 1950s, science and technology became a high priority in the United States. During the two decades since, health sciences libraries have experienced changes in almost all aspects of their operations. Additionally, recent developments in medical care and in medical education have had major influences on the mission of health science libraries. In the unending struggle to keep up with new technologies and services, libraries have had to support increasing demands while they receive a decreasing share of the health care dollar. This paper explores the economic challenges faced by academic health sciences libraries and suggests measures for augmenting traditional sources of funding. The development of marketing efforts, institutional memberships, and fee-based services by the Louis Calder Memorial Library, University of Miami School of Medicine, is presented as a case study. PMID:3224223

  16. Advancing Global Health – The Need for (Better) Social Science

    PubMed Central

    Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    In his perspective "Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health," Ooms argues that actions taken in the field of global health are dependent not only on available resources, but on the normative premise that guides how these resources are spent. This comment sets out how the application of a predominately biomedical positivist research tradition in global health, has potentially limited understanding of the value judgements underlying decisions in the field. To redress this critical social science, including health policy analysis has much to offer, to the field of global health including on questions of governance. PMID:27239873

  17. How Superstition Won and Science Lost. Popularizing Science and Health in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, John C.

    This book studies the history of changing patterns in the dissemination, or popularization of scientific findings, to the general public since 1830. It focuses on three different areas of science: (1) health; (2) psychology; and (3) the natural sciences. The document explores the ways in which this process of popularization has deteriorated. It…

  18. Health metrics and evaluation: strengthening the science.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher J L; Frenk, Julio

    2008-04-01

    With the growing importance of health in the global agenda comes the responsibility to develop a scientific foundation of metrics and evaluation. The scope of this emerging field can be viewed in terms of key topics, including health outcomes, other social outcomes related to health systems, health services, resource inputs, evaluations of programmes and systems, and analyses to support policy choice. It can also be defined in terms of key activities that are needed to strengthen the scientific basis of the field: development of new methods, instruments, software, and hardware; setting global norms and standards for data collection; increasing the availability of high-quality primary data; systematic analysis and synthesis of existing datasets; strengthening national capacity to obtain, analyse, and use data; and reporting and disseminating results. We explore in depth topics with major scientific challenges and institutional and cultural barriers that are slowing the development of the field. Cutting across the various topical areas and disciplinary approaches to these problems are some common scientific issues, including limited comparability of measurement, uncorrected known biases in data, no standard approach to missing data, unrealistic uncertainty estimates, and the use of disease models that have not been properly validated. Only through concerted action will it be possible to assure the production, reproduction, and use of knowledge that is crucial to the advancement of global health. PMID:18395581

  19. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors

    PubMed Central

    Tooey, Mary Joan (M.J.); Arnold, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative. PMID:25349542

  20. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    PubMed

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative. PMID:25349542

  1. Library Research Manual: The Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Emily Montez; Dale, Roland, Ed.

    This independent study workbook is intended to acquaint students of the nursing and allied health professions with the use of Douglas Library of the Chicago State University and to introduce a search strategy for gathering information for research papers. Consisting of nine instructional chapters, the workbook provides information on the card…

  2. Health: The Science of Human Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Charles R.; And Others

    This book examines human health behavior as a lifetime process of adaptation and response to internally and externally demanding environments. Beginning with conception, this book follows the family life cycle from "seed to sod" and beyond. From considerations of conception it moves to birth, growth and development, disease, life style,…

  3. Health Science Education in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    Concern surrounding the status of health education in elementary schools centers around (1) a lack of agreement concerning content, scope, and sequence, (2) its interdisciplinary character, (3) poor teacher preparation, and (4) reliance on incidental teaching and learning situations. Improvement depends upon: (1) defining the areas of concern for…

  4. Statistical Sources for Health Science Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weise, Frieda

    This continuing education course syllabus presents information on the collection of vital and health statistics, lists of agencies or organizations involved in statistical collection and/or dissemination, annotated bibliographies of statistical sources, and guidelines for accessing statistical information. Topics covered include: (1) the reporting…

  5. Applying Nutrition Science to the Public's Health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a bewildering array of nutrition information available to the public and to professionals. Nutrition messages are often conflicting, confusing, and often simply rhetoric. More consumer research is needed to understand more fully the best way to communicate health messages, recommendations, ...

  6. Feasibility and marketing studies of health sciences librarianship education programs.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, C E; Moran, B B; Jenkins, C G; Cogdill, K W; Friedman, C P; Gollop, C J; Moore, M E; Morrison, M L; Tibbo, H R; Wildemuth, B M

    1999-01-01

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill evaluated five curricular models designed to improve education for health sciences librarianship. Three of the models enhanced existing degree and certificate programs, and two were new programs for working information professionals. Models were developed with input from experts and a Delphi study; the marketability of the models was tested through surveys of potential students and employers; and recommendations were made as a guide to implementation. The results demonstrated a demand for more specialized curricula and for retraining opportunities. Marketing data showed a strong interest from potential students in a specialized master's degree, and mid-career professionals indicated an interest in postmaster's programs that provided the ability to maintain employment. The study pointed to the opportunity for a center of excellence in health sciences information education to enable health sciences librarians to respond to their evolving roles. PMID:9934529

  7. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  8. The Inherent Drawbacks of the Pressure to Publish in Health Sciences: Good or Bad Science.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of scientific publications- it is the era of "hunting the article". This commentary discusses the drawbacks of the pressure to publish that certainly contribute to the 'dark side' of science. In fact, health science career progression greatly relies on the number of scientific publications a researcher has, and in many cases these may be more valorized than the health services provided. Of course, scientific publications help to develop the skills of health care professionals, but as Einstein highlighted " not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts". PMID:26594336

  9. The Inherent Drawbacks of the Pressure to Publish in Health Sciences: Good or Bad Science

    PubMed Central

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of scientific publications– it is the era of “hunting the article”. This commentary discusses the drawbacks of the pressure to publish that certainly contribute to the ‘dark side’ of science. In fact, health science career progression greatly relies on the number of scientific publications a researcher has, and in many cases these may be more valorized than the health services provided. Of course, scientific publications help to develop the skills of health care professionals, but as Einstein highlighted “ not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts”. PMID:26594336

  10. Improving Health with Science: Exploring Community-Driven Science Education in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leak, Anne Emerson

    This study examines the role of place-based science education in fostering student-driven health interventions. While literature shows the need to connect science with students' place and community, there is limited understanding of strategies for doing so. Making such connections is important for underrepresented students who tend to perceive learning science in school as disconnected to their experiences out of school (Aikenhead, Calabrese-Barton, & Chinn, 2006). To better understand how students can learn to connect place and community with science and engineering practices in a village in Kenya, I worked with community leaders, teachers, and students to develop and study an education program (a school-based health club) with the goal of improving knowledge of health and sanitation in a Kenyan village. While students selected the health topics and problems they hoped to address through participating in the club, the topics were taught with a focus on providing opportunities for students to learn the practices of science and health applications of these practices. Students learned chemistry, physics, environmental science, and engineering to help them address the health problems they had identified in their community. Surveys, student artifacts, ethnographic field notes, and interview data from six months of field research were used to examine the following questions: (1) In what ways were learning opportunities planned for using science and engineering practices to improve community health? (2) In what ways did students apply science and engineering practices and knowledge learned from the health club in their school, homes, and community? and (3) What factors seemed to influence whether students applied or intended to apply what they learned in the health club? Drawing on place-based science education theory and community-engagement models of health, process and structural coding (Saldana, 2013) were used to determine patterns in students' applications of their

  11. Genetics in Population Health Science: Strategies and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Translational research is needed to leverage discoveries from the frontiers of genome science to improve public health. So far, public health researchers have largely ignored genetic discoveries, and geneticists have ignored important aspects of population health science. This mutual neglect should end. In this article, we discuss 3 areas where public health researchers can help to advance translation: (1) risk assessment: investigate genetic profiles as components in composite risk assessments; (2) targeted intervention: conduct life-course longitudinal studies to understand when genetic risks manifest in development and whether intervention during sensitive periods can have lasting effects; and (3) improved understanding of environmental causation: collaborate with geneticists on gene–environment interaction research. We illustrate with examples from our own research on obesity and smoking. PMID:23927511

  12. Genetics in population health science: strategies and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-10-01

    Translational research is needed to leverage discoveries from the frontiers of genome science to improve public health. So far, public health researchers have largely ignored genetic discoveries, and geneticists have ignored important aspects of population health science. This mutual neglect should end. In this article, we discuss 3 areas where public health researchers can help to advance translation: (1) risk assessment: investigate genetic profiles as components in composite risk assessments; (2) targeted intervention: conduct life-course longitudinal studies to understand when genetic risks manifest in development and whether intervention during sensitive periods can have lasting effects; and (3) improved understanding of environmental causation: collaborate with geneticists on gene-environment interaction research. We illustrate with examples from our own research on obesity and smoking. PMID:23927511

  13. 75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... explore opportunities to enhance NOAA's ongoing ocean health efforts and their impacts on ecosystem and... roles in addressing ocean health issues? (2) What are the right ocean health science questions, products and services for NOAA? (3) Are there additional ocean health science issues that should be included...

  14. 75 FR 18837 - Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health; Privacy Act of 1974; Report of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health..., Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health. ACTION: Notice... minority health information to public and professional audiences. In support of this purpose, this...

  15. Oral health knowledge and behavior among male health sciences college students in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, Jassem; Honkala, Eino; Honkala, Sisko

    2003-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Health auxiliary personnel have an important role in oral health promotion when they graduate and start working in the health care system. This study aims to find out oral health knowledge and oral health behavior of male Health Sciences College students. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all students at the male Health Sciences College in Kuwait (N = 153) during the academic year 2001/2002. The students filled the anonymous questionnaire in the class after the lecture. The response rate was 84% (n = 128). The questions consisted information on the general background, oral health behavior and oral health knowledge. RESULTS: Oral health knowledge seemed to be limited and very few background factors were associated with it. More than half of the students had visited a dentist during the previous 12 months, but only one third of students were brushing twice a day or more often. CONCLUSIONS: It may be concluded that the male Health Sciences College students seemed to have appropriate knowledge on some oral health topics, but limited knowledge on the others. Their toothbrushing practices are still far behind the international recommendation (twice a day) and also the knowledge, why it should be done so frequently also very limited. PMID:12735791

  16. Web-based technologies for health sciences reference and instruction.

    PubMed

    Youngkin, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    New web-based instructional technologies provide health sciences librarians with tools to enhance delivery of reference services, reinforce library instruction, and facilitate outreach activities. Of the many emerging, new web technologies recently available to health information professionals, 12 resources are presented in this article to explain the value these tools bring to informational and instructional settings to enhance demonstration, facilitate collaborative activities, encourage communication, and evaluate learning/understanding. PMID:25023016

  17. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  18. A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-Level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbrick, Jodi Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who…

  19. Reconciling Statistical and Systems Science Approaches to Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward H.; Rahmandad, Hazhir; Shoham, David A.; Hammond, Ross; Huang, Terry T. -K.; Wang, Youfa; Mabry, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    Although systems science has emerged as a set of innovative approaches to study complex phenomena, many topically focused researchers including clinicians and scientists working in public health are somewhat befuddled by this methodology that at times appears to be radically different from analytic methods, such as statistical modeling, to which…

  20. Applied social and behavioral science to address complex health problems.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Allegrante, John P; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Clark, Noreen M; Windsor, Richard C; Zimmerman, Marc A; Green, Lawrence W

    2011-11-01

    Complex and dynamic societal factors continue to challenge the capacity of the social and behavioral sciences in preventive medicine and public health to overcome the most seemingly intractable health problems. This paper proposes a fundamental shift from a research approach that presumes to identify (from highly controlled trials) universally applicable interventions expected to be implemented "with fidelity" by practitioners, to an applied social and behavioral science approach similar to that of engineering. Such a shift would build on and complement the recent recommendations of the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research and require reformulation of the research-practice dichotomy. It would also require disciplines now engaged in preventive medicine and public health practice to develop a better understanding of systems thinking and the science of application that is sensitive to the complexity, interactivity, and unique elements of community and practice settings. Also needed is a modification of health-related education to ensure that those entering the disciplines develop instincts and capacities as applied scientists. PMID:22011425

  1. Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

  2. Faculty Perceptions of Critical Thinking at a Health Sciences University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowles, Joie; Morgan, Christine; Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The fostering of critical thinking skills has become an expectation of faculty, especially those teaching in the health sciences. The manner in which critical thinking is defined by faculty impacts how they will address the challenge to promote critical thinking among their students. This study reports the perceptions of critical thinking held by…

  3. Tufts Health Sciences Database: Lessons, Issues, and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mary Y.; Albright, Susan A.; Alkasab, Tarik; Damassa, David A.; Wang, Paul J.; Eaton, Elizabeth K.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a seven-year experience with developing the Tufts Health Sciences Database, a database-driven information management system that combines the strengths of a digital library, content delivery tools, and curriculum management. Identifies major effects on teaching and learning. Also addresses issues of faculty development, copyright and…

  4. The Use of Hospital Health Science Libraries; A Methodological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleg, Marilyn C.; Pings, Vern M.

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a method to provide facts about the clientele and use of one type of health science library, the hospital medical library. The method was tested in two hospital libraries, Harper Hospital, Detroit, and Hurley Hospital, Flint. The study was divided into four levels of data collecting and…

  5. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 64 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2007-2008, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 240,955 volumes, spent a total of $240,019,298, and employed 2,304…

  6. Management of Circulation Functions in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodnett, Diane M.

    Designed for both experienced professionals and new librarians, this continuing education course syllabus presents a detailed outline of the functions, operations, and management of circulation departments in health sciences libraries. It is noted that emphasis is placed on providing a framework for decision making rather than on providing…

  7. West Virginia University's Health Sciences and Technology Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Ann; Dooley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the Health Sciences and Technology Academy, an outreach and engagement program by West Virginia University to encourage higher education faculty members and administrators, public school teachers, and community leaders to assume the responsibility of mentoring high school students. The primary goal is to increase the college…

  8. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 65 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2006-2007, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 244,188 volumes, spent a total of $244,188,020, and employed 2,395 FTE…

  9. Science for Health Literacy: It's Never Been so Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Marcus; Woods-Townsend, Kathryn; Griffiths, Janice; Christodoulou, Andri; Byrne, Jenny; Bay, Jacquie; Godfrey, Keith; Inskip, Hazel; Hanson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a project called "LifeLab," developed by researchers at the Education School, Faculty of Medicine and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Southampton (UK), to promote a science-oriented approach to health literacy among teenagers. The main purposes of "LifeLab" are: (1) to improve…

  10. Health Science Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Applied Tech., Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary and postsecondary level as part of the health science education component of Florida's comprehensive vocational…

  11. Handbook for Teachers of Health Science Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.; Cooper, Mitch

    This guide is intended as a central source of information for teacher-coordinators and school administrators who are responsible for implementing health science technology education (HSTE) programs in Texas. Section I contains various introductory materials, including an outline of qualifications for HSTE teachers and information on professional…

  12. Selection of Computer Files for Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Jeanene C.; Goddard, Catherine F.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the selection and evaluation of locally mounted computer files for health sciences libraries, including informational programs such as bibliographic and factual databases; computer-assisted instruction programs; and expert systems. Topics addressed include print sources; database sources; selection criteria, including content and cost;…

  13. Ethical Issues of Scientific Inquiry in Health Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This monograph contains 13 papers on the ethics of planning, conducting, and reporting research in health sciences education. It includes four background papers and nine perspective papers. The titles are: (1) "The Imperative for Ethical Conduct in Scientific Inquiry" (Steve M. Dorman); (2) "Fundamental Principles of Ethical Research in Health…

  14. Health Science One and Two: First Two Years of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, John; Nichols, Michele; Camp, Cynthia; Hartwick, Erin; Mortensen, Jennifer; Beck, Laurie; LaNeve, Shannon; Sutter, Nancy; Ryan, Dennis; Wright, Carla; Castro, Patricia; Bell, Hilary; Sella, Gina; Smith, Vicki; Wyatt, Garry

    2010-01-01

    The development of skill standards for Health Science was a result of a collaborative effort involving the Nevada Department of Education and a writing team with extensive experience in both teaching and in the field. The skill standards presented in this report features a framework for students interested in pursuing careers in healthcare and…

  15. Health Sciences Librarians and Education: Clinical Librarianship, Consortia, Extraterrestial Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Polly; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Three speeches presented by a panel of health science librarians discuss: (1) clinical medical librarianship, with a definition and descriptions of programs in several medical school libraries; (2) consortia, including a definition and reasons for their development; and (3) use of telecommunications for sharing medical information. (MBR)

  16. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  17. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. Method: An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Results: Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. Conclusions: The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for “community” building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections. PMID:20428277

  18. OCLC Utilization in Health Sciences Libraries. CE 35, Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Patti

    This syllabus for a continuing education course describes the OCLC system and considers how it can be used by health science libraries. The general governance and administrative structure of OCLC and its network affiliates are detailed, and the OCLC subsystems--online union catalog, serials, interlibrary loan, and acquisitions--and their major…

  19. Evaluating the Science of Discovery in Complex Health Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Cameron D.; Best, Allan; Mortimer, Sharon; Huerta, Timothy; Buchan, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Complex health problems such as chronic disease or pandemics require knowledge that transcends disciplinary boundaries to generate solutions. Such transdisciplinary discovery requires researchers to work and collaborate across boundaries, combining elements of basic and applied science. At the same time, calls for more interdisciplinary health…

  20. The Internet Compendium: Subject Guides to Health and Science Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis; And Others

    This guide describes and evaluates the Internet's health and science resources by subject. It offers information on a multitude of listservs; Usenet newsgroups; forums; electronic journals; topical mailing lists; text archives; Freenets; bulletin boards; FAQs; newsletters; real-time chats; databases; and library catalogs. From alternative medicine…

  1. Continuing Education of Health Sciences Librarians: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qureshi, Azra

    This study examines continuing education and professional development of 210 health sciences librarians affiliated with 70 academic medical libraries in the United States, which has the most advanced system of education in librarianship in the world. Of the 102 respondents, the largest categories were library directors/administrators and public…

  2. Changes in Information Delivery Since 1960 in Health Science Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Louise

    1974-01-01

    An overview of information needs and services in the health sciences since 1960, with emphasis on the services of the National Library of Medicine and some other recent government-funded systems for information dissemination. Includes an extensive list of references. (LS)

  3. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    PubMed Central

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-01-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

  4. Biological and Health Sciences: Report of the Project 2061 Phase I Biological and Health Sciences Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary

    This is one of five panel reports that have been prepared as part of the first phase of Project 2061, a long-term, multipurpose undertaking of the American Association for the Advancement of Science designed to help reform science, mathematics, and technology education in the United States. Major sections included are: (1) "Rationale"; (2) "A…

  5. Preparing health science students for interdisciplinary professional practice.

    PubMed

    Cleak, Helen; Williamson, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a number of lecturers from different clinical schools within the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University embarked on the development of a new interdisciplinary professional practice subject to be undertaken by all final-year undergraduate health science students. The subject was designed to better prepare students for their first professional appointment by introducing them to the concepts of interdisciplinary teamwork, the health care context, and the challenges and constraints that organizational contexts present. This report details the background of the project, the consultation and development that took place in the design of the subject, and implementation of the subject. The uniqueness of the project is explained by the number of disciplines involved, the online delivery, and the focus on a set of generic graduate attributes for health science students. It is hoped that students who have undertaken this subject will have a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals and the context in which they will be working by grappling with many real-life professional issues that they will face when they graduate and enter the workforce. PMID:17941408

  6. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises.

    PubMed

    Colf, Leremy A; Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  7. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  8. Effect of Federal programs on health sciences libraries.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R A

    1987-01-01

    The radical changes and improvements in health sciences libraries during the last quarter century have been primarily achieved through the leadership of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in the application of technology and in the creation of a biomedical communications network. This article describes principal programs and activities of the National Library of Medicine and their effects on health sciences libraries: the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS), implementation of the Medical Library Assistance Act (MLAA), and defense of "fair use" of copyrighted material. The article briefly summarizes more recent Federal activities which directly affect access to and dissemination of health information and concludes with a summary of problems for which solutions must be found if health sciences libraries are to be prepared to meet the future. It is clear from comparing the programs described with current government attitudes that, although the Federal government has promoted advancement in the dissemination of biomedical information in the past, this trend is reversing, and Federal funding to libraries is decreasing while the cost of accessing information is increasing. PMID:10301370

  9. 75 FR 48979 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 75 FR 82033 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  11. 75 FR 68367 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  12. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied, Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 78 FR 42968 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  14. 75 FR 55807 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  15. 76 FR 58521 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  16. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  17. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  18. 76 FR 21387 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ..., Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  19. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  20. 75 FR 41506 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  1. 77 FR 43849 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  2. 78 FR 27410 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  3. 75 FR 20371 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  4. 78 FR 51734 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ....113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  5. 75 FR 63844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  6. 78 FR 64221 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  7. 77 FR 16844 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  8. 75 FR 46950 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  9. 76 FR 5594 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 75 FR 41505 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  11. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  12. 77 FR 33472 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 76 FR 27653 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  14. 78 FR 13358 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...

  15. 75 FR 7487 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards; 93.114... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  16. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental Health Hazards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  17. 77 FR 60445 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park, NC... Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B, Research Triangle Park,...

  18. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Approaches for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: What the Science Says Share: July 2015 © Tom Le Goff/Digital ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  19. Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says Share: March 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  20. Health Policy and Management: in praise of political science

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Health systems have entered a third era embracing whole systems thinking and posing complex policy and management challenges. Understanding how such systems work and agreeing what needs to be put in place to enable them to undergo effective and sustainable change are more pressing issues than ever for policy-makers. The theory-policy-practice-gap and its four dimensions, as articulated by Chinitz and Rodwin, is acknowledged. It is suggested that insights derived from political science can both enrich our understanding of the gap and suggest what changes are needed to tackle the complex challenges facing health systems. PMID:26029899

  1. The ergonomics/human factors approach to health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Bube, J L

    1985-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals scant information on the application of ergonomics to health sciences libraries. Ergonomics research has identified and validated many genuine health hazards in business offices and industrial settings. While appearing innocuous, the library environment is affected by these hazards. As sophisticated technology and machinery are introduced into libraries, the human factors must be considered. This paper examines the hazards of the library environment as identified through ergonomics research and makes recommendations for alleviating or eliminating these dangers. PMID:3161572

  2. Renovation and expansion of an academic health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    Horres, M M; Hitt, S

    1984-01-01

    Planning is described for the renovation, expansion, and principal design features of the Health Sciences Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The three-and-a-half-year construction project resulted in the addition of three floors over the existing building and a complete renovation of the original floor space. An architectural summary provides statistics on project costs and building capacities. Images PMID:6743879

  3. The Academic Health Sciences Library and Serial Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jo Ann

    1974-01-01

    A review of efforts to formulate basic medical journal lists and a report of a survey of subscriptions held in academic health science libraries is presented. The subscriptions held by thirty-seven libraries were analyzed to determine those held by 60-100% of the sample. A comparison of those titles subscribed to by 90-100% of the sample reveals that most of these titles appear in the lists formulated by other studies. PMID:4466506

  4. Health Science Libraries of National, State, and Local Medical Organizations

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    This second survey of medical society-sponsored libraries has been expanded to include national association libraries in allied medical fields, as well as special libraries which do not fall into categories established for the MLA survey of health science libraries. A total of fifty-eight libraries in this subset have been identified, and selected characteristics have been measured. Observations are made concerning methodology, user population, and services. PMID:6041830

  5. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda. PMID:24860264

  6. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects*

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda. PMID:24860264

  7. Musical mnemonics in health science: a first look.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Matthew M

    2013-01-01

    Song, with its memory enhancement potential and ability to engage, has been employed as a learning tool in some academic settings. Of the countless learning environments, health science may seem the most atypical setting for the musical mnemonic, and yet it may be the most suitable for its application. With medicine's robust history of student-made mnemonics, it only seems natural that learners and instructors alike have begun to experiment with song meant to educate and entertain, primarily imparting them through popular media-sharing sites. This initial assessment of song in health science is meant to highlight notions of efficacy, audience, and use through an informal survey of 10 user-made YouTube musical mnemonics. Two of these mnemonics were co-created by the author, while the remaining eight were identified via select search terms and significant viewer numbers. Resulting YouTube data infers that instructors play a major role in the use of musical mnemonics in health science education. User comments indicate that some students have found value in mnemonic songs, helping them recall information during assessments. More robust research methods, like Q-method, meta-analysis, and opinion mining, can further confirm the value and role of musical mnemonics as they pertain to medicine and healthcare. PMID:23110356

  8. Medical and Health Sciences Division research report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Medical and Health Sciences Division conducts research programs relevant to neoplastic, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular diseases. Basic biological science, nuclear medicine, and epidemiology provide an integrated approach to solving biomedical problems directly related to occupational medicine and environmental health effects. The central theme of this research is focused on both the mechanisms and risk assessments of diseases caused by accidental exposure to chemical toxicants derived from fossil and synthetic fuels or to radiation. A major reorganizational change made this past year restructured the division into two branches. The environmental and health sciences branch contains a cancer and pulmonary research section, an interdisciplinary task group section, a cardiovascular research section, and a research support section. The radiation and nuclear medicine branch consists of a radiation and nuclear medicine section and an occupational epidemiology section. In addition, special task groups have been created to provide an interdisciplinary team approach in certain research efforts. Information included in this booklet summarizes research results and related activities for the period from October 1, 1979, to September 30, 1980.

  9. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bethany A.; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. “Early career” health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, “I have demonstrated this competency.” Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the “Health Sciences Information Services” competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the “Research, Analysis, and Interpretation” competency. Conclusions These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies

  10. Changes in Elementary Student Perceptions of Science, Scientists, and Science Careers after Participating in a Curricular Module on Health and Veterinary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Soo Yeon; Parker, Loran Carleton; Adedokun, Omolola; Mennonno, Ann; Wackerly, Amy; San Miguel, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examined to what extent a curriculum module that uses animal and human health scientists and science concepts to portray science and scientists in a relevant and authentic manner could enhance elementary students' aspiration for science careers, attitudes to science, positive perceptions of scientists, and perceived relevance of…

  11. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Al-Bader, Sara; Masum, Hassan; Simiyu, Ken; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation.This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation.The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania), Acorn Technologies (South Africa), Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa), the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar), the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya), and Niprisan's development by Nigeria's National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria).All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems.For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While this is a long-term strategy

  12. Science-based health innovation in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years emerging markets such as India, China, and Brazil have developed appropriate business models and lower-cost technological innovations to address health challenges locally and internationally. But it is not well understood what capabilities African countries, with their high disease burden, have in science-based health innovation. This gap in knowledge is addressed by this series in BMC International Health and Human Rights. The series presents the results of extensive on-the-ground research in the form of four country case studies of health and biotechnology innovation, six studies of institutions within Africa involved in health product development, and one study of health venture funds in Africa. To the best of our knowledge it is the first extensive collection of empirical work on African science-based health innovation. The four country cases are Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. The six case studies of institutions are A to Z Textiles (Tanzania), Acorn Technologies (South Africa), Bioventures venture capital fund (South Africa), the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA; Madagascar), the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI; Kenya), and Niprisan’s development by Nigeria’s National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development and Xechem (Nigeria). All of the examples highlight pioneering attempts to build technological capacity, create economic opportunities, and retain talent on a continent significantly affected by brain drain. They point to the practical challenges for innovators on the ground, and suggest potentially helpful policies, funding streams, and other support systems. For African nations, health innovation represents an opportunity to increase domestic capacity to solve health challenges; for international funders, it is an opportunity to move beyond foreign aid and dependency. The shared goal is creating self-sustaining innovation that has both health and development impacts. While this is a long

  13. Understanding health systems, health economies and globalization: the need for social science perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between globalization and health calls for research from many disciplinary and methodological perspectives. This editorial gives an overview of the content trajectory of the interdisciplinary journal ‘Globalization and Health’ over the first six years of production, 2005 to 2010. The findings show that bio-medical and population health perspectives have been dominant but that social science perspectives have become more evident in recent years. The types of paper published have also changed, with a growing proportion of empirical studies. A special issue on ‘Health systems, health economies and globalization: social science perspectives’ is introduced, a collection of contributions written from the vantage points of economics, political science, psychology, sociology, business studies, social policy and research policy. The papers concern a range of issues pertaining to the globalization of healthcare markets and governance and regulation issues. They highlight the important contribution that can be made by the social sciences to this field, and also the practical and methodological challenges implicit in the study of globalization and health. PMID:22938504

  14. The marriage of art and science in health care.

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Pole, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper invites the reader to consider the marriage of art and science as antidote to much epidemic disease, for our greater personal and societal health. The history of arts medicine is reviewed, identifying its persisting although often tenuous link with health care from pre-history to the present. The author describes his personal encounter with art at the bedside, and how it led to his establishing a comprehensive artist-in-residence program at his university hospital. The scientific evidence underscoring the efficacy of art-making for physical and psychological health are outlined, together with the physiological and biochemical data. The author describes his own program, and offers examples of healing art in action. PMID:11249236

  15. Public health as a catalyst for interprofessional education on a health sciences campus.

    PubMed

    Uden-Holman, Tanya M; Curry, Susan J; Benz, Loretta; Aquilino, Mary Lober

    2015-03-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) has existed in various formats for several decades, the need for IPE recently has taken on renewed interest and momentum. Public health has a critical role to play in furthering IPE, yet schools of public health are often underrepresented in IPE initiatives. The University of Iowa College of Public Health is serving as a catalyst for IPE activities on our health sciences campus, which includes colleges of dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health. IPE-related activities have included campus visit by IPE leaders, administration of the Survey of Critical Elements for Implementing IPE, administration of the Interprofessional Learning Opportunities Inventory survey, the development of a comprehensive strategic plan, and the pilot of an IPE course for all first-year prelicensure students and Master of Health Administration students. Although more work is needed to more fully integrate IPE into the curriculum, success to date of the University of Iowa IPE initiative demonstrates that public health can play a critical role as a convener and catalyst for IPE curricular innovations on a health sciences campus. PMID:25706001

  16. Systemic Hydration: Relating Science to Clinical Practice in Vocal Health

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Naomi A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Study Design Literature Review Methods Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology and biomechanics. Results The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest amongst multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production, however the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and in some cases offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. Conclusions A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function, however greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. PMID:24880674

  17. 77 FR 74198 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Environmental Health Sciences Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council....

  18. 78 FR 47715 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee, July 24, 2013, 08:00...

  19. 78 FR 35637 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  20. 78 FR 64516 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  1. Achieving Equity through Critical Science Agency: An Ethnographic Study of African American Students in a Health Science Career Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart &…

  2. Developing E-science and Research Services and Support at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Layne M.; Butler, John T.; Johnston, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of e-science and research support services in the Health Sciences Libraries (HSL) within the Academic Health Center (AHC) at the University of Minnesota (UMN). A review of the broader e-science initiatives within the UMN demonstrates the needs and opportunities that the University Libraries face while building knowledge, skills, and capacity to support e-research. These experiences are being used by the University Libraries administration and HSL to apply support for the growing needs of researchers in the health sciences. Several research areas that would benefit from enhanced e-science support are described. Plans to address the growing e-research needs of health sciences researchers are also discussed. PMID:23585706

  3. Experiences of undergraduate African health sciences students: A hermeneutic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Inyama, Davis; Williams, Allison; McCauley, Kay

    2015-06-01

    While efforts have been made to understand the experiences of African students in predominantly white environments, the experiences of African students in clinical placement areas have rarely been explored. This paper is a report on a study designed to address the gap in educational research on the experiences of African health sciences students in clinical placements in predominantly white environments. Interviews adopting an open approach to conversations were conducted with nine African students from three health disciplines at one metropolitan university in Australia between 2012 and 2013. Interview transcripts were analyzed using philosophical hermeneutics, where shared meanings were arrived at by employing key Gadamerian hermeneutic components. Findings revealed a number of factors that had a direct effect on the meaning students derived from their clinical placement experiences. These, as revealed in the interlinked domains of body, space, relationships, and time included difference, acceptance, resilience, and cultural sensitivity. Insights from this study may lead to the adoption of strategies designed to improve the experiences of African students studying health sciences in predominantly white environments. PMID:24942056

  4. Reconciling statistical and systems science approaches to public health.

    PubMed

    Ip, Edward H; Rahmandad, Hazhir; Shoham, David A; Hammond, Ross; Huang, Terry T-K; Wang, Youfa; Mabry, Patricia L

    2013-10-01

    Although systems science has emerged as a set of innovative approaches to study complex phenomena, many topically focused researchers including clinicians and scientists working in public health are somewhat befuddled by this methodology that at times appears to be radically different from analytic methods, such as statistical modeling, to which the researchers are accustomed. There also appears to be conflicts between complex systems approaches and traditional statistical methodologies, both in terms of their underlying strategies and the languages they use. We argue that the conflicts are resolvable, and the sooner the better for the field. In this article, we show how statistical and systems science approaches can be reconciled, and how together they can advance solutions to complex problems. We do this by comparing the methods within a theoretical framework based on the work of population biologist Richard Levins. We present different types of models as representing different tradeoffs among the four desiderata of generality, realism, fit, and precision. PMID:24084395

  5. Has the time come for big science in wildlife health?

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Jonathan Mark

    2013-12-01

    The consequences of wildlife emerging diseases are global and profound with increased burden on the public health system, negative impacts on the global economy, declines and extinctions of wildlife species, and subsequent loss of ecological integrity. Examples of health threats to wildlife include Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes a cutaneous fungal infection of amphibians and is linked to declines of amphibians globally; and the recently discovered Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans, the etiologic agent of white nose syndrome which has caused precipitous declines of North American bat species. Of particular concern are the novel pathogens that have emerged as they are particularly devastating and challenging to manage. A big science approach to wildlife health research is needed if we are to make significant and enduring progress in managing these diseases. The advent of new analytical models and bench assays will provide us with the mathematical and molecular tools to identify and anticipate threats to wildlife, and understand the ecology and epidemiology of these diseases. Specifically, new molecular diagnostic techniques have opened up avenues for pathogen discovery, and the application of spatially referenced databases allows for risk assessments that can assist in targeting surveillance. Long-term, systematic collection of data for wildlife health and integration with other datasets is also essential. Multidisciplinary research programs should be expanded to increase our understanding of the drivers of emerging diseases and allow for the development of better disease prevention and management tools, such as vaccines. Finally, we need to create a National Fish and Wildlife Health Network that provides the operational framework (governance, policies, procedures, etc.) by which entities with a stake in wildlife health cooperate and collaborate to achieve optimal outcomes for human, animal, and ecosystem health. PMID:24136386

  6. Interdisciplinary Environmental-health Science Throughout Disaster Lifecycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Morman, S. A.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Potential human health effects from exposures to hazardous disaster materials and environmental contamination are common concerns following disasters. Using several examples from US Geological Survey environmental disaster responses (e.g., 2001 World Trade Center, mine tailings spills, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, 2007-2013 wildfires, 2011 Gulf oil spill, 2012 Hurricane Sandy, 2013 Colorado floods) and disaster scenarios (2011 ARkStorm, 2013 SAFRR tsunami) this presentation will illustrate the role for collaborative earth, environmental, and health science throughout disaster lifecycles. Pre-disaster environmental baseline measurements are needed to help understand environmental influences on pre-disaster health baselines, and to constrain the magnitude of a disaster's impacts. During and following disasters, there is a need for interdisciplinary rapid-response and longer-term assessments that: sample and characterize the physical, chemical, and microbial makeup of complex materials generated by the disasters; fingerprint material sources; monitor, map, and model dispersal and evolution of disaster materials in the environment; help understand how the materials are modified by environmental processes; and, identify key characteristics and processes that influence the exposures and toxicity of disaster materials to humans and the living environment. This information helps emergency responders, public health experts, and cleanup managers: 1) identify short- and long-term exposures to disaster materials that may affect health; 2) prioritize areas for cleanup; and 3) develop appropriate disposal solutions or restoration uses for disaster materials. By integrating lessons learned from past disasters with geospatial information on vulnerable sources of natural or anthropogenic contaminants, the environmental health implications of looming disasters or disaster scenarios can be better anticipated, which helps enhance preparedness and resilience. Understanding economic costs of

  7. Health sciences librarians, patient contact, and secondary traumatic stress*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Rachel W.; McCrillis, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) in health sciences librarians (HSLs) who have direct contact with traumatized individuals and their families. Methods: A twenty-five-item survey and the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS) were distributed via email to three Medical Library Association email discussion lists. Results: A total of fifty-five HSLs responded to the survey. Survey results indicate moderate levels of STS and variability of symptoms among participants. Conclusions: Library and employee assistance program managers should be aware of the emotional toll of patient and/or family contact for HSLs. PMID:25918488

  8. Tibetan medicine: a complementary science of optimal health.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Joseph J; Blackhall, Leslie J; Rapgay, Lobsang

    2009-08-01

    Traditional medical systems are challenging because their theories and practices strike many conventionally trained physicians and researchers as incomprehensible. Should modern medicine dismiss them as unscientific, view them as sources of alternatives hidden in a matrix of superstition, or regard them as complementary sciences of medicine? We make the latter argument using the example of Tibetan medicine. Tibetan medicine is based on analytic models and methods that are rationally defined, internally coherent, and make testable predictions, meeting current definitions of "science." A ninth century synthesis of Indian, Chinese, Himalayan, and Greco-Persian traditions, Tibetan medicine is the most comprehensive form of Eurasian healthcare and the world's first integrative medicine. Incorporating rigorous systems of meditative self-healing and ascetic self-care from India, it includes a world-class paradigm of mind/body and preventive medicine. Adapting the therapeutic philosophy and contemplative science of Indian Buddhism to the quality of secular life and death, it features the world's most effective systems of positive and palliative healthcare. Based on qualitative theories and intersubjective methods, it involves predictions and therapies shown to be more accurate and effective than those of modern medicine in fields from physiology and pharmacology to neuroscience, mind/body medicine, and positive health. The possibility of complementary sciences follows from the latest view of science as a set of tools--instruments of social activity based on learned agreement in aims and methods--rather than as a monolith of absolute truth. Implications of this pluralistic outlook for medical research and practice are discussed. PMID:19743556

  9. New library buildings: the Health Sciences Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, R B

    1979-01-01

    The new Health Sciences Library of Memorial University of Newfoundland is described and illustrated. A library facility that forms part of a larger health sciences center, this is a medium-sized academic health sciences library built on a single level. Along with a physical description of the library and its features, the concepts of single-level libraries, phased occupancy, and the project management approach to building a large health center library are discussed in detail. Images PMID:476319

  10. Conceptualising population health: from mechanistic thinking to complexity science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic interpretation of reality can be traced to the influential work by René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton. Their theories were able to accurately predict most physical phenomena relating to motion, optics and gravity. This paradigm had at least three principles and approaches: reductionism, linearity and hierarchy. These ideas appear to have influenced social scientists and the discourse on population health. In contrast, Complexity Science takes a more holistic view of systems. It views natural systems as being 'open', with fuzzy borders, constantly adapting to cope with pressures from the environment. These are called Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). The sub-systems within it lack stable hierarchies, and the roles of agency keep changing. The interactions with the environment and among sub-systems are non-linear interactions and lead to self-organisation and emergent properties. Theoretical frameworks such as epi+demos+cracy and the ecosocial approach to health have implicitly used some of these concepts of interacting dynamic sub-systems. Using Complexity Science we can view population health outcomes as an emergent property of CAS, which has numerous dynamic non-linear interactions among its interconnected sub-systems or agents. In order to appreciate these sub-systems and determinants, one should acquire a basic knowledge of diverse disciplines and interact with experts from different disciplines. Strategies to improve health should be multi-pronged, and take into account the diversity of actors, determinants and contexts. The dynamic nature of the system requires that the interventions are constantly monitored to provide early feedback to a flexible system that takes quick corrections. PMID:21247500

  11. 78 FR 59042 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  12. 77 FR 9673 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Investigator, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, 111...

  13. The health sciences librarian as Internet navigator and interpreter.

    PubMed Central

    Warling, B N; Stave, C D

    1995-01-01

    Over the past several years, thousands of networked information resources have become available to individuals and institutions with access to the Internet. Unfortunately, the dizzying array of computing and networking environments often frustrates end users' attempts to navigate the Internet. Librarians have begun to take responsibility not only for instructing users in the use of basic network tools such as file transfer, remote log-in, and electronic mail, but also for answering questions concerning network access and even information system design. The authors show how, by continuing to adapt to this new and volatile environment, health sciences librarians find themselves playing increasingly important roles in shaping the information policies and practices of their institutions. To illustrate these new roles, the authors review the experiences of health sciences librarians at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Diego. These institutions have varying and complex networking environments, and their biomedical libraries have taken lead roles in clarifying and interpreting their particular Internet features. PMID:8547896

  14. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  15. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity.

    PubMed

    Valantine, Hannah A; Collins, Francis S

    2015-10-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation's population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation's health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity's impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  16. Translating Family-Focused Prevention Science into Public Health Impact

    PubMed Central

    Spoth, Richard L.; Schainker, Lisa M.; Hiller-Sturmhöefel, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Underage drinking is a pervasive problem in the United States, with serious consequences for youth, families, communities, and society as a whole. Family-focused preventive interventions for children and adolescents have shown potential for reducing underage drinking and other problem behaviors. Research findings indicate that clear advances have been made, in terms of both the number of evidence-based interventions available, and in the quality of the methods used to evaluate them. To fully reap the benefits of such preventive interventions and achieve public health impact, the findings of family-focused preventive intervention science must be translated into real-world, community practices. This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors—effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation. Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors. A model for community–university partnerships has been developed that potentially can facilitate the dissemination and public health impact of universal interventions to prevent underage drinking and other problem behaviors. This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention. PMID:22330218

  17. Inside outreach: a challenge for health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Jane; Berryman, Donna; Harger, Nancy; Julian, Paul; Peterson, Nancy; Spinner, Margaret; Varney, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Like medical and health sciences libraries throughout the country, the Lamar Soutter Library (LSL) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School is dealing with ever-increasing outreach needs in times of diminishing funding. With the goal of reshaping the library's outreach program to better serve our patron groups, the Outreach Study Group was formed to investigate existing models of outreach. Methods: The group initially examined the current literature and subsequently conducted a nationwide survey of medical and health sciences libraries to identify trends in outreach. This article details the methods used for the survey, including establishing criteria for selecting participants, determining the focus, and developing and conducting the survey. Results: Of the 40 libraries invited to participate, 63% completed the survey. An analysis of the data revealed successes, problems, and trends. The group's conclusions led to recommendations for the LSL's future outreach efforts. Conclusions: Analysis of the data revealed key findings in the areas of strategic planning, funding, and evaluation. A thoughtful definition of outreach ensures that outreach activities are expressions of the library's mission. Funding shifts require flexible programs. Evaluation provides data necessary to create new programs, sustain successful ones, and avoid repeating mistakes. PMID:16059422

  18. [The approach of sciences of complexity in health services administration].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Historically, health services administration has been managed under a Taylorist, Fayolist, humanist and bureaucratic focus approach. However, today dynamic and competitive behaviors that require others approaches in management are developing. Because of the social, scientific and technological changes that are occurring, it is necessary to abandon hierarchical and authoritarian schemes, "up and down" lines, prescriptive rules and order line up must be left behind. Health services administration is an adapted complex system that is not proportional, neither predictable in direction or magnitude. A new proposal is to focus on the sciences of complexity, where the social factors, materials, economics, human and ethics coincide with order and disorder, reason and unreason, and in which we must accept that the phenomenon that emerges creates different organizing different structures from the addition or subtraction of components. There is distance in the process of cause and direct effect. The mirage from the sciences of complexity are trans-disciplinary and we have accepted this in others branches of knowledge, such as quantum physics, non-linear mathematics and cybernetics, so we have to accept the influence of entropy, non-entropy, attractors, the theory of chaos and fractals. PMID:23693104

  19. Governing GMOs in the USA: science, law and public health.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Chen, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Controversy surrounds the production and consumption of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Proponents argue that GMO food sources represent the only viable solution to food shortages in an ever-growing global population. Science reports no harm from GMO use and consumption so far. Opponents fear the potentially negative impact that GMO development and use could have on the environment and consumers, and are concerned about the lack of data on the long-term effects of GMO use. We discuss the development of GMO food sources, the history of legislation and policy for the labeling requirements of GMO food products, and the health, environmental, and legal rationale for and against GMO food labeling. The Food and Drug Administration regulates food with GMOs within a coordinated framework of federal agencies. Despite mounting scientific evidence that GMO foods are substantially equivalent to traditionally bred food sources, debate remains over the appropriateness of GMO food labeling. In fact, food manufacturers have mounted a First Amendment challenge against Vermont's passage of a law that requires GMO labeling. Mandatory GMO labeling is not supported by science. Compulsory GMO labels may not only hinder the development of agricultural biotechnology, but may also exacerbate the misconception that GMOs endanger people's health. PMID:26536836

  20. Venture funding for science-based African health innovation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While venture funding has been applied to biotechnology and health in high-income countries, it is still nascent in these fields in developing countries, and particularly in Africa. Yet the need for implementing innovative solutions to health challenges is greatest in Africa, with its enormous burden of communicable disease. Issues such as risk, investment opportunities, return on investment requirements, and quantifying health impact are critical in assessing venture capital’s potential for supporting health innovation. This paper uses lessons learned from five venture capital firms from Kenya, South Africa, China, India, and the US to suggest design principles for African health venture funds. Discussion The case study method was used to explore relevant funds, and lessons for the African context. The health venture funds in this study included publicly-owned organizations, corporations, social enterprises, and subsidiaries of foreign venture firms. The size and type of investments varied widely. The primary investor in four funds was the International Finance Corporation. Three of the funds aimed primarily for financial returns, one aimed primarily for social and health returns, and one had mixed aims. Lessons learned include the importance of measuring and supporting both social and financial returns; the need to engage both upstream capital such as government risk-funding and downstream capital from the private sector; and the existence of many challenges including difficulty of raising capital, low human resource capacity, regulatory barriers, and risky business environments. Based on these lessons, design principles for appropriate venture funding are suggested. Summary Based on the cases studied and relevant experiences elsewhere, there is a case for venture funding as one support mechanism for science-based African health innovation, with opportunities for risk-tolerant investors to make financial as well as social returns. Such funds should

  1. Social Networking Addiction among Health Sciences Students in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Addiction to social networking sites (SNSs) is an international issue with numerous methods of measurement. The impact of such addictions among health science students is of particular concern. This study aimed to measure SNS addiction rates among health sciences students at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: In April 2014, an anonymous English-language six-item electronic self-reporting survey based on the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale was administered to a non-random cohort of 141 medical and laboratory science students at SQU. The survey was used to measure usage of three SNSs: Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California, USA), YouTube (YouTube, San Bruno, California, USA) and Twitter (Twitter Inc., San Francisco, California, USA). Two sets of criteria were used to calculate addiction rates (a score of 3 on at least four survey items or a score of 3 on all six items). Work-related SNS usage was also measured. Results: A total of 81 students completed the survey (response rate: 57.4%). Of the three SNSs, YouTube was most commonly used (100%), followed by Facebook (91.4%) and Twitter (70.4%). Usage and addiction rates varied significantly across the three SNSs. Addiction rates to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, respectively, varied according to the criteria used (14.2%, 47.2% and 33.3% versus 6.3%, 13.8% and 12.8%). However, addiction rates decreased when work-related activity was taken into account. Conclusion: Rates of SNS addiction among this cohort indicate a need for intervention. Additionally, the results suggest that addiction to individual SNSs should be measured and that work-related activities should be taken into account during measurement. PMID:26357556

  2. Teaching Environmental Health Science for Informed Citizenship in the Science Classroom and Afterschool Clubs

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M.; Hundal, Savreen; Kramer, Judy F.; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2013-01-01

    In the era of growing concerns about human-induced climate change and sustainable development, it is important for the schools to prepare students for meaningful engagement with environmental policies that will determine the future of our society. To do this, educators need to face a number of challenges. These include deciding on the science knowledge and skills needed for informed citizenship, identifying teaching practices for fostering such knowledge and skills, and finding ways to implement new practices into the tightly packed existing curriculum. This paper describes two collaborative efforts between the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and University of Maryland College of Education that attempt to meet these challenges. The focus of both projects is on helping students develop information seeking and evaluation and argumentation skills, and applying them to complex socio-scientific issues that have bearing on students’ daily lives. The first effort involves co-designing an afterschool environmental health club curriculum with an interdisciplinary team of middle school teachers. The second effort is the development and implementation of a week-long school drinking water quality debate activity in a high school environmental science classroom. Both projects center on Tox Town, an NLM web resource that introduces students to environmental health issues in everyday environments. The paper describes successes and challenges of environmental health curriculum development, including teachers’ and researchers’ perception of contextual constraints in the club and classroom setting, tensions inherent in co-design, and students’ experience with socio-scientific argumentation. PMID:24382985

  3. Teaching Environmental Health Science for Informed Citizenship in the Science Classroom and Afterschool Clubs.

    PubMed

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M; Hundal, Savreen; Kramer, Judy F; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2012-08-01

    In the era of growing concerns about human-induced climate change and sustainable development, it is important for the schools to prepare students for meaningful engagement with environmental policies that will determine the future of our society. To do this, educators need to face a number of challenges. These include deciding on the science knowledge and skills needed for informed citizenship, identifying teaching practices for fostering such knowledge and skills, and finding ways to implement new practices into the tightly packed existing curriculum. This paper describes two collaborative efforts between the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and University of Maryland College of Education that attempt to meet these challenges. The focus of both projects is on helping students develop information seeking and evaluation and argumentation skills, and applying them to complex socio-scientific issues that have bearing on students' daily lives. The first effort involves co-designing an afterschool environmental health club curriculum with an interdisciplinary team of middle school teachers. The second effort is the development and implementation of a week-long school drinking water quality debate activity in a high school environmental science classroom. Both projects center on Tox Town, an NLM web resource that introduces students to environmental health issues in everyday environments. The paper describes successes and challenges of environmental health curriculum development, including teachers' and researchers' perception of contextual constraints in the club and classroom setting, tensions inherent in co-design, and students' experience with socio-scientific argumentation. PMID:24382985

  4. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human

  5. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  6. 78 FR 32259 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences... Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, July 15, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to July 15, 2013, 5:00 p.m... on May 20, 2013, 78 FR 97. The meeting notice is amended to change the location of the meeting...

  7. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  8. 78 FR 17219 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  9. 78 FR 39739 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  10. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  11. 78 FR 25754 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  12. 77 FR 37423 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  13. 76 FR 62080 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Health Hazards; 93.114, Applied Toxicological Research and Testing, National Institutes of Health, HHS... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;...

  14. A review of electronic journal acquisition, management, and use in health sciences libraries

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Suzetta

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper describes patterns of electronic journal usage in health sciences libraries during the past decade. Method: The paper presents a case study, documenting the pattern of acquisition, management, and usage at the Louis Calder Memorial Library of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Results: Health sciences journals were early to offer electronic alternatives to print. As a result, health sciences libraries, their patrons, and the public at large were early to embrace the new versions and continue to embrace the significant changes in scholarly communication they enable. Although the patterns of electronic journals among health sciences libraries and other special and academic libraries have similarities, they also have differences. Broad studies of electronic journals in non–health sciences libraries have been published, but a retrospective review of electronic journals in health sciences libraries has not. PMID:16404472

  15. The need for integration in health sciences sets the future direction for public health education.

    PubMed

    Li, L M; Tang, J L; Lv, J; Jiang, Y; Griffiths, S M

    2011-01-01

    Since the foundation of the People's Republic of China in 1949, there has been remarkable developments in public health in the country. These achievements are primarily attributed to the public health services and patriotic public health campaigns, although the contribution of high-technology medical applications is also recognized. However, along with the recent socio-economic developments and scientific and technological progress, medical disciplines have become more and more specialized, and clinical and preventive medicine have become further separated from each other. Conventional Chinese wisdom says 'when long divided they must unite, when long united they must divide'. At the onset of the new round of reforms of health care in China, it seems important to revisit the discussions on the urgency for integration of health sciences in medicine in China. Several issues and viewpoints on integrating medicine are discussed in this paper. The biopsychosocial model for health calls for broad integration. Primary care development in China requires integration in education and practice, and in treatment and prevention. Control of chronic diseases requires integrated and united action. Integration of traditional Chinese medicine with Western medicine requires creativity. The integration perspective should be instilled in the minds of medical students. Integration also entails integrated practice. After all, integration entails integrated education and practice in public health education. Changing the current public health education system still has a long way to go. True integration requires integration of concepts, policies, resources and measures, as well as changes in the organization of health care including public health, prevention and treatment. This needs to be a systematic process. Finally, success of integration relies on social mobilization, advocacy, promotion and attention of the entire society. PMID:21168177

  16. Sugars and Health Controversies: What Does the Science Say?123

    PubMed Central

    Rippe, James M; Angelopoulos, Theodore J

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of sugar and its relation to various potential adverse health consequences are the subjects of considerable debate and controversy. This supplement to Advances in Nutrition provides an expanded summary of a symposium held on 26 April 2014 entitled “Sugars and Health Controversies: What Does the Science Say?” as part of the ASN Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2014. The articles in the supplement discuss results of current systematic reviews and meta-analyses as well as randomized controlled trials and draw implications for public policy considerations. In addition, future research gaps are identified. Current research trials conducted with commonly consumed sugars [e.g., sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)] do not support a unique relation to obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, risk factors for heart disease, or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Neurologic differences in response to studies that used pure fructose compared with pure glucose have not been confirmed using typical sugars that are consumed (i.e., sucrose and HFCS), which contain ∼50% glucose and fructose. We conclude that added sugars consumed in the normal forms in which humans consume them, at amounts typical of the human diet and for the time period studied in randomized controlled trials, do not result in adverse health consequences. Although more research trials are needed in many areas of sugar consumption and health, there is little scientific justification for recommending restricting sugar consumption below the reasonable upper limit recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 of no more than 25% of calories.

  17. 1991 survey of recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L T

    1992-01-01

    Twenty health sciences libraries reported building planning, expansion, or construction of new facilities in the association's second annual survey of recent building projects. Six projects are new, freestanding structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Six other projects are part of new construction for separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. The final eight projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven of these twenty libraries were still in projected, predesign, or design stages of awaiting funding approval; of those seven, five were not prepared to release the requested information. Six projects are reported here as illustrative of current building projects. Images PMID:1600420

  18. Strengthening the links between health sciences information users and providers.

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, J L

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, the Hospital Library Service Program of the Central New York Library Resources Council conducted a study to evaluate the usefulness, impacts, and potential services of eleven hospital libraries in a four-county area in New York State; determine the degree to which the libraries comply with Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standard IM.9.2; and provide recommendations for improved services in the member libraries. Two research instruments were used: a survey for hospital-based health sciences professionals and a survey for hospital-based information providers. Results from the two surveys were compared to determine if users' needs were being filled, and to develop plans for improved information services and products. Fourteen recommendations are made that, if implemented, will support the creation of user-defined information products, enhance the library's profile within the hospital, and exploit resource sharing to reduce costs and enhance coordination. PMID:8547898

  19. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sakraida, Teresa J; D'Amico, Jessica; Thibault, Erica

    2010-08-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98-108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and with external parties providing key resources, (b) establishing a perspective of opportunity for research advancement, (c) identifying the larger context of scientific culture and regulatory environment, and (d) anticipating problems with a flexible response and rewarding teamwork. Small grant management included developing a day-to-day system, building a grant/study program development plan, and initiating a marketing plan. PMID:20643328

  20. Medical information, health sciences librarians, and professional liability.

    PubMed

    Hafner, A W

    1990-01-01

    As a gatekeeper to medical literature and a critical link in the delivery of information to physicians, the librarian's role raises the issue of the librarian's professional liability. The paper suggests several ways in which liability may attach to the librarian or the librarian's employers. Although the librarian's personal risk is negligible, the physician's exposure due to ineffective library work is substantial since the courts have held that a physician must keep abreast of progress in his field. Librarians can also become associated with professional liability actions as part of a case against a physician or hospital through the legal doctrine of vicarious liability. The paper concludes by suggesting several proactive steps for health sciences librarians to pursue to insulate themselves from professional liability and to insulate physicians and institutions from vicarious liability. PMID:10107630

  1. Kin of coauthorship in five decades of health science literature.

    PubMed

    Prosperi, Mattia; Buchan, Iain; Fanti, Iuri; Meloni, Sandro; Palladino, Pietro; Torvik, Vetle I

    2016-08-01

    Family background-kinship-can propagate careers. The evidence for academic nepotism is littered with complex associations and disputed causal inferences. Surname clustering, albeit with very careful consideration of surnames' flows across regions and time periods, can be used to reflect family ties. We examined surname patterns in the health science literature, by country, across five decades. Over 21 million papers indexed in the MEDLINE/PubMed database were analyzed. We identified relevant country-specific kinship trends over time and found that authors who are part of a kin tend to occupy central positions in their collaborative networks. Just as kin build potent academic networks with their own resources, societies may do well to provide equivalent support for talented individuals with fewer resources, on the periphery of networks. PMID:27457939

  2. The genesis of craniofacial biology as a health science discipline.

    PubMed

    Sperber, G H; Sperber, S M

    2014-06-01

    The craniofacial complex encapsulates the brain and contains the organs for key functions of the body, including sight, hearing and balance, smell, taste, respiration and mastication. All these systems are intimately integrated within the head. The combination of these diverse systems into a new field was dictated by the dental profession's desire for a research branch of basic science devoted and attuned to its specific needs. The traditional subjects of genetics, embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, dental materials, odontology, molecular biology and palaeoanthropology pertaining to dentistry have been drawn together by many newly emerging technologies. These new technologies include gene sequencing, CAT scanning, MRI imaging, laser scanning, image analysis, ultrasonography, spectroscopy and visualosonics. A vibrant unitary discipline of investigation, craniofacial biology, has emerged that builds on the original concept of 'oral biology' that began in the 1960s. This paper reviews some of the developments that have led to the genesis of craniofacial biology as a fully-fledged health science discipline of significance in the advancement of clinical dental practice. Some of the key figures and milestones in craniofacial biology are identified. PMID:24495071

  3. Health Promotion for Adolescent Childhood Leukemia Survivors: Building on Prevention Science and eHealth

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Diane L.; Lindemulder, Susan J.; Goldberg, Linn; Stadler, Diane D.; Smith, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Teenage survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased morbidity likely due to their prior multicomponent treatment. Habits established in adolescence can impact individuals’ subsequent adult behaviors. Accordingly, healthy lifestyles, avoiding harmful actions, and appropriate disease surveillance are of heightened importance among teenage survivors. We review the findings from prevention science and their relevance to heath promotion. The capabilities and current uses of eHealth components including e-learning, serious video games, exergaming, behavior tracking, individual messaging, and social networking are briefly presented. The health promotion needs of adolescent survivors are aligned with those eHealth aspects to propose a new paradigm to enhance the wellbeing of adolescent ALL survivors. PMID:23109253

  4. Educating Youth About Health and Science Using a Partnership Between an Academic Medical Center and Community-based Science Museum

    PubMed Central

    Griest, Susan; Howarth, Linda C.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William; Carney, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Declining student interest and scholastic abilities in the sciences are concerns for the health professions. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health is committed to promoting more research on health behaviors among US youth, where one of the most striking contemporary issues is obesity. This paper reports findings on the impact of a partnership between Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry linked to a 17-week exhibition of BodyWorlds3 and designed to inform rural underserved youth about science and health research. Self-administered survey measures included health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and interest in the health professions. Four hundred four surveys (88% of participants) were included in analyses. Ninety percent or more found both the Body-Worlds (n = 404) and OHSU (n = 239) exhibits interesting. Dental care habits showed the highest level of intended behavior change (Dental = 45%, Exercise = 34%, Eating = 30%). Overall, females and middle school students were more likely than male and high school students, respectively, to state an intention to change exercise, eating and dental care habits. Females and high school students were more likely to have considered a career in health or science prior to their exhibit visit and, following the exhibit, were more likely to report that this intention had been reinforced. About 6% of those who had not previously considered a career in health or science (n = 225) reported being more likely to do so after viewing the exhibits. In conclusion, high quality experiential learning best created by community-academic partnerships appears to have the ability to stimulate interest and influence intentions to change health behaviors among middle and high school students. PMID:19350372

  5. Children, Health and Science: Child-to-Child Activities and Science and Technology Teaching. Science and Technology Education Document Series No. 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Hugh, Ed.; And Others

    This volume is about children's health, how good science teaching and scientific thinking can improve health, and how health education can contribute to scientific thinking. It is concerned with skills for life: skills which can save and improve lives; skills which go beyond the classroom and are used in daily life and which, when thoroughly…

  6. [Legacy and promises from the teaching of Social Sciences in the Health field].

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2012-12-01

    The article analyzes the teaching and learning of social sciences in health sciences courses from the perspective of the curriculum and learning generated by research groups and thesis supervision activities. The author conducts a rereading of the classics and main contemporary scientists, based on the subarea's scientific output and her own personal experience as professor, researcher, and thesis supervisor. The article focuses on the tradition and teaching of the classics in social sciences, the main contemporary social theories, social sciences in health with an emphasis on teaching, and observations on the interface between teaching in social sciences and life sciences. The author concludes by highlighting the importance of work by social scientists in the health field and identifies the following problematic points: difficulties in dealing with mediations between the biological and the social; frequent subordination of foundations to techniques; and ideological and common-sense issues in the teaching and appropriation of Social Sciences in Health. PMID:23288069

  7. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P. O. Box 12233, MD EC-30... Worker Health and Safety Training; 93.143, NIEHS Superfund Hazardous Substances--Basic Research...

  8. 75 FR 35076 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... and Training, Nat. Institute of Environmental Health Science, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-30/Room 3170 B... Waste Worker Health and Safety Training; 93.143, NIEHS Superfund Hazardous Substances--Basic...

  9. The scholarship of teaching in health science schools.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Ruth-Marie E; Work, Janis A

    2005-01-01

    Teaching is a core mission for all health science schools. Despite its key role in training new generations of health care professionals, teaching has been overshadowed by the revenue- and prestige-generating activities of research and clinical care. Research, both basic and clinical, is equated with scholarship and is rewarded in the promotion and tenure process, as well as with intramural and extramural funding. Clinical service generates revenue for schools; teaching, however, does not generate revenue, and, traditionally, teaching and the creative activity related to it have been seen not as scholarship but as an expectation. Over the last decade or so, scholars of teaching have called for a new view of scholarship that includes the scholarship of teaching. This view is broader in scope than scholarly teaching within a classroom or clinic. It refers to scholarly activity related to teaching that results in enduring products that are peer reviewed and broadly disseminated. These are examples of scholarly work and should be recognized as such. Academic institutions should value high-quality teaching and educational innovations and reward them as scholarly work. This article presents an overview of what the scholarship of teaching means, how it can be assessed, and the needed next steps. PMID:15834814

  10. Translating complex science into life-course health promoting strategies.

    PubMed

    Buttriss, Judith L

    2011-02-01

    These days, we are bombarded with nutrition information from diverse sources and of varying quality. There has been a dramatic increase in communication channels, including more television channels with airtime to fill, and the emergence of the Internet and 'new media' such as social networking sites. Part of this culture is to deliver ever changing and novel angles. The background 'noise' that this creates can make delivery of evidence-based advice about healthy eating that generally carries less novelty value, a huge challenge. This paper illustrates ways in which complex scientific information can be translated into meaningful health promoting strategies that can be applied across the life course. The examples used are nutrition in the context of healthy ageing, communicating the concept of energy density in the context of satiety, healthy hydration, health effects of probiotics and resources for use by teachers in the classroom. This selection of examples demonstrates the processes adopted at the British Nutrition Foundation to identify the evidence base for a particular topic and then to communicate this information to various target audiences. The British Nutrition Foundation's approach typically starts with preparation of a detailed review of the evidence, often with the involvement of external expertise, followed by peer review. For much of this work conventional science communication routes are used, but use is also made of the Internet and various forms of new media. PMID:21208499

  11. Evaluating overall usage of a digital health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, M P; D'Alessandro, D M; Galvin, J R; Erkonen, W E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Digital health sciences library (DHSL) evaluation involves studying the usage of the DHSL by individuals as well as populations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate trends in overall usage of a DHSL as part of a process of continuous quality improvement in order to learn how to enhance a DHSL in order to meet its users' needs better. METHODS: Web server log file analysis was performed on a prototype DHSL, the Virtual Hospital, using two log file analysis programs on data from the month of February over four consecutive years, 1995 to 1998. RESULTS: Overall DHSL usage increased between 1995 and 1997 and leveled off in 1998. Fifteen percent of usage came from countries outside the United States. A broad spectrum of medical information for health care providers and patients was accessed and centered around specialty medical information. CONCLUSIONS: To be of optimal assistance to users, DHSLs should (1) contain a broad base of information on common and uncommon medical problems, (2) accommodate the needs of the significant percentage of users that are international through content translation and mirroring, and (3) ensure they are indexed and catalogued in the major Web search engines and Web general and medical indices so they can be easily found by users. PMID:9803306

  12. An introduction to the Semantic Web for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Robu, Ioana; Robu, Valentin; Thirion, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The paper (1) introduces health sciences librarians to the main concepts and principles of the Semantic Web (SW) and (2) briefly reviews a number of projects on the handling of biomedical information that uses SW technology. Methodology: The paper is structured into two main parts. “Semantic Web Technology” provides a high-level description, with examples, of the main standards and concepts: extensible markup language (XML), Resource Description Framework (RDF), RDF Schema (RDFS), ontologies, and their utility in information retrieval, concluding with mention of more advanced SW languages and their characteristics. “Semantic Web Applications and Research Projects in the Biomedical Field” is a brief review of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), Generalised Architecture for Languages, Encyclopedias and Nomenclatures in Medicine (GALEN), HealthCyberMap, LinkBase, and the thesaurus of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The paper also mentions other benefits and by-products of the SW, citing projects related to them. Discussion and Conclusions: Some of the problems facing the SW vision are presented, especially the ways in which the librarians' expertise in organizing knowledge and in structuring information may contribute to SW projects. PMID:16636713

  13. Health sciences librarians' attitudes toward the Academy of Health Information Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lynda M.; Kars, Marge; Petty, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to ascertain health sciences librarians' attitudes toward the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP). Sample: Systematic sampling was used to select 210 names from the list of members of the Midwest Chapter of the Medical Library Association. Methods: A questionnaire containing open- and closed-ended questions was used to collect the data. Results: A total of 135 usable questionnaires were returned. Of the respondents, 34.8% are members of the academy and most are at the senior or distinguished member levels. The academy gives them a sense of professionalism and helps them to keep current with new trends. The majority of participants (65.2%) are not members of the academy. Among the various reasons proffered are that neither institutions nor employers require it and that there is no obvious benefit to belonging to the academy. Conclusions: More research needs to be done with a larger sample size to determine the attitudes of health sciences librarians, nationwide, toward the academy. PMID:15243638

  14. [The role of science in policy making--EuSANH-ISA project, framework for science advice for health].

    PubMed

    Cianciara, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Maria; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Wysocki, Mirosław J

    2012-01-01

    Governments and other authorities (including MPs) should be well informed on issues of science and technology. This is particularly important in the era of evidence-based practice. This implies the need to get expert advice. The process by which scientific knowledge is transmitted, along with proposals how to solve the problem, is called science advice. The main aim of the article is to discuss the issue of science advice--definitions, interaction between science and policymaking, and its position in contemporary policies. The second aim is to present European Science Advisory Network for Health (EuSANH), EuSANH-ISA project, and framework for science advice for health which was developed by participants. Furthermore, the role of civil society in decision-making process and science advice is also discussed. Interaction between scientists and policy-makers are described in terms of science-push approach (technocratic model), policy-pull (decisionistic) and simultaneous push-pull approach (pragmatic). The position of science advice is described in historical perspective from the 50s, especially in the last two decades. Description relies to USA, Canada and UK. Principles of scientific advice to government (Government Office for Science, UK) are quoted. Some important documents related to science advice in EU and UN are mentioned. EuSANH network is described as well as EuSANH-ISA project, with its objectives and outcomes. According to findings of this project, the process of science advice for health should follow some steps: framing the issue to be covered; planning entire process leading to the conclusion; drafting the report; reviewing the report and revision; publishing report and assessing the impact on policy. PMID:23230726

  15. Skills and abilities needed by environmental health science and protection professionals in the public sector.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Michele

    2003-01-01

    The National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council (EHAC) accredits undergraduate academic environmental health science programs in the United States. The guidelines used by EHAC include core and technical courses that students should take in order to graduate with a bachelor of science degree in environmental health science. As part of a review of the accreditation guidelines, the research reported in this paper was undertaken with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To identify the skills and abilities needed by entry-level environmental health professionals in the public sector, the research 1) examined existing environmental health priorities in public-health agencies, 2) reviewed entry-level job postings, and 3) surveyed more than 120 public-health professionals across the country. The results suggest that students who graduate from accredited programs must be skilled interpersonal communicators with a broad base of technical knowledge. PMID:12575636

  16. External Reporting Lines of Academic Special Libraries: A Health Sciences Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhler, Amy G.; Ferree, Nita; Cataldo, Tara T.; Tennant, Michele R.

    2010-01-01

    Very little literature exists on the nature of external reporting lines and funding structures of academic special libraries. This study focuses on academic health sciences libraries. The authors analyze information gathered from statistics published by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) from 1977 through 2007; an…

  17. Indiana Health Science Teachers: Their Human Genetics/Bioethics Educational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Jon R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Results from a human genetics/bioethics needs assessment questionnaire (N = 124 out of 300) mailed to Indiana health teachers are reported. Genetic topics and human genetic diseases/defects included in health science instruction are listed in two tables. Responses to 16 science/society statements (and statements themselves) are also reported. (SK)

  18. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  19. Are Learning Style Preferences of Health Science Students Predictive of Their Attitudes towards E-Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ted; Zoghi, Maryam; Williams, Brett; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Roller, Louis; Palermo, Claire; McKenna, Lisa; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Hewitt, Lesley; Sim, Jenny; Holt, Tangerine-Ann

    2009-01-01

    The objective for this study was to determine whether learning style preferences of health science students could predict their attitudes to e-learning. A survey comprising the "Index of Learning Styles" (ILS) and the "Online Learning Environment Survey" (OLES) was distributed to 2885 students enrolled in 10 different health science programs at an…

  20. EDUCATION FOR HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARIANSHIP, PROCEEDINGS OF AN INVITATIONAL CONFERENCE (SEATTLE, SEPTEMBER 10-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIEBERMAN, IRVING

    MEDICAL LIBRARIANS, HEALTH SCIENCE FACULTY, AND SPECIALISTS IN RELATED AREAS WERE PARTICIPANTS IN A CONFERENCE HELD TO EXAMINE THE NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARIANSHIP AND DEVELOP SUGGESTIONS FOR APPROPRIATE LIBRARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS. THIS REPORT CONTAINS THE COMPLETE TEXTS OF WORKING PAPERS PREPARED FOR THE CONFERENCE AND MAJOR…

  1. A Study of Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) Students Within Health Science Career Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; And Others

    Participation of minority students within health science career preparation programs is investigated in this study from the University of Washington. The history of minority admissions to medical and nursing schools throughout the country is reviewed. Health sciences programs for minorities at the university are discussed and the impact of the…

  2. The Technology of Evidence-Based Practice: Tools for Navigating the Health Sciences Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    Medical and health sciences libraries have incorporated the elements of evidence-based practice (EBP) into their reference services, instruction, and online resource development for years. While EBP focuses on the use of medical and health sciences literature in the clinical environment (i.e., making decisions about how to treat a particular…

  3. Translational Science at the National Institute of Mental Health: Can Social Work Take Its Rightful Place?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.; Ell, Kathleen; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2007-01-01

    Several recent national reports have noted that there is a 20-year gap between knowledge generated from our best clinical research and the utilization of that knowledge in our health and mental health care sectors. One solution to this dilemma has been the emergence of translational science. Translational science has become a top priority of the…

  4. The Academic Role of the Vice President for Health Sciences: Can a Walrus Become a Unicorn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Edmund D.

    1975-01-01

    The Vice President for Health Sciences is a term used for the chief administrative officer of a multi-unit health science component of a university. This essay reviews this job, and the transformation it has undergone in the past. (Editor/PG)

  5. 78 FR 18997 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ..., Neuropharmacology and Human Metabolism Groups. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101... Free Radical Metabolism Group. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101..., 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m. Agenda: An overview of the Comparative Genomics Group and...

  6. Health Sciences Graduate Students' Perceptions of the Quality of their Supervision: A Measurement Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Gina; Saint-Mleux, Julie; Dubois, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    We developed and evaluated the G3S-SP, a scale measuring health sciences graduate students' perceptions of the quality of their supervision. The scale was developed from a literature review and existing questionnaires. Feedback from health sciences graduate students and supervisors led to a revised version of the scale that was mailed to 215…

  7. 77 FR 18252 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 23, 2012, 8:30...

  8. 77 FR 60448 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Suite 101, A214, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Any... Suites, 2515 Meridian Parkway, Research Triangle Park, NC 27713. Open: November 5, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to...

  9. 77 FR 26300 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, 111 TW Alexander Drive, Maildrop A2-09..., 2515 Meridian Parkway, Research Triangle Park, NC 27713. Open: June 4, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to 11:50...

  10. 75 FR 3474 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/ 3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: February 19,...

  11. 78 FR 26643 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, NIH, 111 TW Alexander Drive, Maildrop A2-09, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, 919-541..., 2515 Meridian Parkway, Research Triangle Park, NC 27713. Open: June 03, 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 11:50...

  12. 75 FR 19981 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/ 3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 13, 2010,...

  13. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology. Grade 1. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Brennan, Carol Ann

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  14. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology. Grade 5. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Pottenger, Larma M.

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  15. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology. Grade 4. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Pottenger, Larma M.

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  16. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology. Grade 2. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Brennan, Carol Ann

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  17. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology. Grade 3. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Brennan, Carol Ann

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  18. DASH: Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology: Kindergarten. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, Francis M., III; Brennan, Carol Ann; Pottenger, Larma M.

    The goal of the Developmental Approaches in Science, Health and Technology (DASH) program is to preserve the curiosity and capture the imagination of all elementary students through an experience of science, technology, and health that engages them in the excitement of exploring and understanding the unknown, inventing and building to solve…

  19. Addressing Diversity in Health Science Students by Enhancing Flexibility through e-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Joy; Thalluri, Jyothi

    2014-01-01

    The technological advancements for teaching and learning sciences for health science students are embedded in the Thalluri-Penman Good Practice Model, which aims to improve the learning experiences of science students and increase student retention and success rates. The model also links students from urban and rural areas, studying both on-and…

  20. The Pedometer as a Tool to Enrich Science Learning in a Public Health Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James A.; Zizzi, Samuel J.; Vitullo, Elizabeth A.; Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara

    2005-01-01

    The United States is experiencing an obesity epidemic: A science-technology-society public health issue tied to our built environment, which is characterized by heavy dependence on automobiles and reduced opportunities to walk and bicycle for transportation. This presents an informal science education opportunity within "science in personal and…

  1. Biomedical Social Science, Unit I: Health and Society. Basic Social Science Inquiry Into Health-Related Problems. Instructor's Manual. Revised Version, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This guide presents lesson plans to accompany the lessons presented in the associated student text. The lessons are designed to teach social science concepts that enhance the prospective health care practitioner's ability to interact effectively with people and to anticipate the demands of health care delivery situations. An introduction to the…

  2. [Outliers and robust logistic regression in Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Cutanda Henríquez, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Logistic regression methods have many applications in Health Sciences. There is a vast literature about procedures to be followed and the way to find the estimators for the parameters from the observed values, and these methods are implemented to all the usual statistical packages. These estimators are of the 'maximum likelihood' kind, i.e., they are the ones that make the observed values the most probable among all the models that could have been used. The good properties of the maximum likelihood estimators are widely demonstrated. However, there are some practical circumstances that may cause the presence of 'outliers', i.e., observed values not corresponding to the logistic model we are assuming as a hypothesis. Occasionally, these anomalous observations can have a strong effect on the fit, and lead the study to the wrong conclusion. The causes of these outliers depend on the particular study, but it is possible to point out classification errors, observations (subjects) with special features which have not been taken into account, uncertainty in the measurement of some parameters, etc. The problem with maximum likelihood estimators is that they are not 'robust', i.e., their sensitivity to outliers could be arbitrarily large, and a minority of outliers could lead to a wrong logistic model. In this work, we will show two cases illustrating possible consequences, and we will discuss the application of robust methods. PMID:19180273

  3. Burnout among faculty physicians in an academic health science centre

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Gardner; Khetani, Nicole; Stephens, Derek

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout experienced by physicians is concerning because it may affect quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of burnout among physicians at an academic health science centre and to test the hypothesis that work hours are related to burnout. METHODS: All 300 staff physicians, contacted through their personal e-mail, were provided an encrypted link to an anonymous questionnaire. The primary outcome measure, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, has three subscales: personal, work related and patient related. RESULTS: The response rate for the questionnaire was 70%. Quantitative demands, insecurity at work and job satisfaction affected all three components of burnout. Of 210 staff physicians, 22% (n=46) had scores indicating personal burnout, 14% (n=30) had scores indicating work-related burnout and 8% (n=16) had scores indicating patient-related burnout. The correlation between total hours worked and total burnout was only 0.10 (P=0.14) DISCUSSION: Up to 22% of academic paediatric physicians had scores consistent with mild to severe burnout. A simple reduction in work hours is unlikely to be successful in reducing burnout and, therefore, quantitative demands, job satisfaction and work insecurity may require attention to address burnout among academic physicians. PMID:22851895

  4. Earth Science and Public Health: Proceedings of the Second National Conference on USGS Health-Related Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to serve the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. As the Nation?s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the USGS can play a significant role in providing scientific knowledge and information that will improve our understanding of the relations of environment and wildlife to human health and disease. USGS human health-related research is unique in the Federal government because it brings together a broad spectrum of natural science expertise and information, including extensive data collection and monitoring on varied landscapes and ecosystems across the Nation. USGS can provide a great service to the public health community by synthesizing the scientific information and knowledge on our natural and living resources that influence human health, and by bringing this science to the public health community in a manner that is most useful. Partnerships with health scientists and managers are essential to the success of these efforts. USGS scientists already are working closely with the public health community to pursue rigorous inquiries into the connections between natural science and public health. Partnering agencies include the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Mine Safety and Health Administration, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Public Health Service, and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Collaborations between public

  5. Achieving equity through critical science agency: An ethnographic study of African American students in a health science career academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart & Finkel, 1998) to highlight the intersections between the career trajectory implied by the Academy (its curriculum, classroom activities, and clinical experiences) and the students' pursued career trajectories. Data was collected over five months and included individual student interviews, group interviews, parent and administrator interviews, field notes from a culminating medical course and clinical internship, and Academy recruitment documents. The results of this study suggest that participants pursued a health science career for altruistic purposes and the Academy was a resource they drew upon to do so. However, the meanings of science and science person implied by the Academy hindered the possibility for many participants' to advance their science career trajectories. While the Academy promised to expose students to a variety of high-status health care roles, they were funneled into feminine, entry-level positions. This study adds to previous underrepresentation literature by contextualizing how identity-related factors influence African American students' career attainment.

  6. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, Sarah; Christie, Gillian; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations. As these technologies play a larger role in health promotion, collaboration between the public health and technology communities will become the norm. Offering public health trainees coursework in computer science alongside traditional public health disciplines will facilitate this evolution, improving public health's capacity to harness these technologies to improve population health. PMID:27227145

  7. 77 FR 4572 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  8. Distance Education in the Health Sciences. Readings in Distance Education, Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G. Ed.; Savrock, Joseph T., Ed.

    This document contains 17 papers on distance education in the health sciences. The following papers are included: "Preface: Distance Education in the Health Professions: A Collection of Research" (Michael G. Moore); "A Historical Overview of Telecommunications in the Health Care Industry" (Joseph S. Anderson); "Distance Education by Interactive…

  9. 75 FR 61765 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  10. 77 FR 12602 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  11. 78 FR 8156 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  12. 75 FR 44273 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  13. 76 FR 13650 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  14. 75 FR 27562 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  15. 76 FR 19378 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  16. 77 FR 5261 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  17. 75 FR 78719 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  18. 77 FR 6569 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  19. 76 FR 26311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  20. 77 FR 22793 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  1. 77 FR 40076 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  2. 76 FR 5184 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  3. 75 FR 32797 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  4. 75 FR 65364 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  5. 78 FR 18359 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  6. 78 FR 59944 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  7. 75 FR 10293 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  8. 76 FR 31620 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  9. 75 FR 21339 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  10. 76 FR 8751 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  11. 78 FR 14562 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  12. 77 FR 73667 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  13. 77 FR 61613 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  14. 75 FR 34147 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  15. 76 FR 46308 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  16. 78 FR 64511 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  17. 76 FR 29772 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  18. 76 FR 52672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  19. 78 FR 14312 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  20. Systems Science: A Good Investment for the Public's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Patricia L.; Kaplan, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement of "Health Education & Behavior" showcases the current state of the field of systems science applications in health promotion and public health. Behind this work lies a steady stream of public dollars at the federal level. This perspective details nearly a decade of investment by the National Institutes of…

  1. 76 FR 63311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  2. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Gillian; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations. As these technologies play a larger role in health promotion, collaboration between the public health and technology communities will become the norm. Offering public health trainees coursework in computer science alongside traditional public health disciplines will facilitate this evolution, improving public health’s capacity to harness these technologies to improve population health. PMID:27227145

  3. Integrating Systems Science and Community-Based Participatory Research to Achieve Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Leah; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Dave, Gaurav; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2016-02-01

    Unanswered questions about racial and socioeconomic health disparities may be addressed using community-based participatory research and systems science. Community-based participatory research is an orientation to research that prioritizes developing capacity, improving trust, and translating knowledge to action. Systems science provides research methods to study dynamic and interrelated forces that shape health disparities. Community-based participatory research and systems science are complementary, but their integration requires more research. We discuss paradigmatic, socioecological, capacity-building, colearning, and translational synergies that help advance progress toward health equity. PMID:26691110

  4. Health sciences libraries in Kuwait: a study of their resources, facilities, and services

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Husain A.; Al-Enezi, Sana

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of health sciences libraries in Kuwait in terms of their staff, collections, facilities, use of information technology, information services, and cooperation. Seventeen libraries participated in the study. Results show that the majority of health sciences libraries were established during the 1980s. Their collections are relatively small. The majority of their staff is nonprofessional. The majority of libraries provide only basic information services. Cooperation among libraries is limited. Survey results also indicate that a significant number of health sciences libraries are not automated. Some recommendations for the improvement of existing resources, facilities, and services are made. PMID:11465688

  5. Digital chat reference in health science libraries: challenges in initiating a new service.

    PubMed

    Dee, Cheryl R; Newhouse, Joshua D

    2005-01-01

    Digital reference service adds a valuable new dimension to health science reference services, but the road to implementation can present questions that require carefully considered decisions. This article incorporates suggestions from the published literature, provides tips from interviews with practicing academic health science librarians, and reports on data from students' exploration of academic health science library Web sites' digital reference services. The goal of this study is to provide guidelines to plan new services, assess user needs, and select software, and to showcase potential benefits of collaboration and proactive and user-friendly marketing. In addition, tips for successful operation and evaluation of services are discussed. PMID:15982952

  6. California Diploma Project Technical Report III: Validity Study--Validity Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaughy, Charis; Bryck, Rick; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study is a validity study of the recently revised version of the Health Science Standards. The purpose of this study is to understand how the Health Science Standards relate to college and career readiness, as represented by survey ratings submitted by entry-level college instructors of health science courses and industry representatives. For…

  7. Personal Health--Personalized Science: A New Driver for Science Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1950s, originating with and driven by the Sputnik shock, there have been tremendous efforts to improve science education. Over the past two decades, the initial focus on science content has been abandoned, at least among many science education researchers, in favor of socio-scientific issues. Yet even this social turn does not appear to…

  8. Using Case Histories in Health Sciences Education- An Example: Leukemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karni, Karen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    To provide an example of how case histories have been developed and used as one means to a team approach to health care in the course, "The Patient and Health Care Team," this paper describes one topic--leukemia--to show the interaction of health care professionals, as well as input from the family itself. (HD)

  9. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    PubMed

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care. PMID:27262477

  10. 78 FR 20931 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: May 15, 2013, 8... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  11. Implementing blended learning into the academic programs of Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahmed R; Prem, Kumar D

    2014-06-01

    Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka, India, is established by an Act of Karnataka State Legislature in the year 1996. Its mandate is to provide training and development in health sciences sector. This University has done pioneering work in the field of curriculum designing for all the health sciences courses offered by the affiliated institutions. In this regard, it has taken lead among all the health sciences universities in India. With student strength of more than one lakh, it has now become a necessity to explore all the possible technological options, so as to provide a comprehensive education to the students. In this context, a proposal has been submitted to the executive head of the University to implement the Blended Learning Program. PMID:24620018

  12. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Patricia P.

    2003-01-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings. PMID:12883559

  13. Institutional Advancement and Public Engagement in the STEM and Health Science Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Victor A.; Kuhl, Michelle Wittcoff

    2007-01-01

    In today's resource-scarce environment, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and health science disciplines must partner with institutional advancement offices to support two key components of research universities--research and graduate education. Framing the partnership in terms of societal needs helps advancement officers to…

  14. Investing in Academic Science for Allied Health Students: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Gagnon, Janelle L.; Moring-Parris, Riana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of allied health CTE students and teachers in a new academic science class designed to strengthen science preparation and postsecondary pathways. Situated within a partnership between the community hospital and an urban school district, this case study drew upon the perspectives of the students, the hospital…

  15. Preparing Tomorrow's Health Sciences Librarians: Feasibility and Marketing Studies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Barbara B.

    With the support of a planning grant from the National Library of Medicine, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) School of Information and Library Science (SILS), in collaboration with the UNC Health Sciences Library and the Program in Medical Informatics, evaluated five curricular models designed to improve education for health…

  16. The Evolution of Research in Family and Consumer Sciences: Food, Nutrition, and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Eleanor D.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of research on food, nutrition, and health in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences and Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 1985-2000 (n=172) identified four categories: (1) changes in dietary standards and nutrient requirements; (2) public policy and guidance on nutrition; (3) food behavior and nutrition intervention; and…

  17. Exploring Predictors of Health Sciences Students' Attitudes towards Complementary-Alternative Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersen, Sverre; Olsen, Rolf V.

    2007-01-01

    This study demonstrated that a "less scientific worldview" predicted health science (HS) students' positive attitude towards "complementary-alternative medicine" (CAM), independently of important background characteristics as gender, pre-college science immersion, age, and type of HS education of the students. A total of 473 students in their…

  18. Everyday Objects of Learning about Health and Healing and Implications for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitari, Wanja

    2006-01-01

    The role of science education in rural development is of great interest to science educators. In this study I investigated how residents of rural Kirumi, Kenya, approach health and healing, through discussions and semistructured and in-depth interviews with 150 residents, 3 local herbalists, and 2 medical researchers over a period of 6 months. I…

  19. Training Future Scientists: Predicting First-Year Minority Student Participation in Health Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Sylvia; Eagan, M. Kevin; Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Park, Julie; Lopez, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the UCLA Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) and Your First College Year (YFCY) surveys, this study examines predictors of the likelihood that science-oriented students would participate in a health science undergraduate research program during the first year of college. The key predictors of…

  20. 77 FR 48164 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m....

  1. 76 FR 57065 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC... Suites, 2515 Meridian Parkway, Research Triangle Park, NC 27713. Open: October 17, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to...

  2. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  3. A Call to Action: A Blueprint for Academic Health Sciences in the Era of Mass Incarceration.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Warren J; Cloud, David; Spaulding, Anne C; Shelton, Deborah; Trestman, Robert L; Altice, Frederick L; Champion-Lippmann, Carisa; Thomas, David; Taxman, Faye S

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 million Americans have criminal records, and the U.S. incarcerates seven times more citizens than most developed countries. The burden of incarceration disproportionately affects people of color and ethnic minorities, and those living in poverty. While 95% of incarcerated people return to society, recidivism rates are high with nearly 75% arrested again within five years of release. Criminal records impede access to employment and other social services such as shelter and health care. Justice-involved people have higher rates of substance, mental health, and some chronic medical disorders than the general population; furthermore, the incarcerated population is rapidly aging. Only a minority of academic health science centers are engaged in health services research, workforce training, or correctional health care. This commentary provides rationale and a blueprint for engagement of academic health science institutions to harness their capabilities to tackle one of the country's most vexing public health crises. PMID:27133508

  4. Oral Health Measurement in Nursing Research: State of the Science

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo; Jablonski, Rita; Boyle, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Oral health can impact general health and systemic disease. Changes in dental plaque, oral microbial flora, and local oral immunity may be important in the development or exacerbation of disease in critically ill patients, trauma patients, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frail elderly. Inasmuch as oral health potentially can be influenced by nursing interventions, nursing research in this area can contribute greatly to improved patient outcomes in these diverse populations. The authors’ research teams have conducted several federally funded projects focused on oral health and have developed synergy in research methods. A unifying theme for these research projects is the measurement of oral health. Standardized measures of components of oral health are available and applicable across populations, and their uses and relationship to nursing research and patient outcomes will be discussed. PMID:16766627

  5. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum Asarnow, Joan; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E; Hughes, Jennifer L; Miranda, Jeanne M; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  6. Public health policy research: making the case for a political science approach.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Nicole F; Clavier, Carole

    2011-03-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of claims that the political determinants of health do not get due consideration and a growing demand for better insights into public policy analysis in the health research field. Several public health and health promotion researchers are calling for better training and a stronger research culture in health policy. The development of these studies tends to be more advanced in health promotion than in other areas of public health research, but researchers are still commonly caught in a naïve, idealistic and narrow view of public policy. This article argues that the political science discipline has developed a specific approach to public policy analysis that can help to open up unexplored levers of influence for public health research and practice and that can contribute to a better understanding of public policy as a determinant of health. It describes and critiques the public health model of policy analysis, analyzes political science's specific approach to public policy analysis, and discusses how the politics of research provides opportunities and barriers to the integration of political science's distinctive contributions to policy analysis in health promotion. PMID:21296911

  7. The Navigation Guide Systematic Review Methodology: A Rigorous and Transparent Method for Translating Environmental Health Science into Better Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synthesizing what is known about the environmental drivers of health is instrumental to taking prevention-oriented action. Methods of research synthesis commonly used in environmental health lag behind systematic review methods developed in the clinical sciences over the past 20 years. Objectives: We sought to develop a proof of concept of the “Navigation Guide,” a systematic and transparent method of research synthesis in environmental health. Discussion: The Navigation Guide methodology builds on best practices in research synthesis in evidence-based medicine and environmental health. Key points of departure from current methods of expert-based narrative review prevalent in environmental health include a prespecified protocol, standardized and transparent documentation including expert judgment, a comprehensive search strategy, assessment of “risk of bias,” and separation of the science from values and preferences. Key points of departure from evidence-based medicine include assigning a “moderate” quality rating to human observational studies and combining diverse evidence streams. Conclusions: The Navigation Guide methodology is a systematic and rigorous approach to research synthesis that has been developed to reduce bias and maximize transparency in the evaluation of environmental health information. Although novel aspects of the method will require further development and validation, our findings demonstrated that improved methods of research synthesis under development at the National Toxicology Program and under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are fully achievable. The institutionalization of robust methods of systematic and transparent review would provide a concrete mechanism for linking science to timely action to prevent harm. Citation: Woodruff TJ, Sutton P. 2014. The Navigation Guide systematic review methodology: a rigorous and transparent method for translating environmental health science into

  8. Advancing One Health Policy and Implementation Through the Concept of One Medicine One Science

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Carol; Travis, Dominic A.; Berger, Kavita; Coat, Gwenaële; Kennedy, Shaun; Steer, Clifford J.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous interspecies disease transmission events, Ebola virus being a recent and cogent example, highlight the complex interactions between human, animal, and environmental health and the importance of addressing medicine and health in a comprehensive scientific manner. The diversity of information gained from the natural, social, behavioral, and systems sciences is critical to developing and sustainably promoting integrated health approaches that can be implemented at the local, national, and international levels to meet grand challenges. The Concept of One Medicine One Science (COMOS) as outlined herein describes the interplay between scientific knowledge that underpins health and medicine and efforts toward stabilizing local systems using 2 linked case studies: the food system and emerging infectious disease. Forums such as the International Conference of One Medicine One Science (iCOMOS), where science and policy can be debated together, missing pieces identified, and science-based collaborations formed among industry, governmental, and nongovernmental policy makers and funders, is an essential step in addressing global health. The expertise of multiple disciplines and research foci to support policy development is critical to the implementation of one health and the successful achievement of global health security goals. PMID:26421234

  9. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1984-01-01

    This list of 450 books and 67 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused mainly on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, in addition to programs in allied dental health and medical secretarial skills. Books are categorized by broad subject followed by an author/editor index; journals are listed alphabetically by title. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual (1984) journal subscriptions would require a total expenditure of approximately $15,000. PMID:6388696

  10. Transdiscipline and research in health: science, society and decision making

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in science should be given to addressing the needs of society and the historical context of the territories. Although technological developments that began with modernity and the industrial revolution allowed human beings to control the resources of nature to put to your service without limits, it is clear that the crisis of the prevailing development models manifest themselves in many ways but with three common denominators: environmental degradation, social injustice and extreme poverty. Consequently, today should not be possible to think a breakthrough in the development of science without addressing global environmental problems and the deep social injustices that increase at all scales under the gaze, impassively in many occasions, of formal science. PMID:26600628

  11. Transdiscipline and research in health: science, society and decision making.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Fabián

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in science should be given to addressing the needs of society and the historical context of the territories. Although technological developments that began with modernity and the industrial revolution allowed human beings to control the resources of nature to put to your service without limits, it is clear that the crisis of the prevailing development models manifest themselves in many ways but with three common denominators: environmental degradation, social injustice and extreme poverty. Consequently, today should not be possible to think a breakthrough in the development of science without addressing global environmental problems and the deep social injustices that increase at all scales under the gaze, impassively in many occasions, of formal science. PMID:26600628

  12. Draft Plan for Development of the Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides - Health Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced a draft development plan for the next Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOX) which will serve as the scientific basis for review of the primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard for nitrogen dioxide...

  13. Japanese Government Policies in Education, Science, Sports and Culture, 1998. Mental and Physical Health and Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Tokyo (Japan).

    This annual publication introduces Japan's educational policies in education, science, sports, and culture. Part 1, "Trends in Education Reform," discusses fundamental concepts in educational reform. Part 2, "Mental and Physical Health and Sports," includes two chapters. Chapter 1, "Health and Sports into the Future," examines 5 concepts:…

  14. 75 FR 6658 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office announces a public teleconference of the Health Effects Subcommittee (HES) of the Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis (Council). The HES, supplemented with additional members from the Council, will discuss its draft peer review report on EPA's health benefits analyses and uncertainty analyses in......

  15. Feasibility Study on the Proposed Hunter College Institute of Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dacso, Michael M.; Konheim, Beatrice G.

    This document proposes that an Institute of Health Sciences be established as a new unit of the City University of New York (CUNY) within the framework of Hunter College in cooperation with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The Institute's bachelors and masters programs would prepare professionals to work with physicians on health teams. The…

  16. Serious video games for health: How behavioral science guided the development of a serious video game

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specifi...

  17. Partnerships To Promote Professional Development and Inquiry Learning in the Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardwell, Genevieve; Rye, James; Lewis, John; McSwain, Cathy Morton; Hyde, G. Jill; Simoyi, Priscah

    The Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) is a partnership between teachers, faculty at West Virginia University, high school students, and local communities that aims to increase the college enrollment rate of underrepresented students and the number of health care providers in the medically underserved rural communities of West Virginia.…

  18. Universal Design for Learning and Its Application to Clinical Placements in Health Science Courses (Practice Brief)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelan, Ann; Halligan, Phil; Quirke, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Ireland's Association for Higher Education, Access and Disability (AHEAD), in partnership with the School of Nursing University College Dublin (UCD), hosted a summer school for professionals working in the Health Sciences sector who have responsibility for including students with disabilities in the health professions, including clinical…

  19. National Academy of Sciences' Reports on Diet and Health--Are They Credible and Consistent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The United States General Accounting Office (GAO) studied the processes used by the National Academy of Sciences to produce two reports on the relationship of diet to health: "Toward Healthful Diets" (1980), and "Diet, Nutrition and Cancer" (1982). Because the reports differed about whether the public could reduce its chronic disease risk through…

  20. Serious Video Games for Health: How Behavioral Science Guided the Development of a Serious Video Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Victoria; Jago, Russell; Griffith, Melissa Juliano

    2010-01-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specific actions that can be used to guide key game…

  1. Complying with the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy to Facilitate Science Availability for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Social work researchers are making significant advances in science funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve the health of underserved and marginalized populations throughout the world. Unfortunately, research results are often only available to other scientists at academic institutions, limiting their impact. To facilitate the…

  2. Talking science and wishing for miracles: understanding cultures of mental health practice.

    PubMed

    Lakeman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Science can only offer a limited account of, and prescription for, mental health care. Yet the language of science and faith in the universal applicability of particular scientific methods to the craft of mental health care has come to permeate mental health practice communities. In this paper, the argument that many beliefs held by mental health professionals might be considered to be based on faith rather than science is presented, and the view that culture provides a useful lens for understanding mental health services and these paradoxes is proposed. Clearly there is a grand mental health narrative or colonizing influence of biological psychiatry that in various ways affects all mainstream mental health services. Local health services and professional communities might be considered subcultures. Understanding how mental health professions and practice are embedded in culture might be useful in considering how practice changes and why. Culture and caring practices are mutually embedded in localized subcultures. Therefore, a rich description of context and history is necessary in publication, presentation, or other communications to enable genuine understanding by a global audience. Viewing mental health practice in a cultural context highlights the importance of values and differences, and encourages humility in the face of ambiguity. PMID:23009308

  3. Politics and the erosion of federal scientific capacity: restoring scientific integrity to public health science.

    PubMed

    Rest, Kathleen M; Halpern, Michael H

    2007-11-01

    Our nation's health and prosperity are based on a foundation of independent scientific discovery. Yet in recent years, political interference in federal government science has become widespread, threatening this legacy. We explore the ways science has been misused, the attempts to measure the pervasiveness of this problem, and the effects on our long-term capacity to meet today's most complex public health challenges. Good government and a functioning democracy require public policy decisions to be informed by independent science. The scientific and public health communities must speak out to defend taxpayer-funded science from political interference. Encouragingly, both the scientific community and Congress are exploring ways to restore scientific integrity to federal policymaking. PMID:17901422

  4. Everyday objects of learning about health and healing and implications for science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitari, Wanja

    2006-02-01

    The role of science education in rural development is of great interest to science educators. In this study I investigated how residents of rural Kirumi, Kenya, approach health and healing, through discussions and semistructured and in-depth interviews with 150 residents, 3 local herbalists, and 2 medical researchers over a period of 6 months. I constructed objects of learning by looking for similarities and differences within interpretive themes. Objects of learning found comprise four types of personal learning tools, three types of relational learning tools, three genres of moral obligation, and five genres of knowledge guarding. Findings show that rural people use (among other learning tools) inner sensing to engage thought processes that lead to health and healing knowledge. The sociocultural context is also an important component in learning. Inner sensing and residents' sociocultural context are not presently emphasized in Kenyan science teaching. I discuss the potential use of rural objects of learning in school science, with specific reference to a health topic in the Kenyan science curriculum. In addition, the findings add to the literature in the Science, Technology, Society, and Environment (STSE) approach to science education, and cross-cultural and global science education.

  5. The establishment of an academic health sciences library in a developing country: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ellis, L S

    1991-07-01

    The development of a Faculty of Medical Sciences (FMS) and an academic health sciences library for the University of the West Indies (UWI) has proven to be a polemical and political issue due to the depressed economy of the country. Although FMS is still shrouded in politics and controversy after its inaugural year, the Medical Sciences Library (MSL) has expanded its dimensions and is actively developing a biomedical information network within the country. This will result in better dissemination and control of biomedical information. The library now participates in joint projects with other health sciences libraries in the country with the goal of joint automated listings of holdings and shared cataloging projects. This paper examines the development of the library and explains the difficulties experienced in its developmental stages due to politics, the delay in appointment of a medical sciences librarian, and the financial decline in the local economy. PMID:1884084

  6. Climate Change and Public Health Policy: Translating the Science

    PubMed Central

    Braks, Marieta; van Ginkel, Rijk; Wint, William; Sedda, Luigi; Sprong, Hein

    2013-01-01

    Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character. PMID:24452252

  7. Climate change and public health policy: translating the science.

    PubMed

    Braks, Marieta; van Ginkel, Rijk; Wint, William; Sedda, Luigi; Sprong, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character. PMID:24452252

  8. Mr. Vetro: A Collective Simulation for Teaching Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannidou, Andri; Repenning, Alexander; Webb, David; Keyser, Diane; Luhn, Lisa; Daetwyler, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Why has technology become prevalent in science education without fundamentally improving test scores or student attitudes? We claim that the core of the problem is "how" technology is being used. Technologies such as simulations are currently not used to their full potential. For instance, physiology simulations often follow textbooks by…

  9. Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jeffrey T; Shapiro, Robert M; Burke, Heather J; Palmer, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the overlap between roles and activities that health care navigators perform and competencies identified by the Medical Library Association’s (MLA’s) educational policy statement.Roles and activities that health care navigators perform were gleaned from published literature. Once common roles and activities that health care navigators perform were identified, MLA competencies were mapped against those roles and activities to identify areas of overlap. The greatest extent of correspondence occurred in patient empowerment and support. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which health sciences librarians might assume responsibility for roles and activities that health care navigators perform PMID:24415921

  10. Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Shapiro, Robert M.; Burke, Heather J.; Palmer, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the overlap between roles and activities that health care navigators perform and competencies identified by the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) educational policy statement. Roles and activities that health care navigators perform were gleaned from published literature. Once common roles and activities that health care navigators perform were identified, MLA competencies were mapped against those roles and activities to identify areas of overlap. The greatest extent of correspondence occurred in patient empowerment and support. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which health sciences librarians might assume responsibility for roles and activities that health care navigators perform. PMID:24415921

  11. Sustainability science: an integrated approach for health-programme planning.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell L; Elliott, Julian H; Nolan, Monica L; Lawton, Paul D; Parkhill, Anne; McLaren, Cameron J; Lavis, John N

    2008-11-01

    Planning for programme sustainability is a key contributor to health and development, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. A consensus evidence-based operational framework would facilitate policy and research advances in understanding, measuring, and improving programme sustainability. We did a systematic review of both conceptual frameworks and empirical studies about health-programme sustainability. On the basis of the review, we propose that sustainable health programmes are regarded as complex systems that encompass programmes, health problems targeted by programmes, and programmes' drivers or key stakeholders, all of which interact dynamically within any given context. We show the usefulness of this approach with case studies drawn from the authors' experience. PMID:18984192

  12. Systems Engineering and Information Science in Health Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William A.

    1969-01-01

    Presented before the combined sessions of the Section on Administration and the Section on Clinical Medicine, American College Health Association, Forty-sixth Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnestoa, May 3, 1968.

  13. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1990-01-01

    This list of 453 books and 74 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, and nutrition programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (179 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1990 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $21,650. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $9,250. PMID:2393755

  14. Selected list of books and journals in allied health sciences.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, A N; Hill, D R

    1988-01-01

    This list of 435 books and 76 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs and/or health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility pf covering the large number and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-six educational programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, nutrition, and medical secretarial programs. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (176 books and 29 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1988 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $19,000. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $7,900. PMID:3066428

  15. The dawn of Structural One Health: a new science tracking disease emergence along circuits of capital.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert G; Bergmann, Luke; Kock, Richard; Gilbert, Marius; Hogerwerf, Lenny; Wallace, Rodrick; Holmberg, Mollie

    2015-03-01

    The One Health approach integrates health investigations across the tree of life, including, but not limited to, wildlife, livestock, crops, and humans. It redresses an epistemological alienation at the heart of much modern population health, which has long segregated studies by species. Up to this point, however, One Health research has also omitted addressing fundamental structural causes underlying collapsing health ecologies. In this critical review we unpack the relationship between One Health science and its political economy, particularly the conceptual and methodological trajectories by which it fails to incorporate social determinants of epizootic spillover. We also introduce a Structural One Health that addresses the research gap. The new science, open to incorporating developments across the social sciences, addresses foundational processes underlying multispecies health, including the place-specific deep-time histories, cultural infrastructure, and economic geographies driving disease emergence. We introduce an ongoing project on avian influenza to illustrate Structural One Health's scope and ambition. For the first time researchers are quantifying the relationships among transnational circuits of capital, associated shifts in agroecological landscapes, and the genetic evolution and spatial spread of a xenospecific pathogen. PMID:25311784

  16. The comparative importance of books: clinical psychology in the health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, J M; Wehmeyer, S

    1999-01-01

    Clinical psychology has received little attention as a subject in health sciences library collections. This study seeks to demonstrate the relative importance of the monographic literature to clinical psychology through the examination of citations in graduate student theses and dissertations at the Fordham Health Sciences Library, Wright State University. Dissertations and theses were sampled randomly; citations were classified by format, counted, and subjected to statistical analysis. Books and book chapters together account for 35% of the citations in clinical psychology dissertations, 25% in nursing theses, and 8% in biomedical sciences theses and dissertations. Analysis of variance indicates that the citations in dissertations and theses in the three areas differ significantly (F = 162.2 with 2 and 253 degrees of freedom, P = 0.0001). Dissertations and theses in biomedical sciences and nursing theses both cite significantly more journals per book than the dissertations in clinical psychology. These results support the hypothesis that users of clinical psychology literature rely more heavily on books than many other users of a health sciences library. Problems with using citation analyses in a single subject to determine a serials to monographs ratio for a health sciences library are pointed out. PMID:10219478

  17. Science-based health innovation in Ghana: health entrepreneurs point the way to a new development path

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Science, technology and innovation have long played a role in Ghana’s vision for development, including in improving its health outcomes. However, so far little research has been conducted on Ghana’s capacity for health innovation to address local diseases. This research aims to fill that gap, mapping out the key actors involved, highlighting examples of indigenous innovation, setting out the challenges ahead and outlining recommendations for strengthening Ghana’s health innovation system. Methods Case study research methodology was used. Data were collected through reviews of academic literature and policy documents and through open-ended, face-to-face interviews with 48 people from across the science-based health innovation system. Data was collected over three visits to Ghana from February 2007 to August 2008, and stakeholders engaged subsequently. Results Ghana has strengths which could underpin science-based health innovation in the future, including health and biosciences research institutions with strong foreign linkages and donor support; a relatively strong regulatory system which is building capacity in other West African countries; the beginnings of new funding forms such as venture capital; and the return of professionals from the diaspora, bringing expertise and contacts. Some health products and services are already being developed in Ghana by individual entrepreneurs, which are innovative in the sense of being new to the country and, in some cases, the continent. They include essential medicines, raw pharmaceutical materials, new formulations for pediatric use and plant medicines at various stages of development. Conclusions While Ghana has many institutions concerned with health research and its commercialization, their ability to work together to address clear health goals is low. If Ghana is to capitalize on its assets, including political and macroeconomic stability which underpin investment in health enterprises, it needs to

  18. The Pedometer as a Tool to Enrich Science Learning in a Public Health Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rye, James A.; Zizzi, Samuel J.; Vitullo, Elizabeth A.; Tompkins, Nancy O'hara

    2005-12-01

    The United States is experiencing an obesity epidemic: A science-technology-society public health issue tied to our built environment, which is characterized by heavy dependence on automobiles and reduced opportunities to walk and bicycle for transportation. This presents an informal science education opportunity within "science in personal and social perspectives'' to use pedometer technology for enhancing students' understandings about human energy balance. An exploratory study was conducted with 29 teachers to investigate how pedometers could be used for providing academic enrichment to secondary students participating in after-school Health Sciences and Technology Academy clubs. Frequency analysis revealed that the pedometer activities often investigated kilocalorie expenditure and/or incorporated hypothesis testing/experimenting. Teachers' perspectives on learning outcomes most frequently conveyed that students increased their awareness of the importance of health habits relative to kilocalorie intake and expenditure. Pedometers have considerable merit for the regular science curriculum as they allow for numerous mathematics applications and inquiry learning and target concepts such as energy and equilibrium that cut across the National Science Education Standards. Pedometers and associated resources on human energy balance are important tools that science teachers can employ in helping schools respond to the national call to prevent childhood obesity.

  19. Science-policy challenges for biodiversity, public health and urbanization: examples from Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keune, H.; Kretsch, C.; De Blust, G.; Gilbert, M.; Flandroy, L.; Van den Berge, K.; Versteirt, V.; Hartig, T.; De Keersmaecker, L.; Eggermont, H.; Brosens, D.; Dessein, J.; Vanwambeke, S.; Prieur-Richard, A. H.; Wittmer, H.; Van Herzele, A.; Linard, C.; Martens, P.; Mathijs, E.; Simoens, I.; Van Damme, P.; Volckaert, F.; Heyman, P.; Bauler, T.

    2013-06-01

    Internationally, the importance of a coordinated effort to protect both biodiversity and public health is more and more recognized. These issues are often concentrated or particularly challenging in urban areas, and therefore on-going urbanization worldwide raises particular issues both for the conservation of living natural resources and for population health strategies. These challenges include significant difficulties associated with sustainable management of urban ecosystems, urban development planning, social cohesion and public health. An important element of the challenge is the need to interface between different forms of knowledge and different actors from science and policy. We illustrate this with examples from Belgium, showcasing concrete cases of human-nature interaction. To better tackle these challenges, since 2011, actors in science, policy and the broader Belgian society have launched a number of initiatives to deal in a more integrated manner with combined biodiversity and public health challenges in the face of ongoing urbanization. This emerging community of practice in Belgium exemplifies the importance of interfacing at different levels. (1) Bridges must be built between science and the complex biodiversity/ecosystem-human/public health-urbanization phenomena. (2) Bridges between different professional communities and disciplines are urgently needed. (3) Closer collaboration between science and policy, and between science and societal practice is needed. Moreover, within each of these communities closer collaboration between specialized sections is needed.

  20. Development of Mental Health in Infancy. NIMH Science Monographs 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blehar, Mary

    The monograph explores development in the infant's first year of life, particularly as it influences later mental health or illness. An introductory section presents a schematic history of early clinical practice (including some earlier preventive trends, changes in the way we think about childhood, and changes in the role of government in…

  1. Partnering health disparities research with quality improvement science in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Lion, K Casey; Raphael, Jean L

    2015-02-01

    Disparities in pediatric health care quality are well described in the literature, yet practical approaches to decreasing them remain elusive. Quality improvement (QI) approaches are appealing for addressing disparities because they offer a set of strategies by which to target modifiable aspects of care delivery and a method for tailoring or changing an intervention over time based on data monitoring. However, few examples in the literature exist of QI interventions successfully decreasing disparities, particularly in pediatrics, due to well-described challenges in developing, implementing, and studying QI with vulnerable populations or in underresourced settings. In addition, QI interventions aimed at improving quality overall may not improve disparities, and in some cases, may worsen them if there is greater uptake or effectiveness of the intervention among the population with better outcomes at baseline. In this article, the authors review some of the challenges faced by researchers and frontline clinicians seeking to use QI to address health disparities and propose an agenda for moving the field forward. Specifically, they propose that those designing and implementing disparities-focused QI interventions reconsider comparator groups, use more rigorous evaluation methods, carefully consider the evidence for particular interventions and the context in which they were developed, directly engage the social determinants of health, and leverage community resources to build collaborative networks and engage community members. Ultimately, new partnerships between communities, providers serving vulnerable populations, and QI researchers will be required for QI interventions to achieve their potential related to health care disparity reduction. PMID:25560436

  2. Interdisciplinary health science research collaboration: strengths, challenges, and case example.

    PubMed

    Bindler, Ruth C; Richardson, Barbara; Daratha, Kenneth; Wordell, Douglas

    2012-05-01

    The mandate for interdisciplinary health research is clear, but barriers persist and researchers are unprepared for collaborative roles. This article explores strengths/challenges/facilitative approaches for interdisciplinary research. Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools, an example of interdisciplinary research, uses comprehensive communication and information management to enhance interdisciplinary research. PMID:20974103

  3. Vitamins and Health. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Inst. for Science and Mathematics Education Development.

    This module provides information on: (1) the nature of health and nutrition; (2) the nature of vitamins; (3) general characteristics of fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins; (4) the source and major role of several vitamins (vitamins C, B, D, E, and K) as well as deficiences that arise from their oversupply, or insufficiency; and (5) ways of…

  4. Students' Reactions to Three Typical Examinations in Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarid, Orly; Anson, Ofra; Bentov, Yaakov

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A search for universal and particular changes in emotional, behavioral and cognitive assessments in relation to three types of examinations: an oral presentation, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and a pencil and paper examination. Methods: One hundred and two students of health professions completed the Profile of…

  5. Fructose toxicity: is the science ready for public health actions?

    PubMed Central

    Tappy, Luc; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose of review The assumption that fructose may be “toxic” and involved in the pathogenesis of non communicable diseases such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and even cancer has resulted in the call for public health action, such as introducing taxes on sweetened beverages. This review evaluates the scientific basis for such action. Recent findings Although some studies hint towards some potential adverse effects of excessive fructose consumption especially when combined with excess energy intake, the results from clinical trials do not support a significant detrimental effect of fructose on metabolic health when consumed as part of a weight maintaining diet in amounts consistent with the average estimated fructose consumption in Western countries. However, definitive studies are missing. Summary and conclusion Public health policies to eliminate or limit fructose in the diet should be considered premature. Instead, efforts should be made to promote a healthy life style that includes physical activity and nutritious foods while avoiding intake of excess calories until solid evidence to support action against fructose is available. Public health is almost certainly to benefit more from policies that are aimed at promoting what is known to be good than from policies that are prohibiting what is not (yet) known to be bad. PMID:22617566

  6. A role for science investments in advancing newborn health.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2014-09-10

    Progress in reducing the mortality of young children cannot be maintained without prioritization, funding, and implementation of neonatal interventions worldwide. Efforts to develop and deliver successful interventions must take a local perspective on problems and solutions, work through local policy processes and health care providers, and link to broader multisector efforts. PMID:25210057

  7. Health Care Reform and Its Implications for the Administrative Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolassa, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the discipline of pharmacoeconomics has much to offer the pharmacy field during a period of health care reform but that these specialists must let their colleagues in related fields know how they can assist in facilitating change. (MSE)

  8. Engaging academia to advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking

    PubMed Central

    Strosnider, Heather; Zhou, Ying; Balluz, Lina; Qualters, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Public health agencies at the federal, state, and local level are responsible for implementing actions and policies that address health problems related to environmental hazards. These actions and policies can be informed by integrating or linking data on health, exposure, hazards, and population. The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is to provide information from a nationwide network of integrated health, environmental hazard, and exposure data that drives actions to improve the health of communities. The Tracking Program and federal, state, and local partners collect, integrate, analyze, and disseminate data and information to inform environmental public health actions. However, many challenges exist regarding the availability and quality of data, the application of appropriate methods and tools to link data, and the state of the science needed to link and analyze health and environmental data. The Tracking Program has collaborated with academia to address key challenges in these areas. The collaboration has improved our understanding of the uses and limitations of available data and methods, expanded the use of existing data and methods, and increased our knowledge about the connections between health and environment. Valuable working relationships have been forged in this process, and together we have identified opportunities and improvements for future collaborations to further advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking. PMID:25038624

  9. A checklist for planning and designing audiovisual facilities in health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, G J; Bischoff, F A; Foxman, D S

    1984-01-01

    Developed by an MLA/HeSCA (Health Sciences Communications Association) joint committee, this checklist is intended to serve as a conceptual framework for planning a new or renovated audiovisual facility in a health sciences library. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and organizational decisions that must be made about an audiovisual facility before the technical or spatial decisions can be wisely made. Specific standards for facilities or equipment are not included. The first section focuses on health sciences library settings. Ideas presented in the remaining sections could apply to academic learning resource center environments as well. A bibliography relating to all aspects of audiovisual facilities planning and design is included with references to specific sections of the checklist. PMID:6208957

  10. Eliminating traditional reference services in an academic health sciences library: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Stephanie J

    2011-01-01

    Question: How were traditional librarian reference desk services successfully eliminated at one health sciences library? Setting: The analysis was done at an academic health sciences library at a major research university. Method: A gap analysis was performed, evaluating changes in the first eleven months through analysis of reference transaction and instructional session data. Main Results: Substantial increases were seen in the overall number of specialized reference transactions and those conducted by librarians lasting more than thirty minutes. The number of reference transactions overall increased after implementing the new model. Several new small-scale instructional initiatives began, though perhaps not directly related to the new model. Conclusion: Traditional reference desk services were eliminated at one academic health sciences library without negative impact on reference and instructional statistics. Eliminating ties to the confines of the physical library due to staffing reference desk hours removed one significant barrier to a more proactive liaison program. PMID:22022221

  11. International Environmental and Occupational Health: From Individual Scientists to Networked Science Hubs

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Joshua; Jessup, Christine; Felknor, Sarah; Humble, Michael; Bader, Farah; Bridbord, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health program (ITREOH) has supported projects that link U.S. academic scientists with scientists from low- and middle-income countries in diverse research and research training activities. Twenty-two projects of varied duration have conducted training to enhance the research capabilities of scientists at 75 institutions in 43 countries in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America, and have built productive research relationships between these scientists and their U.S. partners. ITREOH investigators and their trainees have produced publications that have advanced basic sciences, developed methods, informed policy outcomes, and built institutional capacity. Today, the changing nature of the health sciences calls for a more strategic approach. Data-rich team science requires greater capacity for information technology and knowledge synthesis at the local institution. More robust systems for ethical review and administrative support are necessary to advance population-based research. Sustainability of institutional research capability depends on linkages to multiple national and international partners. In this context, the Fogarty International Center, the National Institute of Environmental Sciences and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, have reengineered the ITREOH program to support and catalyze a multi-national network of regional hubs for Global Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (GEOHealth). We anticipate that these networked science hubs will build upon previous investments by the ITREOH program and will serve to advance locally and internationally important health science, train and attract first-class scientists, and provide critical evidence to guide policy discussions. PMID:23109132

  12. Is research into ethnicity and health racist, unsound, or important science?

    PubMed Central

    Bhopal, R.

    1997-01-01

    Much historical research on race, intelligence, and health was racist, unethical, and ineffective. The concepts of race and ethnicity are difficult to define but continue to be applied to the study of the health of immigrant and ethnic minority groups in the hope of advancing understanding of causes of disease. While a morass of associations has been generated, race and ethnicity in health research have seldom given fundamental new understanding of disease. Most such research is "black box epidemiology." Researchers have not overcome the many conceptual and technical problems of research into ethnicity and health. By emphasising the negative aspects of the health of ethnic minority groups, research may have damaged their social standing and deflected attention from their health priorities. Unless researchers recognise the difficulties with research into ethnicity and health and correct its weaknesses, 20th century research in this subject may suffer the same ignominious fate as that of race science in the 19th century. PMID:9202509

  13. BIREME: Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Information Center.

    PubMed Central

    Bonham, M D

    1990-01-01

    In the twenty years of its existence, BIREME has grown and evolved to meet the increasing information needs of health professionals in Latin America and the Caribbean. Recent emphasis has been on the adoption of new methods based on information technologies (including microcomputers, CD-ROMs, and advanced telecommunications) to improve and enhance services. Services discussed are bibliographic control, bibliographic searches, document delivery, selective dissemination of information (SDI), training, and publications. PMID:2183902

  14. Space Life Sciences at NASA: Spaceflight Health Policy and Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; House, Nancy G.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2005, the President proposed a new initiative, the Vision for Space Exploration. To accomplish the goals within the vision for space exploration, physicians and researchers at Johnson Space Center are establishing spaceflight health standards. These standards include fitness for duty criteria (FFD), permissible exposure limits (PELs), and permissible outcome limits (POLs). POLs delineate an acceptable maximum decrement or change in a physiological or behavioral parameter, as the result of exposure to the space environment. For example cardiovascular fitness for duty standards might be a measurable clinical parameter minimum that allows successful performance of all required duties. An example of a permissible exposure limit for radiation might be the quantifiable limit of exposure over a given length of time (e.g. life time radiation exposure). An example of a permissible outcome limit might be the length of microgravity exposure that would minimize bone loss. The purpose of spaceflight health standards is to promote operational and vehicle design requirements, aid in medical decision making during space missions, and guide the development of countermeasures. Standards will be based on scientific and clinical evidence including research findings, lessons learned from previous space missions, studies conducted in space analog environments, current standards of medical practices, risk management data, and expert recommendations. To focus the research community on the needs for exploration missions, NASA has developed the Bioastronautics Roadmap. The Bioastronautics Roadmap, NASA's approach to identification of risks to human space flight, revised baseline was released in February 2005. This document was reviewed by the Institute of Medicine in November 2004 and the final report was received in October 2005. The roadmap defines the most important research and operational needs that will be used to set policy, standards (define acceptable risk), and

  15. Interprofessional Global Health Education at Oregon Health and Science University: The Interprofessional Community Health and Education Exchange (iCHEE) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Valerie S.; Mazumder, Rajarshi; Spencer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Problem The rapidly diversifying population of North America has disparate health needs that are addressed by creative community-based training of health science students. Approach The authors report 5 years (2008–2012) of experience implementing a novel interprofessional Community Health and Education Exchange (iCHEE) elective course for dental, medical, nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, physician assistant, and public health students of Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). This pioneering interprofessional course was created by the OHSU Global Health Center and is offered in fall, winter, and spring quarters. Students interact with individual clients drawn from community centers supporting refugees, recent immigrants, and other underserved people. In addition to health concerns, clients are encouraged to share backgrounds and experiences with student teams. Clients receive guidance on nutrition, exercise, pharmaceuticals, and accessible health services. Student teams perform a non-invasive health check on clients with the assistance of faculty mentors who, upon finding a physical or mental health issue, refer the client from the educational setting to an appropriate health care facility. Outcomes In addition to supporting health promotion and early intervention for medically underserved people, students reported gaining valuable cross-cultural knowledge, understanding, and experience from clients. Students also appreciated the value of diverse skills and knowledge available in their multidisciplinary teams. Through the end of 2012, over 300 health-professions students worked with approximately 1,200 clients to complete the iCHEE course. Next Steps The iCHEE model should prove helpful in preparing health-professions students at other institutions to understand and serve diverse populations. PMID:24918760

  16. Is U.S. health care an appropriate system? A strategic perspective from systems science

    PubMed Central

    Janecka, Ivo P

    2009-01-01

    Context Systems science provides organizational principles supported by biologic findings that can be applied to any organization; any incongruence indicates an incomplete or an already failing system. U.S. health care is commonly referred to as a system that consumes an ever- increasing percentage of the gross domestic product and delivers seemingly diminishing value. Objective To perform a comparative study of U.S. health care with the principles of systems science and, if feasible, propose solutions. Design General systems theory provides the theoretical foundation for this observational research. Main Outcome Measures A degree of compliance of U.S. health care with systems principles and its space-time functional location within the dynamic systems model. Results of comparative analysis U.S. health care is an incomplete system further threatened by the fact that it functions in the zone of chaos within the dynamic systems model. Conclusion Complying with systems science principles and the congruence of pertinent cycles, U.S. health care would likely dramatically improve its value creation for all of society as well as its resiliency and long-term sustainability. Immediate corrective steps could be taken: Prioritize and incentivize health over care; restore fiscal soundness by combining health and life insurance for the benefit of the insured and the payer; rebalance horizontal/providers and vertical/government hierarchies. PMID:19121210

  17. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan A.; Boden, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs. PMID:25918485

  18. A global snapshot of the state of digital collections in the health sciences, 2013*

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, Keith M.; Knapp, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-nine health sciences libraries (HSLs) worldwide were surveyed regarding the availability of digital collections, evidence of the type of digital collections, level of access, software used, and HSL type. Of the surveyed libraries, 69% (n = 157) had digital collections, with an average of 1,531 items in each collection; 49% (n = 112) also had institutional repositories. In most cases (n = 147), these collections were publicly available. The predominant platforms for disseminating these digital collections were CONTENTdm and library web pages. Only 50% (n = 77) of these collections were managed by the health sciences library itself. PMID:24860271

  19. A global snapshot of the state of digital collections in the health sciences, 2013.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Keith M; Knapp, Maureen M

    2014-04-01

    Two hundred twenty-nine health sciences libraries (HSLs) worldwide were surveyed regarding the availability of digital collections, evidence of the type of digital collections, level of access, software used, and HSL type. Of the surveyed libraries, 69% (n = 157) had digital collections, with an average of 1,531 items in each collection; 49% (n = 112) also had institutional repositories. In most cases (n = 147), these collections were publicly available. The predominant platforms for disseminating these digital collections were CONTENTdm and library web pages. Only 50% (n = 77) of these collections were managed by the health sciences library itself. PMID:24860271

  20. Taking library instruction into the online environment: one health sciences library's experience.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan C; O'Hagan, Emma C

    2014-07-01

    In 2012, an academic health sciences library serving a large research university and medical center introduced synchronous online training for a diverse group of users, including clinicians, researchers, faculty, and distance students. Participants in these "Express Training" classes completed two surveys to assess their experiences. Survey results indicated classes were well received but revealed some areas for improvement. Included are issues that should be considered when implementing online library instruction to meet the diverse needs of academic health sciences library users. Given the popularity of online training among on-campus and distance users, it will be continued and expanded. PMID:25031561

  1. The CLR/NLM Health Sciences Library Management Intern Program: first year.

    PubMed Central

    Maina, W E; Jenkins, C G; Meakin, F A

    1980-01-01

    The first year of the Health Sciences Library Management Intern Program, funded by the National Library of Medicine and administered by the Council on Library Resources, has recently been completed. This paper discusses the origins of the internship, the selection of the successful applicants, and the motivation of the interns and host directors. The basic components of the intership year are described, and its effects on the host libraries and interns are considered. The immediate future of the internship is outlined, and other methods for training health sciences library administrators are briefly discussed. PMID:7356493

  2. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan A; Boden, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs. PMID:25918485

  3. Taking library instruction into the online environment: one health sciences library's experience

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan C.; O'Hagan, Emma C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, an academic health sciences library serving a large research university and medical center introduced synchronous online training for a diverse group of users, including clinicians, researchers, faculty, and distance students. Participants in these “Express Training” classes completed two surveys to assess their experiences. Survey results indicated classes were well received but revealed some areas for improvement. Included are issues that should be considered when implementing online library instruction to meet the diverse needs of academic health sciences library users. Given the popularity of online training among on-campus and distance users, it will be continued and expanded. PMID:25031561

  4. Publication ethics from the perspective of PhD students of health sciences: a limited experience.

    PubMed

    Arda, Berna

    2012-06-01

    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is devoted to the presentation of opinions of PhD candidate students in health sciences in Ankara concerning publication ethics. The data obtained from 143 PhD students from the fields of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary reveal limited but unique experiences. It also shows that plagiarism is one of the worst issues in the publication ethics from the perspective of these young academics. PMID:21318323

  5. Innovations to Enhance the Quality of Health Professions Education at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences -NECTAR Program

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Nathoo, Kusum; Borok, Margaret; Chidzonga, Midion; Aagaard, Eva M.; Connors, Susan C.; Barry, Michele; Campbell, Thomas; Hakim, James

    2014-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) is Zimbabwe's premier health professions training institution. However, several concerns were raised during the past decade over the quality of health education at UZCHS. The number of faculty and students declined markedly until 2010, when there was a medical student intake of 147 while the faculty comprised only 122 (39%) of a possible 314 positions. The economic and political crises that the country experienced from 1999 to 2009 compounded the difficulties faced by the institution by limiting the availability of resources. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) funding opportunity has given UZCHS the stimulus to embark on reforms to improve the quality of health education it offers. UZCHS, in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCSOM), the University of Colorado Denver Evaluation Center (UCDEC), and Stanford University designed the Novel Education Clinical Trainees and Researchers (NECTAR) program to implement a series of health education innovations to meet this challenge. Between 2010 and 2013, innovations that have positively affected the quality of health professions education at UZCHS include the launch of comprehensive faculty development programs and mentored clinical and research programs for postgraduate students. A competency-based curriculum reform process has been initiated; a health professions department has been established; and the Research Support Center has been strengthened, providing critical resources to institutionalize health education and research implementation at the college. A core group of faculty trained in medical education has been assembled, helping to ensure the sustainability of these NECTAR activities. PMID:25072588

  6. Library Statistics of Schools in the Health Sciences: Part I

    PubMed Central

    1966-01-01

    During the winter of 1965/66, statistics on library staff, clientele, resources, expenditures, salaries, and services of medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, and public health schools were collected by the MLA Committee on Surveys and Statistics. In an attempt to provide standardized information on these libraries, the Committee utilized questionnaires provided by the U.S. Office of Education. The survey was conducted in co-operation with the American Dental Association, the American Association of Dental Schools, the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. PMID:16017411

  7. Life science research in space brings health on Earth.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, A J; DeBakey, M E; Gerzer, R; Hansen, R; Sutton, J; Neiman, S N

    2004-06-01

    Leading scientists and physicians review groundbreaking research that is leading the way to better health care for astronauts and new treatments for medical problems on Earth. This research includes the development and testing of a new Ventricular Assist Device for patients with heart failure awaiting heart transplantation; advancements in telemedicine that bring medical care to remote areas on Earth and aid in the diagnosis and treatment of illness during space flight; advanced technologies, such as a miniature mass spectrometer, cardiac ultrasound equipment, bone imaging, non-invasive High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, non-invasive techniques for blood and tissue chemistry measurements; and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. PMID:15793934

  8. Cocoa and heart health: a historical review of the science.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Deanna L

    2013-10-01

    The medicinal use of cocoa has a long history dating back almost five hundred years when Hernán Cortés's first experienced the drink in Mesoamerica. Doctors in Europe recommended the beverage to patients in the 1700s, and later American physicians followed suit and prescribed the drink in early America--ca. 1800s. This article delineates the historic trajectory of cocoa consumption, the linkage between cocoa's bioactive-mechanistic properties, paying special attention to nitric oxides role in vasodilation of the arteries, to the current indicators purporting the benefits of cocoa and cardiovascular health. PMID:24077240

  9. Different ontologies: land change science and health research

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Joseph P; Pan, William K

    2014-01-01

    Land use and land cover (LULC) is now recognized as an important driver of disease. For emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases, LULC offers context and serves as a likely proximate driver of risk particularly when considering vector-borne or zoonotic diseases. Ontological differences embedded within disciplinary structures impede progress limiting the ultimate potential of both LULC data and land change theory within disease research. Geography, space, and time serve as effective complements to traditional health and place organizational and disease-research strategies. Improved systemic clarity is obtained if one orients the disease relationship to particular contexts and if the scales of the relationships are clearly defined. PMID:25621087

  10. Cocoa and Heart Health: A Historical Review of the Science

    PubMed Central

    Pucciarelli, Deanna L.

    2013-01-01

    The medicinal use of cocoa has a long history dating back almost five hundred years when Hernán Cortés’s first experienced the drink in Mesoamerica. Doctors in Europe recommended the beverage to patients in the 1700s, and later American physicians followed suit and prescribed the drink in early America―ca. 1800s. This article delineates the historic trajectory of cocoa consumption, the linkage between cocoa’s bioactive-mechanistic properties, paying special attention to nitric oxides role in vasodilation of the arteries, to the current indicators purporting the benefits of cocoa and cardiovascular health. PMID:24077240

  11. Improving Process Evaluations of Health Behavior Interventions: Learning From the Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Trimmer, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    This article reflects on the current state of process evaluations of health behavior interventions and argues that evaluation practice in this area could be improved by drawing on the social science literature to a greater degree. While process evaluations of health behavior interventions have increasingly engaged with the social world and sociological aspects of interventions, there has been a lag in applying relevant and potentially useful approaches from the social sciences. This has limited the scope for health behavior process evaluations to address pertinent contextual issues and methodological challenges. Three aspects of process evaluations are discussed: the incorporation of contexts of interventions; engagement with the concept of "process" in process evaluation; and working with theory to understand interventions. Following on from this, the article also comments on the need for new methodologies and on the implications for addressing health inequalities. PMID:24064427

  12. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  13. Professional paths of alumni from doctorate programs in health and biological sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hortale, Virginia Alonso; Moreira, Carlos Otávio Fiúza; Bochner, Rosany; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the career path and professional satisfaction of alumni from the doctorate degree programs in health sector. METHODS Exploratory study with 827 alumni of doctoral programs in public health, biological and health sciences at the Fundação Oswaldo Cruz , RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from1984 to 2007. The subjects were grouped in three cross-temporal cohorts according to year. The profiles of the alumni were analyzed, their career paths mapped and information on the perceptions of the education they received and the reasons that led them to choose the institute for their doctoral courses gathered, as well as their evaluations of the courses. The data were collected by means of an online questionnaire. RESULTS There are differences between cohorts of alumni related to the periods they followed the courses, their distinct educational backgrounds and labor processes between those from the biological and health sciences areas, and to the specificities of the different areas where the institution offers doctoral courses: public health, biological and health sciences. CONCLUSIONS The results allow the academic management of the educational processes to expend its knowledge, thus establishing a baseline for tracking the trajectory of alumni, and may contribute to upgrading the follow up process of Brazilian graduate programs. PMID:24789631

  14. Science-based health innovation in Uganda: creative strategies for applying research to development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Uganda has a long history of health research, but still faces critical health problems. It has made a number of recent moves towards building science and technology capacity which could have an impact on local health, if innovation can be fostered and harnessed. Methods Qualitative case study research methodology was used. Data were collected through reviews of academic literature and policy documents and through open-ended, face-to-face interviews with 30 people from across the science-based health innovation system, including government officials, researchers in research institutes and universities, entrepreneurs, international donors, and non-governmental organization representatives. Results Uganda has a range of institutions influencing science-based health innovation, with varying degrees of success. However, the country still lacks a coherent mechanism for effectively coordinating STI policy among all the stakeholders. Classified as a least developed country, Uganda has opted for exemptions from the TRIPS intellectual property protection regime that include permitting parallel importation and providing for compulsory licenses for pharmaceuticals. Uganda is unique in Africa in taking part in the Millennium Science Initiative (MSI), an ambitious though early-stage $30m project, funded jointly by the World Bank and Government of Uganda, to build science capacity and encourage entrepreneurship through funding industry-research collaboration. Two universities – Makerere and Mbarara – stand out in terms of health research, though as yet technology development and commercialization is weak. Uganda has several incubators which are producing low-tech products, and is beginning to move into higher-tech ones like diagnostics. Its pharmaceutical industry has started to create partnerships which encourage innovation. Conclusions Science-based health product innovation is in its early stages in Uganda, as are policies for guiding its development

  15. Translation in the health professions: converting science into action.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Steve; Valente, Thomas W; Rohrbach, Louise A; Skara, Silvana; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2006-03-01

    The systematic translation of evidence-based research findings, tools, and information into practice is critical to improving the quality of our nation's health. However, despite several decades of advances in developing medical knowledge based on high-quality empirical evidence, widespread implementation of these findings into practice in diverse applied settings has not been achieved. This article reviews definitions and conceptual models that describe the translation of research from basic discovery to real-world applications, summarizes the various issues involved in the process of translation, discusses multiple barriers, and provides recommendations to surmount these hurdles. Areas of further research in this arena are suggested. Finally, the article concludes that translational research is an important area to continue to pursue requiring long-term collaborative commitment among researchers and practitioners. PMID:16510878

  16. Images of health and medical science conveyed by television

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Ruth

    1984-01-01

    Content analysis was carried out on medical programmes on BBC television over a three-month period. Television medical programmes were shown to concentrate on hospital-based, technological and expert-dependent issues at the expense of primary care and community health. Images of technology, the hospital and the hospital specialist were found to predominate. Issues such as the family, preventive care, housing and the environment were rarely raised. Doctors appeared and spoke in 94 per cent of programmes, whereas nurses were seen (although not necessarily heard) in 30 per cent. Of 70 doctors interviewed on television, nearly three quarters were hospital doctors or scientists. Only one doctor was explicitly referred to as a general practitioner. PMID:6747932

  17. The ethical implications of health sciences library economics.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, G D

    1991-01-01

    The intersection of ethics and economics is rarely discussed in the library literature or at conferences. This may be due, in part, to what economists describe as a romantic value system, that is, the belief that resources are or should be unlimited and available for exploitation by every individual with a need. But recent changes in the national economy for libraries are forcing a realization that individualistic codes of ethics and value systems do not always result in socially desirable consequences. The problems of information management and access cannot be solved by ethical individuals acting alone. Instead, a new consensus is needed on collective ethical behaviors to ensure that health information resources are managed for the common good. PMID:1958911

  18. Introduction: Addressing Air Pollution and Health Science Questions to Inform Science and Policy

    EPA Science Inventory

    This special issue of Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health (AQAH) is the sixth and final in a series of special journal issues (Solomon 2010, 2011a, b; Solomon et al. 2011; Solomon 2012) associated with the 2010 Air Pollution and Heath Conference: Bridging the Gap between Sources ...

  19. Bone Quest - A Space-Based Science and Health Education Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; David-Street, Janis E.; Abrams, Steve A.

    2000-01-01

    This proposal addresses the need for effective and innovative science and health education materials that focus on space bone biology and its implications for bone health on Earth. The focus of these materials, bone biology and health, will increase science knowledge as well as health awareness. Current investigations of the bone loss observed after long-duration space missions provide a link between studies of bone health in space, and studies of osteoporosis, a disease characterized by bone loss and progressive skeletal weakness. The overall goal of this project is to design and develop web-based and print-based materials for high school science students, that will address the following: a) knowledge of normal bone biology and bone biology in a microgravity environment; b) knowledge of osteoporosis; c) knowledge of treatment modalities for space- and Earth-based bone loss; and d} bone-related nutrition knowledge and behavior. To this end, we propose to design and develop a Bone Biology Tutorial which will instruct students about normal bone biology, bone biology in a microgravity environment, osteoporosis - its definition, detection, risk factors, and prevention, treatment modalities for space- and Earth-based bone loss, and the importance of nutrition in bone health. Particular emphasis will be placed on current trends in . adolescent nutrition, and their relationships to bone health. Additionally, we propose to design and develop two interactive nutrition/health ' education activities that will allow students to apply the information provided in the Bone Biology Tutorial. In the first, students will apply constructs provided in the Bone Biology Tutorial to design "Bone Health Plans" for space travelers.

  20. Systems science and systems thinking for public health: a systematic review of the field

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Gemma; Malbon, Eleanor; Carey, Nicole; Joyce, Andrew; Crammond, Brad; Carey, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports on findings from a systematic review designed to investigate the state of systems science research in public health. The objectives were to: (1) explore how systems methodologies are being applied within public health and (2) identify fruitful areas of activity. Design A systematic review was conducted from existing literature that draws on or uses systems science (in its various forms) and relates to key public health areas of action and concern, including tobacco, alcohol, obesity and the social determinants of health. Data analysis 117 articles were included in the review. An inductive qualitative content analysis was used for data extraction. The following were systematically extracted from the articles: approach, methodology, transparency, strengths and weaknesses. These were then organised according to theme (ie, commonalities between studies within each category), in order to provide an overview of the state of the field as a whole. The assessment of data quality was intrinsic to the goals of the review itself, and therefore, was carried out as part of the analysis. Results 4 categories of research were identified from the review, ranging from editorial and commentary pieces to complex system dynamic modelling. Our analysis of each of these categories of research highlighted areas of potential for systems science to strengthen public health efforts, while also revealing a number of limitations in the dynamic systems modelling being carried out in public health. Conclusions There is a great deal of interest in how the application of systems concepts and approach might aid public health. Our analysis suggests that soft systems modelling techniques are likely to be the most useful addition to public health, and align well with current debate around knowledge transfer and policy. However, the full range of systems methodologies is yet to be engaged with by public health researchers. PMID:26719314

  1. The Health Sciences and Technology Academy: An Educational Pipeline to Address Health Care Disparities in West Virginia

    PubMed Central

    McKendall, Sherron Benson; Kasten, Kasandra; Hanks, Sara; Chester, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Health and educational disparities are national issues in the United States. Research has shown that health care professionals from underserved backgrounds are more likely than others to work in underserved areas. The Association of American Medical Colleges’ Project 3000 by 2000, to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medical schools, spurred the West Virginia School of Medicine to start the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) in 1994 with the goal of supporting interested underrepresented high school students in pursuing college and health professions careers. The program was based on three beliefs: (1) if underrepresented high school students have potential and the desire to pursue a health professions career and are given the support, they can reach their goals, including obtaining a health professions degree; (2) underserved high school students are able to predict their own success if given the right resources; and (3) community engagement would be key to the program’s success. In this perspective, the authors describe the HSTA and its framework and philosophy, including the underlying theories and pedagogy from research in the fields of education and the behavioral/social sciences. They then offer evidence of the program’s success, specifically for African American students, including graduates’ high college-going rate and overwhelming intention to choose a health professions major. Finally, the authors describe the benefits of the HSTA’s community partnerships, including providing mentors to students, adding legislative language providing tuition waivers and a budgetary line item devoted to the program, and securing program funding from outside sources. PMID:24280836

  2. Teaching and Learning in Exercise Science: Contributing to the Health of the Nation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavrianeas, Stasinos; Stewart, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Students of exercise science are well positioned to facilitate a shift of the nation's attitude on health care from disease treatment to disease prevention. This report chronicles our efforts toward transforming the exercise physiology core course from a lecture-based, instructor-centered class to a student-centered environment in which…

  3. Researchers' Perceptions of Statistical Significance Contribute to Bias in Health and Exercise Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Taylor L.; Lohse, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed researchers in the health and exercise sciences to explore different areas and magnitudes of bias in researchers' decision making. Participants were presented with scenarios (testing a central hypothesis with p = 0.06 or p = 0.04) in a random order and surveyed about what they would do in each scenario. Participants showed significant…

  4. A Report on Health Sciences Education Planning for California: 1980-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    Health sciences education planning for California for 1980-82 is examined. The adequacy of educational programs in meeting the needs of California for professional personnel in medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, and optometry is assessed. Data on enrollments and graduation rates in these fields are updated from the 1978 plan, and similar data…

  5. Medical Simulation in the Community College Health Science Curriculum: A Matrix for Future Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Michael P.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2010-01-01

    As the nation's healthcare education system struggles to keep pace with the demand for its services, educators are seeking creative and innovative solutions to meet the needs of a growing number of students. The integration of medical simulation technology into the community college health science curriculum is a creative solution that can meet…

  6. A Podiatric Medical Residency Program in an Academic Health Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogy, Louis T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The podiatric medical residency program in the Health Science Center at San Antonio provides an intensive exposure for the newly graduated podiatrist to practice in a multidisciplinary environment. Residents become more familiar with general medical and surgical diseases and disorders as well as podiatric pathology. (LBH)

  7. General Education in Health Science-Focused Institutions: An Explanatory Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the structure of general education curricula at baccalaureate colleges of health science in relationship to Bergquist's Career-Based Model of curriculum. Using an explanatory sequential mixed methods approach, the model was tested by examining whether the curricula were both prescriptive and specific.…

  8. Child at Risk: A Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Health, Welfare and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senate Committee of Canada (Ontario). Standing Senate Committee on Health, Welfare and Science.

    This report of the Standing Senate Committee on Health, Welfare and Science summarizes and coordinates interdisciplinary evidence and expert opinion in order to provide insight into the way early childhood experiences might be considered as causes of later criminal behavior. The material is divided into three categories: the prenatal period, the…

  9. Information Literacy among Medical Students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Endouware, Benake-ebide C.; Ubogu, Janet O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate whether undergraduate students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University are information literate, and to determine whether they are aware of and use different information resources including electronic ones, and to assess their ability to evaluate information before use.…

  10. Exploring Emerging Issues in Research Higher Degree Supervision of Professional Doctorate Students in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggat, Peter A.; Martinez, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been an increase in the number of students undertaking traditional research masters and doctor of philosophy courses in the health sciences. This paper reviews and summarizes several aspects of the literature related to supervision of students in these traditional research higher degree (RHD) programs in…

  11. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft, 2013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the availability of the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria for public comment and independent peer review. This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most polic...

  12. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (Second External Review Draft, 2015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of oxides of nitrogen. When final, it will provide a critical part of the scientific foundation for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current ...

  13. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of sulfur oxides. When final, it will provide a critical part of the scientific foundation for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current primar...

  14. Report of the Task Force - Space for Health Sciences. Building Blocks. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    The Task Force on Space for Health Sciences is one of four task forces established by the Committee on Capital Financing of the Council of Ontario Universities to work toward the development of a capital formula that would define space needs and building costs for Ontario universities. Each task force has a particular assignment related to the…

  15. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  16. Testing Program Reveals Deficient Mathematics for Health Science Students Commencing University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaught, Keith; Hoyne, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    In response to staff concerns about literacy and numeracy standards of commencing students, the School of Health Sciences at the University of Notre Dame Australia (UNDA) Fremantle campus worked with academic support staff from the University's Academic Enabling and Support Centre (AESC) to develop a Post Entrance Numeracy Assessment (PENA).…

  17. 2008 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the NOx ISA 2008 Report The Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria document represent...

  18. [Training of managers and politicians in ethics of science and ethics of public health].

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    First of all, I will identify the various possible objectives of training in ethics of science and health. I will then examine the institutional context in which managers and politicians act in the light of what is done in Quebec. This analysis will lead me to defend the thesis that in Quebec at least such training is necessary. PMID:23991550

  19. Using Facebook Page Insights Data to Determine Posting Best Practices in an Academic Health Sciences Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houk, Kathryn M.; Thornhill, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library created a Facebook page and a corresponding managing committee in March 2010. Facebook Page Insights data collected from the library's Facebook page were statistically analyzed to investigate patterns of user engagement. The committee hoped to improve posting practices and increase user…

  20. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Designated Health Science Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in designated health science professions in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements, and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals, mission, values, philosophy, and terminology of accreditation of…

  1. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (Second External Review Draft, 2008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation...

  2. Nuclear science and engineering and health physics fellowships: 1984 description. Research areas for the practicum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This booklet describes available research areas at participating centers where a practicum may be held under the Nuclear Science and Engineering and Health Physics Fellowship program. After a year of graduate study each fellow is expected to arrange for a practicum period at one of the participating centers.

  3. How To Survive Your First Year. A Handbook for New Teachers in Health Science Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    This guide is designed to assist teachers who are beginning their first year of teaching Texas' Health Science Technology Education program. Discussed in the guide's seven sections are the following: the state's educational system, the teacher-student relationship, and teachers' internal struggles; planning/scheduling; classroom management…

  4. Cluster Analysis of Assessment in Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen; White, Sue; Power, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Academic content common to health science programs is often taught to a mixed group of students; however, content assessment may be consistent for each discipline. This study used a retrospective cluster analysis on such a group, first to identify high and low achieving students, and second, to determine the distribution of students within…

  5. User Analysis of the University of Kentucky Medical Library Health Sciences Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcley, Janet A.

    The results of a questionnaire sent to the users of the Health Sciences Information Service (HSIS) at the University of Kentucky are summarized by this report. Several observations were made from the data presented: (1) when a dependable information service is organized it gets used; (2) the number of individuals who report the use of HSIS through…

  6. Beyond Learning Management Systems: Designing for Interprofessional Knowledge Building in the Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lax, Leila; Scardamalia, Marlene; Watt-Watson, Judy; Hunter, Judith; Bereiter, Carl

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines theoretical, pedagogical, and technological differences between two technologies that have been used in undergraduate interprofessional health sciences at the University of Toronto. One, a learning management system, WebCT 2.0, supports online coursework. The other, a Knowledge Building environment, Knowledge Forum 2.0,…

  7. The Impact of Wireless Keypads in an Interprofessional Education Context with Health Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brett; Lewis, Belinda; Boyle, Malcolm; Brown, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify if wireless keypads could facilitate interprofessional interaction among undergraduate paramedic, nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, health science, social work and midwifery students. Secondary research aims included the examination of students' perceptions of interprofessional education and how…

  8. The Use of Stress Reduction Training in a College Curriculum for Health Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudesman, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Studied program dealing with stress management for college health science students which included instruction in cognitive behavior modification, biofeedback, and open focus training. Results indicated students (N=43) using these techniques experienced less anxiety in a high pressure situation. Suggests lessening anxiety was related to an increase…

  9. Inquiry Learning of High School Students through a Problem-Based Environmental Health Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Smith, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which high school students improved their inquiry capabilities in relation to scientific literacy through their experience of a problem-based environmental health science curriculum. The two inquiry capabilities studied were scientific questioning and approaches to inquiry into their own…

  10. 78 FR 42053 - Board of Regents, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Quarterly Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... doctoral degrees in the biomedical sciences and public health; approval of awards and honors; a review of... Officer, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20814; telephone 301-295-3066. SUPPLEMENTARY... availability of space, the meeting is open to the public from 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Seating is on a...

  11. A Survey of the Usability of Digital Reference Services on Academic Health Science Library Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Cheryl; Allen, Maryellen

    2006-01-01

    Reference interactions with patrons in a digital library environment using digital reference services (DRS) has become widespread. However, such services in many libraries appear to be underutilized. A study surveying the ease and convenience of such services for patrons in over 100 academic health science library Web sites suggests that…

  12. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (2016 Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report provides the U.S. EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of gaseous oxides of nitrogen. It provides a critical part of the scientific foundation for the U.S. EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the c...

  13. Service-Learning through Partnership with a Community High School: Impact on Minority Health Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Suha M.; Hamed, Kastro M.

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning has been used to integrate an educational experience with community outreach, particularly among underserved populations. In this study, college students enrolled in a health science major were engaged in an educational outreach initiative with a group of students from a high school with a predominantly minority population. The…

  14. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluatio...

  15. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft, 2007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and eva...

  16. 2008 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the NOx ISA 2008 Report The Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria document represent...

  17. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (Second External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluati...

  18. Health Care and Family and Consumer Sciences Education: An Integrative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Ruth; Rider, Mary Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Uses ecological systems theory as a foundation for integrating health care and its public policy issues into family and consumer sciences classrooms. Offers teachers alternative perspectives on consumer behavior changes and needs in heath care systems and policies. Contains 24 references. (JOW)

  19. The Development of an Integrated Science Core Curriculum for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesney, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the development of BioMedical Sciences Core at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah for introductory level allied health students. The design of the "Core" curriculum is to integrate the disciplines of physics, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, and microbiology as they relate to the human body rather than teaching the traditional…

  20. The Impact of Curriculum Change on Health Sciences First Year Students' Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rebecca; Spronken-Smith, Rachel; Bond, Carol; McDonald, Fiona; Reynolds, John; McMartin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to use a learning inventory (the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students, ASSIST) to measure the impact of a curriculum change on students' approaches to learning in two large courses in a health sciences first year programme. The two new Human Body Systems (HUBS) courses were designed to encourage students to take a…

  1. Ring Fenced Research: The Case of Computer-Assisted Learning in Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Gabriel; Ip, Barry

    2005-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research is being promoted in many quarters as the way forward, but "research islands" still persist. Taking computer-assisted learning (CAL) within health sciences as a case in point, this paper describes a detailed study of the references to source material within papers published in general medical, specific nursing and…

  2. State of the Science in Autism: Report to the National Institutes of Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Marie M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This report on the state of the science in autism contains responses to questions posed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and recommendations concerning diagnosis, epidemiology, pathophysiology, communication/social/emotional development, medical intervention, social and behavioral intervention, and biostatistics. General recommendations…

  3. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 18: The Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey).

    PubMed

    Zeraatkar, Kimia; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Havlin, Tracy; Neves, Karen; Şendir, Mesra

    2016-06-01

    This is the 18th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Middle East (Iran, Qatar and Turkey). The next feature column will investigate trends in the Balkan States JM. PMID:27168258

  4. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  5. 75 FR 49500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Contact Person: Gwen W. Collman, PhD, Interim Director, Division of Extramural Research..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: September 2,...

  6. 77 FR 3480 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: February 15, 2012, 2:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: February 16,...

  7. 78 FR 48695 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr. KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709....

  8. 76 FR 10040 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. (919... Meridian Parkway, Research Triangle Park, NC 27713. Open: March 21, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Agenda: An overview of the organization and research in the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis....

  9. 76 FR 46823 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: September 1, 2011, 2:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: September 2,...

  10. Formative Assessment and Academic Achievement in Pre-Graduate Students of Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo-de-la-Pena, Maria T.; Bailles, Eva; Caseras, Xavier; Martinez, Alvar; Ortet, Generos; Perez, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Although educational experts recommend the use of formative assessment, there is a dearth of empirical studies on its impact on academic achievement. In this research the authors analyse to what extent participation and performance in formative assessment are associated with positive academic outcomes of pre-graduate students of health sciences. A…

  11. Cataloging Three-Dimensional Objects: A Study of Academic Health Science Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Jennifer L.

    This study examines a random sample of academic health sciences libraries across the United States to determine if these institutions have three-dimensional medical artifacts in their collections and how they organize and catalog these materials to provide access to them. A questionnaire was sent to heads of cataloging at 30 academic health…

  12. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 19: The Balkan States (Bulgaria and Croatia).

    PubMed

    Kirilova, Savina; Skoric, Lea

    2016-09-01

    This is the 19th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Balkan Region (Bulgaria and Croatia). The next regular feature column will investigate two other Balkan states - Serbia and Slovenia. JM. PMID:27384106

  13. Developments in Health Sciences Libraries since 1974: From Physical Entity to the Virtual Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weise, Frieda O.

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of developments in health sciences libraries leading to the virtual library. Highlights include online searching; integrated library systems; networked resources; the expansion of interlibrary loans and document delivery systems; the Integrated Academic Information Management System; and the role of the National Library of…

  14. Dissemination of Medical Information: Organizational and Technological Issues in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderer, Nancy K.

    1993-01-01

    Describes five programs that have been significant to the evolution of biomedical communications in health sciences libraries over the last twenty years: the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM); Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS); National Research and Education Network (NREN); Unified Medical Language System…

  15. Assessment of Translational and Interdisciplinary Clinical Research at an Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Hanh Dung; Kota, Pravina; James, Judith A.; Stoner, Julie A.; Akins, Darrin R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In response to National Institutes of Health initiatives to improve translation of basic science discoveries we surveyed faculty to assess patterns of and barriers to translational research in Oklahoma. Methods An online survey was administered to University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Medicine faculty, which included demographic and research questions. Results Responses were received from 126 faculty members (24%). Two-thirds spent ≥20% time on research; among these, 90% conduct clinical and translational research. Identifying funding; recruiting research staff and participants; preparing reports and agreements; and protecting research time were commonly perceived as at least moderate barriers to conducting research. While respondents largely collaborated within their discipline, clinical investigators were more likely than basic science investigators to engage in interdisciplinary research. Conclusion While engagement in translational research is common, specific barriers impact the research process. This could be improved through an expanded interdisciplinary collaboration and research support structure. PMID:26242016

  16. COSMIC INHERITANCE RULES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE AND SCIENCE1

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Katinas, G. S.; Watanabe, Y.; Siegelová, J.

    2010-01-01

    Countering the trend in specialization, we advocate the trans-disciplinary monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate for signatures of environmental cyclic and other variabilities in space as well as terrestrial weather on the one hand, and for surveillance of personal and societal health on the other hand. New rules (if confirmed novel laws) emerge as we recognize our inheritance from the cosmos of cycles that constitute and characterize life and align them with inheritance from parents. In so doing, we happen to follow the endeavors of Gregor Mendel, who recognized the segregation and independent assortment of what became known as genes. Circadians, rhythms with periods, τ, between 20 and 28 hours, and cycles with frequencies that are higher (ultradian) or lower (infradian) than circadian, are genetically anchored. An accumulating long list of very important but aeolian (nonstationary) infradian cycles, characterizing the incidence patterns of sudden cardiac death, suicide and terrorism, with drastically different τs, constitutes the nonphotic (corpuscular emission from the sun, heliogeomagnetics, ultraviolet flux, gravitation) Cornélissen-series. PMID:21603087

  17. COSMIC INHERITANCE RULES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE AND SCIENCE.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F; Cornélissen, G; Katinas, G S; Watanabe, Y; Siegelová, J

    2010-01-01

    Countering the trend in specialization, we advocate the trans-disciplinary monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate for signatures of environmental cyclic and other variabilities in space as well as terrestrial weather on the one hand, and for surveillance of personal and societal health on the other hand. New rules (if confirmed novel laws) emerge as we recognize our inheritance from the cosmos of cycles that constitute and characterize life and align them with inheritance from parents. In so doing, we happen to follow the endeavors of Gregor Mendel, who recognized the segregation and independent assortment of what became known as genes. Circadians, rhythms with periods, τ, between 20 and 28 hours, and cycles with frequencies that are higher (ultradian) or lower (infradian) than circadian, are genetically anchored. An accumulating long list of very important but aeolian (nonstationary) infradian cycles, characterizing the incidence patterns of sudden cardiac death, suicide and terrorism, with drastically different τs, constitutes the nonphotic (corpuscular emission from the sun, heliogeomagnetics, ultraviolet flux, gravitation) Cornélissen-series. PMID:21603087

  18. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Knappe, Susanne; Andersson, Gerhard; Araya, Ricardo; Banos Rivera, Rosa M; Barkham, Michael; Bech, Per; Beckers, Tom; Berger, Thomas; Berking, Matthias; Berrocal, Carmen; Botella, Christina; Carlbring, Per; Chouinard, Guy; Colom, Francesc; Csillag, Claudio; Cujipers, Pim; David, Daniel; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Essau, Cecilia A; Fava, Giovanni A; Goschke, Thomas; Hermans, Dirk; Hofmann, Stefan G; Lutz, Wolfgang; Muris, Peter; Ollendick, Thomas H; Raes, Filip; Rief, Winfried; Riper, Heleen; Tossani, Eliana; van der Oord, Saskia; Vervliet, Bram; Haro, Josep M; Schumann, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective, most maladaptive health behaviours and mental disorders can be conceptualized as the result of developmental dysfunctions of psychological functions and processes as well as neurobiological and genetic processes that interact with the environment. The paper presents and discusses an integrative translational model, linking basic and experimental research with clinical research as well as population-based prospective-longitudinal studies. This model provides a conceptual framework to identify how individual vulnerabilities interact with environment over time, and promote critical behaviours that might act as proximal risk factors for ill-health and mental disorders. Within the models framework, such improved knowledge is also expected to better delineate targeted preventive and therapeutic interventions that prevent further escalation in early stages before the full disorder and further complications thereof develop. In contrast to conventional "personalized medicine" that typically targets individual (genetic) variation of patients who already have developed a disease to improve medical treatment, the proposed framework model, linked to a concerted funding programme of the "Science of Behaviour Change", carries the promise of improved diagnosis, treatment and prevention of health-risk behaviour constellations as well as mental disorders. PMID:24375534

  19. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  20. Fostering Empathy in Undergraduate Health Science Majors through the Reconciliation of Objectivity and Subjectivity: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Robert L.; Nichols, Marcia D.

    2012-01-01

    The demand for empathetic health care practitioners requires an academic curriculum suited to that need. Here we describe a series of integrated activities that were designed to foster empathy in undergraduate health science majors. By combining content and pedagogical approaches from the humanities and sciences, we asked students to reconcile…