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Sample records for galvanic skin response

  1. 21 CFR 882.1540 - Galvanic skin response measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Galvanic skin response measurement device. 882... Galvanic skin response measurement device. (a) Identification. A galvanic skin response measurement device... electrical resistance of the skin and the tissue path between two electrodes applied to the skin....

  2. 21 CFR 882.1540 - Galvanic skin response measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galvanic skin response measurement device. 882... Galvanic skin response measurement device. (a) Identification. A galvanic skin response measurement device... electrical resistance of the skin and the tissue path between two electrodes applied to the skin....

  3. 21 CFR 882.1540 - Galvanic skin response measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galvanic skin response measurement device. 882... Galvanic skin response measurement device. (a) Identification. A galvanic skin response measurement device... electrical resistance of the skin and the tissue path between two electrodes applied to the skin....

  4. 21 CFR 882.1540 - Galvanic skin response measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Galvanic skin response measurement device. 882... Galvanic skin response measurement device. (a) Identification. A galvanic skin response measurement device... electrical resistance of the skin and the tissue path between two electrodes applied to the skin....

  5. 21 CFR 882.1540 - Galvanic skin response measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galvanic skin response measurement device. 882.1540 Section 882.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Galvanic skin response measurement device. (a) Identification. A galvanic skin response measurement...

  6. Designing skin response meter for psycho galvanic reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhokalia, Dhruv M.; Atreya, Parul; Kumar, Arun

    2011-12-01

    Human skin offers some resistance to current and voltage. This resistance changes with the emotional state of the body. The circuit proposed here measures changes in our skin resistance following changes in our mental state. In the relaxed state, the resistance offered by the skin is as high as 2 mega-ohms or more, which reduces to 500 kilo-ohms or less when the emotional stress is too high. The reduction in skin resistance is related to increased blood flow and permeability followed by the physiological changes during high stress. This increases the electrical conductivity of the skin. This circuit is useful to monitor the skin's response to relaxation techniques. It is very sensitive and shows response during a sudden moment of stress. Even a deep sigh will give response in the circuit. The circuit uses a sensitive amplifier to sense variations in the skin resistance. IC CA3140 is designed as a resistance- to-voltage converter that outputs varying voltage based on the skin's conductivity.

  7. Media Research with a Galvanic Skin Response Biosensor: Some Kids Work Up a Sweat!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This study considers the galvanic skin response (GSR) of sixth-grade students (n=20) using print, video, and microcomputer segments. Subjects received all three media treatments, in randomized order. Data for analysis consisted of standardized test scores and GSR measures; a moderate positive relationship was shown between cumulative GSR and…

  8. Improved electrode paste provides reliable measurement of galvanic skin response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    High-conductivity electrode paste is used in obtaining accurate skin resistance or skin potential measurements. The paste is isotonic to perspiration, is nonirritating and nonsensitizing, and has an extended shelf life.

  9. Cortisol, biochemical, and galvanic skin responses to music stimuli of different preference values by college students in biology and music.

    PubMed

    VanderArk, S D; Ely, D

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine biochemical and galvanic skin responses to music stimuli. Specifically, 30 university biology and 30 music students' plasma levels of norepinephrine and cortisol and their galvanic skin responses were measured before and after listening to two different musical selections, one of which was preferred (liked) by the music students and not preferred (disliked) by the biology students. The music-listening sessions and the controlled silent sessions were done in an anechoic chamber. 30 biology majors and 30 music majors were in the experimental groups; 14 biology and 17 music majors comprised the control group. Analysis indicated that the cortisol levels and galvanic skin responses were significantly higher for the music majors than the biology majors. The data indicate that music majors listen more critically and analytically to music than biology majors, and cortisol levels are associated with this as increases in music majors and decreases in biology majors after the music. PMID:8367245

  10. Biochemical and galvanic skin responses to music stimuli by college students in biology and music.

    PubMed

    VanderArk, S D; Ely, D

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine biochemical and physiological responses to musical stimuli. Specifically, university music and biology students' plasma levels of norepinephrine, endorphin, and cortisol, and their galvanic skin responses were measured before and after listening to two different musical selections in an anechoic chamber and during controlled silence. The results indicated that biochemical variables changed significantly in both groups during listening to music but were not different during the controlled silence. These data suggest that music majors may listen more analytically to music. GSR responses were significantly higher for music majors than biology majors, and plasma cortisol increased in music students but decreased in biology students. Music which elicits specific emotions induces physiological changes which may be beneficial to relaxation and behavioral therapies. PMID:1501973

  11. Instructions and the Orienting Reflex in "Semantic Conditioning" of the Galvanic Skin Response in an Innocuous Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendery, Mary; Maltzman, Irving

    1977-01-01

    Concerns the effects of instructions on classical conditioning of the GSR (galvanic skin response). It demonstrates that verbal conditioning of the GSR can be obtained using an innocuous unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Discusses implications for theories of human classical conditioning. (Editor/RK)

  12. A stress sensor based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) controlled by ZigBee.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes, one needs to control different emotional situations which can lead the person suffering them to dangerous situations, in both the medium and short term. There are studies which indicate that stress increases the risk of cardiac problems. In this study we have designed and built a stress sensor based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), and controlled by ZigBee. In order to check the device's performance, we have used 16 adults (eight women and eight men) who completed different tests requiring a certain degree of effort, such as mathematical operations or breathing deeply. On completion, we appreciated that GSR is able to detect the different states of each user with a success rate of 76.56%. In the future, we plan to create an algorithm which is able to differentiate between each state. PMID:22778631

  13. Galvanic zinc-copper microparticles produce electrical stimulation that reduces the inflammatory and immune responses in skin.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simarna; Lyte, Peter; Garay, Michelle; Liebel, Frank; Sun, Ying; Liu, Jue-Chen; Southall, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    The human body has its own innate electrical system that regulates the body's functions via communications among organs through the well-known neural system. While the effect of low-level electrical stimulation on wound repair has been reported, few studies have examined the effect of electric potential on non-wounded, intact skin. A galvanic couple comprised of elemental zinc and copper was used to determine the effects of low-level electrical stimulation on intact skin physiology using a Dermacorder device. Zn-Cu induced the electrical potential recorded on intact skin, enhanced H(2)O(2) production and activated p38 MAPK and Hsp27 in primary keratinocytes. Treatment with Zn-Cu was also found to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1α, IL-2, NO and TNF-α in multiple cell types after stimulation with PHA or Propionibacterium acnes bacteria. The Zn-Cu complex led to a dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-α-induced NF-κB levels in keratinocytes as measured by a dual-luciferase promoter assay, and prevented p65 translocation to the nucleus observed via immunofluorescence. Suppression of NF-κB activity via crosstalk with p38 MAPK might be one of the potential pathways by which Zn-Cu exerted its inflammatory effects. Topical application of Zn-Cu successfully mitigated TPA-induced dermatitis and oxazolone-induced hypersensitivity in mice models of ear edema. Anti-inflammatory activity induced by the Zn-Cu galvanic couple appears to be mediated, at least in part, by production of low level of hydrogen peroxide since this activity is reversed by the addition of Catalase enzyme. Collectively, these results show that a galvanic couple containing Zn-Cu strongly reduces the inflammatory and immune responses in intact skin, providing evidence for the role of electric stimulation in non-wounded skin. PMID:21465312

  14. Analysis and Modeling of the Galvanic Skin Response Spontaneous Component in the context of Intelligent Biofeedback Systems Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unakafov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to galvanic skin response (GSR) spontaneous component analysis and modeling. In the study a classification of biofeedback training methods is given, importance of intelligent methods development is shown. The INTENS method, which is perspective for intellectualization, is presented. An important problem of biofeedback training method intellectualization - estimation of the GSR spontaneous component - is solved in the main part of the work. Its main characteristics are described; results of GSR spontaneous component modeling are shown. Results of small research of an optimum material for GSR probes are presented.

  15. Changes in galvanic skin response as affected by musical selection, sex, and academic discipline.

    PubMed

    Peretti, P O

    1975-03-01

    The present paper tested hypotheses that (a) music can influence anxiety; (b) differences in response to music may be found between males and females; and (c) differences in response may be found between music and nonmusic majors. Subjects included 100 music majors, (50 male and 50 female) and 100 nonmusic majors, (50 male and 50 female) randomly selected from students at North Park College, Chicago, Illinois. Test instruments included a pencil-maze, blindfold goggles, GSR apparatus, and a musical recording. All three hypotheses were substantiated in terms of levels of significance ranging from .01 to .05 for different Ss. PMID:1167304

  16. Usefulness of galvanic skin reflex monitor in CT-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Seiichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Go; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Ohta, Takashi; Ishii, Nagao; Ito, Tatsushi

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade with ethanol was performed while monitoring sympathetic nerve activity, with an alternating current (AC) galvanic skin reflex (GSR) monitor, in a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis in whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy was impossible because of pleural adhesion. Sweating was suppressed after the thoracic sympathetic blockade, and the monitor showed a significant increase in skin resistance. The effect of sympathetic blockade could be evaluated directly and in real time using a GSR monitor. PMID:17680195

  17. The timing of galvanic vestibular stimulation affects responses to platform translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavacka, F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We compared the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation applied at 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 s prior to a backward platform translation on postural responses. The effect of the galvanic stimulation was largest on the final equilibrium position of the center of pressure (CoP). The largest effects occurred for the 0.5 and 0-s pre-period, when the dynamic CoP pressure changes in response to both the galvanic stimulus and the platform translation coincided. The shift in the final equilibrium position was also larger than the sum of the shifts for the galvanic stimulus and the platform translation alone for the 0.5 and 0-s pre-periods. The initial rate of change of the CoP response to the platform translation was not significantly affected in any condition. Changes in the peak CoP position could be accounted for by local interaction of CoP velocity changes induced by the galvanic and translation responses alone, but the changes in final equilibrium position could only be accounted for by a change in global body orientation. These findings suggest that the contribution of vestibulospinal information is greatest during the dynamic phase of the postural response, and that the vestibular system contributes most to the later components of the postural response, particularly to the final equilibrium position. These findings suggest that a nonlinear interaction between the vestibular signal induced by the galvanic current and the sensory stimuli produced by the platform translation occurs when the two stimuli are presented within 1 s, during the dynamic phase of the postural response to the galvanic stimulus. When presented at greater separations in time, the stimuli appear to be treated as independent events, such that no interaction occurs. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Galvanic Skin Response and Reported Anxiety During Systematic Desensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Edward T.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the GSR during systematic desensitization. Three groups of females each were preselected for high snake fear. Outcome measures indicated that the desensitization group reduced phobic behavior most, followed by the relaxation group, and then the exposure groups. (Author)

  19. Galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibit melanogenesis via multiple pigmentary pathways.

    PubMed

    Won, Yen-Kim; Lin, Connie B; Seiberg, Miri; Chen, Nannan; Hu, Yaping; Rossetti, Dianne; Saliou, Claude; Loy, Chong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous electrical field of human skin plays an important role in many skin functions. However, the biological effects and mechanism of action of externally applied electrical stimulation on skin remain unclear. Recent study showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles produce electrical stimulation and reduce inflammatory and immune responses in intact skin, suggesting the important role of electrical stimulation in non-wounded skin. The objective of this study is to investigate the biological effect of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles on skin pigmentation. Our findings showed that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis in a human melanoma cell line (MNT-1), human keratinocytes and melanoma cells co-cultures, and in pigmented epidermal equivalents. Treatment of galvanic zinc-copper microparticles inhibited melanogenesis by reducing the promoter transactivation of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 in human melanoma cells. In a co-culture Transwell system of keratinocytes and melanoma cells, galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanin production via downregulation of endothelin-1 secretion from keratinocytes and reduced tyrosinase gene expression in melanoma cells. In addition, exposure of pigmented epidermal equivalents to galvanic zinc-copper microparticles resulted in reduced melanin deposition. In conclusion, our data demonstrated for the first time that galvanic zinc-copper microparticles reduced melanogenesis in melanoma cells and melanin deposition in pigmented epidermal equivalents by affecting multiple pigmentary pathways. PMID:23700242

  20. Electrochemical, galvanic, and mechanical responses of grade 2 titanium in 6% sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.F.; Briant, C.L.; Kumar, K.S.

    1999-02-01

    The electrochemical, galvanic, and mechanical responses of grade 2 titanium in 6% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at different temperatures were investigated. The initial corrosion potential and cathodic reaction rate increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. The initial corrosion potential changed when titanium was coupled with other metals. Naval brass and alloy 600 (UNS N06600) anodically polarized titanium, while zinc and aluminum caused titanium to become a cathode. HY80 steel (UNS K31820), type 316 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S31600), and Monel K500 (UNS N05500, a copper-nickel alloy), polarized titanium anodically or cathodically depending upon temperature and pH. Hydrides formed on the titanium surface at potentials < {approximately} {minus}600 mV{sub SCE} to {minus}700 mV{sub SCE}. Zinc at all temperatures and HY80 at high temperatures caused hydride formation in titanium when coupled galvanically with titanium. Mechanical tests showed an {approx} 10% decrease in ductility under prior and dynamic hydrogen charging conditions.

  1. Characterization of hydrogen responsive nanoporous palladium films synthesized via a spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. F.; Lavrik, N. V.; Joy, D. C.; Hunter, S. R.; Datskos, P. G.; Smith, D. B.; Sepaniak, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    A model is presented regarding the mechanistic properties associated with the interaction of hydrogen with nanoporous palladium (np-Pd) films prepared using a spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction (SGDR), which involves PdCl2 reduction by atomic Ag. Characterization of these films shows both chemical and morphological factors, which influence the performance characteristics of np-Pd microcantilever (MC) nanomechanical sensing devices. Raman spectroscopy, uniquely complemented with MC response profiles, is used to explore the chemical influence of palladium oxide (PdO). These combined techniques support a reaction mechanism that provides for rapid response to H2 and recovery in the presence of O2. Post-SGDR processing via reduction of PdCl2(s) in a H2 environment results in a segregated nanoparticle three-dimensional matrix dispersed in a silver layer. The porous nature of the reduced material is shown by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. Extended grain boundaries, typical of these materials, result in a greater surface area conducive to fast sorption/desorption of hydrogen, encouraged by the presence of PdO. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy are employed to study changes in morphology and chemistry occurring in these nanoporous films under different processing conditions. The unique nature of chemical/morphological effects, as demonstrated by the above characterization methods, provides evidence in support of observed nanomechanical response/recovery profiles offering insight for catalysis, H2 storage and improved sensing applications.

  2. Comparison of postural responses to galvanic vestibular stimulation between pilots and the general populace.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Pu, Fang; Lv, Xiaoning; Li, Shuyu; Li, Jing; Li, Deyu; Li, Minggao; Fan, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) can be used to study the body's response to vestibular stimuli. This study aimed to investigate whether postural responses to GVS were different between pilots and the general populace. Bilateral bipolar GVS was applied with a constant-current profile to 12 pilots and 12 control subjects via two electrodes placed over the mastoid processes. Both GVS threshold and the center of pressure's trajectory (COP's trajectory) were measured. Position variability of COP during spontaneous body sway and peak displacement of COP during GVS-induced body sway were calculated in the medial-lateral direction. Spontaneous body sway was slight for all subjects, and there was no significant difference in the value of COP position variability between the pilots and controls. Both the GVS threshold and magnitude of GVS-induced body deviation were similar for different GVS polarities. GVS thresholds were similar between the two groups, but the magnitude of GVS-induced body deviation in the controls was significantly larger than that in the pilots. The pilots showed less GVS-induced body deviation, meaning that pilots may have a stronger ability to suppress vestibular illusions. PMID:25632395

  3. Comparison of Postural Responses to Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation between Pilots and the General Populace

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Pu, Fang; Lv, Xiaoning; Li, Shuyu; Li, Jing; Li, Deyu; Li, Minggao

    2015-01-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) can be used to study the body's response to vestibular stimuli. This study aimed to investigate whether postural responses to GVS were different between pilots and the general populace. Bilateral bipolar GVS was applied with a constant-current profile to 12 pilots and 12 control subjects via two electrodes placed over the mastoid processes. Both GVS threshold and the center of pressure's trajectory (COP's trajectory) were measured. Position variability of COP during spontaneous body sway and peak displacement of COP during GVS-induced body sway were calculated in the medial-lateral direction. Spontaneous body sway was slight for all subjects, and there was no significant difference in the value of COP position variability between the pilots and controls. Both the GVS threshold and magnitude of GVS-induced body deviation were similar for different GVS polarities. GVS thresholds were similar between the two groups, but the magnitude of GVS-induced body deviation in the controls was significantly larger than that in the pilots. The pilots showed less GVS-induced body deviation, meaning that pilots may have a stronger ability to suppress vestibular illusions. PMID:25632395

  4. Autonomic responses of transsexual and homosexual males to erotic film sequences.

    PubMed

    Barr, R; Blaszczynski, A

    1976-05-01

    Penile volume and galvanic skin responses to nude female and male film sequences were studied in 10 transsexual patients, 44 patients requesting treatment for homosexual impulses, and 60 heterosexual students. Student controls and homosexuals showed significantly greater galvanic skin responses to the preferred than to the nonpreferred sex. Transsexuals tended to show larger galvanic skin responses to females than did male homosexuals. No strong relationships were found between penile volume and galvanic skin response to the preferred sex. It is concluded that transsexual patients differ significantly from homosexual patients in autonomic responsivity, which may have diagnostic usefulness. PMID:952606

  5. The Effect of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, R. L.; Almeida, G. L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of the vestibular system in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group--CG) and eight control group…

  6. Galvanic Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  7. Ambulatory assessment of skin conductivity during first thesis presentation: lower self-confidence predicts prolonged stress response.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone

    2011-06-01

    In this field study self-confidence was tested to predict the course of galvanic electrodermal stress response prior, during and after public speaking. Ten graduate students initially rated their self-confidence and afterwards presented their thesis proposals orally in a 10-min presentation to their supervisor and peers. Galvanic skin response level was measured throughout and analysed for 10 min prior to, during, and 10 min after the presentation. Two major galvanic electrodermal stress response types were observed. Five students showed a 'healthy response', i.e. an anticipatory increase in electrodermal conductance, followed by a decrease after termination of the presentation. The other five students showed a steady increase of skin conductance during and after their presentation ('prolonged response'). In line with the allostatic load model the 'prolonged response' group reported significantly lower self-confidence before presentation than the 'healthy response' group (p < 0.01). Self-confidence is a resource in novices facing an unfamiliar stressor. PMID:21533677

  8. A Developmental Study of Efficiency in Differential Galvanic Skin Response Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishner, Julius; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that there should be an early age range during which inhibiting and facilitating sets do not result in appropriately differential behavior, and that at a subsequent age, there should occur differentiation of GSR conditioning rate as a function of the differential sets. (Author/SDH)

  9. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  10. Differential diagnosis of vertigo--combined galvanic test and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sekitani, T

    1988-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of the disease entities of vertigo are important in clinical investigations. Many concepts and procedures have been proposed for available diagnostic tests. Recent basic and clinical studies proved the efficacy and reliability of galvanic tests, including galvanic nystagmus test (GNT) and galvanic body sway test (GBST), emphasizing that the effects of galvanization are: 1) on the action potential in vestibular nerve and 2) on the resting discharge of the vestibular nerve. These suggest further that galvanic nystagmus reaction (GNT) is mainly a manifested reaction of the semicircular canal system, while galvanic body sway such as spinal reflexes (includ. GBST) are mainly a reaction of the otolithic system. The purpose of this paper is to review briefly the previous results of GBST in our laboratory; and to introduce a newly devised combined galvanic test, simultaneous recording of both GBST and GNT; and also introduce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain including the cerebrum, cerebellum with brainstem relating the central vestibular system, both of which help us to make a more defined diagnosis of the central origin vertigo. On CGT of a normal subject, galvanic eye movements are constantly induced showing the initial eye deviation and the following main deviation during galvanization, on both eyes, which are almost similar and occur synchronously. Galvanic body sway is also induced well with individual components, as described in the previous papers. CGT of the cases with vertigo revealed abnormal response patterns in each disease. PMID:3245417

  11. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants. PMID:15025702

  12. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and to finally reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM) on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e., decision processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs) while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e., whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa. PMID:26300747

  13. Superficial Immunity: Antimicrobial Responses Are More Than Skin Deep.

    PubMed

    Mack, Madison R; Kim, Brian S

    2016-07-19

    The skin barrier is essential for host defense, but how the skin provides protection when the barrier is breached is not well understood. In this issue of Immunity, Gallo and colleagues report that keratinocytes integrate signals from antimicrobial peptides via MAVS signaling to amplify their antiviral immune response. PMID:27438760

  14. What Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Actually Activates

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish Gavin

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper in Frontiers Cohen et al. (2012) asked “What does galvanic vestibular stimulation actually activate?” and concluded that galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) causes predominantly otolithic behavioral responses. In this Perspective paper we show that such a conclusion does not follow from the evidence. The evidence from neurophysiology is very clear: galvanic stimulation activates primary otolithic neurons as well as primary semicircular canal neurons (Kim and Curthoys, 2004). Irregular neurons are activated at lower currents. The answer to what behavior is activated depends on what is measured and how it is measured, including not just technical details, such as the frame rate of video, but the exact experimental context in which the measurement took place (visual fixation vs total darkness). Both canal and otolith dependent responses are activated by GVS. PMID:22833733

  15. Response of human skin to esthetic scarification.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Vincent A; McClellan, Elizabeth A; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate changes in RNA expression in previously healthy adult human skin following thermal injury induced by contact with hot metal that was undertaken as part of esthetic scarification, a body modification practice. Subjects were recruited to have pre-injury skin and serial wound biopsies performed. 4 mm punch biopsies were taken prior to branding and 1 h, 1 week, and 1, 2 and 3 months after injury. RNA was extracted and quality assured prior to the use of a whole-genome based bead array platform to describe expression changes in the samples using the pre-injury skin as a comparator. Analysis of the array data was performed using k-means clustering and a hypergeometric probability distribution without replacement and corrections for multiple comparisons were done. Confirmatory q-PCR was performed. Using a k of 10, several clusters of genes were shown to co-cluster together based on Gene Ontology classification with probabilities unlikely to occur by chance alone. OF particular interest were clusters relating to cell cycle, proteinaceous extracellular matrix and keratinization. Given the consistent expression changes at 1 week following injury in the cell cycle cluster, there is an opportunity to intervene early following burn injury to influence scar development. PMID:24582755

  16. Dezincing galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Braun, C.

    1998-07-01

    A caustic leach dezincing process is being developed for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations in East Chicago, Indiana and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tonnes/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  17. Reproducibility of the vascular response to heating in human skin.

    PubMed

    Savage, M V; Brengelmann, G L

    1994-04-01

    Blood flow in human skin increases enormously in response to direct heating. If local skin temperature is held above 42 degrees C, blood flow eventually stabilizes at a level beyond which other influences, barring change in blood pressure, can produce no further increase. If this maximal level is a reproducible characteristic of an individual's cutaneous vasculature, it could be useful in comparing individuals; for example, in their response to hyperthermia. Our experiments were carried out to discover whether the maximal response of the vasculature of the skin of the forearm can be reproduced within reasonable limits and, also, to clarify the time course of the response. We used water sprayed over the surface of the forearms of 10 subjects to hold skin temperature above 42 degrees C for 60 min. During the last 10 min of heating, forearm blood flow (via venous occlusion plethysmography) was stable, at a level ranging from 16 to 38 ml.min-1.100 ml-1. This level, normalized to a blood pressure of 100 mmHg, was reproduced in a given individual on four or five occasions, with an average coefficient of variation of 10%. The response was 77 +/- 11% (SD) complete after 20 min of heating. Elapsed time at 90% of the final value was 35 +/- 9 (SD) min. We conclude that the maximal forearm blood flow response to local heating is a reproducible characteristic of the cutaneous vasculature with potential utility in the scaling of responses between and within individuals. PMID:8045857

  18. Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

  19. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, William A.; Dudek, Frederick J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1998-01-01

    A process for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75.degree. C. and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (i) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (ii) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (iii) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (iv) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte.

  20. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, W.A.; Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1998-07-14

    A process is described for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75 C and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (1) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (2) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (3) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (4) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte. 1 fig.

  1. Proliferative responses of the skin to external stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, F; Fürstenberger, G

    1993-01-01

    The skin, in particular the epidermis, offers unique opportunities to investigate the induction and control of cellular proliferation and tissue homeostasis both under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Moreover, it represents one of the most feasible model systems for experimental cancer research. As the primary border of the body, the skin has important protective and defensive functions. A general response to external injury consists of a thickening of the epithelial layer (epidermal hyperplasia) combined with an inflammatory reaction. This hyperplastic transformation of the skin is a critical condition of skin tumor development (i.e., conversion and promotion) and of the wound response. It is believed to be due to a transformation of keratinocytes into an activated state characterized by an increased rate of proliferation and the ability to release a series of growth factors and other cytokines that coordinate the defense reaction (e.g., hyperproliferation, recruitment of leukocytes, activation of the immune system) along auto- and paracrine feedback loops. The initial and probably later phases of this response depend critically on a local release of eicosanoids such as prostaglandins and lipoxygenase-generated factors. A unique reaction seen upon phorbol ester treatment of mouse skin is a strong induction of the enzyme 8-lipoxygenase, which might be involved in skin tumor development by catalyzing the generation of clastogenic metabolites thought to play a role in the conversion stage. Hyperplasia may be considered to be the result of an imbalance between the rates of cell gain and cell loss.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8013432

  2. Progress in caustic dezincing of galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.

    1997-08-01

    In response to the worldwide increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last fifteen years, and the cost of environmental compliance associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, processes are being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. In the process discussed here, zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. Pilot testing has been conducted in Hamilton, Ontario for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant in East Chicago, Indiana, now in its second generation, has dezinced in a continuous process mode about 1,800 tonnes of loose clips and shredded stamping plant scrap; this scrap typically has residual zinc below 0.05% and sodium dragout below 0.001%. This paper reviews caustic dezincing pilot plant performance and economics.

  3. Attenuated skin blood flow response to hyperthermia in paraplegic men.

    PubMed

    Freund, P R; Brengelmann, G L; Rowell, L B; Halar, E

    1984-04-01

    To clarify how skin and internal temperatures interact in control of skin blood flow, five male paraplegic subjects (lesions at the level of thoracic vertebrae 1-11) (29-47 yr old) were heated in water-perfused suits to elevate oral temperature (To) 1-1.5 degrees C. In part I only the insensate skin was heated; sensate skin was kept at 32-34 degrees C. No appreciable elevation of forearm blood flow (FBF) or sweating occurred, even with To at 38 degrees C. In part II the suit was applied to the whole body so that skin temperature was 40 degrees C, except for one arm that remained at 32-34 degrees C for FBF measurement. Sweating was noted above the lesion in all but one subject. FBF increased in all subjects but was far below levels previously reported for hyperthermic normal men; also, thresholds appeared elevated. To the extent that effector connections are intact, attenuated FBF response implies that either 1) some vasoconstrictor bias associated with cardiovascular regulation is active or 2) thermoregulatory effector outflow is diminished. If the latter is true, it follows that the effector outflow reduction relates to diminished afferent input. But the component of the effector outflow contributed by peripheral thermoreception is small; thus these findings may indicate that what is lacking in the afferent input is central thermoreception from below the lesion, possibly from the spinal cord itself. PMID:6725058

  4. Inspiration-induced vascular responses in finger dorsum skin.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Groseclose, Edye E

    2002-03-01

    A rapid and deep inspiration triggers a sympathetically mediated transient vasoconstriction of skin arterioles (inspiratory gasp vascular response, IGVR). Because the IGVR has been most often measured and studied in skin that is rich in arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), such as the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx or plantar aspect of the toes, there is little information on its features in skin areas not dominated by thermoregulatory AVAs. Thus, the dependence of the magnitude of the IGVR on AVAs is unclear. We reasoned that if responses in a region of low AVA density, such as the finger dorsum distal phalanx, were comparable to those in AVA-rich skin, this would clarify the issue. Further, it might then be possible to use such areas to provide a useful complementary target for future study of sympathetically induced vasoconstriction. To test this, we determined the features of the finger dorsum IGVR in 28 healthy volunteers (age 19-57 years, 14 males) in whom distal phalanx skin blood perfusion (SBF) was monitored by laser-Doppler during 21 sequential IGVRs, each separated by 2 min. IGVR was quantified as the minimum SBF during each IGVR, expressed as a percentage of each immediately preceding 2-min SBF average. Results (mean +/- SD) revealed an overall IGVR of 72.2 +/- 16.7%, which is very near that reported from studies on the AVA-rich palmar finger pad. We therefore conclude that the IGVR does not depend on the presence of AVAs and that the dorsal distal phalanx is a viable alternative for the study of sympathetically related neurovascular responses. PMID:11866546

  5. Patterns of Coping, Patterns of Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzen, Michael D.; Heffernan, William

    Both behavioral and cognitive coping strategies are determined by an individual's perception of the stressful stimuli. To investigate the relationship of an individual's usual coping style to differential responses to a behavioral or cognitive stressor in four response systems (heart rate, muscle tension, galvanic skin response, and subjective…

  6. Key Role of CRF in the Skin Stress Response System

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Michal A.; Zbytek, Blazej; Tobin, Desmond J.; Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Rivier, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or CRH defining the upper regulatory arm of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, along with the identification of the corresponding receptors (CRFRs 1 and 2), represents a milestone in our understanding of central mechanisms regulating body and local homeostasis. We focused on the CRF-led signaling systems in the skin and offer a model for regulation of peripheral homeostasis based on the interaction of CRF and the structurally related urocortins with corresponding receptors and the resulting direct or indirect phenotypic effects that include regulation of epidermal barrier function, skin immune, pigmentary, adnexal, and dermal functions necessary to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. The regulatory modes of action include the classical CRF-led cutaneous equivalent of the central HPA axis, the expression and function of CRF and related peptides, and the stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin peptides or cytokines. The key regulatory role is assigned to the CRFR-1α receptor, with other isoforms having modulatory effects. CRF can be released from sensory nerves and immune cells in response to emotional and environmental stressors. The expression sequence of peptides includes urocortin/CRF→pro-opiomelanocortin→ACTH, MSH, and β-endorphin. Expression of these peptides and of CRFR-1α is environmentally regulated, and their dysfunction can lead to skin and systemic diseases. Environmentally stressed skin can activate both the central and local HPA axis through either sensory nerves or humoral factors to turn on homeostatic responses counteracting cutaneous and systemic environmental damage. CRF and CRFR-1 may constitute novel targets through the use of specific agonists or antagonists, especially for therapy of skin diseases that worsen with stress, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:23939821

  7. Key role of CRF in the skin stress response system.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Zbytek, Blazej; Tobin, Desmond J; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Rivier, Jean

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or CRH defining the upper regulatory arm of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, along with the identification of the corresponding receptors (CRFRs 1 and 2), represents a milestone in our understanding of central mechanisms regulating body and local homeostasis. We focused on the CRF-led signaling systems in the skin and offer a model for regulation of peripheral homeostasis based on the interaction of CRF and the structurally related urocortins with corresponding receptors and the resulting direct or indirect phenotypic effects that include regulation of epidermal barrier function, skin immune, pigmentary, adnexal, and dermal functions necessary to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. The regulatory modes of action include the classical CRF-led cutaneous equivalent of the central HPA axis, the expression and function of CRF and related peptides, and the stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin peptides or cytokines. The key regulatory role is assigned to the CRFR-1α receptor, with other isoforms having modulatory effects. CRF can be released from sensory nerves and immune cells in response to emotional and environmental stressors. The expression sequence of peptides includes urocortin/CRF→pro-opiomelanocortin→ACTH, MSH, and β-endorphin. Expression of these peptides and of CRFR-1α is environmentally regulated, and their dysfunction can lead to skin and systemic diseases. Environmentally stressed skin can activate both the central and local HPA axis through either sensory nerves or humoral factors to turn on homeostatic responses counteracting cutaneous and systemic environmental damage. CRF and CRFR-1 may constitute novel targets through the use of specific agonists or antagonists, especially for therapy of skin diseases that worsen with stress, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:23939821

  8. Kissing reduces allergic skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-11-01

    The effect of kissing on allergen-induced skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels were studied in 30 normal subjects, 30 patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and 30 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). All of the patients with AR or AD are allergic to house dust mite (HDM) and Japanese cedar pollen (JCP). They are all Japanese and they do not kiss habitually. The subject kissed freely during 30 min with their lover or spouse alone in a room with closed doors while listening to soft music. Before and after kissing, skin prick tests were performed using commercial HDM allergen, JCP allergen, as well as histamine and control solution, and wheal responses were measured. Simultaneously, plasma levels of neurotrophin, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and -4 (NT-4) were measured. Kissing significantly reduced wheal responses induced by HDM and JCP, but not by histamine, and decreased plasma levels of NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 in patients with AR or AD, while it failed to do so in normal subjects. These finding indicate that kissing have some implication in the study of neuroimmunology in allergic patients. PMID:14637240

  9. MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO FILM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASE, HARRY W.; LEVONIAN, EDWARD

    THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SYSTEM WHICH WOULD ALLOW THE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF STUDENTS VIEWING FILM MATERIAL UNDER CONVENTIONAL CLASSROOM CONDITIONS. THE GALVANIC SKIN RESPONSE (GSR) WAS MEASURED BY SENSORS AND USED AS AN INDICATOR OF STUDENT INTERACTION WITH THE FILM MATERIAL. IN…

  10. The Amplitude Phase Decomposition for the Magnetotelluric Impedance Tensor and Galvanic Electric Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Maik; Rudolf, Daniel; Garcia, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of the phase tensor marked a major breakthrough in understanding of, analysing of and dealing with galvanic distortion of the electric field in the Magnetotelluric method. The phase tensor itself can be used for (distortion free) dimensionality analysis, if applicable distortion analysis and even to invert for subsurface models. However, impedance amplitude information is not stored in the phase tensor, therefore the impedance corrected by distortion analysis (or alternative remedies) may yield better results. We formulate an impedance tensor decomposition into the known phase tensor and an amplitude tensor that is shown to be complementary and independent of the phase tensor. The rotational invariant amplitude tensor contains galvanic and inductive amplitudes of which the latter are physically related to the inductive phase information present in the phase tensor. We show, that for the special cases of 1D and 2D subsurfaces, the geometric amplitude tensor parameter (strike and skew) converge to phase tensor parameter and the singular values are the amplitudes of the impedance in TE and TM mode. Further, the physical similarity between inductive phase and amplitude is used to approximate the galvanic amplitude for the general subsurface, which leads to the qualitative interpretation of 3D galvanic distortion: (i) the (purely) galvanic part of the subsurface (as sensed at a given period) may have a changing impact on the impedance (over a period range) and (ii) only the purely galvanic response of the lowest available period should be termed galvanic distortion. The approximation of the galvanic amplitude (and therewith galvanic distortion), though not accurate, offers a new perspective on galvanic distortion, which breaks with the general belief of the need to assume 1D or 2D regional structure for the impedance. The amplitude tensor itself is complementary to the phase tensor containing integrated (galvanic and inductive) subsurface information

  11. Additional support for the existence of skin conductance responses at unconditioned stimulus omission.

    PubMed

    Spoormaker, Victor I; Blechert, Jens; Goya-Maldonado, Roberto; Sämann, Philipp G; Wilhelm, Frank H; Czisch, Michael

    2012-11-15

    The existence of a skin conductance response to an expected but omitted aversive stimulus has recently been challenged. To counter this claim, we provide a review of the literature and a temporal analysis of two independent skin conductance data sets during aversive conditioning and extinction that demonstrates a consistent and reproducible skin conductance response at omission of an anticipated aversive stimulus. The validity of this so-called unconditioned stimulus (US) omission response is relevant for skin conductance modeling in the context of neuroimaging and more generally for conditioning theory. PMID:22922467

  12. GALVANIZED STEEL: NATIONAL DISTRIBUTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a field survey done to observe the extent and application of bare galvanized steel in the United States. or purposes of the analysis, the conterminous 48 states were grouped into four regions. ndustrial and rural areas were considered In the study which exam...

  13. Impaired sympathetic skin response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bir, Levent Sinan; Ozkurt, Sibel; Daloğlu, Güner; Kurt, Tülay

    2005-12-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR) is considered as one of the indexes of autonomic nervous system functions, especially related with the sudomotor function of unmyelinated sympathetic fibers. SSRs are recorded as the potentials with biphasic or multiphasic waveforms by conventional electromyography. SSRs are evaluated by measuring latency (time from the stimulus to the onset), amplitude, and area (the space under the curve of the waveform). Although dysautonomia is a feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as demonstrated by acetylcholine sweat-spot test, there are no data concerning SSR in COPD patients. In this study, we electrophysiologically investigated the sudomotor function of the sympathetic nervous system in patients with COPD. SSRs were recorded in 30 patients with COPD and 21 healthy volunteers. Normal responses were obtained from all subjects in the control group. No response was observed in three patients with COPD. The mean latency, amplitude and area values of the potentials recorded of the remaining 27 patients were compared to the control. The mean latency was longer (p<0.01) and the mean amplitude and area values were lower (p=0.012, p=0.021, respectively) in the patients compared to the control. We also demonstrated significant correlations between the latency, amplitude, or area values of the SSR and two parameters of pulmonary function tests forced expiratory volume one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and FEV1/FVC %. In conclusion, SSR is impaired in patients with COPD, which indicates the dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the degree of impairment in SSR may reflect the severity of airway obstruction in patients with COPD. PMID:16272793

  14. [Galvanization of the area of the spleen as a method of immunocorrection in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A

    1997-01-01

    The effect of galvanization of the splenic area on immune system was studied in 31 patients with chronic bronchitis versus that of immunomodulating drug thymalin (25 patients) or combined rehabilitation without special immunocorrectors (39 patients). Galvanization produced a good response in disorders of cellular and humoral immunities (primarily in low count of T-lymphocytes and T-suppressors), of interactions between immunity components. Immunocorrective effect of galvanization was comparable with that of thymalin. PMID:9424824

  15. Projecting sensations to external objects: evidence from skin conductance response.

    PubMed Central

    Armel, K Carrie; Ramachandran, V S

    2003-01-01

    Subjects perceived touch sensations as arising from a table (or a rubber hand) when both the table (or the rubber hand) and their own real hand were repeatedly tapped and stroked in synchrony with the real hand hidden from view. If the table or rubber hand was then 'injured', subjects displayed a strong skin conductance response (SCR) even though nothing was done to the real hand. Sensations could even be projected to anatomically impossible locations. The illusion was much less vivid, as indicated by subjective reports and SCR, if the real hand was simultaneously visible during stroking, or if the real hand was hidden but touched asynchronously. The fact that the illusion could be significantly diminished when the real hand was simultaneously visible suggests that the illusion and associated SCRs were due to perceptual assimilation of the table (or rubber hand) into one's body image rather than associative conditioning. These experiments demonstrate the malleability of body image and the brain's remarkable capacity for detecting statistical correlations in the sensory input. PMID:12965016

  16. Human skin pigmentation: melanocytes modulate skin color in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Costin, Gertrude-E; Hearing, Vincent J

    2007-04-01

    All organisms, from simple invertebrates to complex human beings, exist in different colors and patterns, which arise from the unique distribution of pigments throughout the body. Pigmentation is highly heritable, being regulated by genetic, environmental, and endocrine factors that modulate the amount, type, and distribution of melanins in the skin, hair, and eyes. In addition to its roles in camouflage, heat regulation, and cosmetic variation, melanin protects against UV radiation and thus is an important defense system in human skin against harmful factors. Being the largest organ of the body that is always under the influence of internal and external factors, the skin often reacts to those agents by modifying the constitutive pigmentation pattern. The focus of this review is to provide an updated overview of important physiological and biological factors that increase pigmentation and the mechanisms by which they do so. We consider endocrine factors that induce temporary (e.g., during pregnancy) or permanent (e.g., during aging) changes in skin color, environmental factors (e.g., UV), certain drugs, and chemical compounds, etc. Understanding the mechanisms by which different factors and compounds induce melanogenesis is of great interest pharmaceutically (as therapy for pigmentary diseases) and cosmeceutically (e.g., to design tanning products with potential to reduce skin cancer risk). PMID:17242160

  17. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  18. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3(+) T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8(+) T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  19. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement. PMID:18584162

  20. Instrumentation (GSR) and Its Effects on Counselor Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michels, Thomas J.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make a pilot investigation testing the feasibility of the use of the galvanic skin response (GSR) as a useful instrument to increase the sensitivity of counselors to their clients. The technique could reduce the amount of direct staff assistance needed in the training program. (Author/BY)

  1. Issues in recycling galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, P.J.; Hellickson, D.A.; Dudek, F.J.

    1995-02-10

    The quality of the steel used for most galvanizing (and tinplate) applications makes scrap derived from their production and use a premier solid charge material for steelmaking. In 1989 the AISI created a Task Force to define the issues and to recommend technologically and economically sound approaches to assure continued, unhindered recyclability of the growing volume of galvanized scrap. The AISI program addressed the treatment of full-sized industrial bales of scrap. The current, on-going MRI (US)--Argonne National Laboratory program is focused on ``loose`` scrap from industrial and post-consumer sources. Results from these programs, issues of scrap management from source to steel melting, the choices for handling zinc in iron and steelmaking and the benefits/costs for removal of zinc (and lead) from scrap prior to melting in BOF and foundry operations are reviewed in this paper.

  2. Basic Taste Stimuli Elicit Unique Responses in Facial Skin Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression changes characteristically with the emotions induced by basic tastes in humans. We tested the hypothesis that the five basic tastes also elicit unique responses in facial skin blood flow. Facial skin blood flow was measured using laser speckle flowgraphy in 16 healthy subjects before and during the application of basic taste stimuli in the oral cavity for 20 s. The skin blood flow in the eyelid increased in response to sweet and umami taste stimuli, while that in the nose decreased in response to a bitter stimulus. There was a significant correlation between the subjective hedonic scores accompanying these taste stimuli and the above changes in skin blood flow. These results demonstrate that sweet, umami, and bitter tastes induce unique changes in facial skin blood flow that reflect subjective hedonic scores. PMID:22145032

  3. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF FILM MOVEMENT AND EMOTIONAL RESPONSE, AND ITS EFFECT ON LEARNING AND ATTITUDE FORMATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, WILLIAM CHARLES, III

    THIS EXPERIMENTAL STUDY EXAMINED THE HYPOTHESES THAT FILM MOTION INCREASES AUDIENCE EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT, INCREASES POSITIVE ATTITUDE RESPONSE TO THE FILM AND DOES NOT AFFECT AUDIENCE INFORMATION RETENTION. OTHER HYPOTHESES WERE THAT THE GALVANIC SKIN RESPONSE (GSR) IS USEFUL FOR EVALUATING FILM AUDIENCE EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT, THAT AUDIENCE…

  4. Effect of skin temperature on cutaneous vasodilator response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Gary J.; Johnson, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The vascular response to local skin cooling is dependent in part on a cold-induced translocation of α2C-receptors and an increased α-adrenoreceptor function. To discover whether β-adrenergic function might contribute, we examined whether β-receptor sensitivity to the β-agonist isoproterenol was affected by local skin temperature. In seven healthy volunteers, skin blood flow was measured from the forearm by laser-Doppler flowmetry and blood pressure was measured by finger photoplethysmography. Data were expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial blood pressure). Pharmacological agents were administered via intradermal microdialysis. We prepared four skin sites: one site was maintained at a thermoneutral temperature of 34°C (32 ± 10%CVCmax) one site was heated to 39°C (38 ± 11%CVCmax); and two sites were cooled, one to 29°C (22 ± 7%CVCmax) and the other 24°C (16 ± 4%CVCmax). After 20 min at these temperatures to allow stabilization of skin blood flow, isoproterenol was perfused in concentrations of 10, 30, 100, and 300 μM. Each concentration was perfused for 15 min. Relative to the CVC responses to isoproterenol at the thermoneutral skin temperature (34°C) (+21 ± 10%max), low skin temperatures reduced (at 29°C) (+17 ± 6%max) or abolished (at 24°C) (+1 ± 5%max) the vasodilator response, and warm (39°C) skin temperatures enhanced the vasodilator response (+40 ± 9%max) to isoproterenol. These data indicate that β-adrenergic function was influenced by local skin temperature. This finding raises the possibility that a part of the vasoconstrictor response to direct skin cooling could include reduced background β-receptor mediated vasodilation. PMID:25701007

  5. Effect of skin wettedness on sweat gland response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of skin wettedness upon sweating rate. Several techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the quantitative nature of this effect. The results include the finding that the evaporative power of the environment has a profound effect on the relationship between body temperature and sweating rate.

  6. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  7. The use of infrared thermography to detect the skin temperature response to physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity has a noticeable effect on skin blood flow and temperature. The thermal regulatory and hemodynamic processes during physical activity are controlled by two conflicting mechanisms: the skin vasoconstriction induced by the blood flow demand to active muscles and the skin vasodilation required by thermoregulation to increase warm blood flow and heat conduction to the skin. The time-evolution of skin temperature during exercise can give useful information about the adaptation of the subject as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise. In this paper, infrared thermography is used to investigate the thermal response of skin temperature during running exercise on treadmill for a group of seven healthy and trained runners. Two different treadmill exercises are considered: a graded load exercise and a constant load exercise; for both exercises the duration was 30 minutes. Within the limits due to the relatively small size of the sample group, results typically indicate a fall in skin temperature during the initial stage of running exercise. As the exercise progresses, the dynamics of the skin temperature response depends on the type of exercise (graded versus constant load) and probably on the level of training of the subject.

  8. Differences in thermal optical response between intact diabetic and nondiabetic human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Jen; Hanna, Charles F.; Kantor, Stan; Hohs, Ronald; Khalil, Omar S.

    2003-07-01

    We observed a difference in the thermal response of localized reflectance signal of human skin between type-2 diabetic and non-diabetic volunteers. We investigated the use of this thermo-optical behavior as a basis for a non-invasive method for the determination of the diabetic status of a subject. We used a two-site temperature differential method, which is predicated upon the measurement of localized reflectance from two areas on the surface of the skin, each of these areas is subjected to a different thermal perturbation. The response of skin localized reflectance to temperature was measured and used in a classification algorithm. We used a discriminant function to classify subjects as diabetics or non-diabetics. In a prediction set of 24 non-invasive tests collected from 6 diabetics and 6 non-diabetics, the sensitivity ranged between 73% and 100%, and the specificity ranged between 75% and 100%, depending on the thermal conditions and probe-skin contact time. The difference in thermo-optical response of the skin of the two groups may be explained in terms of difference in response of cutaneous microcirculation to temperature, which is manifested as a difference in the near infrared light absorption and scattering. Another factor is the difference in the temperature response of the scattering coefficient between the two groups, which may be caused by cutaneous structural differences induced by non-enzymatic glycation of skin protein fibers, and/or by the difference in blood cell aggregation.

  9. Neprilysin is identical to skin fibroblast elastase: its role in skin aging and UV responses.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Naoko; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Haketa, Keiichi; Takema, Yoshinori; Imokawa, Genji

    2010-12-17

    Although human skin fibroblast (HSF) elastase has been characterized as a membrane-bound metalloproteinase, little is known about its structure, amino acid sequence, and encoding gene. As there are similarities in the molecular weights and inhibitory profiles of HSF elastase and neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP)), in this study we tested the hypothesis that they are identical using immunoprecipitation and transfection methods. An immunoprecipitation study demonstrated that HSF elastase activity co-immunoprecipitated with anti-NEP in lysates of cultured HSF. Transfection of an NEP cDNA expression vector into COS-1 cells elicited the expression of HSF elastase and NEP activities in the transfected cells. These findings strongly suggest that HSF elastase is identical to NEP, which functions mainly in neuron-associated cells to degrade neuropeptides. Analysis of the expression pattern of NEP revealed that its expression was remarkably up-regulated at the gene, protein, and enzymatic activity levels during the replicative senescence of cultured HSF. Further, the activity of NEP was markedly enhanced in a pattern similar to elastase activity during the intrinsic aging of mouse skin, in UVA-exposed HSF as well as in HSF treated with conditioned medium from UVB-exposed human keratinocytes. Analysis of the cytokine profile for the stimulation of NEP and HSF elastase activities in HSF demonstrated that among the 11 cytokines tested, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF had the potential to significantly stimulate both activities similarly, again supporting the identity of HSF elastase and NEP. PMID:20876573

  10. Biology of human skin transplanted to the nude mouse: I. Response to agents which modify epidermal proliferation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, G G; Shelby, J

    1981-06-01

    To accept human skin transplanted to the congenitally athymic (nude) mouse as a system to study human skin and its physiologic and pathologic states, it must be demonstrated that skin so maintained retains its function as a biologic unit. We have found that responses of grafted human skin and nude mouse skin to various agents differ. This difference in response has been utilized to assess barrier function and proliferative capacity of human skin grafts. Human skin grafts undergo a proliferative response when 10 ng of the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) is applied. Nudes do not respond to this dose. Increasing the dose to 100 ng of TPA evokes a response in both. However, only in the human skin grafts can this response be blocked with betamethasone valerate (BV). In that human skin grafts do not take on their hosts' responsiveness, and the response of domestic pig skin to these agents before and after grafting is identical, the conclusion is reached that human skin appears to retain its inherent biologic unit function. The data also demonstrate some of the potential of this system to study kinetics of the epidermis of human skin. PMID:7017014

  11. Laboratory annoyance and skin conductance responses to some natural sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, E. A.

    1986-09-01

    The influences of spectral properties of sounds on annoyance and electrodermal activity reactions have been studied. In two laboratory experiments, subjects were exposed to some natural sounds in semi-anechoic conditions. Skin conductance and annoyance reactions were determined. The results suggest that electrodermal activity increases when the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level exceeds 70 dB(A). It is concluded that the width of the spectrum is relevant, and that the greater the fundamental frequency of the harmonic spectrum the more annoying the sound.

  12. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  13. Galvanic etch stop for Si in KOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, E. J.; French, P. J.; Xia, X. H.; Kelly, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    Etch stops and etch-stopping techniques are essential 'tools' for 2D and 3D MEMS devices. Until now, use of a galvanic etch stop (ES) for micromachining in alkaline solutions was usually prohibited due to the large Au:Si area needed and/or high oxygen content required to achieve the ES. We report a new galvanic ES which requires a Au:exposed silicon area ratio of only ~1. Thus for the first time a practical galvanic ES for KOH has been achieved. The ES works by adding small amounts of sodium hypochlorite, NaOCl, to KOH solutions. Essentially the NaOCl increases the oxygen content in the KOH etchant. The dependancy of the galvanic ES on KOH concentration and temperature is investigated. Also, we report on the effects of the added NaOCl on etch rates. SEM images are used to examine the galvanically etch-stopped membranes and their surface morphology. For 33% KOH solutions the galvanic etch stop worked well, producing membranes with uniform thickness ~6 µm (i.e. slightly greater than the deposited epilayer). For 20% KOH solutions, the galvanic etch stop still worked, but the resulting membranes were a little thicker (~10 µm).

  14. Stuttered and Fluent Speakers' Heart Rate and Skin Conductance in Response to Fluent and Stuttered Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Hudock, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have found simultaneous increases in skin conductance response and decreases in heart rate when normally fluent speakers watched and listened to stuttered speech compared with fluent speech, suggesting that stuttering induces arousal and emotional unpleasantness in listeners. However, physiological responses of persons…

  15. Skin Conductance Responses to Another Person's Gaze in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kylliainen, Anneli; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of another person's gaze on physiological arousal were investigated by measuring skin conductance responses (SCR). Twelve able children with autism and 12 control children were shown face stimuli with straight gaze (eye contact) or averted gaze on a computer monitor. In children with autism, the responses to straight gaze were stronger…

  16. A suction blister model reliably assesses skin barrier restoration and immune response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Wilson, Marques A; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J

    2015-02-01

    Skin wound healing models can be used to detect changes in immune function in response to interventions. This study used a test-retest format to assess the reliability of a skin suction blister procedure for quantitatively evaluating human immune function in repeated measures type studies. Up to eight suction blisters (~30 mm(2)) were induced via suction on each participant's left and right forearm (randomized order; blister session 1 and 2), separated by approximately one week. Fluid was sampled from each blister, and the top layer of each blister was removed to reveal up to eight skin wounds. Fluid from each wound was collected 4, 7 and 24h after blisters were induced, and proinflammatory cytokines were measured. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), to assess skin barrier recovery, was measured daily at each wound site until values were within 90% of baseline values (i.e., unbroken skin). Sleep, stress and inflammation (i.e., factors that affect wound healing and immune function), preceding the blister induction, were assessed via activity monitors (Actical, Philips Respironics, Murrysville, Pennsylvania), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and C-reactive protein (CRP), respectively. Area-under-the-curve and TEWL, between blister session 1 and 2, were compared using Pearson correlations and partial correlations (controlling for average nightly sleep, PSS scores and CRP). The suction blister method was considered reliable for assessing immune response and skin barrier recovery if correlation coefficients reached 0.7. Volunteers (n=16; 12 M; 4F) were 23 ± 5 years [mean ± SD]. Time to skin barrier restoration was 4.9 ± 0.8 and 4.8 ± 0.9 days for sessions 1 and 2, respectively. Correlation coefficients for skin barrier restoration, IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1α were 0.9 (P<0.0001), 0.7 (P=0.008) and 0.9 (P<0.0001), respectively. When average nightly sleep, PSS scores and CRP (i.e., percent difference between sessions 1 and 2) were taken into consideration, correlations in

  17. Immune sensitization to methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) resulting from skin exposure: albumin as a carrier protein connecting skin exposure to subsequent respiratory responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), a reactive chemical used for commercial polyurethane production, is a well-recognized cause of occupational asthma. The major focus of disease prevention efforts to date has been respiratory tract exposure; however, skin exposure may also be an important route for inducing immune sensitization, which may promote subsequent airway inflammatory responses. We developed a murine model to investigate pathogenic mechanisms by which MDI skin exposure might promote subsequent immune responses, including respiratory tract inflammation. Methods Mice exposed via the skin to varying doses (0.1-10% w/v) of MDI diluted in acetone/olive oil were subsequently evaluated for MDI immune sensitization. Serum levels of MDI-specific IgG and IgE were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), while respiratory tract inflammation, induced by intranasal delivery of MDI-mouse albumin conjugates, was evaluated based on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Autologous serum IgG from "skin only" exposed mice was used to detect and guide the purification/identification of skin proteins antigenically modified by MDI exposure in vivo. Results Skin exposure to MDI resulted in specific antibody production and promoted subsequent respiratory tract inflammation in animals challenged intranasally with MDI-mouse albumin conjugates. The degree of (secondary) respiratory tract inflammation and eosinophilia depended upon the (primary) skin exposure dose, and was maximal in mice exposed to 1% MDI, but paradoxically limited in mice receiving 10-fold higher doses (e.g. 10% MDI). The major antigenically-modified protein at the local MDI skin exposure site was identified as albumin, and demonstrated biophysical changes consistent with MDI conjugation. Conclusions MDI skin exposure can induce MDI-specific immune sensitivity and promote subsequent respiratory tract inflammatory responses and thus, may play an important role in MDI asthma pathogenesis. MDI

  18. Homeostatic Tissue Responses in Skin Biopsies from NOMID Patients with Constitutive Overproduction of IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Pamela; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; Harden, Jamie Lynn; Pierson, Katherine C.; Dolan, Joseph G.; Novitskaya, Inna; Coats, Israel; Estes, Jacob; Cowen, Edward W.; Plass, Nicole; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sun, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorder, Neonatal-onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID) is the most severe phenotype of disorders caused by mutations in CIAS1 that result in increased production and secretion of active IL-1β. NOMID patients present with systemic and organ-specific inflammation of the skin, central nervous system and bone, and respond dramatically to treatment with IL-1 blocking agents. We compared the cellular infiltrates and transcriptome of skin biopsies from patients with NOMID (n = 14) before treatment (lesional (LS) and non-lesional (pre-NL) skin) and after treatment (post-NL) with the IL-1 blocker anakinra (recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist, Kineret®, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, SOBI), to normal skin (n = 5) to assess tissue responses in the context of untreated and treated disease. Abundant neutrophils distinguish LS skin from pre-NL and post-NL skin. CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells and CD163+ macrophages expressed activated caspase-1 and are a likely source of cutaneous IL-1 production. Treatment with anakinra led to the disappearance of neutrophils, but CD3+ T cells and HLA-DR+ cells remained elevated. Among the upregulated genes IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IL-17A, CCL20, and the neutrophil defensins DEFA1 and DEFA3 were differentially regulated in LS tissues (compared to normal skin). Important significantly downregulated pathways in LS skin included IL-1R/TLR signaling, type I and II cytokine receptor signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, and antigen presentation. The differential expression and regulation of microRNAs and pathways involved in post-transcriptional modification were suggestive of epigenetic modification in the chronically inflamed tissue. Overall, the dysregulated genes and pathways suggest extensive “adaptive” mechanisms to control inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis, likely triggered by chronic IL-1 release in the skin of patients with NOMID. PMID:23226210

  19. Galvanic corrosion reduced in aluminum fabrications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Titanium alloy fasteners dipped at zinc chromate primer are installed while wet in protective coated aluminum panels to reduce galvanic corrosion. Moisture tight seals at fastener points are also provided.

  20. Sympathetic Responses to Noxious Stimulation of Muscle and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Alexander R.; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain triggers adaptive physiological responses that serve as protective mechanisms that prevent continuing damage to tissues and cause the individual to react to remove or escape the painful stimulus. However, an extension of the pain response beyond signaling tissue damage and healing, such as in chronic pain states, serves no particular biological function; it is maladaptive. The increasing number of chronic pain sufferers is concerning, and the associated disease burden is putting healthcare systems around the world under significant pressure. The incapacitating effects of long-lasting pain are not just psychological – reflexes driven by nociceptors during the establishment of chronic pain may cause serious physiological consequences on regulation of other body systems. The sympathetic nervous system is inherently involved in a host of physiological responses evoked by noxious stimulation. Experimental animal and human models demonstrate a diverse array of heterogeneous reactions to nociception. The purpose of this review is to understand how pain affects the sympathetic nervous system by investigating the reflex cardiovascular and neural responses to acute pain and the long-lasting physiological responses to prolonged (tonic) pain. By observing the sympathetic responses to long-lasting pain, we can begin to understand the physiological consequences of long-term pain on cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27445972

  1. Sympathetic Responses to Noxious Stimulation of Muscle and Skin.

    PubMed

    Burton, Alexander R; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain triggers adaptive physiological responses that serve as protective mechanisms that prevent continuing damage to tissues and cause the individual to react to remove or escape the painful stimulus. However, an extension of the pain response beyond signaling tissue damage and healing, such as in chronic pain states, serves no particular biological function; it is maladaptive. The increasing number of chronic pain sufferers is concerning, and the associated disease burden is putting healthcare systems around the world under significant pressure. The incapacitating effects of long-lasting pain are not just psychological - reflexes driven by nociceptors during the establishment of chronic pain may cause serious physiological consequences on regulation of other body systems. The sympathetic nervous system is inherently involved in a host of physiological responses evoked by noxious stimulation. Experimental animal and human models demonstrate a diverse array of heterogeneous reactions to nociception. The purpose of this review is to understand how pain affects the sympathetic nervous system by investigating the reflex cardiovascular and neural responses to acute pain and the long-lasting physiological responses to prolonged (tonic) pain. By observing the sympathetic responses to long-lasting pain, we can begin to understand the physiological consequences of long-term pain on cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27445972

  2. Effects of Niacin Restriction on Sirtuin and PARP Responses to Photodamage in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Claudia A.; Schnell, Stephanie A.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), NAD+-dependent enzymes, link cellular energy status with responses to environmental stresses. Skin is frequently exposed to the DNA damaging effects of UV irradiation, a known etiology in skin cancer. Thus, understanding the defense mechanisms in response to UV, including the role of SIRTs and PARPs, may be important in developing skin cancer prevention strategies. Here, we report expression of the seven SIRT family members in human skin. SIRTs gene expressions are progressively upregulated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells (SIRTs1 and 3), actinic keratoses (SIRTs 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7) and squamous cell carcinoma (SIRTs 1–7). Photodamage induces dynamic changes in SIRT expression with upregulation of both SIRT1 and SIRT4 mRNAs. Specific losses of SIRT proteins occur early after photodamage followed by accumulation later, especially for SIRT4. Niacin restriction, which decreases NAD+, the sirtuin substrate, results in an increase in acetylated proteins, upregulation of SIRTs 2 and 4, increased inherent DNA damage, alterations in SIRT responses to photodamage, abrogation of PARP activation following photodamage, and increased sensitivity to photodamage that is completely reversed by repleting niacin. These data support the hypothesis that SIRTs and PARPs play important roles in resistance to photodamage and identify specific SIRTs that respond to photodamage and may be targets for skin cancer prevention. PMID:22860104

  3. Short-term cadmium exposure induces stress responses in frog (Pelophylax bergeri) skin organ culture.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Francesca; Belia, Silvia; Di Rosa, Ines; Paracucchi, Romina; Rossi, Roberta; La Porta, Gianandrea; Lucentini, Livia; Fagotti, Anna

    2015-12-01

    There have been a few studies on the negative effects of pollutants on amphibian skin, the first structural barrier that interacts with the environment and its potential contaminants. In this study an ex vivo skin organ culture from the amphibian Pelophylax bergeri was used to evaluate cell stress responses induced by short-term exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal known to be an environmental hazard to both humans and wildlife. Histopathological studies were carried out on skin explants using light microscopy and changes in the expression of stress proteins, such as Metallothionein (MT) and Heat shock proteins (HSPs), were investigated by Real-time RT-PCR. Results revealed that amphibian skin reacts to Cd-induced stress by activating biological responses such as morphological alterations and dose- and time-dependent induction of Mt and Hsp70 mRNA expression, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers of exposure to Cd. This work provides a basis for a better understanding of the tissue-specific responses of amphibian skin as a target organ to Cd exposure and its in vitro use for testing potentially harmful substances present in the environment. PMID:26277541

  4. Responses in acral and non-acral skin vasomotion and temperature during lowering of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Elstad, Maja; Vanggaard, Leif; Lossius, Astrid H; Walløe, Lars; Bergersen, Tone Kristin

    2014-10-01

    Arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) in acral skin (palms and soles) have a huge capacity to shunt blood directly from the arteries to the superficial venous plexus of the extremities. We hypothesized that acral skin, which supplies blood to the superficial venous plexus, has a stronger influence on blood flow adjustments during cooling in thermoneutral subjects than does non-acral skin. Thirteen healthy subjects were exposed to stepwise cooling from 32 °C to 25 °C and 17 °C in a climate chamber. Laser Doppler flux and skin temperature were measured simultaneously from the left and right third finger pulp and bilateral upper arm skin. Coherence and correlation analyses were performed of short-term fluctuations at each temperature interval. The flux from finger pulps showed the synchronous spontaneous fluctuations characteristic of skin areas containing AVAs. Fluctuation frequency, amplitude and synchronicity were all higher at 25 °C than at 32 °C and 17 °C (p<0.02). Bilateral flux from the upper arm skin showed an irregular, asynchronous vasomotor pattern with small amplitudes which were independent of ambient temperature. At 32 °C, ipsilateral median flux values from the right arm (95% confidence intervals) were 492 arbitrary units (au) (417, 537) in finger pulp and 43 au (35, 60) in upper arm skin. Flux values gradually decreased in finger pulp to 246 au (109, 363) at 25 °C, before an abrupt fall occurred at a median room temperature of 24 °C, resulting in a flux value of 79 au (31, 116) at 17 °C. In the upper arm skin a gradual fall throughout the cooling period to 21 au (13, 27) at 17 °C was observed. The fact that the response of blood flow to ambient cooling is stronger in acral skin than in non-acral skin suggests that AVAs have a greater capacity to adjust blood flow in thermoneutral zone than arterioles in non-acral skin. PMID:25436967

  5. The Skin That We Sing: Culturally Responsive Choral Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ways that music education can be made more culturally responsive, or congruent with the orientations of culturally diverse students. Music education in the United States has historically been based on Eurocentric frameworks that may no longer be applicable in an increasingly multicultural society. For the many teachers…

  6. Frequency-response-based analysis of respiratory sensor measuring capacitance built across skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Makie; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    A capacitive respiratory sensor is studied by attaching the electrodes to the skin. The signal characteristics related to the electrode position and body motion are examined. The frequency response indicates the nearly pure capacitance characteristics. The sensing mechanism model based on the equivalent skin thickness change generated by the body volume change accompanying respiration is reasonably consistent with the experimental results. The sensing method is examined by measuring the frequency response under some different conditions including the grounding issue. The electrode attached to the concave site tends to show a smaller signal difference between inhalation and exhalation. The convex site stabilizes the measurement. The bellyband combined with the electrode realizes stable sensing with comfortable fit on the skin.

  7. Loss of serum response factor in keratinocytes results in hyperproliferative skin disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, Heidi; von Tobel, Lukas; Schäfer, Matthias; Alberti, Siegfried; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mauch, Cornelia; Hohl, Daniel; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Bloch, Wilhelm; Nordheim, Alfred; Werner, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) plays a crucial role in the development of several organs. However, its role in the skin has not been explored. Here, we show that keratinocytes in normal human and mouse skin expressed high levels of SRF but that SRF expression was strongly downregulated in the hyperproliferative epidermis of wounded and psoriatic skin. Keratinocyte-specific deletion within the mouse SRF locus during embryonic development caused edema and skin blistering, and all animals died in utero. Postnatal loss of mouse SRF in keratinocytes resulted in the development of psoriasis-like skin lesions. These lesions were characterized by inflammation, hyperproliferation, and abnormal differentiation of keratinocytes as well as by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Ultrastructural analysis revealed markedly reduced cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts and loss of cell compaction in all epidermal layers. siRNA-mediated knockdown of SRF in primary human keratinocytes revealed that the cytoskeletal abnormalities and adhesion defects were a direct consequence of the loss of SRF. In contrast, the hyperproliferation observed in vivo was an indirect effect that was most likely a consequence of the inflammation. These results reveal that loss of SRF disrupts epidermal homeostasis and strongly suggest its involvement in the pathogenesis of hyperproliferative skin diseases, including psoriasis. PMID:19307725

  8. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  9. Stress and immune responses in skin of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) under different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui; Liu, Bao-Liang; Feng, Wen-Rong; Han, Cen; Huang, Bin; Lei, Ji-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Fish skin and its mucus provide the first line of defense against chemical, physical and biological stressors, but little is known about the role of skin and its mucus in immune response to crowding stress. In the present study, we investigated the stress and immune responses in skin of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) under different stocking densities. Turbot (average weight 185.4 g) were reared for 120 days under three densities: low density (LD), medium density (MD), and high density (HD). After 120 days, fish were weighed and sampled to obtain blood, mucus and skin tissues which were used for analyses of biochemical parameters and genes expression. The results showed HD treatment significantly suppressed growth and enhanced plasma cortisol and glucose levels (P < 0.05). In mucus, the activities of lysozyme (LZM), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and esterase in HD treatment were lower than LD and MD treatments (P < 0.05) In skin, HD treatment resulted in up-regulation in malondialdehyde (MDA) formation and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) mRNA level, and down-regulation in activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the transcriptions of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor -α (TNF-α), insulin-like growth factor- (IGF-) and LZM (P < 0.05). Overall, the data suggested that overly high stocking density was a stressor which caused an immunosuppression in skin of turbot. Moreover, this information would help to understand the skin immunity and their relation with stress and disease in fish. PMID:27235366

  10. Transplantation of Tail Skin to Study Allogeneic CD4 T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of T cell responses and their consequences during allo-antigen recognition requires a model that enables one to distinguish between donor and host T cells, to easily monitor the graft, and to adapt the system in order to answer different immunological questions. Medawar and colleagues established allogeneic tail-skin transplantation in mice in 1955. Since then, the skin transplantation model has been continuously modified and adapted to answer specific questions. The use of tail-skin renders this model easy to score for graft rejection, requires neither extensive preparation nor deep anesthesia, is applicable to animals of all genetic background, discourages ischemic necrosis, and permits chemical and biological intervention. In general, both CD4+ and CD8+ allogeneic T cells are responsible for the rejection of allografts since they recognize mismatched major histocompatibility antigens from different mouse strains. Several models have been described for activating allogeneic T cells in skin-transplanted mice. The identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in different mouse strains including C57BL/6 mice was an important step toward understanding and studying T cell-mediated alloresponses. In the tail-skin transplantation model described here, a three-point mutation (I-Abm12) in the antigen-presenting groove of the MHC-class II (I-Ab) molecule is sufficient to induce strong allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation in C57BL/6 mice. Skin grafts from I-Abm12 mice on C57BL/6 mice are rejected within 12-15 days, while syngeneic grafts are accepted for up to 100 days. The absence of T cells (CD3-/- and Rag2-/- mice) allows skin graft acceptance up to 100 days, which can be overcome by transferring 2 x 104 wild type or transgenic T cells. Adoptively transferred T cells proliferate and produce IFN-γ in I-Abm12-transplanted Rag2-/- mice. PMID:25147005

  11. Thermal Response of In Vivo Human Skin to Fractional Radiofrequency Microneedle Device

    PubMed Central

    Manuskiatti, Woraphong; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Inthasotti, Siriluk; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Hanamornroongruang, Suchanan; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Chu-ongsakol, Sorawuth

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS) is a novel fractional skin resurfacing system. Data on thermal response to this fractional resurfacing technique is limited. Objectives. To investigate histologic response of in vivo human skin to varying energy settings and pulse stacking of a FRMS in dark-skinned subjects. Methods. Two female volunteers who were scheduled for abdominoplasty received treatment with a FRMS with varying energy settings at 6 time periods including 3 months, 1 month, 1 week, 3 days, 1 day, and the time immediately before abdominoplasty. Biopsy specimens were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Verhoeff-Van Gieson (VVG), colloidal iron, and Fontana-Masson stain. Immunohistochemical study was performed by using Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) antibody and collagen III monoclonal antibody. Results. The average depth of radiofrequency thermal zone (RFTZ) ranged from 100 to 300 μm, correlating with energy levels. Columns of cell necrosis and collagen denaturation followed by inflammatory response were initially demonstrated, with subsequent increasing of mucin at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Immunohistochemical study showed positive stain with HSP70. Conclusion. A single treatment with a FRMS using appropriate energy setting induces neocollagenesis. This wound healing response may serve as a mean to improve the appearance of photodamaged skin and atrophic scars. PMID:27247943

  12. Metal fume fever among galvanized welders.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2014-07-01

    The metal fume fever (MFF) is an inhalation fever syndrome in welders of galvanized steel, who join and cut metal parts using flame or electric arc and other sources of heat. Inhalation of certain freshly formed metal oxides produced from welding process can cause MFF as an acute self-limiting flulike illness. The most common cause of MFF is the inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO). The inhalation of ZnO particles can provoke a number of clinical responses of which accompanied by changes in composition of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, including early increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory marker, and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lungs. The MFF is characterized by fever, cough, sputing, wheezing, chest tightness, fatique, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis with a left shift, thirst, metallic taste, and salivations. The diagnosis of MFF diagnosis is based on clinical finding and occupational history. The symptoms resolved spontaneously. The treatment of MFF is entirely symptomatic, no specific treatment is indicated for MFF. The mainstay of management of MFF is prevention of sub-sequent exposure to harmful metals. Including public and physician awareness of MFF may help to reduce the occurrence of the disease. PMID:25348190

  13. Activation of Molecular Signatures for Antimicrobial and Innate Defense Responses in Skin with Transglutaminase 1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ryosuke; Jitsukawa, Orie; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) that are associated with defects in skin barrier structure and function. However, the molecular processes induced by the transglutaminase 1 deficiency are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to uncover those processes by analysis of cutaneous molecular signatures. Gene expression profiles of wild-type and Tgm1–/–epidermis were assessed using microarrays. Gene ontology analysis of the data showed that genes for innate defense responses were up-regulated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Based on that result, the induction of Il1b and antimicrobial peptide genes, S100a8, S100a9, Defb14, Camp, Slpi, Lcn2, Ccl20 and Wfdc12, was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A protein array revealed that levels of IL-1β, G-CSF, GM-CSF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9 and CCL2 were increased in Tgm1–/–skin. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand genes, Hbegf, Areg and Ereg, were activated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of an epidermal extract from Tgm1–/–mice was significantly increased against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the epidermis of ichthyosiform skins from patients with TGM1 mutations, S100A8/9 was strongly positive. The expression of those antimicrobial and defense response genes was also increased in the lesional skin of an ARCI patient with TGM1 mutations. These results suggest that the up-regulation of molecular signatures for antimicrobial and innate defense responses is characteristic of skin with a transglutaminase 1 deficiency, and this autonomous process might be induced to reinforce the defective barrier function of the skin. PMID:27442430

  14. Skin lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... and contains fluid or semisolid material Benign skin growths such as seborrheic keratoses or neurofibromas Boils , painful, red bumps usually involving an infected hair follicle Corn or callus, caused by skin thickening in response ...

  15. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation. PMID:26529641

  16. The innate and adaptive response to mosquito saliva and Plasmodium sporozoites in the skin.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Christine S; Sinnis, Photini

    2015-04-01

    A malaria infection begins when an infected mosquito takes a blood meal and inoculates parasites into the skin of its mammalian host. The parasite then has to exit the skin and escape the immune cells that protect the body from infection and alert the system to intruding pathogens. It has become apparent that this earliest stage of infection is amenable to vaccine interventions. Here, we discuss how the innate and adaptive host response to both mosquito saliva and the parasite may interfere with the infection, as well as possible mechanisms the parasite might use to circumvent the host defense. PMID:25694058

  17. Mechanical response of porcine skin under compression from low to high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara; Butler, Ben; Williams, Alun; Brown, Katherine; Proud, William

    2013-06-01

    Uniaxial compression experiments were performed on fresh porcine skin samples at different strain rates to study the stress-strain response. Low strain rate experiments were performed with an Instron 5566, while high strain rates were achieved using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar system. Magnesium bars and semiconductor strain gauges were used respectively to maximize the signal transmission from porcine skin to the output bar and to allow the signal measurement. Skin samples were harvested from different area of the animal to investigate the heterogeneity of such material. The experimental results showed that the mechanical response of skin in compression is strongly dependent on the strain rate of loading and on the location from which the samples were collected. Specimens collected from the rump showed a stiffer response compared to samples harvested from the thigh. Finally, a histological analysis of the samples post compression was carried out to examine the extent of tissue damage as a function of strain rate. This work is supported by the Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK and The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London, UK.

  18. Enhanced immune responses by skin vaccination with influenza subunit vaccine in young hosts.

    PubMed

    Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Esser, E Stein; McMaster, Sean R; Kalluri, Priya; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Prausnitz, Mark R; Skountzou, Ioanna; Denning, Timothy L; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Compans, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    Skin has gained substantial attention as a vaccine target organ due to its immunological properties, which include a high density of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination route not only in animal models but also in adults. Young children represent a population group that is at high risk from influenza infection. As a result, this group could benefit significantly from influenza vaccine delivery approaches through the skin and the improved immune response it can induce. In this study, we compared the immune responses in young BALB/c mice upon skin delivery of influenza vaccine with vaccination by the conventional intramuscular route. Young mice that received 5 μg of H1N1 A/Ca/07/09 influenza subunit vaccine using MN demonstrated an improved serum antibody response (IgG1 and IgG2a) when compared to the young IM group, accompanied by higher numbers of influenza-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in the bone marrow. In addition, we observed increased activation of follicular helper T cells and formation of germinal centers in the regional lymph nodes in the MN immunized group, rapid clearance of the virus from their lungs as well as complete survival, compared with partial protection observed in the IM-vaccinated group. Our results support the hypothesis that influenza vaccine delivery through the skin would be beneficial for protecting the high-risk young population from influenza infection. PMID:25744228

  19. High-power femtosecond-terahertz pulse induces a wound response in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jaehun; Jo, Sung Jin; Jung, Seonghoon; Kwon, Oh Sang; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Gun-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has emerged for biomedical applications such as scanning, molecular spectroscopy, and medical imaging. Although a thorough assessment to predict potential concerns has to precede before practical utilization of THz source, the biological effect of THz radiation is not yet fully understood with scant related investigations. Here, we applied a femtosecond-terahertz (fs-THz) pulse to mouse skin to evaluate non-thermal effects of THz radiation. Analysis of the genome-wide expression profile in fs-THz-irradiated skin indicated that wound responses were predominantly mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. We validated NFκB1- and Smad3/4-mediated transcriptional activation in fs-THz-irradiated skin by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Repeated fs-THz radiation delayed the closure of mouse skin punch wounds due to up-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that fs-THz radiation initiate a wound-like signal in skin with increased expression of TGF-β and activation of its downstream target genes, which perturbs the wound healing process in vivo. PMID:23907528

  20. The electromagnetic response of human skin in the millimetre and submillimetre wave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Davidovich, Issak; Sakran, Fadi; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography revealed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. This, together with the fact that the dielectric permittivity of the dermis is higher than that of the epidermis, brings forward the supposition that as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts could be regarded as low Q helical antennas. The implications of this statement were further investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment of the in vivo reflectivity of the skin of subjects under varying physiological conditions (Feldman et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 128102). The simulation and experimental results are in a good agreement and both demonstrate that sweat ducts in the skin could indeed behave as low Q antennas. Thus, the skin spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system and shows the minimum of reflectivity at some frequencies in the frequency band of 75-110 GHz. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. As such, it has the potential to become the underlying principle for remote sensing of the physiological parameters and the mental state of the examined subject.

  1. The electromagnetic response of human skin in the millimetre and submillimetre wave range.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Davidovich, Issak; Sakran, Fadi; Agranat, Aharon J

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography revealed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. This, together with the fact that the dielectric permittivity of the dermis is higher than that of the epidermis, brings forward the supposition that as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts could be regarded as low Q helical antennas. The implications of this statement were further investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment of the in vivo reflectivity of the skin of subjects under varying physiological conditions (Feldman et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 128102). The simulation and experimental results are in a good agreement and both demonstrate that sweat ducts in the skin could indeed behave as low Q antennas. Thus, the skin spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system and shows the minimum of reflectivity at some frequencies in the frequency band of 75-110 GHz. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. As such, it has the potential to become the underlying principle for remote sensing of the physiological parameters and the mental state of the examined subject. PMID:19430110

  2. High-power femtosecond-terahertz pulse induces a wound response in mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jaehun; Jo, Sung Jin; Jung, Seonghoon; Kwon, Oh Sang; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Gun-Sik

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has emerged for biomedical applications such as scanning, molecular spectroscopy, and medical imaging. Although a thorough assessment to predict potential concerns has to precede before practical utilization of THz source, the biological effect of THz radiation is not yet fully understood with scant related investigations. Here, we applied a femtosecond-terahertz (fs-THz) pulse to mouse skin to evaluate non-thermal effects of THz radiation. Analysis of the genome-wide expression profile in fs-THz-irradiated skin indicated that wound responses were predominantly mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. We validated NFκB1- and Smad3/4-mediated transcriptional activation in fs-THz-irradiated skin by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Repeated fs-THz radiation delayed the closure of mouse skin punch wounds due to up-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that fs-THz radiation initiate a wound-like signal in skin with increased expression of TGF-β and activation of its downstream target genes, which perturbs the wound healing process in vivo.

  3. Role of β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase receptor in UVB mediated responses in skin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Neehar; Demmer, Tara A.; Sharma, Alok K.; Elcheva, Irina; Spiegelman, Vladimir S.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancers are the most common cancers in the United States. Exposure to UVB radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase has been found to be involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and transformation. Aberrant up-regulation of beta-transducin repeats-containing proteins (β-TrCP) is often found in cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We have previously demonstrated that β-TrCP2 is over-expressed in chemically induced mouse skin tumors [1]. Various cellular stress stimuli, including UVB, induce an increase in β-TrCP1 mRNA and protein levels in human cells [2]. We have previously shown that inhibition of β-TrCP function, by induction of dominant negative β-TrCP2 (β-TrCP2ΔF), in vitro in hTERT immortalized normal keratinocytes, results in increase in UVB induced apoptosis [3]. We have generated transgenic mice with inducible, selective expression of dominant negative β-TrCP2 in epidermis with the Keratin 5 promoter (K5-rTA × TRE-HA-β-TrCPΔF). Here we report that inhibition of β-TrCP function in mouse epidermis results in decrease in UVB-induced edema, hyperplasia, and inflammatory response and increment in UVB-induced apoptosis in skin. Our results suggest that β-TrCP may be an essential player in UVB induced responses in skin and can be a potential therapeutic target for skin cancer. PMID:21187057

  4. [Impulse galvanization in postoperative urination disorders].

    PubMed

    Kölbl, H; Riss, P

    1988-03-01

    In this study we examined the therapeutic effect of impulse-galvanization in patients with voiding difficulties after anterior vaginal repair. Patients (n = 56/79) revealing residual urine until the sixth postoperative day were studied. Considering the onset of the first spontaneous micturition and the lack of residual urine no significant difference was found in the group undergoing impulse-galvanization (n = 19) compared to a group without therapy (n = 37). By adjuvant treatment with alpha-sympathicolytics, spasmolytics or tranquilizers patients with impulse-galvanization and the comparative group were found to be without residual urine 11.2 and 13 days after surgery, respectively (p less than 0.001). PMID:3259522

  5. Simulation to coating weight control for galvanizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Yan, Zhang; Wu, Kunkui; Song, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Zinc coating weight control is one of the most critical issues for continuous galvanizing line. The process has the characteristic of variable-time large time delay, nonlinear, multivariable. It can result in seriously coating weight error and non-uniform coating. We develop a control system, which can automatically control the air knives pressure and its position to give a constant and uniform zinc coating, in accordance with customer-order specification through an auto-adaptive empirical model-based feed forward adaptive controller, and two model-free adaptive feedback controllers . The proposed models with controller were applied to continuous galvanizing line (CGL) at Angang Steel Works. By the production results, the precise and stability of the control model reduces over-coating weight and improves coating uniform. The product for this hot dip galvanizing line does not only satisfy the customers' quality requirement but also save the zinc consumption.

  6. Functional Specialization of Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets in Regulating T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Björn E.; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen-presenting cells classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance toward harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions toward contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens, and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease. PMID:26557117

  7. Molecular characterization of human skin response to diphencyprone at peak and resolution phases: therapeutic insights.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Cueto, Inna; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Krueger, James G

    2014-10-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that induces delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. It is used as an immune-modulating therapeutic, but its molecular effects in human skin are largely unknown. We studied cellular and molecular characteristics of a recall response to 0.04% DPCP at 3-day (peak) and 14-day (resolution) time points using immune markers, reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and gene array approaches. A peak response showed modulation of ∼7,500 mRNA transcripts, with high expression of cytokines that define all major effector T-cell subsets. Concomitant increases in T-cell and CD11c+ dendritic cell (DC) infiltrates were measured. The resolution reaction was characterized by unexpectedly high levels of T cells and mature (DC-lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein positive (DC-LAMP+)) DCs, but with marked decreases in expression of IL-2, IFNγ, and other T cell-derived cytokines. However, negative immune regulators such as IDO1 that were high in peak reactions, continued to have high expression in resolution reactions. In the resolution reaction, ∼1,500 mRNA transcripts were significantly different from placebo-treated skin. These data suggest that the response to DPCP evolves from an inflammatory/effector peak at day 3 to a more regulated immune response after 14 days. This model system could be useful for further dissection of mechanisms of immune activation or negative immune regulation in human skin. PMID:24751728

  8. Molecular characterization of human skin response to diphencyprone at peak and resolution phases: therapeutic insights

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Cueto, Inna; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Krueger, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that induces delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. It is used as an immune modulating therapeutic, but its molecular effects in human skin are largely unknown. We studied cellular and molecular characteristics of a recall response to 0.04% DPCP at 3 day (peak) and 14 day (resolution) timepoints using immune markers, RT-PCR and gene array approaches. A peak response showed modulation of ~7,500 mRNA transcripts, with high expression of cytokines that define all major effector T-cell subsets. Concomitant increases in T-cell and CD11c+ dendritic cell (DC) infiltrates were measured. The resolution reaction was characterized by unexpectedly high levels of T-cells and mature (DC-LAMP+) DCs, but with marked decreases in expression of IL-2, IFNγ, and other T-cell derived cytokines. However, negative immune regulators such as IDO1 that were high in peak reactions, continued to have high expression in resolution reactions. In the resolution reaction, ~1,500 mRNA transcripts were significantly different from placebo-treated skin. These data suggest the response to DPCP evolves from an inflammatory/effector peak at day 3 to a more regulated immune response after 14 days. This model system could be useful for further dissection of mechanisms of immune activation or negative immune regulation in human skin. PMID:24751728

  9. Elevated local skin temperature impairs cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to a simulated haemorrhagic challenge while heat stressed

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, J.; Lucas, R. A. I.; Crandall, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    During a simulated haemorrhagic challenge, syncopal symptoms develop sooner when individuals are hyperthermic relative to normothermic. This is due, in part, to a large displacement of blood to the cutaneous circulation during hyperthermia, coupled with inadequate cutaneous vasoconstriction during the hypotensive challenge. The influence of local skin temperature on these cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses is unclear. This project tested the hypothesis that local skin temperature modulates cutaneous vasoconstriction during simulated haemorrhage in hyperthermic humans. Eight healthy participants (four men and four women; 32 ± 7 years old; 75.2 ± 10.8 kg) underwent lower-body negative pressure to presyncope while heat stressed via a water-perfused suit sufficiently to increase core temperature by 1.2 ± 0.2°C. At forearm skin sites distal to the water-perfused suit, local skin temperature was either 35.2 ± 0.6 (mild heating) or 38.2 ± 0.2°C (moderate heating) throughout heat stress and lower-body negative pressure, and remained at these temperatures until presyncope. The reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance during the final 90 s of lower-body negative pressure, relative to heat-stress baseline, was greatest at the mildly heated site (−10 ± 15% reduction) relative to the moderately heated site (−2 ± 12%; P = 0.05 for the magnitude of the reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance between sites), because vasoconstriction at the moderately heated site was either absent or negligible. In hyperthermic individuals, the extent of cutaneous vasoconstriction during a simulated haemorrhage can be modulated by local skin temperature. In situations where skin temperature is at least 38°C, as is the case in soldiers operating in warm climatic conditions, a haemorrhagic insult is unlikely to be accompanied by cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:22903981

  10. Galvanic microparticles increase migration of human dermal fibroblasts in a wound-healing model via reactive oxygen species pathway.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cimetta, Elisa; Villasante, Aranzazu; Kupferstein, Nicolette; Southall, Michael D; Fassih, Ali; Xie, Junxia; Sun, Ying; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Electrical signals have been implied in many biological mechanisms, including wound healing, which has been associated with transient electrical currents not present in intact skin. One method to generate electrical signals similar to those naturally occurring in wounds is by supplementation of galvanic particles dispersed in a cream or gel. We constructed a three-layered model of skin consisting of human dermal fibroblasts in hydrogel (mimic of dermis), a hydrogel barrier layer (mimic of epidermis) and galvanic microparticles in hydrogel (mimic of a cream containing galvanic particles applied to skin). Using this model, we investigated the effects of the properties and amounts of Cu/Zn galvanic particles on adult human dermal fibroblasts in terms of the speed of wound closing and gene expression. The collected data suggest that the effects on wound closing are due to the ROS-mediated enhancement of fibroblast migration, which is in turn mediated by the BMP/SMAD signaling pathway. These results imply that topical low-grade electric currents via microparticles could enhance wound healing. PMID:24113575

  11. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Therapeutic endpoints: How to obtain efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Chan, Henry H; Alam, Murad; Tannous, Zeina; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Clinical endpoints are immediate or early tissue reactions that occur during laser treatment. They can guide the laser surgeon in delivering safe and effective laser treatment. Some endpoints act as warning signs of injury to the skin; others can indicate a therapeutic response. The first article in this series reviewed undesirable and warning endpoints, and this article focuses on desirable and therapeutic endpoints and their underlying mechanisms in laser surgery. We will also review treatments without clinical endpoints. PMID:27085228

  12. Regulatory T Cells Modulate Th17 Responses in Tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) individuals

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Background The factors governing latency in tuberculosis (TB) are not well understood but appear to include pathogen and host factors. We have used Tuberculin skin test positivity as a tool to study cytokine responses in latent TB. Methods To identify host factors important in maintenance of TST positivity, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses of tuberculin skin test positive (TST+; latent TB) or negative (TST−; healthy) individuals in South India where skin test positivity can define TB latency. Results While PPD- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate Ag-specific Th1 and Th2 cytokines were not significantly different between the two groups, the Th17 cytokines—IL-17 and IL-23—were significantly decreased in TST+ individuals compared with the TST− individuals. This Th17 cytokine modulation was associated with significantly increased expression of CTLA-4 and Foxp3. Although CTLA-4 blockade failed to restore full production of IL-17 and IL-23 in TST+ individuals, depletion of regulatory T cells significantly increased production of these cytokines. Conclusion TST positivity is characterized by increased activity of regulatory T cells and a coincident downregulation of the Th17 response. PMID:19929695

  13. Skindex, a quality-of-life measure for patients with skin disease: reliability, validity, and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chren, M M; Lasek, R J; Quinn, L M; Mostow, E N; Zyzanski, S J

    1996-11-01

    To measure the effects of skin disease on patients' quality of life, we developed a 61-item self-administered survey instrument called Skindex. Skindex has eight scales, each of which addresses a construct, or an abstract component, in a comprehensive conceptual framework: cognitive effects, social effects, depression, fear, embarrassment, anger, physical discomfort, and physical limitations. Item responses are standardized from 0 (no effect) to 100 (maximal effect); a scale score is the average of responses to items addressing a construct. In 201 patients seen by dermatologists, mean scale scores (+/-SD) ranged from 14 (+/-17) for physical limitations to 31 (+/-22) for physical discomfort. Scale scores were reproducible after 72 h (r = 0.68-0.90) and were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.76-0.86). Construct validity was assessed in two ways: (i) in a comparison of patients with inflammatory dermatoses and patients with isolated lesions, patients with inflammatory dermatoses had higher scale scores, and (ii) in an exploratory factor analysis, 78% of the common variance was explained by seven factors that correlated with the scale scores of Skindex. Most of the a priori scale scores changed in the expected direction in patients who reported that their skin conditions had improved or worsened after 6 mo. Finally, physicians' judgments of disease severity did not consistently correlate with Skindex scores. These preliminary data suggest that Skindex reliably and responsively measures the effects of skin disease on patients' quality of life and may supplement clinical judgments of disease severity. PMID:8875954

  14. The effect of the moisture content of a local heat source on the blood flow response of the skin.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Bains, Gurinder; Raju, Chinna; Lohman, Everett; Berk, Lee; Prowse, Michelle; Gunda, Shashi; Madani, Piyush; Batt, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    Numerous studies have examined the effect of local and global heating of the body on skin blood flow. However, the effect of the moisture content of the heat source on the skin blood flow response has not been examined. Thirty-three subjects, without diabetes or cardiovascular disease, between the ages of 22 and 32 were examined to determine the relationship between the effects of dry vs. moist heat applied for the same length of time and with the skin clamped at the same skin temperature on the blood flow response of the skin. The skin, heated with an infrared heat lamp (skin temperature monitored with a thermocouple) to 40 degrees C for 15 min, was either kept moist with wet towels or, in a separate experiment, kept dry with Drierite (a desiccant) between the towels to remove any moisture. Before and after heat exposure of the forearm, blood pressure, heart rate, skin moisture content, skin temperature, and skin blood flow were recorded. The results of the experiment showed that there was no change in skin moisture after 15 min exposure to dry heat at 40 degrees C. However, with moist heat, skin moisture increased by 43.7%, a significant increase (P < 0.05). With dry heat, blood flow increased from the resting value by 282.3% whereas with moist heat, blood flow increased by 386% over rest, a significant increase over dry heat (P < 0.05). Thus, with a set increase in skin temperature, moist heat was a better heating modality than dry heat. The reason may be linked to moisture sensitivity in calcium channels in the vascular endothelial cell. PMID:19415313

  15. Intestinal Microbiota Promotes Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation by Enhancing Th17 Response

    PubMed Central

    Zákostelská, Zuzana; Málková, Jana; Klimešová, Klára; Rossmann, Pavel; Hornová, Michaela; Novosádová, Iva; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Kostovčík, Martin; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Štepánková, Renata; Jůzlová, Kateřina; Hercogová, Jana; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease in which Th17 cells play a crucial role. Since indigenous gut microbiota influences the development and reactivity of immune cells, we analyzed the link among microbiota, T cells and the formation of psoriatic lesions in the imiquimod-induced murine model of psoriasis. To explore the role of microbiota, we induced skin inflammation in germ-free (GF), broad-spectrum antibiotic (ATB)-treated or conventional (CV) BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We found that both mice reared in GF conditions for several generations and CV mice treated with ATB were more resistant to imiquimod-induced skin inflammation than CV mice. The ATB treatment dramatically changed the diversity of gut bacteria, which remained stable after subsequent imiquimod application; ATB treatment resulted in a substantial increase in the order Lactobacillales and a significant decrease in Coriobacteriales and Clostridiales. Moreover, as compared to CV mice, imiquimod induced a lower degree of local and systemic Th17 activation in both GF and ATB-treated mice. These findings suggest that gut microbiota control imiquimod-induced skin inflammation by altering the T cell response. PMID:27434104

  16. Galvanic Cells: Anodes, Cathodes, Signs and Charges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemistry is a difficult subject for students at school and beyond and even for their teachers. This article explores the difficult "truth" that, when a current flows from a galvanic cell, positive ions within the cell electrolyte move towards the electrode labelled positive. This seems to contravene the basic rule that like charges repel…

  17. Whole-body heating decreases skin vascular response to low orthostatic stress in the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Nakayama, Yoshiro; Sone, Ryoko

    2006-04-01

    To elucidate the influence of heat stress on cutaneous vascular response in the lower extremities during orthostatic stress, a head-up tilt (HUT) test at angles of 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees for 4 min each was conducted under normothermic control conditions followed by whole-body heat stress produced by a hot water-perfused suit in healthy volunteers. Skin blood flows (SkBF) in the forearm, thigh, and calf were monitored using laser-Doppler flowmetry throughout the experiment. Furthermore, to elucidate the effects of increased core and local skin temperatures on the local vascular response in calf skin under increasing orthostatic stress, the thigh was occluded at 20, 30, 50, 70, and 80 mmHg with a cuff in both the normothermic condition and the whole-body or local heating condition. Significant decreases in forearm SkBF during HUT were observed at an angle of 60 degrees during normothermia and at 30 degrees or more during heating. SkBF in the thigh and calf was decreased significantly by HUT at 15 degrees and above during normothermia, and there was no significant reduction of SkBF in these sites during HUT at the lower angles (15 degrees -45 degrees ) during whole-body heating. Significant decreases of calf SkBF were observed at cuff pressures of 20 mmHg and above during normothermia and of 30 mmHg and above during whole-body and local heating, respectively. These results suggest that SkBF in the lower extremities shows a marked reduction compared with the upper extremities during low orthostatic stress in normothermia, and the enhanced skin vasoconstrictor response in the lower extremities is diminished by both whole-body and local heat stress. PMID:16839449

  18. Regional variations of skin blood flow response to histamine: evaluation by spectrophotometry and laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Ethel; Aviram, Guy; Zeltser, D.; Brenner, Sarah; Maibach, Howard I.

    1996-01-01

    To study inherent differences in skin function related to regional variation, we tested the hypothesis that different reactivities of small blood vessels via their direct and indirect activation by histamine play an important role in the observed regional variation of processes. Histamine was administered to three cutaneous regions in 20 volunteers, and the induced response was quantified utilizing spectrophotometry and laser Doppler flowmetry. The back exhibited the greatest response, followed by the forearm and ankle in decreasing order of responsiveness. We suggest that the intensity of the wheal and flare response may partly be related to the local reactivity of the blood vessels once the histamine actually reached them, and to their indirect dilatation via the axonal reflex. These blood vessel response observations may provide initial insight into inherent functional differences influencing cutaneous manifestations of endogenous and exogenous diseases.

  19. Galvanic vestibular stimulation in hemi-spatial neglect

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Zubko, Olga; Sakel, Mohamed; Coulton, Simon; Higgins, Tracy; Pullicino, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Hemi-spatial neglect is an attentional disorder in which the sufferer fails to acknowledge or respond to stimuli appearing in contralesional space. In recent years, it has become clear that a measurable reduction in contralesional neglect can occur during galvanic vestibular stimulation, a technique by which transmastoid, small amplitude current induces lateral, attentional shifts via asymmetric modulation of the left and right vestibular nerves. However, it remains unclear whether this reduction persists after stimulation is stopped. To estimate longevity of effect, we therefore conducted a double-blind, randomized, dose-response trial involving a group of stroke patients suffering from left-sided neglect (n = 52, mean age = 66 years). To determine whether repeated sessions of galvanic vestibular stimulation more effectively induce lasting relief than a single session, participants received 1, 5, or 10 sessions, each lasting 25 min, of sub-sensory, left-anodal right-cathodal noisy direct current (mean amplitude = 1 mA). Ninety five percent confidence intervals indicated that all three treatment arms showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-stimulation baseline and the final day of stimulation on the primary outcome measure, the conventional tests of the Behavioral Inattention Test. More remarkably, this change (mean change = 28%, SD = 18) was still evident 1 month later. Secondary analyses indicated an allied increase of 20% in median Barthel Index (BI) score, a measure of functional capacity, in the absence of any adverse events or instances of participant non-compliance. Together these data suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation, a simple, cheap technique suitable for home-based administration, may produce lasting reductions in neglect that are clinically important. Further protocol optimization is now needed ahead of a larger effectiveness study. PMID:24523679

  20. Galvanic vestibular stimulation in hemi-spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Zubko, Olga; Sakel, Mohamed; Coulton, Simon; Higgins, Tracy; Pullicino, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Hemi-spatial neglect is an attentional disorder in which the sufferer fails to acknowledge or respond to stimuli appearing in contralesional space. In recent years, it has become clear that a measurable reduction in contralesional neglect can occur during galvanic vestibular stimulation, a technique by which transmastoid, small amplitude current induces lateral, attentional shifts via asymmetric modulation of the left and right vestibular nerves. However, it remains unclear whether this reduction persists after stimulation is stopped. To estimate longevity of effect, we therefore conducted a double-blind, randomized, dose-response trial involving a group of stroke patients suffering from left-sided neglect (n = 52, mean age = 66 years). To determine whether repeated sessions of galvanic vestibular stimulation more effectively induce lasting relief than a single session, participants received 1, 5, or 10 sessions, each lasting 25 min, of sub-sensory, left-anodal right-cathodal noisy direct current (mean amplitude = 1 mA). Ninety five percent confidence intervals indicated that all three treatment arms showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-stimulation baseline and the final day of stimulation on the primary outcome measure, the conventional tests of the Behavioral Inattention Test. More remarkably, this change (mean change = 28%, SD = 18) was still evident 1 month later. Secondary analyses indicated an allied increase of 20% in median Barthel Index (BI) score, a measure of functional capacity, in the absence of any adverse events or instances of participant non-compliance. Together these data suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation, a simple, cheap technique suitable for home-based administration, may produce lasting reductions in neglect that are clinically important. Further protocol optimization is now needed ahead of a larger effectiveness study. PMID:24523679

  1. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  2. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  3. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Honda, Tetsuya; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-10-19

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. PMID:26438363

  4. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. PMID:26438363

  5. A dose-response analysis of skin cancer from inorganic arsenic in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Boyle, K.E.; Chen, C.W.; Gibb, H.J. )

    1989-12-01

    A study of the prevalence of skin cancer among 40,421 persons consuming arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan was used for a cancer dose-response assessment of ingested arsenic. The numbers of persons at risk over three dose intervals and four exposure durations were estimated from the data in order to apply the method of maximum likelihood to a multistage-Weibull time/dose-response model. A constant exposure level since birth for each of the exposure categories was assumed. It was found that the cumulative hazard increases as a power of three in age, and is linear or quadratic (with a linear coefficient) in dose. Observations from a smaller epidemiologic survey in Mexico were similar to what would be predicted from the model of the Taiwan data. Assuming that the skin cancer risk from ingested arsenic in the American population would also be similar to the Taiwan population, an American male would have a lifetime risk of developing skin cancer of 1.3 x 10(-3) (3.0 x 10(-3)) if exposed to 1 microgram/kg/day for a 76-year lifespan (median lifespan in the U.S.).

  6. Non-Invasive Measurement of Skin Microvascular Response during Pharmacological and Physiological Provocations

    PubMed Central

    Iredahl, Fredrik; Löfberg, Andreas; Sjöberg, Folke; Farnebo, Simon; Tesselaar, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular changes in the skin due to pharmacological and physiological provocations can be used as a marker for vascular function. While laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used extensively for measurement of skin microvascular responses, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) and Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) are novel imaging techniques. TiVi measures red blood cell concentration, while LDF and LSCI measure perfusion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare responses to provocations in the skin using these different techniques. Method Changes in skin microcirculation were measured in healthy subjects during (1) iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and noradrenaline (NA), (2) local heating and (3) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) using LDF, LSCI and TiVi. Results Iontophoresis of SNP increased perfusion (LSCI: baseline 40.9±6.2 PU; 10-min 100±25 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 119±18; 10-min 150±41 AU; p = 0.011). No change in perfusion (LSCI) was observed after iontophoresis of NA (baseline 38.0±4.4 PU; 10-min 38.9±5.0 PU; p = 0.64), while RBC concentration decreased (TiVi: baseline 59.6±11.8 AU; 10-min 54.4±13.3 AU; p = 0.021). Local heating increased perfusion (LDF: baseline 8.8±3.6 PU; max 112±55 PU; p<0.001, LSCI: baseline 50.8±8.0 PU; max 151±22 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 49.2±32.9 AU; max 99.3±28.3 AU; p<0.001). After 5 minutes of forearm occlusion with prior exsanguination, a decrease was seen in perfusion (LDF: p = 0.027; LSCI: p<0.001) and in RBC concentration (p = 0.045). Only LSCI showed a significant decrease in perfusion after 5 minutes of occlusion without prior exsanguination (p<0.001). Coefficients of variation were lower for LSCI and TiVi compared to LDF for most responses. Conclusion LSCI is more sensitive than TiVi for measuring microvascular changes during SNP-induced vasodilatation and forearm occlusion. TiVi is more sensitive to noradrenaline

  7. The response of skin to applied stress: investigation of bitemark distortion in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Thorsrud, Kyle; Miller, Raymond G; Dorion, Robert B J; Bush, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of distortional properties of skin is important in bitemark analysis. Thus, the response of skin to stress from bites was investigated. Four sets of models were created from the dentition of one individual. Anterior teeth were systematically removed to vary contact surface area. A biting apparatus was constructed with an integrated load cell. Forty-six bites were created perpendicular to Langer lines on six cadavers. Rate of force application and bite pressure were controlled. Metric/angular measurement and hollow volume overlays were employed. Distortion produced by each dentition was calculated and assessed. Results showed that as teeth impressed loose tissue, mesial/distal distance increased, angles of rotation flattened, and inter-canine distance lengthened. An opposite effect was seen in tight tissue. When the surface area of the dentition was reduced, a mixture of these effects was observed. Conclusions indicated that stiffness of the tissue was the most important variable in bitemark distortion. PMID:20002269

  8. When Beauty Is Skin Deep: Regulation of the Wound Response by Caspase-8, RIPK3, and the Inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Vince, James E

    2015-08-01

    Caspase-8 downregulation is observed in the epidermis of wounded skin, whereas permanent epidermal caspase-8 deletion causes chronic skin inflammation, suggesting that caspase-8 is a critical regulator of skin homeostasis and, possibly, the wound response. In this issue, Lee et al. document how epidermal caspase-8 deletion, or cutaneous wounding, results in increased NF-κB activation to drive keratinocyte caspase-1 expression and subsequent secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and IL-1α. Consequently, loss of NF-κB activity, caspase-1, or the IL-1 receptor delays wound healing. Previous studies have documented how chronic skin inflammation in caspase-8-deficient mice is rescued by RIPK3 co-deletion. Therefore, targeting caspase-1, IL-1, or RIPK3 itself may benefit treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases, or where an inappropriate inflammatory response proves detrimental to wound healing, such as in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26174535

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase G894T gene polymorphism and response to skin reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam; Ghazali, Dzuzaini Mohd; Abdullah, Haswati; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Wong, Abd Rahim

    2009-09-01

    Post occlusive skin reactive hyperemia (PORH) is a tool used to assess microcirculation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediates nitric oxide (NO) production; polymorphism of the eNOS gene may affect response to the PORH process. This study aims to determine whether eNOS G894T gene polymorphism affects response to skin PORH. 230 normotensive male and females between 18 and 40 years participated in this cross-sectional study. 170 subjects were of the homozygous GG genotype, whereas 60 were of the GT genotype. Skin PORH was performed by occlusion of the upper arm at 200 mm Hg for 3 min. Skin perfusion and temperature were monitored before, during and after occlusion release using the laser Doppler fluximetry. There were no significant differences between genotypes in their baseline blood pressure, serum cholesterol, BMI and age. Maximum change in perfusion after occlusion release (PORHmax) for the GG and GT genotypes were not significantly different at 50.15+/-1.29 vs. 47.92+/-2.17 AU; ANCOVA, p=0.351. Peak perfusion (PORHpeak) were also not significantly different between the two genotypes (61.23+/-1.36 vs. 57.72+/-2.32 AU; p=0.169). Minimum baseline perfusion were however higher in the GG compared to the GT genotype (10.83+/-0.29 vs. 9.61+/-0.50, p=0.029). We conclude that microvascular reactivity, assessed by change in perfusion after temporary ischemia was not significantly different between the GG and GT genotypes of the eNOS G894T gene. eNOS 894T allele carriers however, have lower baseline perfusion compared to the homozygous G894 allele carrier. PMID:19481100

  10. Propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, retards response to MSH in skin of Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, G L; Greenberg, N

    1987-01-01

    Lacking sympathetic innervation, the skin of A. carolinensis, an iguanid lizard, darkens within minutes in response to circulating melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) or beta adrenergic agonists such as epinephrine (EPI). This change is produced by dispersion of melanin from a perinculear position within dermal melanophores into superficial dendritic processes. These melanophores possess alpha-2 and beta-2 adrenergic as well as MSH receptors except in a patch of skin behind the eye, the eyespot, which lacks alpha receptors. Activation of beta or MSH receptors leads to stimulation of adenyl cyclase whereas alpha stimulation inhibits the enzyme to override the others. In a series of trials, injection of saline or propranolol was followed after 30 minutes by saline, EPI, or MSH. Propranolol inhibited chromatophore response to EPI. It also, unexpectedly, retarded the response to MSH, increasing latency to eyespot formation and body color change as well as the duration of darkening for both. Alteration of MSH response by a beta blocker could be explained by linkage of both adrenergic receptors and the MSH receptor to a common adenyl cyclase molecule to form a functional unit in the membrane of the melanophore. PMID:3671516

  11. Galvanic corrosion-effect of environmental and experimental variables

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel coupled to alloy C-22 and Ti Gr-12, respectively was evaluated in an acidic brine (pH {approx} 2.75) at 30 C, 60 C and 80 C using zero resistance ammeter method. A limited number of experiments were also performed in a neutral brine involving A 516 steel/alloy C-22 couple. The steady-state galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as functions of anode-to-cathode (A/C) area ratio and electrode distance. Results indicate that the galvanic current was gradually reduced as the A/C area ratio was increased. No systematic trend on the effect of A/C area ratio on the galvanic potential was observed. Also, no significant effect of electrode distance on the galvanic current and galvanic potential was evident. In general, increased galvanic current was noticed with increasing temperature. The limited data obtained in the neutral brine indicate that the galvanic current was reduced in this environment, compared to that in the acidic brine. Optical microscopic examination was performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface damage resulting from galvanic interaction. A 516 steel suffered from general corrosion and crevice corrosion in all environments tested. Very light crevice corrosion mark was observed with alloy C-22 and Ti Gr-12 in the acidic brine at 60 C and 80 C. However, this mark appears to be a surface discoloration and no actual crevice was detected.

  12. Raman spectroscopy: in vivo quick response code of skin physiological status.

    PubMed

    Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Le Guillou, Maud; Guichard, Nathalie; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologists need to combine different clinically relevant characteristics for a better understanding of skin health. These characteristics are usually measured by different techniques, and some of them are highly time consuming. Therefore, a predicting model based on Raman spectroscopy and partial least square (PLS) regression was developed as a rapid multiparametric method. The Raman spectra collected from the five uppermost micrometers of 11 healthy volunteers were fitted to different skin characteristics measured by independent appropriate methods (transepidermal water loss, hydration, pH, relative amount of ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol). For each parameter, the obtained PLS model presented correlation coefficients higher than R2=0.9. This model enables us to obtain all the aforementioned parameters directly from the unique Raman signature. In addition to that, in-depth Raman analyses down to 20 μm showed different balances between partially bound water and unbound water with depth. In parallel, the increase of depth was followed by an unfolding process of the proteins. The combinations of all these information led to a multiparametric investigation, which better characterizes the skin status. Raman signal can thus be used as a quick response code (QR code). This could help dermatologic diagnosis of physiological variations and presents a possible extension to pathological characterization. PMID:24839943

  13. Raman spectroscopy: in vivo quick response code of skin physiological status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Le Guillou, Maud; Guichard, Nathalie; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2014-11-01

    Dermatologists need to combine different clinically relevant characteristics for a better understanding of skin health. These characteristics are usually measured by different techniques, and some of them are highly time consuming. Therefore, a predicting model based on Raman spectroscopy and partial least square (PLS) regression was developed as a rapid multiparametric method. The Raman spectra collected from the five uppermost micrometers of 11 healthy volunteers were fitted to different skin characteristics measured by independent appropriate methods (transepidermal water loss, hydration, pH, relative amount of ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol). For each parameter, the obtained PLS model presented correlation coefficients higher than R2=0.9. This model enables us to obtain all the aforementioned parameters directly from the unique Raman signature. In addition to that, in-depth Raman analyses down to 20 μm showed different balances between partially bound water and unbound water with depth. In parallel, the increase of depth was followed by an unfolding process of the proteins. The combinations of all these information led to a multiparametric investigation, which better characterizes the skin status. Raman signal can thus be used as a quick response code (QR code). This could help dermatologic diagnosis of physiological variations and presents a possible extension to pathological characterization.

  14. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  15. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  16. Vertical Soil Profiling Using a Galvanic Contact Resistivity Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S.; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  17. Host responses in human skin after conventional intradermal injection or microneedle administration of virus-like-particle influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Pirri, Daniela; Kang, Sang-Moo; Compans, Richard W; Birchall, James C

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized microneedle devices are being developed for painlessly targeting vaccines to the immune cell populations in skin. As skin immunization studies are generally restricted to animal models however, where skin architecture and immunity is greatly different to human, surprisingly little is known about the local human response to intradermal (ID) vaccines. Here we use surgically excised human skin to explore for the first time the complex molecular and cellular host responses to a candidate influenza vaccine comprising nanoparticulate virus-like-particles (VLPs), administered via conventional hypodermic injection or reduced scale microneedles. Responses at the molecular level are determined by microarray analysis (47,296 discrete transcripts) and validated by quantitative PCR (96 genes). Cellular response is probed through monitoring migration of dendritic cells in viable skin tissue. Gene expression mapping, ontological analysis and qPCR reveal up-regulation of a host of genes responsible for key immunomodulatory processes and host viral response, including cell recruitment, activation, migration and T cell interaction following both ID and microneedle injection of VLPs; the response from the microneedles being more subtle. Significant morphological and migratory changes to skin dendritic cells are also apparent following microneedle VLP delivery. This is the first study displaying the global, multifaceted immunological events that occur at the site of vaccine deposition in human skin and will subsequently influence the degree and nature of innate and adaptive immune responses. An increased understanding of the detailed similarities and differences in response against antigen administered via different delivery modalities will inform the development of improved vaccines and vaccine delivery systems. PMID:23564440

  18. Biological and metabolic response in STS-135 space-flown mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mao, X W; Pecaut, M J; Stodieck, L S; Ferguson, V L; Bateman, T A; Bouxsein, M L; Gridley, D S

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that space flight condition-induced biological damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To explore possible mechanisms, changes in gene expression profiles implicated in oxidative stress and in ECM remodeling in mouse skin were examined after space flight. The metabolic effects of space flight in skin tissues were also characterized. Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) was launched at the Kennedy Space Center on a 13-day mission. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the STS-135 using animal enclosure modules (AEMs). Within 3-5 h after landing, the mice were euthanized and skin samples were harvested for gene array analysis and metabolic biochemical assays. Many genes responsible for regulating production and metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly (p < 0.05) altered in the flight group, with fold changes >1.5 compared to AEM control. For ECM profile, several genes encoding matrix and metalloproteinases involved in ECM remodeling were significantly up-/down-regulated following space flight. To characterize the metabolic effects of space flight, global biochemical profiles were evaluated. Of 332 named biochemicals, 19 differed significantly (p < 0.05) between space flight skin samples and AEM ground controls, with 12 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated including altered amino acid, carbohydrate metabolism, cell signaling, and transmethylation pathways. Collectively, the data demonstrated that space flight condition leads to a shift in biological and metabolic homeostasis as the consequence of increased regulation in cellular antioxidants, ROS production, and tissue remodeling. This indicates that astronauts may be at increased risk for pathophysiologic damage or carcinogenesis in cutaneous tissue. PMID:24796731

  19. Impact of skin temperature and hydration on plasma volume responses during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, Robert W; Sollanek, Kurt J; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2014-08-15

    Heat stress and hydration may both alter plasma volume (PV) responses during acute exercise; potential interactions have not been fully studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of graded elevations in skin temperature (Tsk) on PV changes during steady-state exercise under conditions of euhydration (EU) and hypohydration (HYPO, -4% of body mass). Thirty-two men (22 ± 4 yr) were divided into four cohorts (n = 8 each) and completed EU and HYPO trials in one environment [ambient temperature (Ta) 10, 20, 30, and 40°C]. Thirty minutes of cycle ergometry (50% V̇o2peak) was performed. Core (Tre) and mean skin (Tsk) temperatures were measured; changes in PV, total circulating protein (TCP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were calculated; and skin blood flow (SkBF) was estimated. Hypohydration decreased (P < 0.05) PV by 200 ml (-5.7%) but did not alter TCP. Plasma loss was not different between EU and HYPO during exercise at any Ta. Plasma losses were greater (P < 0.05) with elevated Ta with an average -130, -174, -294, and -445 ml losses during the 10, 20, 30, and 40°C trials, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations (r = 0.50 to 0.84) were found between ΔTCP and ΔPV during exercise when Tsk was cool/warm (<33°C; Ta 10, 20, and 30°C), but not at 40°C (high Tsk). We conclude that 1) graded skin warming proportionally accentuated plasma loss; 2) plasma loss was associated with plasma protein efflux at lower Tsk and SkBF; 3) at high Tsk, additional plasma loss likely results from increased net filtration at the capillaries; and 4) HYPO did not alter vascular fluid loss during exercise in any environment. PMID:24994888

  20. Effects and dose-response relationships of skin cancer and blackfoot disease with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wen-Ping

    1977-01-01

    In a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than 60 years, a high prevalence of chronic arsenicism has been observed in recent years. The total population of this “endemic” area is approximately 100,000. A general survey of 40,421 inhabitants and follow-up of 1,108 patients with blackfoot disease were made. Blackfoot disease, so-termed locally, is a peripheral vascular disorder resulting in gangrene of the extremities, especially the feet. The overall prevalence rates for skin cancer was 10.6 per 1000, and for blackfoot disease 8.9 per 1000. Generally speaking, the prevalence increased steadily with age in both diseases. The prevalence rates for skin cancer and blackfoot disease increased with the arsenic content of well water, i.e., the higher the arsenic content, the more patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease. A dose–response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. Furthermore, the degree of permanent impairment of function in the patient was directly related to duration of intake of arsenical water and to duration of such intake at the time of onset. The most common cause of death in the patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease was carcinoma of various sites. The 5-year survival rate after the onset of blackfoot disease was 76.3%; the 10-year survival rate was 63.3% and 15-year survival rate, 52.2%. The 50% survival point was 16 years after onset of the disease. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:908285

  1. Regulating inflammation using acid-responsive electrospun fibrous scaffolds for skin scarless healing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Cui, Wenguo; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  2. Regulating Inflammation Using Acid-Responsive Electrospun Fibrous Scaffolds for Skin Scarless Healing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  3. Histone H3 Phosphorylation in Human Skin Histoculture as a Tool to Evaluate Patient’s Response to Antiproliferative Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte, Fernando; Porth, Katherine; Sadekova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of patient’s response to chemotherapeutic drugs is often difficult and time consuming. Skin punch biopsies are easily accessible material that can be used for the evaluation of surrogate biomarkers of a patient’s response to a drug. In this study, we hypothesized that assessment of phosphorylated histone H3 in human skin punch biopsies could be used as a pharmacodynamics biomarker of patient’s response to the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor SCH2047069. To test this hypothesis, we used a human skin histoculture technique that allows culturing intact human skin in the presence of the drug. Human melanoma and skin histocultures were treated with SCH2047069, and the effect of the drug was assessed by increasing histone H3 phosphorylation using immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that SCH2047069 has a significant effect on cell proliferation in human melanoma and skin histoculture and justify using human skin punch biopsies for evaluation of the pharmacodynamic changes induced by SCH2047069. ACRONYMS Histone subunit H3 (H3), Kinesin spindle protein (KSP), 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EDU), Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE). PMID:26917945

  4. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Warning endpoints: How to avoid side effects.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Lasers are versatile, commonly used treatment tools in dermatology. While it is tempting to follow manufacturer's guidelines or other "recipes" for laser treatment, this approach alone can be a recipe for disaster. Specific and immediate skin responses or endpoints exist and are clinically useful because they correlate with underlying mechanisms that are either desirable (ie, therapeutic), undesirable (ie, warning signs of injury or side effects), or incidental. The observation of clinical endpoints is a safe and reliable guide for appropriate treatment. This article presents the warning endpoints during specific dermatologic laser treatments, and the accompanying article presents the therapeutic endpoints, their underlying mechanisms, and the utility of these endpoints. PMID:27085227

  5. Macrophage- and Neutrophil-Derived TNF-α Instructs Skin Langerhans Cells to Prime Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Epaulard, Olivier; Adam, Lucille; Poux, Candice; Zurawski, Gerard; Salabert, Nina; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Oh, Sangkon; Romain, Gabrielle; Chapon, Catherine; Banchereau, Jacques; Lévy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime immune responses. However, the roles of skin resident Langerhans cells (LCs) in eliciting immune responses have not been fully understood. We here demonstrate for the first time that LCs in cynomolgus macaque skin are capable of inducing antiviral-specific immune responses in vivo. Targeting HIV-Gag or influenza hemagglutinin antigens to skin LCs using recombinant fusion proteins of anti-Langerin antibody and antigens resulted in the induction of the viral antigen-specific responses. We further demonstrated that such antigen-specific immune responses elicited by skin LCs were greatly enhanced by TLR ligands (TLR-Ls), polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and R848. These enhancements were not due to the direct actions of TLR-Ls on LCs, but mainly dependent on TNF-α secreted from macrophages and neutrophils recruited to local tissues. Skin LC activation and migration out of the epidermis are associated with macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. More importantly, blocking TNF-α abrogated the activation and migration of skin LCs. This study highlights that the cross-talk between innate immune cells in local tissues is an important component for the establishment of adaptive immunity. Understanding the importance of local immune networks will help us to design new and effective vaccines against microbial pathogens. PMID:25057007

  6. Similar nociceptive afferents mediate psychophysical and electrophysiological responses to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iannetti, G D; Zambreanu, L; Tracey, I

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perceive and withdraw rapidly from noxious environmental stimuli is crucial for survival. When heat stimuli are applied to primate hairy skin, first pain sensation is mediated by type-II A-fibre nociceptors (II-AMHs). In contrast, the reported absence of first pain and II-AMH microneurographical responses when heat stimuli are applied to the hand palm has led to the notion that II-AMHs are lacking in this primate glabrous skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hairy and glabrous skin stimulation on neural transmission of nociceptive inputs elicited by different kinds of thermal heating. We recorded psychophysical and EEG brain responses to radiant (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and contact heat stimuli (contact heat-evoked potentials, CHEPs) delivered to the dorsum and the palm of the hand in normal volunteers. Brain responses were analysed at a single-trial level, using an automated approach based on multiple linear regression. Laser stimulation of hairy and glabrous skin at the same energy elicited remarkably similar psychophysical ratings and LEPs. This finding provides strong evidence that first pain to heat does exist in glabrous skin, and suggests that similar nociceptive afferents, with the physiological properties of II-AMHs, mediate first pain to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans. In contrast, when contact heat stimuli were employed, a significantly higher nominal temperature had to be applied to glabrous skin in order to achieve psychophysical ratings similar to those obtained following hairy skin stimulation, and CHEPs following glabrous skin stimulation had significantly longer latencies (N2 wave, +25%; P2 wave, +24%) and smaller amplitudes (N2 wave, −40%; P2 wave, −44%) than CHEPs following hairy skin stimulation. Irrespective of the stimulated territory, CHEPs always had significantly longer latencies (hairy skin N2 wave, +75%; P2 wave, +56%) and smaller amplitudes (hairy skin N2 wave, −42%; P

  7. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  8. Cutaneous antigen priming via gene gun leads to skin-selective Th2 immune-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, David; Harder, Greg; Fattouh, Ramzi; Sun, Jiangfeng; Goncharova, Susanna; Stämpfli, Martin R; Coyle, Anthony J; Bramson, Jonathan L; Jordana, Manel

    2005-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the compartmentalization of immune responses is governed, in part, by tissue-selective homing instructions imprinted during T cell differentiation. In the context of allergic diseases, the fact that "disease" primarily manifests in particular tissue sites, despite pervasive allergen exposure, supports this notion. However, whether the original site of Ag exposure distinctly privileges memory Th2 immune-inflammatory responses to the same site, while sparing remote tissue compartments, remains to be fully investigated. We examined whether skin-targeted delivery of plasmid DNA encoding OVA via gene-gun technology in mice could generate allergic sensitization and give rise to Th2 effector responses in the skin as well as in the lung upon subsequent Ag encounter. Our data show that cutaneous Ag priming induced OVA-specific serum IgE and IgG1, robust Th2-cytokine production, and late-phase cutaneous responses and systemic anaphylactic shock upon skin and systemic Ag recall, respectively. However, repeated respiratory exposure to aerosolized OVA failed to instigate airway inflammatory responses in cutaneous Ag-primed mice, but not in mice initially sensitized to OVA via the respiratory mucosa. Importantly, these contrasting airway memory responses correlated with the occurrence of Th2 differentiation events at anatomically separate sites: indeed cutaneous Ag priming resulted in Ag-specific proliferative responses and Th2 differentiation in skin-, but not thoracic-, draining lymph nodes. These data indicate that Ag exposure to the skin leads to Th2 differentiation within skin-draining lymph nodes and subsequent Th2 immunity that is selectively manifested in the skin. PMID:15661930

  9. Cooling reduces the cutaneous afferent firing response to vibratory stimuli in glabrous skin of the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Catherine R; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R

    2013-02-01

    Skin on the foot sole plays an important role in postural control. Cooling the skin of the foot is often used to induce anesthesia to determine the role of skin in motor and balance control. The effect of cooling on the four classes of mechanoreceptor in the skin is largely unknown, and thus the aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of cooling on individual skin receptors in the foot sole. Such insight will better isolate individual receptor contributions to balance control. Using microneurography, we recorded 39 single nerve afferents innervating mechanoreceptors in the skin of the foot sole in humans. Afferents were identified as fast-adapting (FA) or slowly adapting (SA) type I or II (FA I n = 16, FA II n = 7, SA I n = 6, SA II n = 11). Receptor response to vibration was compared before and after cooling of the receptive field (2-20 min). Overall, firing response was abolished in 30% of all receptors, and this was equally distributed across receptor type (P = 0.69). Longer cooling times were more likely to reduce firing response below 50% of baseline; however, some afferent responses were abolished with shorter cooling times (2-5 min). Skin temperature was not a reliable indicator of the level of receptor activation and often became uncoupled from receptor response levels, suggesting caution in the use of this parameter as an indicator of anesthesia. When cooled, receptors preferentially coded lower frequencies in response to vibration. In response to a sustained indentation, SA receptors responded more like FA receptors, primarily coding "on-off" events. PMID:23155170

  10. Optimisation of gelatin extraction from Unicorn leatherjacket (Aluterus monoceros) skin waste: response surface approach.

    PubMed

    Hanjabam, Mandakini Devi; Kannaiyan, Sathish Kumar; Kamei, Gaihiamngam; Jakhar, Jitender Kumar; Chouksey, Mithlesh Kumar; Gudipati, Venkateshwarlu

    2015-02-01

    Physical properties of gelatin extracted from Unicorn leatherjacket (Aluterus monoceros) skin, which is generated as a waste from fish processing industries, were optimised using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). A Box-Behnken design was used to study the combined effects of three independent variables, namely phosphoric acid (H3PO4) concentration (0.15-0.25 M), extraction temperature (40-50 °C) and extraction time (4-12 h) on different responses like yield, gel strength and melting point of gelatin. The optimum conditions derived by RSM for the yield (10.58%) were 0.2 M H3PO4 for 9.01 h of extraction time and hot water extraction of 45.83 °C. The maximum achieved gel strength and melting point was 138.54 g and 22.61 °C respectively. Extraction time was found to be most influencing variable and had a positive coefficient on yield and negative coefficient on gel strength and melting point. The results indicated that Unicorn leatherjacket skins can be a source of gelatin having mild gel strength and melting point. PMID:25694708

  11. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Responses in rectal and skin temperatures to centrifugal forces in rats of different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, K.; Sato, H.; Okuda, N.; Makino, Y.; Isobe, Y.

    1982-03-01

    Effects of centrifugation upon rectal (Tre) and tail skin temperatures (Ts) were studied in male Wistar rats at varying ambient temperature (Ta) using a centrifuge which was placed in a climatic chamber. Centrifugal forces of Gz of 3.0 were imposed on rats which were suspended at horizontal body position using a newly developed mesh suits holding method in the animal box placed on the rotating arm of the centrifuge. Headwards or tailwards forces were applied according to the experimental design. No significant difference of the responses was observed between the two force directions. Centrifugations imposed at different Ta of 15, 20, 25, 30 and 32.5‡C resulted in falls in Tre accompanied by rises in tail Ts at the cooler environments, while rises in Tre accompanied by falls in Ts in the warmer environments. The Ta at which the response pattern of Tre and Ts was reversed (critical ambient temperature) was 26.8±2.3 (mean and SE) and 27.9±2.8‡C, respectively. Tolerance to centrifugation was markedly increased in cooler environments than in wanner ones. It was suggested that the increased skin pressure due to centrifugation exerted some inhibitory effects upon central thermoregulatory ability.

  13. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  14. Molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus maculatus-X. couchianus interspecies hybrid skin to UVB exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Bowswell, Mikki; Bowswell, William; Yang, Kuan; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic and genetic similarities between Xiphophorus and human melanoma render Xiphophorus a useful animal model for studying the genetic basis of melanoma etiology. In the Xiphophorus model, melanoma has been shown to be inducible by ultraviolet light (UVB) exposure among interspecies hybrids, but not in parental line fish similarly treated. This leads to questions of what genes are responsive to UVB exposure in the skin of the interspecies hybrids, as well as how parental alleles in hybrids may be differentially regulated and the potential roles they may play in induced melanomagenesis. To address these questions, we produced X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus (Sp-Couch) F1 hybrid fish, exposed both hybrid and parental fish to UVB, and performed gene expression profiling of the skin using RNA-Seq methodology. We characterized a group of unique UVB-responsive genes in Sp-Couch hybrid including dct, pmela, tyr, tyrp1a, slc2a11b, rab38a, rab27, tspan10, slc45a2, oca2, slc24a5, ptn and mitfa. These genes are associated with melanin production and melanocyte proliferation. They were also up-regulated in Sp-Couch hybrid, indicating that their UVB response is hybridization initiated. In the hybrid, several melanin production and pigmentation related genes, including slc45a2, tspan10, dct, slc2a11b and ptn showed either X. couchianus or X. maculatus allele specific expression. The finding that these genes exhibit allele specific expression regulatory mechanisms in Sp-Couch hybrids, but do not exhibit a corresponding UVB response in either one of the parental fishes, may suggest UVB targets and imply mechanisms regarding the susceptibility of Sp-Couch to induced melanomagenesis. PMID:26254713

  15. Skin-colour changes i the lizard, Anolis carolinensis, in response to localized electrical stimulation and lesions in the diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Hemer, J H; Salas, M A; LaPointe, J L

    1981-05-01

    A study was made of changes in skin colour in the lizard, Anolis carolinensis, in response to deep electrical stimulation at 0.2 mm intervals throughout the periventricular region of the diencephalon and the anterior brain stem. Double-barrelled glass microelectrodes with tip diameters of 3 microns were used. A 20 microA pulse-train consisting of a 500 Hz signal lasting for 1 s yielded localized responses. Skin darkening occurred only in response to stimulation delivered in the anterior and dorsal region of the diencephalon and skin lightening only in response to stimulation in a small area in the posterior and ventral region of the hypothalamus. Electrical lesions in the latter region resulted in permanent skin darkening. Surgical interruption of the hypothalamo-hypophysial neurosecretory tract did not block skin-colour change in response to dark or light backgrounds. It was concluded that MSH release is under tonic inhibitory control by hypothalamic neurones in Anolis. Both inhibitory and stimulatory neurones can be localized stereotaxically in the diencephalon and neither type corresponds with the neurosecretory neurones of the hypothalamo-hypophysial tract. The functional relationship between the stimulatory neurones and the inhibitory neurones and pars intermedia remains unclear. PMID:7017054

  16. Evidence for humoral effects on the radiation response of rat foot skin.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, M; Ross, G A; Wilkinson, J H; Bywaters, A

    2002-01-01

    The influence of perturbation of the physiologic state of the whole body on the outcome of radiation exposure has been examined in a rat foot model. Irradiation was carried out using 60Co gamma-rays. Moist desquamation was used as an endpoint. Rats were given a priming dose of 2 Gy, 4 Gy or 7 Gy to their whole body except their hind feet (partial body priming dose). After a variable time period both hind feet of these animals were irradiated with graded doses of 60Co gamma-rays. The incidence of moist desquamation in the irradiated feet of these animals was compared with the incidence of moist desquamation in animals that had not received the initial partial body priming dose. It was noticed that the incidence of moist desquamation in the rat foot skin of animals that received 7 Gy partial body priming dose 4 h prior to irradiation of their hind feet was significantly less than moist desquamation in control animals. The ED(50) value of 22.53+/-0.16 Gy for moist desquamation of the foot skin of control animals was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the value of 25.25+/-0.29 Gy obtained for animals that received a partial body priming dose of 7 Gy 4 h prior to irradiation of their hind feet. It was concluded that the response of rat foot skin to radiation was not purely the result of epidermal stem cell kill and that it can be modified by alterations in the overall physiological state of the animal's body brought about by a priming dose to the whole of the animal's body except the hind feet. PMID:11806958

  17. Arsenic-induced enhancement of ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis in mouse skin: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Fredric J; Uddin, Ahmed N; Wu, Feng; Nádas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to establish the form of the dose-response relationship for dietary sodium arsenite as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in a mouse skin model. Hairless mice (strain Skh1) were fed sodium arsenite continuously in drinking water starting at 21 days of age at concentrations of 0.0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/L. At 42 days of age, solar spectrum UVR exposures were applied three times weekly to the dorsal skin at 1.0 kJ/m2 per exposure until the experiment ended at 182 days. Untreated mice and mice fed only arsenite developed no tumors. In the remaining groups a total of 322 locally invasive squamous carcinomas occurred. The carcinoma yield in mice exposed only to UVR was 2.4 +/- 0.5 cancers/mouse at 182 days. Dietary arsenite markedly enhanced the UVR-induced cancer yield in a pattern consistent with linearity up to a peak of 11.1 +/- 1.0 cancers/mouse at 5.0 mg/L arsenite, representing a peak enhancement ratio of 4.63 +/- 1.05. A decline occurred to 6.8 +/- 0.8 cancers/mouse at 10.0 mg/L arsenite. New cancer rates exhibited a consistent-with-linear dependence on time beginning after initial cancer-free intervals ranging between 88 and 95 days. Epidermal hyperplasia was elevated by arsenite alone and UVR alone and was greater than additive for the combined exposures as were growth rates of the cancers. These results demonstrate the usefulness of a new animal model for studying the carcinogenic action of dietary arsenite on skin exposed to UVR and should contribute to understanding how to make use of animal data for assessment of human cancer risks in tissues exposed to mixtures of carcinogens and cancer-enhancing agents. PMID:15064167

  18. In vivo analysis of THz wave irradiation induced acute inflammatory response in skin by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Jinhyo; Mun, Jungho; Bae, Sangyoon; Jeong, Young Uk; Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Kim, Pilhan

    2014-05-19

    The recent development of THz sources in a wide range of THz frequencies and power levels has led to greatly increased interest in potential biomedical applications such as cancer and burn wound diagnosis. However, despite its importance in realizing THz wave based applications, our knowledge of how THz wave irradiation can affect a live tissue at the cellular level is very limited. In this study, an acute inflammatory response caused by pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin of a live mouse was analyzed at the cellular level using intravital laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Pulsed THz wave (2.7 THz, 4 μs pulsewidth, 61.4 μJ per pulse, 3Hz repetition), generated using compact FEL, was used to irradiate an anesthetized mouse's ear skin with an average power of 260 mW/cm(2) for 30 minutes using a high-precision focused THz wave irradiation setup. In contrast to in vitro analysis using cultured cells at similar power levels of CW THz wave irradiation, no temperature change at the surface of the ear skin was observed when skin was examined with an IR camera. To monitor any potential inflammatory response, resident neutrophils in the same area of ear skin were repeatedly visualized before and after THz wave irradiation using a custom-built laser-scanning confocal microscopy system optimized for in vivo visualization. While non-irradiated control skin area showed no changes in the number of resident neutrophils, a massive recruitment of newly infiltrated neutrophils was observed in the THz wave irradiated skin area after 6 hours, which suggests an induction of acute inflammatory response by the pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin via a non-thermal process. PMID:24921268

  19. Galvanic vestibular stimulation for analysis of postural adaptation and stability.

    PubMed

    Johansson, R; Magnusson, M; Fransson, P A

    1995-03-01

    Human postural dynamics was investigated in 12 normal subjects by means of a force platform recording body sway, induced by bipolar transmastoid galvanic stimulation of the vestibular nerve and labyrinth. The model adopted was that of an inverted segmented pendulum, the dynamics of postural control being assumed to be reflected in the stabilizing forces actuated by the feet as a result of complex muscular activity subject to state feedback of body sway and position. Time-series analysis demonstrates that a transfer function from stimulus to sway-force response with specific parameters can be identified. In addition, adaptation to the vestibular stimulus is demonstrated to exist, and we describe this phenomenon using quantification in terms of a postural adaptation time constant in the range of 40-50 s. The results suggest means to evaluate adaptive behavior and postural control in the erect human being which may be useful in the rehabilitation of individuals striving to regain upright stance. PMID:7698784

  20. Assessing the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses to increasing anemia severity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Dey, Ankita; Chen, Tenn F.

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent medical condition that seriously affects millions of people all over the world. In many regions, not only its initial detection but also its monitoring are hindered by limited access to laboratory facilities. This situation has motivated the development of a wide range of optical devices and procedures to assist physicians in these tasks. Although noticeable progress has been achieved in this area, the search for reliable, low-cost, and risk-free solutions still continues, and the strengthening of the knowledge base about this disorder and its effects is essential for the success of these initiatives. We contribute to these efforts by closely examining the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses (within and outside the visible region of the light spectrum) to reduced hemoglobin concentrations associated with increasing anemia severity levels. This investigation, which involves skin specimens with distinct biophysical and morphological characteristics, is supported by controlled in silico experiments performed using a predictive light transport model and measured data reported in the biomedical literature. We also propose a noninvasive procedure to be employed in the monitoring of this condition at the point-of-care.

  1. Leukotriene B(4) mediates sphingosylphosphorylcholine-induced itch-associated responses in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Saito, Ayumi; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2009-12-01

    In atopic dermatitis, the concentration in the skin of sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), which is produced from sphingomyelin by sphingomyelin deacylase, is increased. In the present study, we investigated the itch-eliciting activity of SPC and related substances and the mechanisms of SPC action in mice. An intradermal injection of SPC, but not sphingomyelin and sphingosine, induced scratching, an itch-associated response, which was not suppressed by a deficiency in mast cells or the H(1) histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. The action of SPC was inhibited by the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. SPC action also was inhibited by the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton and the leukotriene B(4) antagonist ONO-4057, but not by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Moreover, SPC action was inhibited by the antiallergic agent azelastine, which suppresses the action and production of leukotriene B(4). Administration of SPC to the skin and to primary cultures of keratinocytes increased leukotriene B(4) production. SPC increased intracellular Ca(2+) ion concentration in primary cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons and keratinocytes. These results suggest that SPC induces itching through a direct action on primary afferents and leukotriene B(4) production of keratinocytes. Sphingomyelin deacylase and SPC receptors may be previously unreported targets for antipruritic drugs. PMID:19657356

  2. Response of human skin to ultraviolet radiation: dissociation of erythema and metabolic changes following sunscreen protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pearse, A.D.; Marks, R.

    1983-03-01

    After UV irradiation of human skin there is an increase in epidermal and stratum corneum thickness and an increase in the thymidine autoradiographic labeling index. Previously we have demonstrated that persistent exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) alters the distribution and activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) within the epidermis; G-6-PDH activity is increased over the whole epidermis and SDH activity is diminished in the granular cell area but increased in the basal layer. When skin is protected by an efficient sunscreen and irradiated with UVB, there is almost complete inhibition of the erythema normally seen following UVR exposure. In this study we have investigated the cytochemical, cell kinetic, and histometric changes that take place in the epidermis after UVB irradiation, with and without two different types of sunscreen. Some of the histometric and metabolic changes associated with UVB exposure were still evident despite sunscreen protection and the successful blocking of the erythema response. The implications of these findings are discussed together with the use of sunscreens to prevent development of solar damage.

  3. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  4. Optimising a model-based approach to inferring fear learning from skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Matthias; Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Bach, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory sympathetic arousal is often inferred from skin conductance responses (SCR) and used to quantify fear learning. We have previously provided a model-based approach for this inference, based on a quantitative Psychophysiological Model (PsPM) formulated in non-linear dynamic equations. Here we seek to optimise the inversion of this PsPM. Using two independent fear conditioning datasets, we benchmark predictive validity as the sensitivity to separate the likely presence or absence of the unconditioned stimulus. Predictive validity is optimised across both datasets by (a) using a canonical form of the SCR shape (b) filtering the signal with a bi-directional band-pass filter with cut off frequencies 0.0159 and 5 Hz, (c) simultaneously inverting two trials (d) explicitly modelling skin conductance level changes between trials (e) the choice of the inversion algorithm (f) z-scoring estimates of anticipatory sympathetic arousal from each participant across trials. The original model-based method has higher predictive validity than conventional peak-scoring or an alternative model-based method (Ledalab), and benefits from constraining the model, optimised data preconditioning, and post-processing of ensuing parameters. PMID:26291885

  5. Optimising a model-based approach to inferring fear learning from skin conductance responses.

    PubMed

    Staib, Matthias; Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Bach, Dominik R

    2015-11-30

    Anticipatory sympathetic arousal is often inferred from skin conductance responses (SCR) and used to quantify fear learning. We have previously provided a model-based approach for this inference, based on a quantitative Psychophysiological Model (PsPM) formulated in non-linear dynamic equations. Here we seek to optimise the inversion of this PsPM. Using two independent fear conditioning datasets, we benchmark predictive validity as the sensitivity to separate the likely presence or absence of the unconditioned stimulus. Predictive validity is optimised across both datasets by (a) using a canonical form of the SCR shape (b) filtering the signal with a bi-directional band-pass filter with cut off frequencies 0.0159 and 5 Hz, (c) simultaneously inverting two trials (d) explicitly modelling skin conductance level changes between trials (e) the choice of the inversion algorithm (f) z-scoring estimates of anticipatory sympathetic arousal from each participant across trials. The original model-based method has higher predictive validity than conventional peak-scoring or an alternative model-based method (Ledalab), and benefits from constraining the model, optimised data preconditioning, and post-processing of ensuing parameters. PMID:26291885

  6. Character of skin on photo-thermal response and its regeneration process using second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-lian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-man; Chen, Wei R; Wang, Yun-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of skin collagen on photo-thermal response and its regeneration process is an important but difficult task. In this study, morphology and spectrum characteristics of collagen during photo-thermal response and its light-induced remodeling process were obtained by second-harmonic generation microscope in vivo. The texture feature of collagen orientation index and fractal dimension was extracted by image processing. The aim of this study is to detect the information hidden in skin texture during the process of photo-thermal response and its regeneration. The quantitative relations between injured collagen and texture feature were established for further analysis of the injured characteristics. Our results show that it is feasible to determine the main impacts of phototherapy on the skin. It is important to understand the process of collagen remodeling after photo-thermal injuries from texture feature. PMID:23508280

  7. Analysis of skin conductance response during evaluation of preferences for cosmetic products

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Hideki; Hirao, Naoyasu

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed skin conductance response (SCR) as a psychophysiological index to evaluate affective aspects of consumer preferences for cosmetic products. To examine the test-retest reliability of association between preferences and SCR, we asked 33 female volunteers to complete two experimental sessions approximately 1 year apart. The participants indicated their preferences in a typical paired comparison task by choosing the better option from a combination of two products among four products. We measured anticipatory SCR prior to expressions of the preferences. We found that the mean amplitude of the SCR elicited by the preferred products was significantly larger than that elicited by the non-preferred products. The participants' preferences and corresponding SCR patterns were well preserved at the second session 1 year later. Our results supported cumulating findings that SCR is a useful index of consumer preferences that has future potential, both in laboratory and marketing settings. PMID:25709593

  8. COPPER-INDUCED CORROSION OF GALVANIZED STEEL PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause(s) of rapid pitting failure of galvanized steel pipe used in consumer plumbing systems. The presence of copper in water and the character of the galvanized steel pipe were factors examined in detail. Pipe manufactured in Korea...

  9. Mineralogical Evidence of Galvanic Corrosion in Domestic, Drinking Water Pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution system (DWDS) piping contains numerous examples of galvanically-coupled metals (e.g., soldered copper pipe joints, copper-lead pipes joined during partial replacements of lead service lines). The possible role of galvanic corrosion in the release of l...

  10. 77 FR 28404 - Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... notice in the Federal Register on November 25, 2011 (76 FR 72721). The hearing was held in Washington, DC... COMMISSION Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... retarded, by reason of imports from Mexico of galvanized steel wire, provided for in subheadings...

  11. 76 FR 29266 - Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... notice in the Federal Register of April 7, 2011 (76 FR 19382). The conference was held in Washington, DC... COMMISSION Galvanized Steel Wire From China and Mexico Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Mexico of galvanized steel wire, provided for in...

  12. Skin Metabolite, Farnesyl Pyrophosphate, Regulates Epidermal Response to Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Migration.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Sawaya, Andrew P; Stone, Rivka C; Lindley, Linsey E; Ojeh, Nkemcho; Vukelic, Sasa; Samuels, Herbert H; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-11-01

    Skin produces cholesterol and a wide array of sterols and non-sterol mevalonate metabolites, including isoprenoid derivative farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). To characterize FPP action in epidermis, we generated transcriptional profiles of primary human keratinocytes treated with zaragozic acid (ZGA), a squalene synthase inhibitor that blocks conversion of FPP to squalene resulting in endogenous accumulation of FPP. The elevated levels of intracellular FPP resulted in regulation of epidermal differentiation and adherens junction signaling, insulin growth factor (IGF) signaling, oxidative stress response and interferon (IFN) signaling. Immunosuppressive properties of FPP were evidenced by STAT-1 downregulation and prominent suppression of its nuclear translocation by IFNγ. Furthermore, FPP profoundly downregulated genes involved in epidermal differentiation of keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin ex vivo. Elevated levels of FPP resulted in induction of cytoprotective transcriptional factor Nrf2 and its target genes. We have previously shown that FPP functions as ligand for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), one of the major regulator of epidermal homeostasis. Comparative microarray analyses show significant but not complete overlap between FPP and glucocorticoid regulated genes, suggesting that FPP may have wider transcriptional impact. This was further supported by co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments where we show that upon binding to GR, FPP recruits β-catenin and, unlike glucocorticoids, recruits co-repressor GRIP1 to suppress keratin 6 gene. These findings have many clinical implications related to epidermal lipid metabolism, response to glucocorticoid therapy as well as pleiotropic effects of cholesterol lowering therapeutics, statins. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2452-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916741

  13. Thin-skinned salt tectonics as a response to crustal movements in a recent convergent setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendeville, Bruno; Gaullier, Virginie; Deverchere, Jacques; Sage, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Published data from the seismic survey "MARADJA 1" conducted in August and September 2003 offshore the Algerian coast have imaged the Messinian salt response to tectonic activity within the basement. This helps to understand how the vertical movements of basement blocks have been recorded by thin-skinned salt tectonics. The area is undergoing crustal convergence, as attested by the Boumerdes earthquake (magnitude 6.8), which happened in 2003. The seismic data have revealed the presence of an elevated plateau, forming a 3D promontory restricted to the area offshore Algiers and is absent west and east of that area. The promontory is likely related to the contractional reactivation of the margin, as was recorded by subsalt thrusts mapped by Domzig et al. (2006). The data provided additional information on the deformation of the Messinian mobile evaporite unit and its Plio-Quaternary overburden. Margin-perpendicular profiles show mostly compressional features (anticlines and synclines) that had little or no activity during Messinian times. By contrast, margin-parallel profiles clearly show that extensional, reactive salt diapiric ridges formed early, as early as the time of deposition of the Messinian Upper Unit, as recorded by fan-shaped strata. These ridges have recorded E-W, thin-skinned gravity gliding above the Messinian salt, as a response to the rise of the basement plateau. We tested this hypothesis using analogue models. Indeed, the rise of the plateau generated preferential E-W extension above the salt, rather than N-S, which was prevented by the compressional regional tectonic stresses related to the convergence of the African and European plates.

  14. The effect of body temperature on the hunting response of the middle finger skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; Van de Linde, F J; Romet, T T; Ducharme, M B

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between body temperature and the hunting response (intermittent supply of warm blood to cold exposed extremities) was quantified for nine subjects by immersing one hand in 8 degree C water while their body was either warm, cool or comfortable. Core and skin temperatures were manipulated by exposing the subjects to different ambient temperatures (30, 22, or 15 degrees C), by adjusting their clothing insulation (moderate, light, or none), and by drinking beverages at different temperatures (43, 37 and 0 degrees C). The middle finger temperature (Tfi) response was recorded, together with ear canal (Tear), rectal (Tre), and mean skin temperature (Tsk). The induced mean Tear changes were -0.34 (0.08) and +0.29 (0.03) degrees C following consumption of the cold and hot beverage, respectively. Tsk ranged from 26.7 to 34.5 degrees C during the tests. In the warm environment after a hot drink, the initial finger temperature (T(fi,base)) was 35.3 (0.4) degrees C, the minimum finger temperature during immersion (T(fi,min)) was 11.3 (0.5) degrees C, and 2.6 (0.4) hunting waves occurred in the 30-min immersion period. In the neutral condition (thermoneutral room and beverage) T(fi,base) was 32.1 (1.0) degrees C, T(fi,min) was 9.6 (0.3) degrees C, and 1.6 (0.2) waves occurred. In the cold environment after a cold drink, these values were 19.3 (0.9) degrees C, 8.7 (0.2) degrees C, and 0.8 (0.2) waves, respectively. A colder body induced a decrease in the magnitude and frequency of the hunting response. The total heat transferred from the hand to the water, as estimated by the area under the middle finger temperature curve, was also dependent upon the induced increase or decrease in Tear and Tsk. We conclude that the characteristics of the hunting temperature response curve of the finger are in part determined by core temperature and Tsk. Both T(fi,min) and the maximal finger temperature during immersion were higher when the core temperature was elevated; Tsk

  15. Local Antiglycan Antibody Responses to Skin Stage and Migratory Schistosomula of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Kies, Christiaan L; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Meeusen, Els N T; Hokke, Cornelis H; van Diepen, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease affecting over 230 million people worldwide. Although effective drug treatment is available, reinfections are common, and development of immunity is slow. Most antibodies raised during schistosome infection are directed against glycans, some of which are thought to be protective. Developing schistosomula are considered most vulnerable to immune attack, and better understanding of local antibody responses raised against glycans expressed by this life stage might reveal possible glycan vaccine candidates for future vaccine research. We used antibody-secreting cell (ASC) probes to characterize local antiglycan antibody responses against migrating Schistosoma japonicum schistosomula in different tissues of rats. Analysis by shotgun Schistosoma glycan microarray resulted in the identification of antiglycan antibody response patterns that reflected the migratory pathway of schistosomula. Antibodies raised by skin lymph node (LN) ASC probes mainly targeted N-glycans with terminal mannose residues, Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc) and Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX). Also, responses to antigenic and schistosome-specific glycosphingolipid (GSL) glycans containing highly fucosylated GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcβ1)n stretches that are believed to be present at the parasite's surface constitutively upon transformation were found. Antibody targets recognized by lung LN ASC probes were mainly N-glycans presenting GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN) and GlcNAc motifs. Surprisingly, antibodies against highly antigenic multifucosylated motifs of GSL glycans were not observed in lung LN ASC probes, indicating that these antigens are not expressed in lung stage schistosomula or are not appropriately exposed to induce immune responses locally. The local antiglycan responses observed in this study highlight the stage- and tissue-specific expression of antigenic parasite glycans and provide insights into glycan targets possibly involved in resistance to S. japonicum infection

  16. Local Antiglycan Antibody Responses to Skin Stage and Migratory Schistosomula of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Cornelis H.; Kies, Christiaan L.; McWilliam, Hamish E. G.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease affecting over 230 million people worldwide. Although effective drug treatment is available, reinfections are common, and development of immunity is slow. Most antibodies raised during schistosome infection are directed against glycans, some of which are thought to be protective. Developing schistosomula are considered most vulnerable to immune attack, and better understanding of local antibody responses raised against glycans expressed by this life stage might reveal possible glycan vaccine candidates for future vaccine research. We used antibody-secreting cell (ASC) probes to characterize local antiglycan antibody responses against migrating Schistosoma japonicum schistosomula in different tissues of rats. Analysis by shotgun Schistosoma glycan microarray resulted in the identification of antiglycan antibody response patterns that reflected the migratory pathway of schistosomula. Antibodies raised by skin lymph node (LN) ASC probes mainly targeted N-glycans with terminal mannose residues, Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc) and Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX). Also, responses to antigenic and schistosome-specific glycosphingolipid (GSL) glycans containing highly fucosylated GalNAcβ1-4(GlcNAcβ1)n stretches that are believed to be present at the parasite's surface constitutively upon transformation were found. Antibody targets recognized by lung LN ASC probes were mainly N-glycans presenting GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN) and GlcNAc motifs. Surprisingly, antibodies against highly antigenic multifucosylated motifs of GSL glycans were not observed in lung LN ASC probes, indicating that these antigens are not expressed in lung stage schistosomula or are not appropriately exposed to induce immune responses locally. The local antiglycan responses observed in this study highlight the stage- and tissue-specific expression of antigenic parasite glycans and provide insights into glycan targets possibly involved in resistance to S. japonicum infection

  17. Topical anaesthesia does not affect cutaneous vasomotor or sudomotor responses in human skin.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, K; Wilson, T E

    2013-10-01

    (1) The effects of local sensory blockade (topical anaesthesia) on eccrine sweat glands and cutaneous circulation are not well understood. This study aimed to determine whether topical lidocaine/prilocaine alters eccrine sweat gland and cutaneous blood vessel responses. (2) Sweating (capacitance hygrometry) was induced via forearm intradermal microdialysis of five acetylcholine (ACh) doses (1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(0) m, 10-fold increments) in control and treated forearm sites in six healthy subjects. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatory (sodium nitroprusside) and adrenergic vasoconstrictor (noradrenaline) agonists were iontophoresed in lidocaine/prilocaine-treated and control forearm skin in nine healthy subjects during blood flow assessment (laser Doppler flowmetry, expressed as% from baseline cutaneous vascular conductance; CVC; flux/mean arterial pressure). (3) Non-linear regression curve fitting identified no change in the ED50 of ACh-induced sweating after sensory blockade (-1.42 ± 0.23 logM) compared to control (-1.27 ± 0.23 logM; P > .05) or in Emax (0.43 ± 0.08 with, 0.53 ± 0.16 mg cm(-2) min(-1) without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > .05). Sensory blockade did not alter the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (1280 ± 548% change from baseline CVC with, 1204 ± 247% without lidocaine/prilocaine) or vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline (-14 ± 4% change from baseline CVC with, -22 ± 14% without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > 0.05). (4) Cutaneous sensory blockade does not appear to alter nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation, adrenergic vasoconstriction, or cholinergic eccrine sweating dose-response sensitivity or responsiveness to maximal dose. Thus, lidocaine/prilocaine treatment should not affect sweat gland function or have blood flow implications for subsequent research protocols or clinical procedures. PMID:23663206

  18. Perceptual responses to microstimulation of single afferents innervating joints, muscles and skin of the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, G; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1990-01-01

    1. Microneurographic techniques were used to isolate single afferent axons within cutaneous and motor fascicles of the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist in thirteen subjects. Of the sixty-five identified afferents, eleven innervated the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints, sixteen innervated muscle spindles, three innervated Golgi tendon organs and thirty-five supplied the glabrous skin of the hand. 2. Intrafascicular stimulation through the recording microelectrode, using trains of constant-voltage positive pulses (0.3-0.8 V, 0.1-0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz) or constant-current biphasic pulses (0.4-13.0 microA, 0.2 ms, 1-100 Hz), evoked specific sensations from sites associated with some afferent species but not others. 3. Microstimulation of eight of the eleven joint afferent sites (73%) evoked specific sensations. With four, subjects reported innocuous deep sensations referred to the relevant joint. With the other four, the subjects reported a sensation of joint displacement that partially reflected the responsiveness of the afferents to joint rotation. 4. Microstimulation of fourteen of the sixteen muscle spindle afferent sites (88%) generated no perceptions when the stimuli did not produce overt movement. However, subjects could correctly detect the slight movements generated when the stimuli excited the motor axons to the parent muscle. 5. With seven of the nine rapidly adapting (type RA or FAI) cutaneous afferents (88%) microstimulation evoked sensations of 'flutter-vibration', and with two of eight slowly adapting (type SAI) afferents (25%) it evoked sensations of 'sustained pressure'. Of the eighteen SAII afferents, which were classified as such by their responses to planar skin stretch, the majority (83%) generated no perceptions, confirming previous work, but three evoked sensations of movements or pressure. 6. The present results suggest a relatively secure transmission of joint afferent traffic to perceptual levels, and it is concluded that the

  19. Skin surface lipids of the domestic chicken, and neutral lipid standards as stimuli for the penetration response of Austrobilharzia variglandis cercariae.

    PubMed

    Zibulewsky, J; Fried, B; Bacha, W J

    1982-10-01

    Lipids were extracted from the skin of 2-wk-old domestic chickens using sterile cotton gauze dampened with chloroform:methanol (2:1). Preparative thin-layer chromatography separated the skin lipids into six major fractions: phospholipids, free sterols, free fatty acids, triglycerides, methyl esters, sterol esters. The penetration response of the marine avian schistosome cercaria, Austrobilharzia variglandis, to chicken skin lipid fractions, and to neutral lipid standards, was tested by coating lipids on agar in a Petri dish containing a seawater overlay. All neutral lipids tested produced significantly greater penetration responses than the chloroform control. The phospholipid skin fraction killed cercariae. Lipid from whole chicken skin produced the greatest penetration response, followed by free fatty acids and free sterol skin fractions. Of the standards tested, the whole neutral lipid standard, containing cholesterol, oleic acid, triolein, methyl oleate, and cholesteryl oleate, produced the greatest response, followed by the cholesterol standard and the oleic acid standard. PMID:7131196

  20. Quantification of sympathetic vascular responses in skin by laser Doppler flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Spence, V A; Wilson, S B; Abbot, N C

    1991-05-01

    An improved physiological test of focal sympathetic nervous function using a laser Doppler flowmeter is presented. The test evaluates rapid reflex changes in skin blood flow at the finger tip where there are abundant arteriovenous anastomoses with dense sympathetic innervation. Indirect body heating was employed in all subjects to induce central vasodilation and to obtain stable comparable finger tip blood flows prior to stimulus. The reflex vasoconstriction which occurs following inspiratory gasp and contralateral hand cold challenge was quantified and its reproducibility investigated on three separate occasions in 20 young subjects. The variability in responses both within and between young subjects was small. The test was applied to 10 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and to 10 age-matched control subjects. Vasoconstrictor reflexes were significantly lower in the diabetic group (p less than 0.005) with responses lower than 2 SD from the mean for age-matched controls. In conclusion, the test provides an assessment of focal autonomic damage which can be applied to other regions of the body rich in arteriovenous anastomoses and may have application in clinical studies investigating autonomic activity. PMID:2060997

  1. Divergent metabolic responses of Apostichopus japonicus suffered from skin ulceration syndrome and pathogen challenge.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yina; Li, Chenghua; Ou, Changrong; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Yali; Su, Xiurong; Li, Ye; Li, Taiwu

    2013-11-13

    Skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) is the main limitation in the development of Apostichopus japonicus culture industries, in which Vibrio splendidus has been well documented as one of the major pathogens. However, the intrinsic mechanisms toward pathogen challenge and disease outbreak remain largely unknown at the metabolic level. In this work, the metabolic responses were investigated in muscles of sea cucumber among natural SUS-diseased and V. splendidus-challenged samples. The pathogen did not induce obvious biological effects in A. japonicus samples after infection for the first 24 h. An enhanced energy storage (or reduced energy demand) and immune responses were observed in V. splendidus-challenged A. japonicus samples at 48 h, as marked by increased glucose and branched chain amino acids, respectively. Afterward, infection of V. splendidus induced significant increases in energy demand in A. japonicus samples at both 72 and 96 h, confirmed by decreased glucose and glycogen, and increased ATP. Surprisingly, high levels of glycogen and glucose and low levels of threonine, alanine, arginine, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and ATP were founded in natural SUS-diseased sea cucumber. Our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interaction for sea cucumber, and informed that the metabolic biomarkers induced by V. splendidus were not usable for the prediction of SUS disease in practice. PMID:24127639

  2. Body visual discontinuity affects feeling of ownership and skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Tieri, Gaetano; Tidoni, Emmanuele; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-01-01

    When we look at our hands we are immediately aware that they belong to us and we rarely doubt about the integrity, continuity and sense of ownership of our bodies. Here we explored whether the mere manipulation of the visual appearance of a virtual limb could influence the subjective feeling of ownership and the physiological responses (Skin Conductance Responses, SCRs) associated to a threatening stimulus approaching the virtual hand. Participants observed in first person perspective a virtual body having the right hand-forearm (i) connected by a normal wrist (Full-Limb) or a thin rigid wire connection (Wire) or (ii) disconnected because of a missing wrist (m-Wrist) or a missing wrist plus a plexiglass panel positioned between the hand and the forearm (Plexiglass). While the analysis of subjective ratings revealed that only the observation of natural full connected virtual limb elicited high levels of ownership, high amplitudes of SCRs were found also during observation of the non-natural, rigid wire connection condition. This result suggests that the conscious embodiment of an artificial limb requires a natural looking visual body appearance while implicit reactivity to threat may require physical body continuity, even non-naturally looking, that allows the implementation of protective reactions to threat. PMID:26602036

  3. One night of partial sleep deprivation affects habituation of hypothalamus and skin conductance responses.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anja C; Blechert, Jens; Sämann, Philipp G; Eidner, Ines; Czisch, Michael; Spoormaker, Victor I

    2014-09-15

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in clinical anxiety, but it remains unclear whether they are cause and/or consequence of this condition. Fear conditioning constitutes a valid laboratory model for the acquisition of normal and pathological anxiety. To explore the relationship between disturbed sleep and anxiety in more detail, the present study evaluated the effect of partial sleep deprivation (SD) on fear conditioning in healthy individuals. The neural correlates of 1) nonassociative learning and physiological processing and 2) associative learning (differential fear conditioning) were addressed. Measurements entailed simultaneous functional MRI, EEG, skin conductance response (SCR), and pulse recordings. Regarding nonassociative learning, partial SD resulted in a generalized failure to habituate during fear conditioning, as evidenced by reduced habituation of SCR and hypothalamus responses to all stimuli. Furthermore, SCR and hypothalamus activity were correlated, supporting their functional relationship. Regarding associative learning, effects of partial SD on the acquisition of conditioned fear were weaker and did not reach statistical significance. The hypothalamus plays an integral role in the regulation of sleep and autonomic arousal. Thus sleep disturbances may play a causal role in the development of normal and possibly pathological fear by increasing the susceptibility of the sympathetic nervous system to stressful experiences. PMID:24920020

  4. Associations between Language Development and Skin Conductance Responses to Faces and Eye Gaze in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagg, Steven D.; Davis, Robert; Heaton, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Attention to social stimuli is associated with language development, and arousal is associated with the increased viewing of stimuli. We investigated whether skin conductance responses (SCRs) are associated with language development in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): a population that shows abnormalities in both attention to others and language…

  5. Skin turgor

    MedlinePlus

    Doughy skin; Poor skin turgor; Good skin turgor; Decreased skin turgor ... Call your health care provider if: Poor skin turgor occurs with vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. The skin is very slow to return to normal, or the skin "tents" up ...

  6. Power source effects of soft plasma jet and the differential response of skin cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pulsed power direct current energy sources were compared using an indirect discharge plasma jet applied to treat cancerous and normal skin cells. Two power supplies with different voltage and current profiles were compared and optimized through the measurement of physical parameters and evaluated through the treatment of skin cells using an atmospheric pressure nitrogen gas plasma jet. Plasma density and temperature, power output, gas output temperature, and reactive species production were measured. Cell morphology, viability, and ROS generation were investigated using staining. A differential response has been shown between the normal and cancerous cell lines. The cancer cells viability reduced while normal cells did not over the same treatment time.

  7. The Lancet Weight Determines Wheal Diameter in Response to Skin Prick Testing with Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Elberling, Jesper; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin prick test (SPT) is a common test for diagnosing immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies. In clinical routine, technicalities, human errors or patient-related biases, occasionally results in suboptimal diagnosis of sensitization. Objective Although not previously assessed qualitatively, lancet weight is hypothesized to be important when performing SPT to minimize the frequency of false positives, false negatives, and unwanted discomfort. Methods Accurate weight-controlled SPT was performed on the volar forearms and backs of 20 healthy subjects. Four predetermined lancet weights were applied (25 g, 85 g, 135 g and 265 g) using two positive control histamine solutions (1 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL) and one negative control (saline). A total of 400 SPTs were conducted. The outcome parameters were: wheal size, neurogenic inflammation (measured by superficial blood perfusion), frequency of bleeding, and the lancet provoked pain response. Results The mean wheal diameter increased significantly as higher weights were applied to the SPT lancet, e.g. from 3.2 ± 0.28 mm at 25 g to 5.4 ± 1.7 mm at 265 g (p<0.01). Similarly, the frequency of bleeding, the provoked pain, and the neurogenic inflammatory response increased significantly. At 265 g saline evoked two wheal responses (/160 pricks) below 3 mm. Conclusion and clinical relevance The applied weight of the lancet during the SPT-procedure is an important factor. Higher lancet weights precipitate significantly larger wheal reactions with potential diagnostic implications. This warrants additional research of the optimal lancet weight in relation to SPT-guidelines to improve the specificity and sensitivity of the procedure. PMID:27213613

  8. DOSE-RESPONSE FOR UV-INDUCED IMMUNE SUPPRESSION IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: DIFFERENCES BASED ON ERYTHEMAL REACTIVITY RATHER THAN SKIN PIGMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to suppress immune responses in human subjects. The purpose of this study was to develop dose responses across a broad range of skin pigmentation in order to facilitate risk assessment. UVR was administered using FS 20 bulbs. Skin pigmentation...

  9. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  10. ATP in human skin elicits a dose-related pain response which is potentiated under conditions of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S G; Warburton, J; Bhattacharjee, A; Ward, J; McMahon, S B

    2000-06-01

    minimal erythymic dose) resulted in double the pain rating of normal skin, increasing from 15.3 +/- 4.1 to 32.7 +/- 4.1. The pain response to saline was not significantly altered after UV irradiation at any time-point studied. We conclude that ATP produces pain by activating capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive afferents when applied to skin. The possibility that ATP activates nociceptors indirectly via its degradation products cannot be ruled out. The effects of ATP are dose-dependent and responses desensitize only slowly. In inflammatory conditions, ATP may be a potent activator of nociceptors and an endogenous mediator of pain. PMID:10825361

  11. DOSE-RESPONSE STUDIES OF SODIUM ARSENITE IN THE SKIN OF K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has previously been observed that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic and/or its metabolites increase(s) tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice. To identify potential biomarkers and modes of action for this skin tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles w...

  12. Epidermal and dermal changes in response to various skin rejuvenation methods.

    PubMed

    Helbig, D; Simon, J C; Paasch, U

    2010-12-01

    During the last years, a number of new devices have been developed to improve the dermal and epidermal signs of photo- and chronological skin ageing. There are well-established ablative and non-ablative skin resurfacing options using different lasers and light sources, but side effects have been observed frequently. A recently developed photorejuvenation method using non-thermal stimulation of skin cells with low energy and narrow band light has been termed photomodulation. Light emitting diodes are the ideal source of this kind of light that stimulate mitochondrial cell organelles leading to up-regulation of cytochrome electron transport pathway leading to mitochondrial DNA gene modulation. This paper reviews the most current knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic changes of ageing and summarizes different systems for skin rejuvenation with focus on non-thermal non-ablative skin rejuvenation modalities. PMID:20572891

  13. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  14. Skin microvascular and metabolic response to pressure relief maneuvers in people with spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Le, Du V. N.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu A.; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-02-01

    Clinician's recommendations on wheelchair pressure reliefs in the context of the high prevalence of pressure ulcers that occur in people with spinal cord injury is not supported by strong experimental evidence. Some data indicates that altered tissue perfusion and oxygenation occurring under pressure loads, such as during sitting, induce various pathophysiologic changes that may lead to pressure ulcers. Pressure causes a cascade of responses, including initial tissue hypoxia, which leads to ischemia, vascular leakage, tissue acidification, compensatory angiogenesis, thrombosis, and hyperemia, all of which may lead to tissue damage. We have developed an advanced skin sensor that allows measurement of oxygenation in addition to perfusion, and can be safely used during sitting. The sensor consists of a set of fiber optics probes, spectroscopic and Laser Doppler techniques that are used to obtain parameters of interest. The overriding goal of this project is to develop the evidence base for clinical recommendations on pressure reliefs. In this paper we will illustrate the experimental apparatus as well as some preliminary results of a small clinical trial conducted at the National Rehabilitation Hospital.

  15. Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2012-05-18

    Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

  16. Quantitative measures of sympathetic skin response in diabetes: relation to sudomotor and neurological function.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D M; Reid, G; Rowley, D A; Abraham, R R

    1992-01-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR) at the foot to a deep inspiration was measured in 68 randomly selected diabetic patients and 46 age matched normal subjects and compared with other quantitative measures of neurological and sudomotor function. SSR was obtained in all but three diabetic patients. The upper limit of normal for the onset latency was 2202 ms and the lower limit for the amplitude of the first wave 92 microV. Ten diabetic patients had measurable but prolonged latencies, and 11 had measurable but low amplitudes. There were no significant associations between latency, height, and age, but in insulin dependent patients there was a significant diminution of response amplitude with increasing duration of diabetes. Latency was weakly associated with Marstock thermal thresholds, respiratory RR variation, and common peroneal nerve conduction velocity. SSR amplitude was associated with the density of pilocarpine activatable sweatspots in the same region of the foot. Patients with abnormal latencies were significantly older and had reduced thermal sensation than those with normal latencies. Median coefficients of variation for repeat testing in diabetic patients were 9% for latency and 13% for amplitude. The test is objective and reproducible, but latency measurements reflect conduction in a long multineuronal pathway and are not purely a measure of peripheral C fibre function; amplitude measurements reflect the density of spontaneously activable sweat glands and are therefore a valid measure of peripheral sympathetic activity, though they depend more on temperature than do latencies (mean change over the range 32-34 degrees C; 8.5% degrees C for amplitude, -2.5%/degrees C for latency). Images PMID:1331334

  17. Galvanic corrosion study of container materials using zero resistance ammeter

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A. K., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel separately coupled to six different corrosion-resistant alloys was investigated in an acidic brine (pHa2.70) at 30{degree}C 60{degree}C and 80{degree}C using zero resistance ammeter technique. The corrosion-resistant alloys include Alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4 and C-22; and Ti Grade-12, which were coupled to A 516 steel at an anode-to- cathode area ratio of one. The galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as a function of time at all three temperatures. Optical microscopic examination was also performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface degradation due to galvanic coupling. The overall results are presented in this paper.

  18. 1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. South approach, looking north. The galvanized piping extends from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South approach, looking north. The galvanized piping extends from the abutments across the length of the arch. - Weaverland Bridge, Quarry Road spanning Conestoga Creek, Terre Hill, Lancaster County, PA

  20. Technical report on galvanic cells with fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Crouthamel, C. E.; Fischer, A. K.; Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Johnson, C. E.; Shimotake, H.; Tevebaugh, A. D.

    1969-01-01

    Technical report is presented on sodium and lithium cells using fused salt electrolytes. It includes a discussion of the thermally regenerative galvanic cell and the secondary bimetallic cell for storage of electricity.

  1. Iron serves as diffusion barrier in thermally regenerative galvanic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouthamel, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Pure iron or iron-coated diaphragm provides a hydrogen diffusion electrode for a thermally regenerative galvanic cell. It allows the gas to diffuse through its interatomic spaces and resists the corrosive action of the cell environment.

  2. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  3. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  4. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  5. Different oxidative stress response in keratinocytes and fibroblasts of reconstructed skin exposed to non extreme daily-ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Pierrard, Cécile; Lejeune, François; Sok, Juliette; Thomas, Marie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Experiments characterizing the biological effects of sun exposure have usually involved solar simulators. However, they addressed the worst case scenario i.e. zenithal sun, rarely found in common outdoor activities. A non-extreme ultraviolet radiation (UV) spectrum referred as "daily UV radiation" (DUVR) with a higher UVA (320-400 nm) to UVB (280-320 nm) irradiance ratio has therefore been defined. In this study, the biological impact of an acute exposure to low physiological doses of DUVR (corresponding to 10 and 20% of the dose received per day in Paris mid-April) on a 3 dimensional reconstructed skin model, was analysed. In such conditions, epidermal and dermal morphological alterations could only be detected after the highest dose of DUVR. We then focused on oxidative stress response induced by DUVR, by analyzing the modulation of mRNA level of 24 markers in parallel in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. DUVR significantly modulated mRNA levels of these markers in both cell types. A cell type differential response was noticed: it was faster in fibroblasts, with a majority of inductions and high levels of modulation in contrast to keratinocyte response. Our results thus revealed a higher sensitivity in response to oxidative stress of dermal fibroblasts although located deeper in the skin, giving new insights into the skin biological events occurring in everyday UV exposure. PMID:20706594

  6. Different Oxidative Stress Response in Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts of Reconstructed Skin Exposed to Non Extreme Daily-Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Marionnet, Claire; Pierrard, Cécile; Lejeune, François; Sok, Juliette; Thomas, Marie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Experiments characterizing the biological effects of sun exposure have usually involved solar simulators. However, they addressed the worst case scenario i.e. zenithal sun, rarely found in common outdoor activities. A non-extreme ultraviolet radiation (UV) spectrum referred as “daily UV radiation” (DUVR) with a higher UVA (320–400 nm) to UVB (280–320 nm) irradiance ratio has therefore been defined. In this study, the biological impact of an acute exposure to low physiological doses of DUVR (corresponding to 10 and 20% of the dose received per day in Paris mid-April) on a 3 dimensional reconstructed skin model, was analysed. In such conditions, epidermal and dermal morphological alterations could only be detected after the highest dose of DUVR. We then focused on oxidative stress response induced by DUVR, by analyzing the modulation of mRNA level of 24 markers in parallel in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. DUVR significantly modulated mRNA levels of these markers in both cell types. A cell type differential response was noticed: it was faster in fibroblasts, with a majority of inductions and high levels of modulation in contrast to keratinocyte response. Our results thus revealed a higher sensitivity in response to oxidative stress of dermal fibroblasts although located deeper in the skin, giving new insights into the skin biological events occurring in everyday UV exposure. PMID:20706594

  7. Measurements of skin temperature responses to cold exposure of foot and face in healthy individuals: variability and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Lipponen, Jukka A; Eskelinen, Perttu; Tarvainen, Mika P; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Närhi, Matti

    2011-07-01

    Skin vasomotor responses to cold exposure (CE) have been measured widely and shown to be abnormal in some clinical conditions. Among other methods, monitoring of skin temperature (Tsk) changes has been applied for those purposes. We investigated such changes simultaneously in different skin areas of healthy young men during foot and facial CE. Tsk was measured using infrared thermography in the big toe and dorsum of the left foot and with a contact thermode in the fingertip. The relationship of Tsk responses within individuals and factors influencing them were examined using mixed model analysis. Tsk changes varied greatly between sessions, measured areas and individuals. Foot CE that was painful produced both stronger central circulatory and Tsk responses than facial CE. Tsk changes were prominent in the fingertip, moderate in the toe and weak or absent in the dorsal foot. The Tsk changes were related to the baseline levels and changes of blood pressure, heart rate, the baseline Tsk values and stimulus intensity. However, despite the different cold stimuli and measurement techniques, an intra-individual correlation of the Tsk responses was good. In the foot, the big toe area is applicable for studies of Tsk reactions when warm, and the modified Tsk gradient helps to evaluate the level of peripheral vasoconstriction. The cold-induced Tsk changes may be informative in the studies of the cutaneous vasoregulation but the individual character of the cold stress reactivity and numerous confusing factors should be considered when drawing conclusions on the basis of the recorded results. PMID:21672139

  8. Enhanced memory responses to H1N1 influenza vaccination in the skin using vaccine coated-microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Quan, Fu-Shi; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Morbidity and mortality due to influenza could be reduced by improved vaccination. Methods To develop a novel skin delivery method for simple and self administration, we prepared microneedle patches with stabilized influenza vaccine and investigated their protective immune responses. Results Mice immunized by a single microneedle dose of trehalose-stabilized influenza vaccine developed strong antibody responses that were long-lived. Compared to traditional intramuscular immunization, stabilized microneedle vaccination was superior in inducing protective immunity as evidenced by efficient lung viral clearance and enhanced humoral and antibody secreting cell immune responses after lethal challenge. Vaccine stabilization was found to be important, because mice immunized with an unstabilized microneedle vaccine elicited weaker IgG2a antibody response and were only partially protected against viral challenge. Improved trafficking of dendritic cells to regional lymph nodes by microneedle delivery to the skin might play a role in contributing to improved protective immunity. Conclusions These findings suggest that vaccination in the skin using a microneedle patch can improve protective efficacy, induce long-term sustained immunogenicity, and may provide a simple method of administration to improve influenza vaccination. PMID:20017632

  9. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D.; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400–700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions. PMID:26121474

  10. The remote sensing of mental stress from the electromagnetic reflection coefficient of human skin in the sub-THz range.

    PubMed

    Safrai, Eli; Ishai, Paul Ben; Caduff, Andreas; Puzenko, Alexander; Polsman, Alexander; Agranat, Aharon J; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the reflection coefficient of human skin in the frequency range from 95 to 110 GHz (W band) mirrors the temporal relaxation of stress induced by physical exercise. In this work, we extend these findings to show that in the event of a subtle trigger to stress, such as mental activity, a similar picture of response emerges. Furthermore, the findings are extended to cover not only the W band (75-110 GHz), but also the frequency band from 110 to 170 GHz (D band). We demonstrate that mental stress, induced by the Stroop effect and recorded by the galvanic skin response (GSR), can be correlated to the reflection coefficient in the aforementioned frequency bands. Intriguingly, a light physical stress caused by repeated hand gripping clearly showed an elevated stress level in the GSR signal, but was largely unnoted in the reflection coefficient in the D band. The implication of this observation requires further validation. PMID:22170380

  11. Galvanic Corrosion of Coated Al Alloy Panels with More Noble Fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhicao

    A test sample incorporating a painted Al alloy panel, uncoated through-hole fasteners, and scribes has been shown to provide accelerated response during atmospheric corrosion testing in the field and in laboratory chambers. Several different aspects of this test sample and the behavior of different coating systems are investigated in this dissertation. The galvanic current between SS316 or Ti-6Al-4V fasteners and painted and scribed AA7075-T6 panels was examined during exposure in a salt fog chamber using a zero-resistance ammeter. The anodic current of the AA7075-T6 panel and the cathodic current of each of the four fasteners were monitored using different connection schemes. The anodic current of the panel depended on the number of fasteners connected. The total cathodic current of fasteners was approximately equal to the anodic current of the AA7075-T6 panel, which validates the accuracy of the current measurement. Furthermore, galvanic interaction between the fasteners was observed such that the cathodic current of other fasteners was decreased when a new fastener was added to the measurement. Scribes on a panel can interact with distant fasteners, not just the closest ones. The amount of corrosion as determined by charge and optical profilometry were close and indicated SS316 fasteners caused more corrosion attack than Ti-6Al-4V fasteners. The galvanic current of an AA7075-T6 panel coupled with mixed SS316 and Ti-6Al-4V fasteners was monitored using a zero-resistance ammeter during 3 weeks exposure in an ASTM B117 chamber or immersed in 5 wt% NaCl solution. SS316 fasteners provided more cathodic current than Ti in both environments and the current in ASTM B117 was higher than in 5 wt% NaCl solution due to greater oxygen availability. The integral of the anodic current with time and optical profilometery (OP) analysis were used to assess the corrosion attack quantitatively for two different coating systems. An acceleration factor was defined to represent the

  12. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI) before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm), mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is observed in afferent

  13. The effect of heating rate on the cutaneous vasomotion responses of forearm and leg skin in humans.

    PubMed

    Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Miller, James T; Hodges, Gary J

    2016-05-01

    We examined skin blood flow (SkBF) and vasomotion in the forearm and leg using laser-Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) and spectral analysis to investigate endothelial, sympathetic, and myogenic activities in response to slow (0.1°C·10s(-1)) and fast (0.5°C·10s(-1)) local heating. At 33°C (thermoneutral) endothelial activity was higher in the legs than the forearms (P≤0.02). Fast-heating increased SkBF more than slow heating (P=0.037 forearm; P=0.002 leg). At onset of 42°C, endothelial (P=0.043 forearm; P=0.48 leg) activity increased in both regions during the fast-heating protocol. Following prolonged heating (42°C) endothelial activity was higher in both the forearm (P=0.002) and leg (P<0.001) following fast-heating. These results confirm regional differences in the response to local heating and suggest that the greater increase in SkBF in response to fast local heating is initially due to increased endothelial and sympathetic activity. Furthermore, with sustained local skin heating, greater vasodilatation was observed with fast heating compared to slow heating. These data indicate that this difference is due to greater endothelial activity following fast heating compared to slow heating, suggesting that the rate of skin heating may alter the mechanisms contributing to cutaneous vasodilatation. PMID:26808211

  14. Study of fibroblast gene expression in response to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide or UVA with skin aging.

    PubMed

    Hazane-Puch, Florence; Bonnet, Mathilde; Valenti, Kita; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Favier, Alain; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The skin aging process, implying oxidative stress, is associated with specific gene expression. Ultraviolet A (UVA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) making them relevant in the study of skin cell responses to oxidative stresses. To investigate transcript expression associated with chronological skin aging and its modulation by two oxidative stresses, cDNA micro-arrays, composed of a set of 81 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones, were used to probe the patterns of transcript expression in human fibroblasts of five young (< 21 years-old) and five older (> 50 years-old) healthy females at basal levels and 24 h after exposure to UVA (7 J/cm2) and H(2)O(2) (20 mM). At the basal state, 22% of total genes were up-regulated in the older group. Although both stresses led to the same cell mortality, H(2)O(2) induced a stronger modulation of gene expression than UVA, with 19.5% of transcripts up-regulated versus 4%. The aging process affected the response to H(2)O(2) and even though cells from old donors presented higher basal levels of transcripts they were not able to regulate them in response to the stress. Interestingly, UVA had a specific strong inhibitory effect on the expression of chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2) transcript, suggesting a possible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. PMID:20299309

  15. Noninvasive In Vivo Imaging to Evaluate Immune Responses and Antimicrobial Therapy against Staphylococcus aureus and USA300 MRSA Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Zussman, Jamie; Donegan, Niles P.; Irene Ramos, Romela; Garcia, Nairy C.; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Simon, Scott I.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus skin infections represent a significant public health threat because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As greater understanding of protective immune responses and more effective antimicrobial therapies are needed, a S. aureus skin wound infection model was developed in which full-thickness scalpel cuts on the backs of mice were infected with a bioluminescent S. aureus (methicillin sensitive) or USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain and in vivo imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the bacterial burden. In addition, the infection-induced inflammatory response was quantified using in vivo fluorescence imaging of LysEGFP mice. Using this model, we found that both IL-1α and IL-1β contributed to host defense during a wound infection, whereas IL-1β was more critical during an intradermal S. aureus infection. Furthermore, treatment of a USA300 MRSA skin infection with retapamulin ointment resulted in up to 85-fold reduction in bacterial burden and a 53% decrease in infection-induced inflammation. In contrast, mupirocin ointment had minimal clinical activity against this USA300 strain, resulting in only a 2-fold reduction in bacterial burden. Taken together, this S. aureus wound infection model provides a valuable preclinical screening method to investigate cutaneous immune responses and the efficacy of topical antimicrobial therapies. PMID:21191403

  16. Responses to hyperthermia. Optimizing heat dissipation by convection and evaporation: Neural control of skin blood flow and sweating in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline J; Johnson, John M

    2016-04-01

    Under normothermic, resting conditions, humans dissipate heat from the body at a rate approximately equal to heat production. Small discrepancies between heat production and heat elimination would, over time, lead to significant changes in heat storage and body temperature. When heat production or environmental temperature is high the challenge of maintaining heat balance is much greater. This matching of heat elimination with heat production is a function of the skin circulation facilitating heat transport to the body surface and sweating, enabling evaporative heat loss. These processes are manifestations of the autonomic control of cutaneous vasomotor and sudomotor functions and form the basis of this review. We focus on these systems in the responses to hyperthermia. In particular, the cutaneous vascular responses to heat stress and the current understanding of the neurovascular mechanisms involved. The available research regarding cutaneous active vasodilation and vasoconstriction is highlighted, with emphasis on active vasodilation as a major responder to heat stress. Involvement of the vasoconstrictor and active vasodilator controls of the skin circulation in the context of heat stress and nonthermoregulatory reflexes (blood pressure, exercise) are also considered. Autonomic involvement in the cutaneous vascular responses to direct heating and cooling of the skin are also discussed. We examine the autonomic control of sweating, including cholinergic and noncholinergic mechanisms, the local control of sweating, thermoregulatory and nonthermoregulatory reflex control and the possible relationship between sudomotor and cutaneous vasodilator function. Finally, we comment on the clinical relevance of these control schemes in conditions of autonomic dysfunction. PMID:26830064

  17. Patterning of colloidal particles in the galvanic microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Linda

    A Cu-Au galvanic microreactor is used to demonstrate the autonomous patterning of two-dimensional colloidal crystals with spatial and orientational order which are adherent to the electrode substrate. The microreactor is comprised of a patterned array of copper and gold microelectrodes in a coplanar arrangement that is immersed in a dilute hydrochloric acid solution in which colloidal polystyrene microspheres are suspended. During the electrochemical dissolution of copper, polystyrene colloids are transported to the copper electrodes. The spatial arrangement of the electrodes determines whether the colloids initiate aggregation at the edges or centers of the copper electrodes. Depending on the microreactor parameters, two-dimensional colloidal crystals can form and adhere to the electrode. This thesis investigates the mechanisms governing the autonomous particle motion, the directed particle trajectory (inner- versus edge-aggregation) as affected by the spatial patterning of the electrodes, and the adherence of the colloidal particles onto the substrate. Using in situ current density measurements, particle velocimetry, and order-of-magnitude arguments, it is shown that particle motion is governed by bulk fluid motion and electrophoresis induced by the electrochemical reactions. Bulk electrolyte flow is most likely driven by electrochemical potential gradients of reaction products formed during the inhomogeneous copper dissolution, particularly due to localized high current density at the electrode junction. Preferential aggregation of the colloidal particles resulting in inner- and edge-aggregation is influenced by changes to the flow pattern in response to difference in current density profiles as affected by the spatial patterning of the electrode. Finally, by determining the onset of particle cementation through particle tracking analysis, and by monitoring the deposition of reaction products through the observation of color changes of the galvanic electrodes in

  18. Application of Concanavalin A during immune responsiveness skin-swelling tests facilitates measurement interpretation in mammalian ecology.

    PubMed

    Bílková, Barbora; Albrecht, Tomáš; Chudíčková, Milada; Holáň, Vladimír; Piálek, Jaroslav; Vinkler, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The skin-swelling test is a simple and widespread method used in field ecological research to estimate cellular immune responsiveness in animals. This immunoecological test is based on measuring the magnitude of tissue swelling response at specific times following subcutaneous application of an experimental pro-inflammatory stimulant. In the vast majority of studies across vertebrate taxa, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is used as a universal stimulant. Given the complexity of immune response activation pathways of PHA, however, interpretation of test results can be ambiguous. Goal of this study was to improve methodology of the skin-swelling test to decrease this ambiguity. Here, we present an alternative protocol aimed at facilitating interpretation of skin-swelling data for mammals. Based on previous evidence suggesting that mammalian T cells are readily activated by Concanavalin A (ConA) in vitro, we compared cellular immune responses in vivo to PHA and ConA as an alternative pro-inflammatory stimulant in mice. We measured magnitude of tissue swelling and compared it with intensity of blood cell infiltration into tissue over a 72-hour interval. Our results corroborate that PHA and ConA show important differences in both dynamics and response amplitude in rodents. ConA induces stronger swelling with a distinct leukocyte activity pattern and higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin 6 [IL-6] and interferon gamma[IFN-γ]) expression than PHA during peak response (24-h post-treatment). Furthermore, unlike PHA, magnitude of swelling was positively associated with cellular activity (number of neutrophils infiltrating tissue) following ConA injection. We conclude that ConA is the more suitable stimulant for skin-swelling tests in mammals. This is because of the molecular binding specificity in the two lectins, that is, ConA specifically activates T cells while PHA also triggers erythroagglutination. We propose that ConA be used in all future ecological testing in

  19. Galvanic gold plating for fixed dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Tuncer Burak; Yilmaz, Burak

    2013-01-01

    Metal ceramic partial fixed dental prostheses have been commonly used for the replacement of missing teeth for many years. Because of an increase in the price of gold, base metal alloys have been the choice of alloy for the fabrication of metal ceramic restorations in many dental clinics. Some major disadvantages of base metals are their corrosion and the dark coloration they may cause at the crown margins. This article describes a galvanic gold-plating technique, which is used to minimize corrosion and improve the esthetics of metal ceramic restorations fabricated with Cr-Co base metal alloys. This technique involves the deposition of a 6 μm to 8 μm 24 K gold layer directly onto the Cr-Co cast prosthesis framework. The technique improves metal surface properties, making them more biocompatible and usable, however, requires additional equipment and experienced laboratory technicians. Clinical studies should be performed to corroborate the long term success of this technique. PMID:24926220

  20. Passive Resonant Bidirectional Converter with Galvanic Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblad, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A passive resonant bidirectional converter system that transports energy across a galvanic barrier includes a converter using at least first and second converter sections, each section including a pair of transfer terminals, a center tapped winding; a chopper circuit interconnected between the center tapped winding and one of the transfer terminals; an inductance feed winding interconnected between the other of the transfer terminals and the center tap and a resonant tank circuit including at least the inductance of the center tap winding and the parasitic capacitance of the chopper circuit for operating the converter section at resonance; the center tapped windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a first common winding core and the inductance feed windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a second common winding core for automatically synchronizing the resonant oscillation of the first and second converter sections and transferring energy between the converter sections until the voltage across the pairs of transfer terminals achieves the turns ratio of the center tapped windings.

  1. Autonomous colloidal crystallization in a galvanic microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punckt, Christian; Jan, Linda; Jiang, Peng; Frewen, Thomas A.; Saville, Dudley A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2012-10-01

    We report on a technique that utilizes an array of galvanic microreactors to guide the assembly of two-dimensional colloidal crystals with spatial and orientational order. Our system is comprised of an array of copper and gold electrodes in a coplanar arrangement, immersed in a dilute hydrochloric acid solution in which colloidal micro-spheres of polystyrene and silica are suspended. Under optimized conditions, two-dimensional colloidal crystals form at the anodic copper with patterns and crystal orientation governed by the electrode geometry. After the aggregation process, the colloidal particles are cemented to the substrate by co-deposition of reaction products. As we vary the electrode geometry, the dissolution rate of the copper electrodes is altered. This way, we control the colloidal motion as well as the degree of reaction product formation. We show that particle motion is governed by a combination of electrokinetic effects acting directly on the colloidal particles and bulk electrolyte flow generated at the copper-gold interface.

  2. Simulation of the effect of photoprotective titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles on the thermal response and optical characteristics of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, I. V.; Seteikin, A. Yu.; Popov, A. P.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal response of skin covered with a mixture of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles of optimal sizes and irradiated by sunlight has been calculated. The nanoparticles were rubbed into the skin for maximum protection against the incident radiation. The dependences of the temperature dynamics in different skin layers (corneal layer, epidermis, dermis) have been obtained and analyzed upon skin irradiation with light at a wavelength of 310-800 nm. It has been found that increasing light scattering and absorption due to the nanoparticles introduced into the corneal layer resulted in a decrease in the thermal load and penetration depth of the incident radiation.

  3. Uremic pruritus: skin divalent ion content and response to ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Blachley, J D; Blankenship, D M; Menter, A; Parker, T F; Knochel, J P

    1985-05-01

    Pruritus is a frequent and troublesome consequence of end-stage renal disease. We have surveyed 155 chronic dialysis patients and found pruritus to be a significant problem in approximately 70%. Seventeen patients reporting severe pruritus were treated thrice weekly with total body exposure to either UVA or UVB light. UVB light resulted in resolution of pruritus in all cases. UVA light was without significant effect. Skin biopsies obtained before and after UV phototherapy revealed elevated contents of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in all pruritic patients. The resolution of pruritus following UVB treatment was associated with a reduction of skin phosphorus to values comparable with nonpruritic uremics or healthy volunteers. Uremic pruritus may be due to increased skin divalent ion content resulting in microprecipitation of calcium or magnesium phosphate. PMID:4003393

  4. Activin enhances skin tumourigenesis and malignant progression by inducing a pro-tumourigenic immune cell response

    PubMed Central

    Antsiferova, Maria; Huber, Marcel; Meyer, Michael; Piwko-Czuchra, Aleksandra; Ramadan, Tamara; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Havran, Wendy L.; Dummer, Reinhard; Hohl, Daniel; Werner, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Activin is an important orchestrator of wound repair, but its potential role in skin carcinogenesis has not been addressed. Here we show using different types of genetically modified mice that enhanced levels of activin in the skin promote skin tumour formation and their malignant progression through induction of a pro-tumourigenic microenvironment. This includes accumulation of tumour-promoting Langerhans cells and regulatory T cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, activin inhibits proliferation of tumour-suppressive epidermal γδ T cells, resulting in their progressive loss during tumour promotion. An increase in activin expression was also found in human cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas when compared with control tissue. These findings highlight the parallels between wound healing and cancer, and suggest inhibition of activin action as a promising strategy for the treatment of cancers overexpressing this factor. PMID:22146395

  5. Developmental and Metabolic Plasticity of White-Skinned Grape Berries in Response to Botrytis cinerea during Noble Rot1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Thomas S.; Vicente, Ariel R.; Doyle, Carolyn L.; Ye, Zirou; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2015-01-01

    Noble rot results from exceptional infections of ripe grape (Vitis vinifera) berries by Botrytis cinerea. Unlike bunch rot, noble rot promotes favorable changes in grape berries and the accumulation of secondary metabolites that enhance wine grape composition. Noble rot-infected berries of cv Sémillon, a white-skinned variety, were collected over 3 years from a commercial vineyard at the same time that fruit were harvested for botrytized wine production. Using an integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that noble rot alters the metabolism of cv Sémillon berries by inducing biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as ripening processes. During noble rot, B. cinerea induced the expression of key regulators of ripening-associated pathways, some of which are distinctive to the normal ripening of red-skinned cultivars. Enhancement of phenylpropanoid metabolism, characterized by a restricted flux in white-skinned berries, was a common outcome of noble rot and red-skinned berry ripening. Transcript and metabolite analyses together with enzymatic assays determined that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a consistent hallmark of noble rot in cv Sémillon berries. The biosynthesis of terpenes and fatty acid aroma precursors also increased during noble rot. We finally characterized the impact of noble rot in botrytized wines. Altogether, the results of this work demonstrated that noble rot causes a major reprogramming of berry development and metabolism. This desirable interaction between a fruit and a fungus stimulates pathways otherwise inactive in white-skinned berries, leading to a greater accumulation of compounds involved in the unique flavor and aroma of botrytized wines. PMID:26450706

  6. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  7. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  8. Acute and long-term transcriptional responses in sulfur mustard-exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Vallet, V; Poyot, T; Cléry-Barraud, C; Coulon, D; Sentenac, C; Peinnequin, A; Boudry, I

    2012-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) ranks among the alkylating chemical warfare agents. Skin contact with HD produces an inflammatory response that evolves into separation at the epidermal-dermal junction conducting to blistering and epidermis necrosis. Up to now, current treatment strategies of HD burns have solely consisted in symptomatic management of skin damage. Therapeutic efficacy studies are still being conducted; classically using appropriate animal skin toxicity models. In order to substantiate the use of SKH-1 hairless mouse as an appropriate model for HD-induced skin lesions, we investigate the time-dependent quantitative gene expression of various selected transcripts associated to the dorsal skin exposure to HD saturated vapors. Using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the expression of interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, macrophage inflammatory proteins (MIP)-2α (also called Cxcl2) and MIP-1αR (also called Ccr1), matrix metalloproteases (MMP-9 and MMP-2), laminin γ2 monomer (Lamc2) and keratin (K)1 was determined up to 21 days after HD challenge in order to allow enough time for wound repair to begin. Specific transcript RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that IL-6, IL-1β, Ccr1, Cxcl2 mRNA levels increased as early as 6 h in HD-exposed skins and remained up-regulated over a 14-day period. Topical application of HD also significantly up-regulated MMP-9, TNF-α, and Lamc2 expression at specific time points. In contrast, MMP-2 mRNA levels remained unaffected by HD over the time-period considered, whereas that long-term study revealed that K1 mRNA level significantly increased only 21 days after HD challenge. Our study hereby provides first-hand evidence to substantiate a long period variation expression in the inflammatory cytokine, MMPs and structural components following cutaneous HD exposure in hairless mouse SKH-1. Our data credit the use of SKH-1 for investigating mechanisms of HD-induced skin toxicity and for

  9. Biocompatible films with tailored spectral response for prevention of DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Lozano, Rebeca; Pimentel, Belén; Castro-Smirnov, José R; Calvo, Mauricio E; Míguez, Hernán; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-09-16

    A hybrid nanostructured organic-in-organic biocompatible film capable of efficiently blocking a preselected range of ultraviolet light is designed to match the genotoxic action spectrum of human epithelial cells. This stack protects cultured human skin cells from UV-induced DNA lesions. As the shielding mechanism relies exclusively on reflection, the secondary effects due to absorption harmful radiation are prevented. PMID:26149339

  10. Bovine Tuberculosis: Effect of the Tuberculin Skin Test on In vitro Interferon gamma Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease of zoonotic and economic importance. In many countries, control is based on test and slaughter policies and/or abattoir surveillance. For testing, cell mediated immune- (CMI-) based assays (i.e., Tuberculin skin test (TST) supplemented by the interferon gamma (...

  11. Early mucosal responses in blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) skin to Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens are well-equipped to detect, adhere to, and initiate infection in their finfish hosts. The mucosal surfaces of fish, such as the skin, function as the front line of defense against such bacterial insults that are routinely encountered in the aquatic environment. While recent prog...

  12. Surface Lipids as Multifunctional Mediators of Skin Responses to Environmental Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Chiara; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Skin surface lipid (SSL) film is a mixture of sebum and keratinocyte membrane lipids, protecting skin from environment. Its composition is unique for the high percentage of long chain fatty acids, and of the polyterpenoid squalene, absent in other human tissues, and in non-human Primates sebum. Here, the still incomplete body of information on SSL as mediators of external chemical, physical, and microbial signals and stressors is revised, focusing on the central event of the continuous oxidative modification induced by the metabolic activity of residential and pathological microbial flora, natural or iatrogenic UV irradiation, exposure to chemicals and cosmetics. Once alpha-tocopherol and ubiquinol-10 antioxidant defences of SSL are overcome, oxidation of squalene and cholesterol gives rise to reactive by-products penetrating deeper into skin layers, to mediate local defensive inflammatory, photo-protective, immune reactions or, at higher concentrations, inducing local but also systemic immune depression, ultimately implicating skin cancerogenesis. Qualitative modifications of SSL represent a pathogenetic sign of diagnostic value in dermatological disorders involving altered sebum production, like pytiriasis versicolor, acne, atopic or seborrheic dermatitis, as well as photo-aging. Achievements of nutriceutical interventions aimed at restoring normal SSL composition and homeostasis are discussed, as feasible therapeutic goals and major means of photo-protection. PMID:20981292

  13. Dextran hydrogel scaffolds enhance angiogenic responses and promote complete skin regeneration during burn wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Zhang, Xianjie; Shen, Yu-I; Sebastian, Raul; Dickinson, Laura E; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Reinblatt, Maura; Steenbergen, Charles; Harmon, John W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-12-27

    Neovascularization is a critical determinant of wound-healing outcomes for deep burn injuries. We hypothesize that dextran-based hydrogels can serve as instructive scaffolds to promote neovascularization and skin regeneration in third-degree burn wounds. Dextran hydrogels are soft and pliable, offering opportunities to improve the management of burn wound treatment. We first developed a procedure to treat burn wounds on mice with dextran hydrogels. In this procedure, we followed clinical practice of wound excision to remove full-thickness burned skin, and then covered the wound with the dextran hydrogel and a dressing layer. Our procedure allows the hydrogel to remain intact and securely in place during the entire healing period, thus offering opportunities to simplify the management of burn wound treatment. A 3-week comparative study indicated that dextran hydrogel promoted dermal regeneration with complete skin appendages. The hydrogel scaffold facilitated early inflammatory cell infiltration that led to its rapid degradation, promoting the infiltration of angiogenic cells into the healing wounds. Endothelial cells homed into the hydrogel scaffolds to enable neovascularization by day 7, resulting in an increased blood flow significantly greater than treated and untreated controls. By day 21, burn wounds treated with hydrogel developed a mature epithelial structure with hair follicles and sebaceous glands. After 5 weeks of treatment, the hydrogel scaffolds promoted new hair growth and epidermal morphology and thickness similar to normal mouse skin. Collectively, our evidence shows that customized dextran-based hydrogel alone, with no additional growth factors, cytokines, or cells, promoted remarkable neovascularization and skin regeneration and may lead to novel treatments for dermal wounds. PMID:22171002

  14. Enkephalins and dorsal horn neurones of the cat: effects on responses to noxious and innocuous skin stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, A W; Hall, J G; Headley, P M

    1977-01-01

    1. In spinal cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose, a study was made of the effects of methionine enkephalin and methionine enkephalin amide on the responses of neurones of spinal laminae IV and V to noxious and innocuous skin stimuli. The enkephalins were ejected from micropipettes either in the region of cell bodies or in the substantia gelatinosa. 2. Administered near cell bodies the enkephalins reduced spontaneous firing and cell responses to both types of skin stimuli. These effects were antagonized by naloxone when administered near cell bodies but not when given intravenously in doses (0.3-0.6 mg/kg) more than adequate to antagonize analgesic doses of morphine. 3. Administered in the substantia gelatinosa the enkephalins were more selective in their action. The predominant effect was a reduction in nociceptive responses with little effect on non-nociceptive responses although spontaneous firing was commonly reduced. Naloxone administered either in the substantia gelatinosa or intravenously (0.1-0.3 mg/kg) reversed these effects of the enkephalins. PMID:588805

  15. The Response of Human Skin Commensal Bacteria as a Reflection of UV Radiation: UV-B Decreases Porphyrin Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhan; Zhu, Wenhong; Shu, Muya; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L.; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Recent global radiation fears reflect the urgent need for a new modality that can simply determine if people are in a radiation risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been thought to be the major risk factor for most skin cancers. Although various biomarkers derived from the responses of human cells have been revealed, detection of these biomarkers is cumbersome, probably requires taking live human tissues, and varies significantly depending on human immune status. Here we hypothesize that the reaction of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a human resident skin commensal, to UV radiation can serve as early surrogate markers for radiation risk because the bacteria are immediately responsive to radiation. In addition, the bacteria can be readily accessible and exposed to the same field of radiation as human body. To test our hypothesis, P. acnes was exposed to UV-B radiation. The production of porphyrins in P. acnes was significantly reduced with increasing doses of UV-B. The porphyrin reduction can be detected in both P. acnes and human skin bacterial isolates. Exposure of UV-B to P. acnes- inoculated mice led to a significant decrease in porphyrin production in a single colony of P. acnes and simultaneously induced the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the epidermal layers of mouse skin. Mass spectrometric analysis via a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ)-Orbitrap XL showed that five peptides including an internal peptide (THLPTGIVVSCQNER) of a peptide chain release factor 2 (RF2) were oxidized by UV-B. Seven peptides including three internal peptides of 60 kDa chaperonin 1 were de-oxidized by UV-B. When compared to UV-B, gamma radiation also decreased the porphyrin production of P. acnes in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a different signature of protein oxidation/de-oxidation. We highlight that uncovering response of skin microbiome to radiation will facilitate the development of pre-symptomatic diagnosis

  16. A microfluidic galvanic cell on a single layer of paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Krutarth H.; Emrani, Saina; Rodriguez, Sandra; Liaw, Shi-Shen; Pham, Linda; Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Gomez, Frank A.; Haan, John L.

    2016-06-01

    Paper microfluidics is used to produce single layer galvanic and hybrid cells to produce energy that could power paper-based analytical sensors. When two aqueous streams are absorbed onto paper to establish co-laminar flow, the streams stay in contact with each other with limited mixing. The interface at which mixing occurs acts as a charge-transfer region, eliminating the need for a salt bridge. We designed a Cusbnd Zn galvanic cell that powers an LED when two are placed in series. We also used more powerful redox couples (formate and silver, formate and permanganate) to produce higher power density (18 and 3.1 mW mg-1 Pd). These power densities are greater than previously reported paper microfluidic fuel cells using formate or methanol. The single layer design is much more simplified than previous reports of multi-layer galvanic cells on paper.

  17. Guided colloidal crystallization in a galvanic micro reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punckt, Christian; Jan, Linda; Khusid, Boris; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2009-11-01

    We present a novel method for assembling colloidal particles into an ordered coplanar array of two-dimensional crystals. This technique utilizes an autonomous galvanic micro reactor to control the location and morphology of colloidal crystals. Coplanar arrays of copper and gold microelectrodes are placed into a dilute water solution of hydrochloric acid to form a galvanic couple between the copper acting as an anode and the gold as a cathode. Under appropriate conditions, colloidal particles suspended in the solution assemble into two-dimensional colloidal crystals adherent to the anodic copper. Polystyrene and silica particles having similar sizes and zeta potentials but different densities were employed to study the fluid flow in the galvanic reactor. Spatially resolved, optical analysis of the reaction rate was used to estimate the magnitude and distribution of the electric current over the copper electrodes. Physical mechanisms governing the particle motion and aggregation will be discussed.

  18. The Feasibility of Using a Galvanic Cell Array for Corrosion Detection and Solution Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark; Calle, Luz-Marina; Zeitlin, Nancy P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An initial investigation into the response of the individual galvanic couples was conducted using potentiodynamic polarization measurements of solutions under conditions of varying corrosivity. It is hypothesized that the differing electrodes may provide a means to further investigate the corrosive nature of the analyte through genetic algorithms and pattern recognition techniques. The robust design of the electrochemical sensor makes its utilization in space exploration particularly attractive. Since the electrodes are fired on a ceramic substrate at 900 C, they may be one of the most rugged sensors available for the anticipated usage.

  19. Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) in healthy persons: acute effects on skin temperature and hemodynamic orthostatic response.

    PubMed

    Haebisch, E M

    1995-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) we studied the skin temperature and hemodynamic reactions in 63 healthy persons. The data were obtained before and after the application of GTN and Glycerin (GL) placebo patches, during one hour. The skin temperature was measured on both forearms, the local (left sided) and systemic (right sided) reaction on GTN was related to the skin fold and the calculated body fat content. The bilateral rise of skin temperature and its duration was higher and longer in obese than in lean persons mainly in obese women. The UV induced thermo and the later photothermoreaction (Erythema) was reduced on the left forearm after the application of GTN and GL patches. The observed hemodynamic GTN effect confirmed known postural reactions, such as decreased arterial pressure (delta mAP = -2.9%), increased heart rate (delta HR = +7.4%) and QTc prolongation (delta QTc = +4.9%) in upright position. An adverse drug effect with increased mean blood pressure (delta mAP = +12%) and increased heart rate (delta HR = +10.4%) mainly in supine position was observed in 11% of the participants, but only in men. Such a reaction was already described by Murell, 1879. Individual GTN effects were analyzed and related to habits and family history. In male smokers and in persons with hypertensive and diabetic close relatives, the hypotensive GTN effect was accentuated in supine position. In the upright position the group with hypertensives in the family presented a moderate hypotensive reaction without secondary tachycardia and the smokers presented only a slightly increased heart rate. Our observations suggest that individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) with its active component nitric oxide (NO) depends on physiological conditions, related to endogenous vasoactive substances, mainly the interaction with EDRF (the endogenous NO) and the activity of the Renin-Angiotensin System. PMID

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Responsive Changes in Collagen and Elastin Networks in Skin.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Jazli; Shezali, Hafiz; Radzi, Zamri; Yahya, Noor Azlin; Abu Kassim, Noor Hayaty; Czernuszka, Jan; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2016-01-01

    Collagen and elastin networks make up the majority of the extracellular matrix in many organs, such as the skin. The mechanisms which are involved in the maintenance of homeostatic equilibrium of these networks are numerous, involving the regulation of genetic expression, growth factor secretion, signalling pathways, secondary messaging systems, and ion channel activity. However, many factors are capable of disrupting these pathways, which leads to an imbalance of homeostatic equilibrium. Ultimately, this leads to changes in the physical nature of skin, both functionally and cosmetically. Although various factors have been identified, including carcinogenesis, ultraviolet exposure, and mechanical stretching of skin, it was discovered that many of them affect similar components of regulatory pathways, such as fibroblasts, lysyl oxidase, and fibronectin. Additionally, it was discovered that the various regulatory pathways intersect with each other at various stages instead of working independently of each other. This review paper proposes a model which elucidates how these molecular pathways intersect with one another, and how various internal and external factors can disrupt these pathways, ultimately leading to a disruption in collagen and elastin networks. PMID:27434176

  1. Dynamics of thermographic skin temperature response during squat exercise at two different speeds.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Michielon, Giovanni; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-07-01

    Low intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation has been shown to create blood flow restriction within muscles that may affect thermoregulation through the skin. We aimed to investigate the influence of two speeds of exercise execution on skin temperature dynamics using infrared thermography. Thirteen active males performed randomly two sessions of squat exercise (normal speed, 1s eccentric/1s concentric phase, 1s; slow speed, 5s eccentric/5s concentric phase, 5s), using ~50% of 1 maximal repetition. Thermal images of ST above muscles quadriceps were recorded at a rate of 0.05Hz before the exercise (to determine basal ST) and for 480s following the initiation of the exercise (to determine the nonsteady-state time course of ST). Results showed that ST changed more slowly during the 5s exercise (p=0.002), whereas the delta (with respect to basal) excursions were similar for the two exercises (p>0.05). In summary, our data provided a detailed nonsteady-state portrait of ST changes following squat exercises executed at two different speeds. These results lay the basis for further investigations entailing the joint use of infrared thermography and Doppler flowmetry to study the events taking place both at the skin and the muscle level during exercises executed at slow speed. PMID:27264889

  2. Staphylococcal LTA-Induced miR-143 Inhibits Propionibacterium acnes-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaoli; Li, Zhiheng; Liu, Kewei; Wu, Yelin; Jiang, Deming; Lai, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) plays a critical role in modulating cutaneous inflammatory responses in skin. Although S. epidermidis has been shown to co-colonize with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in acne lesions, it is unclear whether S. epidermidis is involved in the regulation of P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we demonstrated that S. epidermidis inhibited P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. P. acnes induced the expression of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α via the activation of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in both keratinocytes and mouse ears. Staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid activated TLR2 to induce miR-143 in keratinocytes, and miR-143, in turn, directly targeted 3' UTR of TLR2 to decrease the stability of TLR2 mRNA and then decreased TLR2 protein, thus inhibiting P. acnes-induced proinflammatory cytokines. The inhibitory effect of miR-143 was further confirmed in vivo as the administration of miR-143 antagomir into mouse ears abrogated the inhibitory effect of lipoteichoic acid on P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid inhibits P. acnes-induced inflammation via the induction of miR-143, and suggest that local modulation of inflammatory responses by S. epidermidis at the site of acne vulgaris might be a beneficial therapeutic strategy for management of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:26739093

  3. Increased skin tearing in broilers and reduced collagen synthesis in skin in vivo and in vitro in response to the coccidiostat halofuginone.

    PubMed

    Granot, I; Bartov, I; Plavnik, I; Wax, E; Hurwitz, S; Pines, M

    1991-07-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted in an effort to elucidate the mechanism of suppression by halofuginone of skin strength in broilers. In the in vivo study, halofuginone was included at concentrations of 0, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg of diet, corresponding to 0, 50, 100, and 200%, respectively, of the amount recommended for use as a coccidiostat. Each dietary treatment was given to 260 female broiler day-old chickens. Skin tearing was evaluated at the processing plant. Skin collagen and Kjeldahl-nitrogen were determined chemically. At the age of 7 wk, BW and feed efficiency were affected only in birds consuming the diet containing the highest concentration of the drug. Skin tearing increased but skin collagen concentration decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Fibroblasts were obtained by collagenase digestion from chicken skin and cultured. The cultured cells were incubated with various concentrations of halofuginone, monensin, and nicarbazin, and [3H]proline incorporation was evaluated in collagenase-digestible (representing mostly collagen) and nondigestible proteins exported by the cells into the medium. Halofuginone, at a concentration as low as 10(-11) M, inhibited incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-digestible proteins, but did not affect incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-nondigestible proteins. Even at concentrations as high as 10(-9) M, neither monensin nor nicarbazin affected collagenase-digestible proteins. The in vitro results suggest that halofuginone specifically inhibits collagen synthesis by skin fibroblasts. Results of both in vivo and in vitro trials suggest that the increase of skin tearing during processing, induced by halofuginone, is caused by direct suppression of skin collagen synthesis. PMID:1886867

  4. Association between HLA-DR4 haplotypes and tuberculin skin test response in the Aché population.

    PubMed

    Lindenau, J D; Guimarães, L S P; Hurtado, A M; Hill, K R; Tsuneto, L T; Salzano, F M; Petzl-Erler, M L; Hutz, M H

    2014-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has a major role in the regulation of the immune response as it is involved in the defense against pathogens. Evidence for association with tuberculosis (TB) is more consistent for class II than for class I HLA genes. TB is important among indigenous peoples in South America, not only because of its historical role in regional depopulation, but also because it is still widespread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of HLA class II alleles, haplotypes and genotypes and tuberculin skin test response (TST) in 76 individuals of the Aché population. Poisson Regression was employed to assess risk genotypes. DRB1*04, DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 were associated with TST response in this population. PMID:25329634

  5. Sympathetic skin response following thermal, electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation in familial dysautonomia patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Azelrod, F B; Schweibold, G; Kolodny, E H

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether sympathetic skin response (SSR) testing evaluates afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction, we studied SSR in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) in whom both afferent small and efferent sympathetic fibers are largely reduced. We analyzed whether the response pattern to a combination of stimuli specific for large or small fiber activation allows differentiation between afferent and efferent small fiber dysfunction. In 52 volunteers and 13 FD patients, SSR was studied at palms and soles after warm, cold and heat as well as electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation. In addition, thermal thresholds were assessed at four body sites using a Thermotest device (Somedic; Stockholm, Sweden). In volunteers, any stimulus induced reproducible SSRs. Only cold failed to evoke SSR in two volunteers. In all FD patients, electrical SSR was present, but amplitudes were reduced. Five patients had no acoustic SSR, four had no inspiratory SSR. Thermal SSR was absent in 10 patients with abnormal thermal perception and present in one patient with preserved thermal sensation. In two patients, thermal SSR was present only when skin areas with preserved temperature perception were stimulated. In patients with FD, preserved electrical SSR demonstrated the overall integrity of the SSR reflex but amplitude reduction suggested impaired sudomotor activation. SSR responses were dependent on the perception of the stimulus. In the presence of preserved electrical SSR, absent thermal SSR reflects afferent small fiber dysfunction. A combination of SSR stimulus types allows differentiation between afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction. PMID:10574280

  6. Accessing to arteriovenous blood flow dynamics response using combined laser speckle contrast imaging and skin optical clearing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Rui; Chen, Min; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows a great potential for monitoring blood flow, but the spatial resolution suffers from the scattering of tissue. Here, we demonstrate the capability of a combination method of LSCI and skin optical clearing to describe in detail the dynamic response of cutaneous vasculature to vasoactive noradrenaline injection. Moreover, the superior resolution, contrast and sensitivity make it possible to rebuild arteries-veins separation and quantitatively assess the blood flow dynamical changes in terms of flow velocity and vascular diameter at single artery or vein level. PMID:26114023

  7. On texture, corrosion resistance and morphology of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, H.; Toroghinejad, M. R.; Golozar, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    Texture is an important factor which affects the coating properties. Chemical composition of the zinc bath can strongly influence the texture of hot-dip galvanized coatings. In this study, lead content of the zinc bath was changed from 0.01 wt.% to 0.11 wt.%. Specimens were prepared from zinc baths of different lead content and its texture was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviour was analyzed by Tafel extrapolation and linear polarization tests. To study the corrosion products of the specimens, salt spray test was employed. Also, the spangle size of the specimens was determined using line intercept method. From the experimental results it was found that (00.2) basal plane texture component would be weakened by increasing the lead content of the zinc and conversely, (20.1) high angle pyramidal texture components strengthened. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2) texture component and weaker (20.1) component have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2) and strong (20.1) texture components. In addition, surface morphology would be changed and presence of basal planes decreases at the coating surface due to the increase of lead in the zinc bath. Furthermore, spangle size would be increased by increasing the lead content of the zinc bath. Investigation on the effects of skin pass rolling showed that in this case, (00.2) basal texture component and corrosion resistance of the skin passed specimens, in comparison with non-skin passed specimens, have been decreased.

  8. Skin-Specific Unsaturated Fatty Acids Boost the Staphylococcus aureus Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Thu; Hanzelmann, Dennis; Härtner, Thomas; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial fatty acids (AFAs) protect the human epidermis against invasion by pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we questioned whether human skin fatty acids (FAs) can be incorporated into the lipid moiety of lipoproteins and whether such incorporation would have an impact on innate immune stimulation in the model organism Staphylococcus aureus USA300 JE2. This organism synthesized only saturated FAs. However, when feeding USA300 with unsaturated FAs present on human skin (C16:1, C18:1, or C18:2), those were taken up, elongated stepwise by two carbon units, and finally found in the bacterial (phospho)lipid fraction. They were also observed in the lipid moiety of lipoproteins. When USA300 JE2 was fed with the unsaturated FAs, the cells and cell lysates showed an increased innate immune activation with various immune cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Immune activation was highest with linoleic acid (C18:2). There are several pieces of evidence that the enhanced immune stimulating effect was due to the incorporation of unsaturated FAs in lipoproteins. First, the enhanced stimulation was dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Second, an lgt mutant, unable to carry out lipidation of prolipoproteins, was unable to carry out immune stimulation when fed with unsaturated FAs. Third, the supplied FAs did not significantly affect growth, protein release, or expression of the model lipoprotein Lpl1. Although S. aureus is unable to synthesize unsaturated FAs, it incorporates long-chain unsaturated FAs into its lipoproteins, with the effect that the cells are better recognized by the innate immune system. This is an additional mechanism how our skin controls bacterial colonization and infection. PMID:26502910

  9. Skin-Specific Unsaturated Fatty Acids Boost the Staphylococcus aureus Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Thu; Hanzelmann, Dennis; Härtner, Thomas; Peschel, Andreas; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial fatty acids (AFAs) protect the human epidermis against invasion by pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we questioned whether human skin fatty acids (FAs) can be incorporated into the lipid moiety of lipoproteins and whether such incorporation would have an impact on innate immune stimulation in the model organism Staphylococcus aureus USA300 JE2. This organism synthesized only saturated FAs. However, when feeding USA300 with unsaturated FAs present on human skin (C16:1, C18:1, or C18:2), those were taken up, elongated stepwise by two carbon units, and finally found in the bacterial (phospho)lipid fraction. They were also observed in the lipid moiety of lipoproteins. When USA300 JE2 was fed with the unsaturated FAs, the cells and cell lysates showed an increased innate immune activation with various immune cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Immune activation was highest with linoleic acid (C18:2). There are several pieces of evidence that the enhanced immune stimulating effect was due to the incorporation of unsaturated FAs in lipoproteins. First, the enhanced stimulation was dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Second, an lgt mutant, unable to carry out lipidation of prolipoproteins, was unable to carry out immune stimulation when fed with unsaturated FAs. Third, the supplied FAs did not significantly affect growth, protein release, or expression of the model lipoprotein Lpl1. Although S. aureus is unable to synthesize unsaturated FAs, it incorporates long-chain unsaturated FAs into its lipoproteins, with the effect that the cells are better recognized by the innate immune system. This is an additional mechanism how our skin controls bacterial colonization and infection. PMID:26502910

  10. Regional Skin Temperature Response to Moderate Aerobic Exercise Measured by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infrared thermography (IRT) does not require contact with the skin, and it is a convenient, reliable and non-invasive technique that can be used for monitoring the skin temperature (TSK). Objectives: The aim of this study was to monitor the variations in the regional TSK during exercise on 28 regions of interest (ROIs) (forehead, face, chest, abdomen, back, lumbar, anterior and posterior neck, and posterior and anterior views of the right and left hands, forearms, upper arms, thighs, and legs) with IRT. Patients and Methods: 12 physically active young males were monitored with IRT during the following three phases: a) 30 minutes before exercise b) while performing one hour of moderate intensity exercise on a treadmill at 60% of the VO2max, and c) 60 minutes after exercise. Results: During pre-exercise, all TSK reached a steady-state (P ≤ 0.05), which ensured adequate thermal stabilisation. At the beginning of exercise, there was a significant reduction in the TSK in most ROIs after 10 minutes of activity, except for the lower limbs (legs and thighs). After one hour of recovery, in the anterior view of the hands and thighs and in the posterior view of the legs, there were significant increases in the TSK compared to pre-exercise. Conclusions: There were significant distinctions in the skin temperature distribution during exercise according to the activity of the area under consideration during exercise, which may be important in the development of physiological models and heat flux analyses for different purposes. PMID:27217931