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Sample records for gamdat-78 gamma decay

  1. E6 Gamma Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. Alex; Rae, W. D. M.

    2011-05-06

    Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

  2. Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas; Hill, Richard J.; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2005-03-01

    The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

  3. Rare decay {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi}{gamma}{gamma} in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.; Drechsel, D.

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the rare radiative {eta} decay modes {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} within the framework of chiral perturbation theory at {ital O}({ital p}{sup 4}). We present photon spectra and partial decay rates for both processes as well as a Dalitz contour plot for the charged decay. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  5. Experimental Status of b -> s(d) gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lodovico, F

    2004-02-05

    Radiative penguin decays provide an indirect probe for physics beyond the Standard Model and contribute to the determination of the CKM matrix elements. Copious quantities of B mesons produced at the B-Factories permit precision measurements of radiative penguin decays. We review the experimental status of the radiative penguin processes b {yields} s(d){gamma}.

  6. A search for the rare decay. mu. /sup +/. -->. e/sup +/. gamma gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Grosnick, D.P.

    1987-02-01

    An experimental search for the lepton-family number nonconserving decay, ..mu../sup +/ ..-->.. e/sup +/..gamma gamma.., has been conducted at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the Crystal Box detector. The detector consists of a modular NaI(Tl) calorimeter, scintillator hodoscope, and a high-resolution, cylindrical drift chamber. It provides a large solid-angle for detecting three-body decays and has good resolutions in the time, position, and energy measurements to eliminate unwanted backgrounds. No evidence for ..mu../sup +/ ..-->.. e/sup +/..gamma gamma.. is found, giving an upper limit for the branching ratio of GAMMA(..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma gamma..)/GAMMA(..mu.. ..-->.. e nu anti nu) less than or equal to 7.2 x 10/sup -11/ (90% C.L.). This result is an improvement of more than two orders of magnitude in the existing limit. 109 refs., 39 figs.

  7. Observation of the competitive double-gamma nuclear decay.

    PubMed

    Walz, C; Scheit, H; Pietralla, N; Aumann, T; Lefol, R; Ponomarev, V Yu

    2015-10-15

    The double-gamma (γγ)-decay of a quantum system in an excited state is a fundamental second-order process of quantum electrodynamics. In contrast to the well-known single-gamma (γ)-decay, the γγ-decay is characterized by the simultaneous emission of two γ quanta, each with a continuous energy spectrum. In nuclear physics, this exotic decay mode has only been observed for transitions between states with spin-parity quantum numbers J(π) = 0(+) (refs 1-3). Single-gamma decays-the main experimental obstacle to observing the γγ-decay-are strictly forbidden for these 0(+) → 0(+) transitions. Here we report the observation of the γγ-decay of an excited nuclear state (J(π) = 11/2(-)) that is directly competing with an allowed γ-decay (to ground state J(π) = 3/2(+)). The branching ratio of the competitive γγ-decay of the 11/2(-) isomer of (137)Ba to the ground state relative to its single γ-decay was determined to be (2.05 ± 0.37) × 10(-6). From the measured angular correlation and the shape of the energy spectra of the individual γ-rays, the contributing combinations of multipolarities of the γ radiation were determined. Transition matrix elements calculated using the quasiparticle-phonon model reproduce our measurements well. The γγ-decay rate gives access to so far unexplored important nuclear structure information, such as the generalized (off-diagonal) nuclear electric polarizabilities and magnetic susceptibilities. PMID:26469051

  8. Gamma-ray anisotropies from decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weniger, C.

    2011-06-01

    Many theoretically well-motivated models predict the decay of dark matter with lifetimes much longer than the age of the universe. This can potentially lead to peculiar features in the observed cosmic-ray fluxes. In particular the gamma-ray channel, which carries directional information, is promising for dark matter searches, since it is sensitive to the underlying source distribution. We will discuss the peculiar dipole-like anisotropy of prompt gamma-ray radiation from dark matter decay inside our galaxy, as well as the angular power-spectrum of gamma-rays from dark matter decay outside of our galaxy. We will comment on the experimental detectability of such anisotropies.

  9. Gravitino decay and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) spectrum does not exhibit evidence for the decay of light gravitinos, in contradiction to the suggestion by Olive and Silk (1985), who observed a bump near 1 MeV in the CGB radiation spectrum. It is suggested that better fits to the CGB spectrum would be provided by mechanisms generating a power-law spectrum which is flattened below about 2 MeV. Olive and Silk maintain that the decays of a long-lived particle such as the gravitino may be responsible for features in the gamma-ray spectrum near 1 MeV.

  10. Na-22 decay gamma rays from classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truran, James W.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-1565 has provided support for a program of theoretical research in nuclear astrophysics and related areas, focusing upon the possibility of detecting gamma rays from nearby novae. Particular attention has been given to the evaluation of the theoretical expectations for gamma ray emission from four possible sources: (1) the positron decays of the unstable CNO and fluorine isotopes that are transported to the surface regions of the envelope in the earliest stages of the outbursts; (2) Be-7 decay gamma rays, (3) Na-22 decay gamma rays released in the later stages of the outbursts; and (4) Al-26 decay gamma rays from novae and their possible contribution to Galactic emission. The critical questions of (1) the frequency of occurrence of ONeMg-enriched novae; (2) the expected Galactic distribution of the novae that produce 26Al; and (3) the nature of the observed soft X-ray emission from classical novae, have also been addressed. Considerable progress in research has been achieved on many of these fronts. Brief summaries of the results of several research projects are presented.

  11. Measurment of B Decays to phi K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-28

    The authors search for the decays B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{bar K}{sup 0}{gamma} in a data sample of 228 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. They measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6} and set an upper limit {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{bar K}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. They also measure the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma}, {Alpha}{sub CP} = (-26 {+-} 14 {+-} 5)%. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  12. Gamma emission in precompound reactions: 1, Statistical model and collective gamma decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hoering, A. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA . Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Weidenmueller, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We extend the theory of particle-induced precompound reactions by including gamma decay. We use the Brink-Axel hypothesis and consider the gamma emission of giant dipole resonances built on the ground state and on the excited states of the composite system. The latter are modeled as multiparticle multi-hole excitations. In this way, we combine the statistical ansatz and the chaining hypothesis typical for precompound reaction theories, with the collective aspects of gamma decay. Formulas for average S-matrix and average cross section are derived in this framework.

  13. Gamma emission in precompound reactions: 1, Statistical model and collective gamma decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hoering, A. |; Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1992-09-01

    We extend the theory of particle-induced precompound reactions by including gamma decay. We use the Brink-Axel hypothesis and consider the gamma emission of giant dipole resonances built on the ground state and on the excited states of the composite system. The latter are modeled as multiparticle multi-hole excitations. In this way, we combine the statistical ansatz and the chaining hypothesis typical for precompound reaction theories, with the collective aspects of gamma decay. Formulas for average S-matrix and average cross section are derived in this framework.

  14. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de E-mail: redondo@mppmm.mpg.de

    2010-06-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  15. Gamma-ray decay of levels in /sup 53/Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Gamma-ray decay of levels in the stable isotope /sup 53/Cr has been studied using /sup 53/Cr(n,n'..gamma..) reactions for incident neutron energies between threshold and 10 MeV. Of the 65 gamma rays or gamma-ray groups observed for neutron interactions with /sup 53/Cr, 50 have been placed or tentatively placed among 34 levels in /sup 53/Cr up to an excitation energy of 4.36 MeV. Deduced branching ratios are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements except for decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level. For the decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level we are unable to explain variations in the branching ratios of the transition gamma rays as a function of incident neutron energy within the framework of the presently known level structure of /sup 53/Cr and suggest the possibility of a second energy level at E/sub x/ = 1537 keV. 59 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts and neutron star field decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Blumenthal, George; Chuang, Kuan-Wen; Hurley, Kevin; Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison; Linder, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Assuming a Galactic origin of gamma-ray bursts, we use pulsar data to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron stars and determine the sampling depths of current detectors. Based on these distance limits, we calculate the corresponding age distribution of Galactic neutron stars and apply an exponential field decay model to test whether the observed high incidence rate of cyclotron lines is consistent with suggested field decay time scales of order 10 exp 7 years. We find that the properties of the observed population of gamma-ray bursts are inconsistent with the idea that bursts originate at arbitrary times on neutron stars whose fields decay on time scales shorter than about 10 exp 9 years. Possible interpretations of this inconsistency are discussed.

  17. Measurement of B decays to phi K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-07-28

    We measure the branching fraction of the radiative B{sup -} decay {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma}) = (3.46 {+-} 0.57{sub -0.37}{sup +0.39}) x 10{sup -6}, and set an upper limit on the radiative {bar B}{sup 0} decay {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{bar K}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 2.71 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We also measure the direct CP asymmetry of the B{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{gamma} mode {Alpha}{sub CP} = (-26.4 {+-} 14.3 {+-} 4.8)%. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These measurements are based on 207 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector.

  18. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keVmore » in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.« less

  19. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keV in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  20. Search for monenergetic gamma rays from psi /3684/ decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. W.; Beron, B. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hofstadter, R.; Howell, R. L.; Hughes, E. B.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.; Hilger, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported of a search for monoenergetic gamma rays with energies above 50 MeV arising from psi (3684) decay. The measurements were made by operating an electron-positron storage ring at a center-of-mass energy of 3684 MeV and detecting the secondary gamma rays with large-crystal NaI(T1) spectrometers. No significant evidence is found for the emission of such radiation, and upper limits are placed on such emissions for energies above 50 MeV.

  1. Study of the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 gamma gamma at KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbo; /Arizona U.

    2007-08-01

    The authors study on the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}, measure a{sub V}, and branching ratio by analyzing 96, 97 and 99 data. The measurements were taken by KTeV at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. After all cuts, they have 1982 K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} candidate. The background level is estimated as 30%. K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} branching ratio is measured as (1.29 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.04(sys)) x 10{sup -6}. By using D'Ambrosio's theory to fit a{sub V}, a{sub V} = -(-0.31 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.07(sys)).

  2. A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-02

    We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

  3. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  4. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  5. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  6. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  7. Flare gamma ray continuum emission from neutral pion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Mackinnon, Alec L.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate, in detail, the production of solar flare gamma ray emission above 100 MeV via the interaction of high energy protons with the ambient solar atmosphere. We restrict our considerations to the broadband gamma ray spectrum resulting from the decay of neutral pions produced in p-H reactions. Thick-target calculations are performed to determine the photon fluences. However, proton transport is not considered. Inferences about the form of the proton spectrum at 10-100 MeV have already been drawn from de-excitation gamma ray lines. Our aim is to constrain the proton spectrum at higher energies. Thus, the injected proton spectrum is assumed to have the form of a Bessel Function, characteristics of stochastic energy at higher energies. The detailed shape of the gamma ray spectra around 100 MeV is found to have a strong dependence on the spectral index of the power law and on the turnover energy (from Bessel function to power law). As would be expected, the harder the photon spectrum the wider the 100 MeV feature. The photon spectra are to be compared with observations and used to place limits upon the number of particles accelerated and to constrain acceleration models.

  8. Radiative Penguin Decays of B Mesons: Measurements of B to K* gamma, B to K2* gamma, and Search for B0 to phi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.

    2005-01-03

    Electromagnetic radiative penguin decays of the B meson were studied with the BaBar detector at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. Branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of the decay B {yields} K*{gamma}, branching fractions of B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma} are presented. The decay rates may be enhanced by contributions from non-standard model processes.

  9. Measurements of B to V(Gamma) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Yarritu, Aaron K.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-09-02

    The standard model has been highly successful at describing current experimental data. However, extensions of the standard model predict particles that have masses at energy scales that are above the electroweak scale. The flavor-changing neutral current processes of the B meson are sensitive to the influences of these new physics contributions. These processes proceed through loop diagrams, thus allowing new physics to enter at the same order as the standard model. New physics may contribute to the enhancement or suppression of rate asymmetries or the decay rates of these processes. The transition B {yields} V{gamma} (V = K*(892), {rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020)) represents radiative decays of the B meson that proceed through penguin processes. Hadronic uncertainties limit the theoretical accuracy of the prediction of the branching fractions. However, uncertainties, both theoretical and experimental, are much reduced when considering quantities involving ratios of branching fractions, such as CP or isospin asymmetries. The most dominant exclusive radiative b {yields} s transition is B {yields} K*{gamma}. We present the best measurements of the branching fractions, direct CP, and isospin asymmetries of B {yields} K*{gamma}. The analogous b {yields} d transitions are B {yields} {rho}{gamma} and B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, which are suppressed by a factor of |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|{sup 2} {approx} 0.04 relative to B {yields} K*{gamma}. A measurement of the branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, as well as a search for B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, are also given. These measurements are combined to calculate the ratio of CKM matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|, which corresponds to the length of one side of the unitary triangle. Finally, we present a search for the penguin annihilation process B {yields}{phi}{gamma}. We use a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected with

  10. New studies of nuclear decay {gamma}-rays from novae

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.C.

    1997-11-01

    The cause of the nova outburst is a thermonuclear runaway (TNR) in hydrogen rich material transferred by a companion onto a white dwarf. Studies of this phenomenon have shown that the TNR produces large concentrations of the short lived positron unstable isotopes of the CNO nuclei which are transported to the surface by convection so that early in the outburst we expect significant numbers of radioactive decays to occur at the surface. The resulting {gamma}-ray emission may be detectable from nearby novae early in their outbursts. The TNR is also expected to produce substantial amounts of {sup 7}Be and {sup 22}Na. Their decays also yield potentially detectable levels of {gamma}-ray emission for relatively nearby novae. We are also interested in the role played by novae in the production of the {approximately}2M{circle_dot} of {sup 26}Al found in the galaxy. In order to improve our predictions of this phenomenon, we have performed a new set of calculations of TNR`s on ONeMg and CO white dwarfs with an updated nuclear reaction network and opacities.

  11. Bounding the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay from Higgs mediated flavor changing neutral current transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    The Higgs-mediated flavor violating bottom-strange quarks transitions induced at the one-loop level by a nondiagonal Hbs coupling are studied within the context of an effective Yukawa sector that comprises SU{sub L}(2)xU{sub Y}(1)-invariant operators of up to dimension six. The most recent experimental result on B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} with hard photons is employed to constrain the Hbs vertex, which is used to estimate the branching ratio for the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay. It is found that the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay can reach a branching ratio of the order of 4x10{sup -8}, which is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the current experimental limit.

  12. Search for radiative penguin decays B(+)-->rho(+)gamma, B(0)-->rho(0)gamma, and B(0)-->omegagamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Lodovico, F Di; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Buono, L Del; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Groot, N De; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Nardo, G De; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-14

    A search for the decays B-->rho(770)gamma and B0-->omega(782)gamma is performed on a sample of 211 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. No evidence for the decays is seen. We set the following limits on the individual branching fractions: B(B+-->rho(+)gamma)<1.8 x 10(-6), B(B0-->rho(0)gamma)<0.4 x 10(-6), and B(B0-->omegagamma)<1.0 x 10(-6) at the 90% confidence level. We use the quark model to limit the combined branching fraction B [B-->(rho/omega)gamma]<1.2 x 10(-6), from which we determine a constraint on the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V(td)|/|V(ts)|. PMID:15698065

  13. Measurement of upper limits for {upsilon}{yields}{gamma}+R decays

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.

    2007-12-01

    We report on a study of exclusive radiative decays {upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}+R (n=1, 2, 3), with R a narrow resonant hadronic state decaying into four or more charged particles (plus possible neutrals). Using data collected from the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we present upper limits of order 10{sup -4} for such bottomonium two-body decays as a function of the mass M{sub R} recoiling opposite the photon.

  14. Searches for Lepton flavor violation in the decays tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma and tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lindsay, C D; Locke, C B; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a tau lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+/-7)x10{6} tau decays collected by the BABAR detector near the Upsilon(4S), Upsilon(3S) and Upsilon(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma)<3.3x10{-8} and B(tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma)<4.4x10{-8} at 90% confidence level. PMID:20366586

  15. Gamma-ray lines from novae. [relationship to radioactive decay and positron annihilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Hoyle, F.

    1974-01-01

    An appropriate gamma-ray telescope could detect the gamma-rays associated with radioactive decays. The observable lines would be the annihilation radiation following the positron emission of N-13, O-14, O-15, and Na-22 and the 2.312-MeV line emitted following the O-14 decay and the 1.274-MeV line emitted following the Na-22 decay. The experimental possibility should be borne in mind for the occurrence of novae within a few kiloparsecs.

  16. Decaying vs. annihilating dark matter in light of a tentative gamma-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmüller, Wilfried; Garny, Mathias E-mail: mathias.garny@desy.de

    2012-08-01

    Recently reported tentative evidence for a gamma-ray line in the Fermi-LAT data is of great potential interest for identifying the nature of dark matter. We compare the implications for decaying and annihilating dark matter taking the constraints from continuum gamma-rays, antiproton flux and morphology of the excess into account. We find that higgsino and wino dark matter are excluded, also for nonthermal production. Generically, the continuum gamma-ray flux severely constrains annihilating dark matter. Consistency of decaying dark matter with the spatial distribution of the Fermi-LAT excess would require an enhancement of the dark matter density near the Galactic center.

  17. Search for the decay K+ to pi+ gamma gamma in the pi+ momentum region P > 213 MeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Artamonov, A.V.; Bassalleck, B.; Bhuyan, B.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; Chen, S.; Chiang, I.-H.; Christidi, I.-A.; Cooper, P.S.; Diwan, M.V.; Frank, J.S.; Fujiwara, T.; Hu, J.; Jaffe, D.E.; Kabe, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.M.; Khotjantsev, A.N.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, M.; Komatsubara, T.K.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /New Mexico U. /Brookhaven /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Fermilab /Kyoto U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Moscow, INR /CSR, Edmonton /Fukui U. /Fukui U. /Osaka U., Res. Ctr. Nucl. Phys. /Osaka U., LNS /Japan, Natl. Defence Academy /Delhi U.

    2005-05-01

    We have searched for the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma} decay in the kinematic region with {pi}{sup +} momentum close to the end point. No events were observed, and the 90% confidence-level upper limit on the partial branching ratio was obtained, B(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma}, P > 213 MeV/c) < 8.3 x 10{sup -9} under the assumption of chiral perturbation theory including next-to-leading order ''unitarity'' corrections. The same data were used to determine an upper limit on the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma} branching ratio of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} at the 90% confidence level.

  18. Search for two-{gamma} sum-energy peaks in the decay out of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays decaying out of the superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 192}Hg has a quasicontinuous distribution. Whereas methods to construct level schemes from discrete lines in coincidence spectra are well established, new techniques must still be developed to extract information from coincidences involving quasicontinuous {gamma}rays. From an experiment using Eurogam, we obtained impressively clean 1- and 2-dimensional {gamma} spectra from pairwise or single gates, respectively, on the transitions of the SD band in {sup 192}Hg. We investigated methods to exploit the 2-dimensional quasicontinuum spectra coincident with the SD band to determine the excitation energy of the SD band above the normal yrast line. No strong peaks were observed in the 2-{gamma} sum spectra; only candidates of peaks at a 2-3 {sigma} level were found. This suggests that 2-{gamma} decay is not the dominant decay branch out of SD bands, consistent with the observed multiplicity of 3.2. We shall next search for peaks in sum-spectra of 3 {gamma}s.

  19. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  20. Final Results from the KTeV Experiment on the Decay K(L) ---> pi0 gamma gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cox, B.; Erwin, A.R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison /Campinas State U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors report on a new measurement of the branching ratio B(K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}) using the KTeV detector. They reconstruct 1982 events with an estimated background of 608, that results in B(K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{Gamma}{gamma}) = (1.29 {+-} 0.03{sub stat} {+-} 0.05{sub syst}) x 10{sup -6}. They also measure the parameter, a{sub V}, which characterizes the strength of vector meson exchange terms in this decay. They find a{sub V} = -0.31 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.07{sub syst}. These results utilize the full KTeV data set collected from 1997 to 2000 and supersede earlier KTeV measurements of the branching ratio and a{sub V}.

  1. Search for the Decays B0 to e+e-gamma and B0 to mu+mu-gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H

    2007-06-22

    We present results of a search for the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{gamma} ({ell} = e, {mu}). The search is performed using 320x106 B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Gamma}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We find no significant signal and set the following branching fraction upper limits at the 90% confidence level: {beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -7} and {beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{gamma}) < 1.5 x 10{sup -7}.

  2. Inclusive gamma-ray spectra from psi/3095/ and psi-prime/3684/ decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddick, C. J.; Burnett, T. H.; Masek, G. E.; Miller, E. S.; Smith, J. G.; Stronski, J. P.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vernon, W.; Badtke, D. H.; Barnett, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive gamma-ray experiments were carried out in a e(+)e(-) colliding-beam apparatus with NaI(Tl) arrays as detectors. The inclusive gamma-ray spectra, after cosmic-ray background subtraction, are shown as histograms for the decays of the psi(3095) and psi-prime(3684). The psi spectrum has no significant narrow structure, while the psi-prime spectrum shows at least four peaks. Three major radiative decays of the psi-prime(3684) are found, and their respective branching fractions are computed.

  3. {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{gamma} and related rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The connection of rare decays to supersymmetric grand unification is highlighted, and a brief review of the status of rare decay experiments is given. The status of the MEGA experiment, a search for {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{gamma}, is reported. Some ideas for a new experimental arrangement that has the potential to reach a sensitivity of 10{sup {minus}14} are presented.

  4. Measurement of direct photon emission in K+-->pi(+)pi(0)gamma decay

    PubMed

    Adler; Aoki; Ardebili; Atiya; Bergbusch; Blackmore; Bryman; Chiang; Convery; Diwan; Frank; Haggerty; Inagaki; Ito; Kabe; Kettell; Kishi; Kitching; Kobayashi; Komatsubara; Konaka; Kuno; Kuriki; Kycia; Li; Littenberg

    2000-12-01

    We have performed a measurement of the K+-->pi(+)pi(0)gamma decay and have observed 2x10(4) events. The best fit to the decay spectrum gives a branching ratio for direct photon emission of (4.7+/-0.8+/-0. 3)x10(-6) in the pi(+) kinetic energy region of 55 to 90 MeV and requires no component due to interference with inner bremsstrahlung. PMID:11102135

  5. A Model-Independent Search for the decay B->l nu gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /more authors..

    2012-10-09

    The authors present a search for the radiative leptonic decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, using a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment. In this analysis, they fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} decays, then search for evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma} in the rest of the event. They observe no significant evidence of signal decays and report model-independent branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma}) < 17 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma}) < 24 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}), all at the 90% confidence level.

  6. Diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background as a probe of cosmological gravitino regeneration and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K.A.; Silk, J.

    1985-11-18

    We predict the presence of a spectral feature in the isotropic cosmic gamma-ray background associated with gravitino decays at high red shifts. With a gravitino abundance that falls in the relatively narrow range expected for thermally regenerated gravitinos following an inflationary epoc in the very early universe, gravitinos of mass several gigaelectronvolts are found to yield an appreciable flux of 1--10-MeV diffuse gamma rays.

  7. Decay modes B{sub d,s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, J. A. Macdonald; Eeg, J. O.

    2007-02-01

    The various decay modes of the type B{yields}{gamma}D* are dynamically different. In general, there are factorized contributions of pole and nonpole type, and pseudoscalar exchange contributions at meson level. The purpose of this paper is to point out that the decay modes B{sub d,s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0} have small contributions from such mechanisms, in contrast to the decay modes B{sub d,s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0} and B{sup -}{yields}{gamma}D{sub s,d}*{sup -}. On the other hand, there are nonfactorizable 1/N{sub c} suppressed contributions from colored four quark operators obtained from Fierz transformations of the standard four quark operators. Such 1/N{sub c} suppressed terms involving emission of soft gluons are calculated within a heavy-light chiral quark model, and they are found to dominate the amplitudes for the decay modes B{sub d,s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0}. We estimate the branching ratio for these modes in the low velocity regime, i.e. in the heavy quark limit, both for the b and the c quarks. In this limit we obtain a value {approx_equal}1x10{sup -5} for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0}, and {approx_equal}6x10{sup -7} for B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0}. We expect substantial corrections to these numbers because the energy gap between the b- and c-quark masses are significantly bigger than 1 GeV. However, we expect that our estimates of the amplitudes for B{sub d,s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}D*{sup 0} give the right order of magnitude because other mechanisms are numerically suppressed in this special case.

  8. Studies of charmed hadronic B decays with the early LHCb data and prospects for {gamma} measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nardulli, J.

    2010-12-22

    We present the first studies of decays of the type B{yields}DX, where D represents a charmed meson (D{sup 0}, D{sup (*)+}, or D{sub s}) from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Our studies use data accumulated during the 2010 run of the LHC. This work represents the first steps on a programme towards a precision measurement of the angle {gamma} of the CKM Unitarity Triangle. The prospects for this {gamma} measurement will be reviewed.

  9. Precision electron-gamma spectroscopic data from the beta decay of 153Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, S.; Rani Rao, Dwaraka; Venkataramaniah, K.

    2016-02-01

    The decay of 153Sm was studied with a HPGe detector and a Si(Li) detector based electron transporter. Forty four gamma transitions belonging to sixteen excited levels in the daughter nucleus 153Eu were analyzed for their energies, emission intensities, conversion electron intensities and conversion coefficients. These values have resulted in the determination of precise beta emission intensities to the levels in 153Eu and in the construction of an internally consistent decay scheme. The present study will add to the decay data available on this radionuclide for reliable dose estimations for medical applications.

  10. Search For the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 pi0 gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Edward; /Virginia U.

    2006-08-01

    This thesis describes a search for the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} using data from the KTeV experiment, using the topology K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0}{gamma} (where {pi}{sub D}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}e{sup +}e{sup -}). Due to Bose statistics and the real nature of the photon, the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decay can proceed at lowest order only by the Cp conserving direct emission of an E2 photon. The decay vanishes to O(p{sup 4}) in chiral perturbation theory and is a probe of the theory to the sixth order. The primary background to this decay consists of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} events with one lost photon. The upper limit for the decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} presented in this thesis is 2.32 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This upper limit was derived from both 1997 and 1999 data, using a blind analysis. The upper limit was derived from a Feldman-Cousins method, based on a weighted total of 0.53 data events in the signal region with an expected K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} background of 0.37 {+-} 0.28 events. The previous upper limit for this decay was 5.6 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Ultra-low gamma-ray measurement system for neutrinoless double beta decay.

    PubMed

    Kang, W G; Choi, J H; Jeon, E J; Lee, J I; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Lee, J H; Ma, K J; Myung, S S; So, J H

    2013-11-01

    An experiment for the detection of 0νβ(+)/EC and 0νEC/EC in 92Mo nuclei has been carried out with a scintillating crystal, CaMoO4, in coincidence with the HPGe detector. We study the background events inside the event selection window for 0ν β(+)/EC decays of CaMoO4 detector. For 51.2 days of data taking period, we didn't observe any event in the neutrinoless EC/EC decay event window. The (92)Mo 0νβ(+)/EC decay half-life limit was set to 0.61×10(20) years with a 90% confidence by method of Feldman and Cousins. This ultra-low gamma ray measurement utilizing coincidence technique can be used for the resonant EC/EC decay process of some nuclei which is potentially important for neutrinoless double beta decay process. PMID:23726518

  12. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP and Isospin Asymmetry in B->K*(892)gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-19

    We present an analysis of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}(892){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){gamma} using a sample of about 383 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B factory. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.47 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = (4.22 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -5}. We constrain the direct CP asymmetry to be -0.033 < {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.028 and the isospin asymmetry to be 0.017 < {Delta}{sub 0-} < 0.116, where the limits are determined by the 90% confidence interval and include both the statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  13. Measurement of the direct CP asymmetry in b-->s gamma Decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-07-01

    We describe a measurement of the direct CP asymmetry between inclusive b-->s gamma and b-->s gamma decays. This asymmetry is expected to be less than 0.01 in the standard model, but could be enhanced up to about 0.10 by new physics contributions. We use a sample of 89 x 10(6) BB pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at SLAC PEP-II, from which we reconstruct a set of 12 exclusive b-->s gamma final states containing one charged or neutral kaon and one to three pions. We measure an asymmetry of A(CP)(b-->s gamma)=0.025+/-0.050(stat)+/-0.015(syst), corresponding to an allowed range of -0.06s gamma)<+0.11 at 90% confidence level. PMID:15323901

  14. Search for the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 pi0 gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; Cox, B.; /Arizona U. /UCLA /Campinas State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Colorado U. /Elmhurst Coll. /Fermilab /Osaka U. /Rice U. /Sao Paulo U. /Virginia U.

    2007-08-01

    The KTeV E799 experiment has conducted a search for the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{sup 0}{gamma} via the topology K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{sub D}{gamma} (where {pi}{sup 0}{sub D} {yields} {gamma}e{sup +}e{sup -}). Due to Bose statistics of the {pi}{sup 0} pair and the real nature of the photon, the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decay is restricted to proceed at lowest order by the CP conserving direct emission (DE) of an E2 electric quadrupole photon. The rate of this decay is interesting theoretically since chiral perturbation theory predicts that this process vanishes at level O(p{sup 4}). Therefore, this mode probes chiral perturbation theory at O(p{sup 6}). In this paper we report a determination of an upper limit of 2.43 x 10{sup -7} (90% CL) for K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}. This is approximately a factor of 20 lower than previous results.

  15. Gamma rays emitted in the decay of 31-year 178m2Hf

    SciTech Connect

    MB, S; PW, W; GC, B; JJ, C; PE, G; G, H; R, P; F, S; HC, S

    2003-10-15

    The spontaneous decay of the K{sup {pi}} = 16{sup +}, 31-year {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has been investigated with a 15 kBq source placed at the center of a 20-element {gamma}-ray spectrometer. High-multipolarity M4 and E5 transitions, which represent the first definitive observation of direct {gamma}-ray emission from the isomer, have been identified, together with other low-intensity transitions. Branching ratios for these other transitions have elucidated the spin dependence of the mixing between the two known K{sup {pi}} = 8{sup -} bands. The M4 and E5 {gamma}-ray decays are the first strongly K-forbidden transitions to be identified with such high multipolarities, and demonstrate a consistent extension of K-hindrance systematics, with an inhibition factor of approximately 100 per degree of K forbiddenness. Some unplaced transitions are also reported.

  16. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  17. Electromagnetic Decay of the $\\Sigma^{0}(1385)$ to $\\Lambda\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moscov; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, J P; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Daniel, AJI; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Dey, Biplap; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Forest, Tony; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Guidal, Michel; Guegan, Baptiste; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Konczykowski, Piotr; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; McAndrew, Josephine; KcKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Micherdzinska, Anna; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrison, Brian; Moutarde, Herve; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Ni, Andrey; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Pereira, Sergio; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Seraydaryan, Heghine; Sharabian, Youri; Smith, Elton; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Taylor, Charles; Vernarsky, Brian; Vineyard, Michael; Voutier, Eric; Weinstein, Lawrence; Watts, Daniel; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic decay $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda \\gamma$ was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a proton target, producing an exclusive final state of $K^+\\Sigma^{*0}$. We report the decay widths ratio $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$/ $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\pi^0$ = $1.42 \\pm 0.12(\\text{stat})_{-0.07}^{+0.11}(\\text{sys})$%. This ratio is larger than most theoretical predictions by factors ranging from 1.5-3, but is consistent with the only other experimental measurement. From the reported ratio we calculate the partial width and electromagnetic transition magnetic moment for $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$.

  18. SN2014J gamma rays from the 56Ni decay chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland; Siegert, Thomas; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Krause, Martin; Greiner, Jochen; Maeda, Keiichi; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Sim, Stuart A.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2015-02-01

    Context. The detection and measurement of gamma-ray lines from the decay chain of 56Ni provides unique information about the explosion in supernovae. SN2014J at 3.3 Mpc is a sufficiently-nearby supernova of type Ia so that such measurements have been feasible with the gamma-ray spectrometer SPI on ESA's INTEGRAL gamma-ray observatory. Aims: The 56Ni freshly produced in the supernova is understood to power the optical light curve, because it emits gamma rays upon its radioactive decay first to 56Co and then to 56Fe. Gamma-ray lines from 56Co decay are expected to become directly visible through the white dwarf material several weeks after the explosion, as they progressively penetrate the overlying material of the supernova envelope, which is diluted as it expands. The lines are expected to be Doppler-shifted or broadened from the kinematics of the 56Ni ejecta. We aim to exploit high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL toward constraining the 56Ni distribution and kinematics in this supernova. Methods: We use the observations with the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL, together with an improved instrumental background method. Results: We detect the two main lines from 56Co decay at 847 and 1238 keV, which are significantly Doppler-broadened, and at intensities (3.65 ± 1.21) × 10-4 and (2.27 ± 0.69) × 10-4 ph cm-2 s-1, respectively, at their brightness maximum. We measure their rise toward a maximum after about 60-100 days and a decline thereafter. The intensity ratio of the two lines is found to be consistent with expectations from 56Co decay (0.62 ± 0.28 at brightness maximum, the expected ratio is 0.68). We find that the broad lines seen in the late, gamma-ray transparent phase are not representative of the early gamma-ray emission, and notice instead that the emission spectrum is complex and irregular until the supernova is fully transparent to gamma rays, with progressive uncovering of the bulk of 56Ni. We infer that the

  19. Extraction of {gamma} from charmless hadronic B {yields} PP decays using SU(3) flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Suprun, Denis A.

    2006-07-11

    The decays of B mesons to a pair of charmless pseudoscalar mesons (PP decays) have been analyzed within the framework of flavor SU(3) symmetry and quark-diagrammatic topological approach. Flavor symmetry breaking is taken into account in tree (T) amplitudes through ratios of decay constants fK and f{pi}; exact SU(3) is assumed elsewhere. Acceptable fits to B {yields} PP branching ratios and CP asymmetries are obtained with tree, color-suppressed and QCD penguin amplitudes. Singlet penguin amplitude was introduced to describe decay amplitudes of the modes with {eta} and {eta}' mesons in the final state. Electroweak penguin amplitudes were expressed in terms of the corresponding tree-level diagrams. Values of the weak phase {gamma} were found to be consistent with the current indirect bounds from other analyses of CKM parameters.

  20. B-barB Mixing with hadronic decays and prospects for the determination of gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yangheng

    2001-04-01

    We present determinations of the B_d-barBd mixing parameter Δ Md from the time evolution of hadronic decays events contained in a large sample of Υ(4S) decays recorded in the Belle detector at KEKB. The flavor of the other B is determined with tagging techniques that exploit the correlation between the flavor of the heavy quark and its decay products (leptons, kaons, high momentum tracks). The proper-time-difference distributions for the same-flavor and opposite-flavor events are then simultaneously fit to an expression containing Δ M_Bd as a free parameter. We also discuss the prospects for the determination of gamma using hadronic decay modes.

  1. Measurement of B \\to X \\gamma Decays and Determination of |V_{td}/V_{ts}|

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2008-08-05

    Using a sample of 383 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment, they measure sums of seven exclusive final states B {yields} X{sub d(s)}{gamma}, where X{sub d}(X{sub s}) is a non-strange (strange) charmless hadronic system in the mass range 0.6-1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. After correcting for unmeasured decay modes in this mass range, they obtain a branching fraction for b {yields} d{gamma} of (7.2 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 2.3(syst.)) x 10{sup -6}. Taking the ratio of X{sub d} to X{sub s} they find {Lambda}(b {yields} d{gamma})/{Lambda}(b {yields} s{gamma}) = 0.033 {+-} 0.013(stat.) {+-} 0.009(syst.), from which they determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.177 {+-} 0.043.

  2. Gamma-ray spectra of individual components of decay series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Henry

    2001-04-01

    In order to obtain high quality spectra to update the ``Heath Catalog" of spectra with Ge detectors, we (I and a group of Univ. of Michigan undergraduates*) have investigated the neutron activation and decay products related to natural thorium and natural uranium. We have used the UM Ford Nuclear Reactor for irradiations and the UM Phoenix Memorial Lab for the remaining work. Spectra have been obtained with a variety of detectors, some suitable for low energies (>5 keV) and others efficient (70%) for high energies. Sources have been obtained in a variety of forms, each of which has been characterized in comparison with a thin, point source. We will report on A=233 (Th, Pa, and U, and the Np-237 parent of Pa-233), A=234 (Th and the Pa isomers), and A=239 (U, Np, and the Am-243 parent of Np-239). *The 2000-01 undergrad research group consists of Jason Banker, Adam Berro, Adam Cole, Amelia Deschamps, Erik Epp, Ralph Pierre, and Emma Wong.

  3. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones.

  4. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in B0 --> KS pi0 gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-10-20

    The authors measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays for two regions of K{sub S}{sup 0}-{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass, m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}), using the final BABAR data set of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They find 339 {+-} 24 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.03 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and C{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.03. In the range 1.1 < m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} they find 133 {+-} 20 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.09 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.36 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.04. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  5. Search for lepton flavor violation in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Minamora, J S; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Schott, G; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-02-01

    A search for the nonconservation of lepton flavor in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma has been performed with 2.07x10(8) e+e--->tau+tau- events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. We find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of Beta(tau+/--->e+/-gamma)<1.1x10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:16486807

  6. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decay tau -> electron gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2005-08-26

    A search for the non-conservation of lepton flavor in the decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma} has been performed with 2.07 x 10{sup 8} e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. They find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  7. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  8. Characterization of a new modular decay total absorption gamma-ray spectrometer (DTAS) for FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Montaner Piza, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Marin, E.; Rice, S.; Rubio, B.

    2013-06-10

    Beta-decay studies are one of the main goals of the DEcay SPECtroscopy experiment (DESPEC) to be installed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). DESPEC aims at the study of nuclear structure of exotic nuclei. A new modular Decay Total Absorption gamma-ray Spectrometer (DTAS) is being built at IFIC and is specially adapted to studies at fragmentation facilities such as the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR. The designed spectrometer is composed of 16 identical NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. This work focuses on the characterization of these independent modules, as an initial step for the characterization of the full spectrometer. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to understand the detector response.

  9. Search for the decay K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}3{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Y. C.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Chen, K. F.; Wu, M. L.; Ahn, J. K.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Akune, Y.; Fujioka, Y.; Ishibashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Ogata, R.; Shimogawa, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Tsukamoto, T.; Baranov, V.; Kurilin, A. S.; Kuzmin, E.; Moisseenko, A.

    2011-02-01

    We performed a search for the decay K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}3{gamma} with the E391a detector at KEK. In the data accumulated in 2005, no event was observed in the signal region. Based on the assumption of K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}3{gamma} proceeding via parity-violation, we obtained the single event sensitivity to be (3.23{+-}0.14)x10{sup -8}, and set an upper limit on the branching ratio to be 7.4x10{sup -8} at the 90% confidence level. This is a factor of 3.2 improvement compared to the previous results. The results of K{sub L}{sup 0}{yields}3{gamma} proceeding via parity-conservation were also presented in this paper.

  10. Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B -Meson Decay B -> X_s gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, V.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2006-01-06

    Radiative decays of the B meson, B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, proceed via virtual flavor changing neutral current processes that are sensitive to contributions from high mass scales, either within the Standard Model of electroweak interactions or beyond. In the Standard Model, these transitions are sensitive to the weak interactions of the top quark, and relatively robust predictions of the inclusive decay rate exist. Significant deviation from these predictions could be interpreted as indications for processes not included in the minimal Standard Model, like interactions of charged Higgs or SUSY particles. The analysis of the inclusive photon spectrum from B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays is rather challenging due to high backgrounds from photons emitted in the decay of mesons in B decays as well as e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation to low mass quark and lepton pairs. Based on 88.5 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector, the photon spectrum above 1.9 GeV is presented. By comparison of the first and second moments of the photon spectrum with QCD predictions (calculated in the kinetic scheme), QCD parameters describing the bound state of the b quark in the B meson are extracted: m{sub b} = (4.45 {+-} 0.16) GeV/c{sup 2}; {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2} = (0.65 {+-} 0.29) GeV{sup 2}. These parameters are useful input to non-perturbative QCD corrections to the semileptonic B decay rate and the determination of the CKM parameter |V{sub ub}|. Based on these parameters and heavy quark expansion, the full branching fraction is obtained as: {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}){sup E{sub {gamma}}>1.6 GeV} = (4.05 {+-} 0.32(stat) {+-} 0.38(syst) {+-} 0.29(model)) x 10{sup -4}. This result is in good agreement with previous measurements, the statistical and systematic errors are comparable. It is also in good agreement with the theoretical Standard Model predictions, and thus within the present errors there is no indication of any interactions not accounted for in the

  11. Different Contributions of the {phi}{yields}K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}{gamma} Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Kucukarslan, Ayse; Unal, Yasemin

    2011-12-26

    The scalar mesons and vector mesons contribution to the radiative decay {phi}{yields}K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}{gamma} are studied within the framework of the phenomenological approach. The branching ratio of this decay is calculated to be 10{sup -8}-10{sup -12}. Furthermore, obtained values are compared with the experimental and theoretical results existing in the literature.

  12. Evidence of the Exponential Decay Emission in the Swift Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Hill, J.E.; Krimm, H.A.; Yamazaki, R.; Takami, K.; Swindell, S.; Osborne, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the steep decay emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT). In contrast to the analysis in recent literature, instead of extrapolating the data of Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) down into the XRT energy range, we extrapolated the XRT data up to the BAT energy range, 15-25 keV, to produce the BAT and XRT composite light curve. Based on our composite light curve fitting, we have confirmed the existence of an exponential decay component which smoothly connects the BAT prompt data to the XRT steep decay for several GRBs. We also find that the XRT steep decay for some of the bursts can be well fitted by a combination of a power-law with an exponential decay model. We discuss that this exponential component may be the emission from an external shock and a sign of the deceleration of the outflow during the prompt phase.

  13. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.

  14. Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in Radiative B Decays to eta K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-14

    The authors present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}; for B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} they also measure the branching fractions and for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} the time-integrated charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The results are S = -0.18{sub -0.46}{sup +0.49} {+-} 0.12, C = -0.32{sub -0.39}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.07, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = (7.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = (7.7 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Alpha}{sub ch} = (-9.0{sub -9.8}{sup +10.4} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -2}. The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  15. Study of B to X \\gamma Decays and Determination of |V_{td}/V_{ts}|

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-22

    Using a sample of 471 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector, we study the sum of seven exclusive final states B {yields} X{sub s(d){gamma}}, where X{sub s(d)} is a strange (non-strange) hadronic system with a mass of up to 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. After correcting for unobserved decay modes, we obtain a branching fraction for b {yields} d{gamma} of (9.2 {+-} 2.0(stat.) {+-} 2.3(syst.)) x 10{sup -6} in this mass range, and a branching fraction for b {yields} s{gamma} of (23.0 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.0(syst.)) x 10{sup -5} in the same mass range. We find {Beta}(b{yields}d{gamma})/{Beta}(b{yields}s{gamma}) = 0.040 {+-} 0.009(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.), from which we determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.199 {+-} 0.022(stat.) {+-} 0.024(syst.) {+-} 0.002(th.).

  16. Constraining |V(td)|/|V(ts)| Using Radiative Penguin B -> V(K*/rho/omega)gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ping; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-08

    Exclusive radiative penguin B decays, B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}, are flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) processes. Studies of these decays are of special interest in testing Standard Model (SM) predictions and searching for other beyond-the-SM FCNC interactions. Using 89 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR, we measure the branching fraction ({Beta}), CP-asymmetry ({Alpha}), and isospin asymmetry ({Delta}{sub 0-}) of B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}){gamma} as follows: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = 3.92 {+-} 0.20(stat.) {+-} 0.24(syst.); {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = 3.87 {+-} 0.28(stat.) {+-} 0.26(syst.); {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = -0.013 {+-} 0.36(stat.) {+-} 0.10(syst.); {Delta}{sub 0-}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = 0.050 {+-} 0.045(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.) {+-} 0.024(R{sup +/0}). The 90% confidence intervals for the CP-asymmetry and the isospin-asymmetry in the B {yields} K*{gamma} decay are given as: -0.074 < {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.049, -0.046 < {Delta}{sub 0-} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.146. We also search for B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma} decays using 211 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR. No evidence for these decays is found. We set the upper limits at 90% confidence level for these decays: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 0.4 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup +}{yields} {rho}{sup =}{gamma}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -6}; {bar {Beta}}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6}. These results are in good agreement with the SM predictions. The branching fractions of these decays are then used to constrain the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}|.

  17. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  18. Intense gamma-ray lines from hidden vector dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Arina, Chiara; Hambye, Thomas; Ibarra, Alejandro; Weniger, Christoph E-mail: thambye@ulb.ac.be E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de

    2010-03-01

    Scenarios with hidden, spontaneously broken, non-abelian gauge groups contain a natural dark matter candidate, the hidden vector, whose longevity is due to an accidental custodial symmetry in the renormalizable Lagrangian. Nevertheless, non-renormalizable dimension six operators break the custodial symmetry and induce the decay of the dark matter particle at cosmological times. We discuss in this paper the cosmic ray signatures of this scenario and we show that the decay of hidden vector dark matter particles generically produce an intense gamma ray line which could be observed by the Fermi-LAT experiment, if the scale of custodial symmetry breaking is close to the Grand Unification scale. This gamma line proceeds directly from a tree level dark matter 2-body decay in association with a Higgs boson. Within this model we also perform a determination of the relic density constraints taking into account the dark matter annihilation processes with one dark matter particle in the final state. The corresponding direct detection rates can be easily of order the current experimental sensitivities.

  19. Limits to the radiative decays of neutrinos and axions from gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations obtained by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer in the energy range 4.1-6.4 MeV are used to provide limits on the possible radiative decay of neutrinos and axions emitted by SN 1987A. For branching ratio values for the radiative decay modes of less than about 0.0001, the present limits are more stringent than those based upon the photon flux from decaying relic neutrinos. The data are also used to set an axion mass limit.

  20. The MEGA (Muon decays into an Electron and a GAmma ray) experiment: A search for. mu. -->. e. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The MEGA experiment is designed to search for the ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma.. process with a branching ratio sensitivity of 10/sup -13/. This decay violates the empirically established rule of lepton family number conservation and lies outside the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. In order for the experiment to make a factor of 500 improvement over the existing limit, a new design was adopted that employs highly modular, fast detectors and state-of-the-art electronic readout. The detectors are contained in a 15 kG solenoidal field produced by a superconducting magnet. The central region is a positron spectrometer, and the outer region is four layers of pair spectrometers. Data taking is expected to commence in 1989. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  2. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation. PMID:17280195

  3. The MEGA (Muon decays into an Electron and a GAmma ray) hardware trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.J.; Amann, J.F.; Black, J.K.; Cooper, M.D.; Wright, S.C.; Crocker, J.; Sanders, H.

    1988-01-01

    The MEGA experiment is designed to search for the rare decay ..mu.. ..-->.. e ..gamma.. with a branching ratio sensitivity of /approximately/10/sup -13/. As is typical of rare-decay experiments, extensive, online filtering of the data is required for MEGA. The MEGA experiment uses a hardware pattern-recognition system based on Programmable Array Logic (PAL) devices. Additional events are eliminated in an online ACP system before data are written to tape. The MEGA trigger system is generally applicable where high-rate, short-propagation-delay trigger systems are required. This report contains an introduction to the MEGA experiment, a discussion of the MEGA hardware trigger system and a discussion of the system's measured performance. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  4. A Reconsideration of the b{yields}s{gamma} Decay in the Minimal Flavor Violating MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Michael; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang

    2008-11-23

    We present a MSSM study of the b{yields}s{gamma} decay in a Minimal Flavor Violating (MFV) framework, where the form of the soft SUSY breaking terms is determined by the Standard Model Yukawa couplings. In particular, we address the role of gluino contributions, which are set to zero in most studies of the MFV MSSM.Gluino contributions can play an important role in the MFV MSSM whenever {mu}xtan{beta} is large. In fact, similarly to chargino contributions, gluino contributions are tan{beta} enhanced and can easily dominate charged Higgs contributions for large values of tan{beta}. Even though each of the separate contributions to b{yields}s{gamma} can be sizeable by itself, surprisingly no absolute lower bound can be placed on any of the relevant SUSY masses, since patterns of partial cancellations among the three competing contributions (Higgs, chargino and gluino) can occur throughout the MSSM parameter space.

  5. Reexamination of the Optical Gamma Ray Decay in T229h

    SciTech Connect

    Utter, S.B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Barnes, A.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Becker, J.A.; Weiss, M.S.; Lougheed, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements of a clean, 2-{mu}C {sup 233}U sample were made to verify light emission from gamma ray decay of the first excited nuclear level in {sup 229}Th . The results showed that the light observed in earlier studies was likely to be caused by alpha-particle induced fluorescence of air. {ital In vacuo,} no light emission was discernable. The {sup 229}Th system, therefore, does not appear to provide the level of access for studying atomic-nuclear interactions suggested by the previous measurements. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  6. {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O: Properties of sub-barrier resonance {gamma}-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.

    2012-10-20

    In a recent experiment performed at Triumf using the Dragon 0 Degree-Sign spectrometer and its associated BGO array, the complete {gamma}-decay of the radiative capture channel below the Coulomb barrier has been measured for the first time. This measurement has been performed at two energies E{sub c.m.}= 6.6 and 7.2 MeV. A selective contribution of the entrance spins 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} has been evidenced which is consistent with existing results above the barrier.

  7. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau{sup +}-->e{sup +}-{gamma} and {tau}{sup +}-->{mu}{sup +}-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+-7)x10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{sup +}-->e{sup +}-{gamma})<3.3x10{sup -8} and B({tau}{sup +}-->{mu}{sup +}-{gamma})<4.4x10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  8. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  9. The Beta-Delayed Proton and Gamma Decay of 27P for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, E.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.; Lotay, G. J.; Wallace, J.; Doherty, D.; Saastamoinen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The creation site of 26Al is still under debate. It is thought to be produced in hydrogen burning and in explosive helium burning in novae and supernovae, and possibly also in the H-burning in outer shells of red giant stars. Also, the reactions for its creation or destruction are not completely known. When 26Al is created in novae, the reaction chain is: 24Mg(p,γ)25AI(β+v)25 Mg(p,γ)26Al, but this chain can be by-passed by another chain, 25Al(p, γ)26Si(p, γ)27P and it can also be destroyed directly. The reaction 26m Al (p, γ)27 Si* is another avenue to bypass the production of 26Al and it is dominated by resonant capture. We find and study these resonances by an indirect method, through the beta-decay of 27P. A clean and abundant source of 27P was produced for the first time and separated with MARS. A new implantation-decay station which allows increased efficiency for low energy protons and for high-energy gamma-rays was used. We measured gamma-rays and beta-delayed protons emitted from states above the proton threshold in the daughter nucleus 27Si to identify and characterize the resonances. The lifetime of 27P was also measured with accuracy under 2%.

  10. Gamma rays from muons from WIMPs: Implementation of radiative muon decays for dark matter analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Andre; Freese, Katherine; Li, Jinmian; Savage, Christopher; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-06-01

    Dark matter searches in gamma ray final states often make use of the fact that photons can be produced from final state muons. Modern Monte Carlo generators and dark matter codes include the effects of final state radiation from muons produced in the dark matter annihilation process itself, but neglect the O (1 %) radiative correction that arises from the subsequent muon decay. After implementing this correction we demonstrate the effect that it can have on dark matter phenomenology by considering the case of dark matter annihilation to four muons via scalar mediator production. We first show that the AMS-02 positron excess can no longer easily be made consistent with this final state once the Fermi-LAT dwarf limits are calculated with the inclusion of radiative muon decays, and we next show that the Fermi-LAT galactic center gamma excess can be improved with this final state after inclusion of the same effect. We provide code and tables for the implementation of this effect in the popular dark matter code micrOMEGAs, providing a solution for any model producing final state muons.

  11. Study of Higgs boson production and its b-b(bar) decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (m{sub H} = 115-140 GeV/c{sup 2}) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (p Pb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b{bar b} decay. Using equivalent Weizsacker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} p H Pb) and semielastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} X H Pb) processes at {radical}S{sub NN} = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} b{bar b} and misidentified {gamma}{gamma} {yields} q{bar q} events), we find that a Higgs boson with m{sub H} = 120 GeV/c{sup 2} could be observed in the b{bar b} channel with a 3{sigma}-significance integrating 300 pb{sup -1} with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t{bar t} cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

  12. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  13. Evidence for X(3872) --> Psi(2S) gamma in B+/- --> X(3872) K+/- Decays, and a Study of B --> ccbar gamma K

    SciTech Connect

    Fulsom, B

    2008-09-09

    In a search for B {yields} c{bar c}{gamma} K decays with the BABAR detector, where c{bar c} includes J/{psi} and {psi}(2S), and K includes K{sup {+-}}, K{sub S}{sup 0} and K*(892), they find evidence for X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma} and X(3872) {yields} {psi}(2S){gamma} with 3.6{sigma} and 3.5{sigma} significance, respectively. They measure the product of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} X (3872)K{sup {+-}}) {center_dot} {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}}) {center_dot} {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} {psi}(2S){gamma}) = (9.9 {+-} 2.9(stat.) {+-} 0.6(syst.)) x 10{sup -6}.

  14. Naked-eye optical flash from gamma-ray burst 080319B: Tracing the decaying neutrons in the outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Yizhong; Zhang Bing; Wei Daming

    2009-01-15

    For an unsteady baryonic gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow, the fast and slow proton shells collide with each other and produce energetic soft gamma-ray emission. If the outflow has a significant neutron component, the ultrarelativistic neutrons initially expand freely until decaying at a larger radius. The late-time proton shells ejected from the GRB central engine, after powering the regular internal shocks, will sweep these {beta}-decay products and give rise to very bright UV/optical emission. The naked-eye optical flash from GRB 080319B, an energetic explosion in the distant Universe, can be well explained in this way.

  15. A photon detector system for the search for the rare muon decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ausdeln, L.A.

    1993-11-01

    An innovative and state of the art pair spectrometer system to measure the photon component of {mu}{sup +} decay to obtain an improved branching ratio limit for the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is investigated. Analysis algorithms are developed and an experimental inner bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained and agrees well with Monte Carlo simulations. Background sources are investigated and found to be highly suppressed at various stages of acquisition and analysis.

  16. Parity nonconservation in the {gamma} decay of polarized 17/2{sup -} isomers in {sup 93}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.S. Nara; Hass, M.; Goldring, G.; Ackermann, D.; Sulignano, B.; Gerl, J.; Hessberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Schaffner, H.; Brown, B.A.

    2005-08-01

    The determination of the 0 deg. - 180 deg. asymmetry (A{sub {gamma}}), which arises because of the parity nonconserving matrix element, in the 751-keV {gamma} decay of polarized 17/2{sup -} isomers in {sup 93}Tc with respect to the direction of polarization is reported. A combined analysis of the present results together with those from our earlier work yields an effect of two standard deviations.

  17. Neutral-pion-decay gamma rays from the Galaxy and the interstellar gas content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    Knowledge of the total gamma-ray production rate per H atom from the decay of neutral pions produced in interstellar cosmic-ray interactions is essential for determining the possible amount of interstellar H2. This production rate is recalculated here using the latest accelerator data on neutral pion production in p-p interactions up to about 1500 GeV. A simple but accurate approximation used here resolves the past disagreement over the magnitude of this rate. An upper limit is obtained of (1.51 plus or minus 0.23) times 10 to the -25th power/sec, consistent with the observed upper limit of 1.6 times 10 to the -25th power/sec.

  18. Weak {gamma}-transition intensities in the electron capture decay of {sup 144}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.J.; Altgilbers, A.S.; Hindi, M.M.; Norman, E.B.; Larimer, R.

    1996-09-01

    We have determined the absolute intensity of weak {gamma} transitions in the level scheme of {sup 144}Nd, observed following the electron capture decay of {sup 144}Pm. The absolute intensity of the 1397-keV {ital E}3 branch from the 2093-keV (5{sub 1}{sup {minus}}) level was determined to be (4.9 {plus_minus} 0.7) {times} 10{sup {minus}4}{percent}. This leads to a revised absolute transition rate of {ital B}({ital E}3;5{sub 1}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}2{sup +}{sub 1})=26{sub {minus}12}{sup +15} Weisskopf units, which is still consistent with an interpretation of the 5{sub 1}{sup {minus}} level based on quadrupole-octupole coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Fast Rise Exponential Decay (FRED) Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Fluence Duration Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. C.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2003-05-01

    The fluences and durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be systematically underestimated for low signal-to-noise ratios. This is the result of a human operator selecting a time interval shorter than the burst interval, effectively ignoring burst flux in the fluence calculation. The gradual rise and decay of the FRED-type GRBs are especially susceptible to this bias. Because of the large number of FREDs in the BATSE catalogue, a series of Monte Carlo simulations of hypothetical FREDs have been analyzed. By varying the parameters of the Norris et al. pulse model, the properties of those FREDs most susceptible to the fluence duration bias have been identified. This work is funded by NASA grant NRA-98-OSS-03 and NSF grant AST00-98499.

  20. A comparison of radiative capture with decay gamma-ray method in bore hole logging for economic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.

    1972-01-01

    The recent availability of borehole logging sondes employing a source of neutrons and a Ge(Li) detector opens up the possibility of analyzing either decay or capture gamma rays. The most efficient method for a given element can be predicted by calculating the decay-to-capture count ratio for the most prominent peaks in the respective spectra. From a practical point of view such a calculation must be slanted toward short irradiation and count times at each station in a borehole. A simplified method of computation is shown, and the decay-to-capture count ratio has been calculated and tabulated for the optimum value in the decay mode irrespective of the irradiation time, and also for a ten minute irradiation time. Based on analysis of a single peak in each spectrum, the results indicate the preferred technique and the best decay or capture peak to observe for those elements of economic interest. ?? 1972.

  1. The quasi-continuum of gamma rays following the decay of superdeformed bands in the Hg region

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1996-12-31

    The quasi-continuum part of the spectrum associated with the decay-out of the yrast superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg has been extracted. It has for the first time been possible to compare the spin and excitation energy determined from the analysis of the quasi-continuum {gamma} rays to the exact result obtained from the one-step linking transitions.

  2. High-energy cosmic antiparticle excess vs. isotropic gamma-ray background problem in decaying dark matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Budaev, R. I.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Laletin, M. N.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We are going to show that any conventional decaying dark matter model, providing an explanation of cosmic antiparticle excess observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, inevitably faces the contradiction with isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background, measured by FERMI/LAT.

  3. THE TEMPORAL AND SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF 'FAST RISE AND EXPONENTIAL DECAY' GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Yin, Y.; Bi, X. W.; Zhao, X. H.; Bao, Y. Y. E-mail: astromali@126.co

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we have analyzed the temporal and spectral behavior of 52 fast rise and exponential decay (FRED) pulses in 48 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the CGRO/BATSE, using a pulse model with two shape parameters and the Band model with three shape parameters, respectively. It is found that these FRED pulses are distinguished both temporally and spectrally from those in the long-lag pulses. In contrast to the long-lag pulses, only one parameter pair indicates an evident correlation among the five parameters, which suggests that at least four parameters are needed to model burst temporal and spectral behavior. In addition, our studies reveal that these FRED pulses have the following correlated properties: (1) long-duration pulses have harder spectra and are less luminous than short-duration pulses and (2) the more asymmetric the pulses are, the steeper are the evolutionary curves of the peak energy (E{sub p}) in the {nu}f{sub {nu}} spectrum within the pulse decay phase. Our statistical results give some constraints on the current GRB models.

  4. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar Boson in Radiative Transitions Y -> gamma A^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-02

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(2S) and {Upsilon}(3S) resonances: {Upsilon}(2S, 3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such a particle appears in extensions of the Standaard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) and 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A{sup 0}. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson: {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  5. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega^*_C Decaying to Omega^0_C Gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-11-15

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon {Omega}*{sub c} (css) in the radiative decay {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}{gamma}, where the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the {Omega}*{sub c} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is measured to be 70.8 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of {Omega}*{sub c} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation.

  6. Measurement of CP observables in B__ ->D_CPK__ decays and constraints on the CKM angle gamma

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    Using the entire sample of 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we perform a 'GLW' analysis of B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sup {+-}} decays, using decay modes in which the neutral D meson decays to either CP-eigenstates or non-CP-eigenstates. We measure the partial decay rate charge asymmetries for CP-even and CP-odd D final states to be A{sub CP+} = 0.25 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02 and A{sub CP-} = -0.09 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively, where the first error is the statistical and the second is the systematic uncertainty. The parameter A{sub CP+} is different from zero with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations, constituting evidence for direct CP violation. We also measure the ratios of the charged-averaged B partial decay rates in CP and non-CP decays, R{sub CP+} = 1.18 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.05 and R{sub CP-} = 1.07 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.04. We infer frequentist confidence intervals for the angle {gamma} of the (db) unitarity triangle, for the strong phase difference {delta}{sub B}, and for the amplitude ratio r{sub B}, which are related to the B{sup -} {yields} D{sup -} decay amplitude by r{sub B}e{sup i({delta}{sub b-{gamma}})} = A(B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup 0-}). Including statistical and systematic uncertainties, they obtain 0.24 < r{sub B} < 0.45 (0.06 < r{sub B} < 0.51) and, modulo 180{sup o}, 11.3{sup o} < {gamma} < 22.7{sup o} or 80.9{sup o} < {gamma} < 99.1{sup o} or 157.3{sup o} < {gamma} 168.7{sup o} (7.0{sup o} < {gamma} < 173.0{sup o}) at the 68% (95%) confidence level.

  7. The quasicontinuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of the superdeformed in {sup 194}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Over the last year we developed techniques for the study of the quasicontinuum of gamma-rays from both the feeding and especially the decay of the superdeformed (SD) bands in the Hg nuclei, most notably {sup 192}Hg. From this analysis we could extract both the spin and energy of some of the SD bands. The quasicontinuum analysis is the only technique so far that could extract these two fundamental properties of the now more than 100 SD bands found in the A = 150 and A = 190 regions. We based our understanding of the feeding and decay on comparisons of the data with extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the emission of gamma rays, both from the entry distribution toward the SD minimum, and, at lower spins, from the decay out of the SD band back to the states in the normal well.

  8. Observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{phi}{gamma} and Search for B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} Decays at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Wicht, J.; Bay, A.; Schneider, O.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Zwahlen, N.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Takasaki, F.

    2008-03-28

    We search for the radiative penguin decays B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{phi}{gamma} and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} in a 23.6 fb{sup -1} data sample collected at the {upsilon}(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy collider. We observe for the first time a radiative penguin decay of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson in the B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{phi}{gamma} mode and we measure B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{phi}{gamma})=(57{sub -15}{sup +18}(stat){sub -11}{sup +12}(syst))x10{sup -6}. No significant B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} signal is observed and we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})<8.7x10{sup -6}.

  9. Complete leading order analysis in Chiral Perturbation Theory of the decays K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} and K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sub +}l{sub {minus}}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Goity; Longzhe Zhang

    1997-02-01

    The decays K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} and K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}{gamma} are studied at the leading order p{sup 6} in Chiral Perturbation Theory. One-loop contributions stemming from the odd intrinsic parity {vert_bar}{Delta}S{vert_bar}=1 effective Lagrangian of order p{sup 4} are included and shown to be of possible relevance. They affect the decay K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} adding to the usual pole terms a piece free of counterterm uncertainties. In the case of the K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}{gamma} decays the dependence of the form factor on the dilepton invariant mass requires a counterterm. The form factor may receive a sizeable contribution from chiral logarithms. Including considerations from the K{sub L}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma} direct emission amplitude, the authors obtain two consistent scenarios. In one scenario the long distance contributions from the one-loop terms are important, while in the other they are marginal. In both cases the counterterm is shown to be significant.

  10. Inhibitory effect of gamma irradiation and its application for control of postharvest green mold decay of Satsuma mandarins.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Chu, Eun-Hee; Lee, Gun Woong; Cho, Chuloh; Park, Hae-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Gamma irradiation has been shown to be effective for the control of postharvest fungi in vitro, but little is known regarding antifungal action, responses to gamma irradiation, and its application to fresh produce. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum on Satsuma mandarin fruits. Green mold was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma irradiation showed a complete inhibition of spore germination, germ tube elongation, and mycelial growth of P. digitatum, particularly at 1.0kGy. To further investigate the mechanisms by which gamma irradiation inhibits fungal growth, the membrane integrity and cellular leakage of conidia were tested, indicating that gamma irradiation results in the loss of plasma membrane integrity, causing the release of intracellular contents such as soluble proteins. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses can completely inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens, but such high doses cause severe fruit damage. Thus, to eliminate the negative impact on fruit quality, gamma irradiation at lower doses was evaluated for inhibition of P. digitatum, in combination with a chlorine donor, sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione (NaDCC). Interestingly, only a combined treatment with 0.4kGy of gamma irradiation and 10ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against green mold decay. The mechanisms by which the combined treatment decreased the green mold decay of mandarin fruits can be directly associated with the disruption of cell membrane of the fungal pathogen, which resulted in a loss of cytoplasmic material from the hyphae. These findings suggest that a synergistic effect of combining treatment with gamma irradiation with NaDCC has potential as an antifungal approach to reduce the severity of green mold in mandarin fruits. PMID:27356109

  11. Implications of the Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements on annihilating or decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hütsi, Gert; Hektor, Andi; Raidal, Martti E-mail: andi.hektor@cern.ch

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the recently published Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements in the context of leptonically annihilating or decaying dark matter (DM) with the aim to explain simultaneously the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and the PAMELA, Fermi and HESS (PFH) anomalous e{sup ±} data. Five different DM annihilation/decay channels 2e, 2μ, 2τ, 4e, or 4μ (the latter two via an intermediate light particle φ) are generated with PYTHIA. We calculate both the Galactic and extragalactic prompt and inverse Compton (IC) contributions to the resulting gamma-ray spectra. To find the Galactic IC spectra we use the interstellar radiation field model from the latest release of GALPROP. For the extragalactic signal we show that the amplitude of the prompt gamma-emission is very sensitive to the assumed model for the extragalactic background light. For our Galaxy we use the Einasto, NFW and cored isothermal DM density profiles and include the effects of DM substructure assuming a simple subhalo model. Our calculations show that for the annihilating DM the extragalactic gamma-ray signal can dominate only if rather extreme power-law concentration-mass relation C(M) is used, while more realistic C(M) relations make the extragalactic component comparable or subdominant to the Galactic signal. For the decaying DM the Galactic signal always exceeds the extragalactic one. In the case of annihilating DM the PFH favored parameters can be ruled out by gamma-ray constraints only if power-law C(M) relation is assumed. For DM decaying into 2μ or 4μ the PFH favored DM parameters are not in conflict with the gamma-ray data. We find that, due to the (almost) featureless Galactic IC spectrum and the DM halo substructure, annihilating DM may give a good simultaneous fit to the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and to the PFH e{sup ±} data without being in clear conflict with the other Fermi-LAT gamma-ray measurements.

  12. Model-Independent Results for the Decay B \\to L Nu(L) Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, D.M.; /McGill U.

    2012-04-09

    We present a search for the radiative leptonic decays B{sub +} {yields} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} and then search for evidence of the signal decay within the rest of the event. This method provides clean kinematic information on the signal's missing energy and high momentum photon and lepton, and allows for a model-independent analysis of this decay. Using a data sample of 465 million B-meson pairs, we obtain sensitivity to branching fractions of the same order as predicted by the Standard Model. We report a model-independent branching fraction upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}) at the 90% confidence level.

  13. A search for gamma-ray lines from the decay of Fe-59 in Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, M. J.; Leising, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched spectra of Supernova (SN) 1987A, accumulated during several 35-day intervals after the explosion by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), for gamma-ray lines at 1.099 and 1.292 MeV from the decay of Fe-59 which may have been produced in the progenitor's helium shell. We find no evidence for these lines, down to 3-sigma upper limits approximately = 7 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.099 MeV line, or approximately = 4.5 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.292 MeV line, in any 35-day interval. We derive a conservative 3-sigma upper limit on the mass fraction of Fe-59 in the helium shell of 2.9 x 10(exp -3).

  14. Phenomenological coupling of excited lepton to Z/sup 0/ and Z/sup 0/ decay to hard. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyniak, P.; Sundaresan, M.K.

    1985-06-01

    We explore the possibility of enhancing the decay Z/sup 0/..-->..e/sup +/e..gamma.. with a hard photon through the existence of an excited spin-(1/2) lepton coupling to Z/sup 0/ and ..gamma.., while remaining consistent with constraints on these couplings from data on e/sup +/e/sup -/..--> gamma gamma.. and g-2. For an excited-lepton mass less than the Z/sup 0/ mass, we find that the rate can be enhanced but does not peak for high photon energies. We set lower limits on the couplings for the case of the excited lepton heavier than Z/sup 0/, as a function of mass of the heavy lepton.

  15. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  16. Evidence for X(3872)-->psi(2S)gamma in B(+/-)-->X(3872)K(+/-) decays and a study of B-->cc[over ]gammaK.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Schott, G; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Lo Secco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Peliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-04-01

    In a search for B-->cc[over ]gammaK decays with the BABAR detector, where cc[over ] includes J/psi and psi(2S), and K includes K(+/-), K(S)(0), and K(*)(892), we find evidence for X(3872)-->J/psigamma and X(3872)-->psi(2S)gamma with 3.6sigma and 3.5sigma significance, respectively. We measure the product of branching fractions B(B(+/-)-->X(3872)K(+/-))xB(X(3872)-->J/psigamma)=[2.8+/-0.8(stat)+/-0.1(syst)]x10(-6) and B(B(+/-)-->X(3872)K(+/-))xB(X(3872)-->psi(2S)gamma)=[9.5+/-2.7(stat)+/-0.6(syst)]x10(-6). PMID:19392347

  17. Reactor Decay Heat in {sup 239}Pu: Solving the {gamma} Discrepancy in the 4-3000-s Cooling Period

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, A.; Jordan, D.; Tain, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Caballero, L.; Nacher, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyas, J.; Vitez, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L.; Aeysto, J.; Penttilae, H.; Moore, I. D.; Eronen, T.; Jokinen, A.

    2010-11-12

    The {beta} feeding probability of {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei, which are important contributors to the decay heat in nuclear reactors, has been measured using the total absorption technique. We have coupled for the first time a total absorption spectrometer to a Penning trap in order to obtain sources of very high isobaric purity. Our results solve a significant part of a long-standing discrepancy in the {gamma} component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range.

  18. Measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->K*0gamma(K*0-->K(0)Spi0) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-11-12

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->K(*0)gamma(K(*0)-->K(0)(S)pi(0)) decays based on 124 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In a sample containing 105+/-14 signal decays, we measure S(K(*)gamma)=0.25+/-0.63+/-0.14 and C(K(*)gamma)=-0.57+/-0.32+/-0.09, where the first error is statistical and the second, systematic. PMID:15600911

  19. Confirmation of parity violation in the {gamma} decay of {sup 180}Hf{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Lakshmi, S.; Stone, N. J.; Severijns, N.; Kraev, I. S.; Wauters, F.; Zakoucky, D.; Giles, T.; Lindroos, M.; Koester, U.

    2007-08-15

    This paper reports measurements made using the technique of online nuclear orientation which reexamine the {gamma} decay of isomeric {sup 180}Hf{sup m} and specifically the 501 keV 8{sup -}6{sup +} transition. The irregular admixture of E2 to M2/E3 multipolarity in this transition, deduced from the forward-backward asymmetry of its angular distribution, has for decades stood as the prime evidence for parity mixing in nuclear states. The experiment, based on ion implantation of the newly developed mass-separated {sup 180}Hf{sup m} beam at the CERN online isotope mass separator (ISOLDE) facility into an iron foil maintained at millikelvin temperatures, produces higher degrees of polarization than were achieved in previous studies of this system. The value found for the E2/M2 mixing ratio, {epsilon}=-0.0324(16)(19), is in close agreement with the previous published average value {epsilon}=-0.030(2), in full confirmation of the presence of the irregular E2 admixture in the 501 keV transition. The temperature dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry has been measured over a more extended range of nuclear polarization than previously possible, giving further evidence for parity mixing of the 8{sup -} and 8{sup +} levels and the deduced E2/M2 mixing ratio.

  20. Gamma-ray bounds from EAS detectors and heavy decaying dark matter constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Arman; Dario Serpico, Pasquale

    2015-10-01

    The very high energy Galactic γ-ray sky is partially opaque in the (0.1-10) PeV energy range. In the light of the recently detected high energy neutrino flux by IceCube, a comparable very high energy γ-ray flux is expected in any scenario with a sizable Galactic contribution to the neutrino flux. Here we elaborate on the peculiar energy and anisotropy features imposed upon these very high energy γ-rays by the absorption on the cosmic microwave background photons and Galactic interstellar light. As a notable application of our considerations, we study the prospects of probing the PeV-scale decaying DM scenario, proposed as a possible source of IceCube neutrinos, by extensive air shower (EAS) cosmic ray experiments. In particular, we show that anisotropy measurements at EAS experiments are already sensitive to τDM~ Script O(1027) s and future measurements, using better gamma/hadron separation, can improve the limit significantly.

  1. Gamma-ray bounds from EAS detectors and heavy decaying dark matter constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-10-07

    The very high energy Galactic γ-ray sky is partially opaque in the (0.1–10) PeV energy range. In the light of the recently detected high energy neutrino flux by IceCube, a comparable very high energy γ-ray flux is expected in any scenario with a sizable Galactic contribution to the neutrino flux. Here we elaborate on the peculiar energy and anisotropy features imposed upon these very high energy γ-rays by the absorption on the cosmic microwave background photons and Galactic interstellar light. As a notable application of our considerations, we study the prospects of probing the PeV-scale decaying DM scenario, proposed as a possible source of IceCube neutrinos, by extensive air shower (EAS) cosmic ray experiments. In particular, we show that anisotropy measurements at EAS experiments are already sensitive to τ{sub DM}∼O(10{sup 27}) s and future measurements, using better gamma/hadron separation, can improve the limit significantly.

  2. Weibel Filament Decay and Thermalization in Collisionless Shocks and Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Nakar, Ehud

    2006-04-01

    Models for the synchrotron emission of gamma-ray burst afterglows suggest that the magnetic field is generated in the shock wave that forms as relativistic ejecta plow through the circumburst medium. Transverse Weibel instability efficiently generates magnetic fields near equipartition with the postshock energy density. The detailed saturated state of the instability, as seen in particle-in-cell simulations, consists of magnetically self-pinched current filaments. The filaments are parallel to the direction of propagation of the shock and are about a plasma skin depth in radius, forming a quasi-two-dimensional structure. We argue that the Weibel filaments are susceptible to pressure-driven instabilities and use a rudimentary analytical model to illustrate the development of a particular, kinklike unstable mode. The instabilities destroy the quasi-two-dimensional structure of the Weibel filaments. For wavelengths longer than the skin depth, the kinklike mode grows at the rate equal to the speed of light divided by the wavelength. We calculate the transport of collisionless test particles in the filaments experiencing the instability and show that the particles diffuse in energy. This diffusion marks the beginning of thermalization in the shock transition layer and causes initial magnetic field decay as particles escape from the filaments. We discuss the implications of these results for the structure of the shock and the polarization of the afterglow.

  3. Gamma-ray detection from gravitino dark matter decay in the μνSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ki-Young; Muñoz, Carlos; López-Fogliani, Daniel E.; Austri, Roberto Ruiz de E-mail: d.lopez@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: rruiz@ific.uv.es

    2010-03-01

    The μνSSM provides a solution to the μ-problem of the MSSM and explains the origin of neutrino masses by simply using right-handed neutrino superfields. Given that R-parity is broken in this model, the gravitino is a natural candidate for dark matter since its lifetime becomes much longer than the age of the Universe. We consider the implications of gravitino dark matter in the μνSSM, analyzing in particular the prospects for detecting gamma rays from decaying gravitinos. If the gravitino explains the whole dark matter component, a gravitino mass larger than 20GeV is disfavored by the isotropic diffuse photon background measurements. On the other hand, a gravitino with a mass range between 0.1−20 GeV gives rise to a signal that might be observed by the FERMI satellite. In this way important regions of the parameter space of the μνSSM can be checked.

  4. Overall picture of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances within a modified practical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovoj, A. M.; Mitsyna, L. V.; Jovancevic, N.

    2016-05-01

    The intensities of two-step cascades in 43 nuclei of mass number in the range of 28 ≤ A ≤ 200 were approximated to a high degree of precision within a modified version of the practical cascade-gammadecay model introduced earlier. In this version, the rate of the decrease in the model-dependent density of vibrational levels has the same value for any Cooper pair undergoing breakdown. The most probable values of radiative strength functions both for E1 and for M1 transitions are determined by using one or two peaks against a smooth model dependence on the gamma-transition energy. The statement that the thresholds for the breaking of Cooper pairs are higher for spherical than for deformed nuclei is a basic result of the respective analysis. The parameters of the cascade-decay process are now determined to a precision that makes it possible to observe the systematic distinctions between them for nuclei characterized by different parities of neutrons and protons.

  5. Revisiting the {sup 238}U Thermal Capture Cross Section and Gamma-Ray Emission Probabilities from {sup 239}Np Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Firestone, R.B.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.; Moxon, M.C

    2005-07-15

    The precise value of the thermal capture cross section of {sup 238}U is uncertain, and evaluated cross sections from various sources differ by more than their assigned uncertainties. A number of the original publications have been reviewed to assess the discrepant data, corrections were made for more recent standard cross sections and other constants, and one new measurement was analyzed. Because of the strong correlations in activation measurements, the gamma-ray emission probabilities from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 239}Np were also analyzed. As a result of the analysis, a value of 2.683 {+-} 0.012 b was derived for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 238}U. A new evaluation of the gamma-ray emission probabilities from {sup 239}Np decay was also undertaken.

  6. Measurements of x-and {gamma}-ray emission probabilities in the {Beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 233} Pa.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kellett, M. A.; Nichols, A. L.

    2010-12-01

    X- and {gamma}-ray emission probabilities from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 233}Pa were measured with planar (LEPS) and coaxial Ge detectors. A {sup 233}Pa source was produced after radiochemical separation from a {sup 237}Np sample in which the parent ({sup 237}Np) and daughter ({sup 233}Pa) nuclides were in secular equilibrium. The results are compared with previous measurements and data evaluations.

  7. Search for Invisible Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S)->gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-11-05

    We search for a light scalar particle produced in single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) resonance through the process {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} + A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} invisible. Such an object appears in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. If, in addition, there exists a light, stable neutralino, decays of A{sup 0} could be preferentially to an invisible final state. We search for events with a single high-energy photon and a large missing mass, consistent with a 2-body decay of {Upsilon}(3S). We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} invisible) at (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range m{sub A{sup 0}} {le} 7.8 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  8. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  9. Measurement of CKM-angle gamma with Charmed B0 Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Baak, Max Arjen

    2007-07-17

    This thesis reports measurements of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in fully reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} (D{sup (*){-+}} and B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup {-+}} {rho}{sup {+-}}) decays in approximately 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California, as published in Ref. [14]. The phenomenon of CP violation allows one to distinguish between matter and antimatter, and, as such, is one of the essential ingredients needed to explain the apparent abundance of matter over antimatter in the universe. The Standard Model describes the observed elementary particles in terms of three generations of quarks and leptons, as well as the weak, electromagnetic, and strong interactions between them. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, which describes the weak interactions between the quarks. The weak interactions between quarks are described by coupling constants that are functions of three real parameters and one irreducible complex phase. The magnitude of all CP violating effects in the Standard Model is related to this complex phase. The measurement of the CP violating phase of the CKM matrix is an important part of the present scientific program in particle physics. Violation of the CP symmetry manifests itself as a non-zero area of the Unitarity Triangle. The Unitarity Triangle needs to be overconstrained by experimental measurements in order to demonstrate that the CKM mechanism is the correct explanation of this phenomenon. No stringent measurement of the CKM-angle {gamma} is yet available.

  10. Search for the decay KL to pi0 e+ e- and study of the decay KL to e+ e- gamma gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikelsons, Peter L.

    The particle decay KL-->p0e+e- is a probe of direct CP violation, a phenomenon previously only seen in KL-->pp decays. Understanding direct CP violation is an important part of understanding violation of CP symmetry in general. Experimentally, one of the obstacles to studying KL-->p0e+e- is the rare decay KL-->e+e- gg , which can mimic KL-->p0e+e- . A study of KL-->p0e+e- and KL-->e+e- gg was made as part of the KTeV E799 experiment. K-->p0p0Dalitz decays were used for normalization, and a KL flux of (2.65 +/- 0.18) × 1011 decays was measured. We observed 1578 KL-->e+e- gg candidate events, of which 1516.5 +/- 1.8 remain after background subtraction. These events allow measurement of the Bergström, Massó, and Singer KLgg vertex form- factor parameter, aK*=+0.015+/- 0.12stat.+/-0.03sys. , in mild disagreement with the previously fit value of -0.28 +/- 0.08. This form-factor implies a corresponding branching ratio of G(KL-->e+e- g g,E*g>5 MeV)/G(KL-->all ) = (5.82+/-0.15stat.+/-0.31 sys.+/-0.19BR)× 10-7 , in agreement with the QED prediction. The search for KL-->p0e+e- found two candidate events. However, 1.06 +/- 0.41 events were expected from background processes. Therefore, we do not claim observation of KL-->p0e+e- . Instead, with a single-event sensitivity of 1.00 × 10 -10, we set an upper limit on the KL-->p0e+e- branching ratio of 4.86 × 10-10 at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Long-Distance Dominance of the CP Asymmetry in B{yields}X{sub s,d{gamma}} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Benzke, Michael; Neubert, Matthias; Lee, Seung J.; Paz, Gil

    2011-04-08

    We show that in the standard model the parametrically leading (by a factor 1/{alpha}{sub s}) contribution to the inclusive CP asymmetry in B{yields}X{sub s,d{gamma}} decays arises from a long-distance effect in the interference of the electromagnetic dipole amplitude with the amplitude for an up-quark penguin transition accompanied by soft gluon emission. Using model estimates for the associated hadronic parameter {Lambda}-tilde{sub 17}{sup u}, we predict a value in the range -0.6%gamma}}}{sup SM}<2.8%. In view of current experimental data, a future precision measurement of the flavor-averaged CP asymmetry would signal the presence of new physics only if a value below -2% was found. A cleaner probe of new physics is offered by the difference of the CP asymmetries in charged versus neutral B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} decays.

  12. Lepton flavor violating l{yields}l{sup '}{gamma} and Z{yields}ll{sup '} decays induced by scalar leptoquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benbrik, Rachid; Chua, C.-K.

    2008-10-01

    Motivated by the recent muon g-2 data, we study the lepton flavor violating (LFV) l{yields}l{sup '}{gamma} and Z{yields}ll{sup '} (l, l{sup '}=e, {mu}, {tau} decays with l{ne}l{sup '}) in a scalar leptoquark model. Leptoquarks can produce sizable LFV l{yields}l{sup '}{gamma} decay rates that can be easily reached by present or near future experiments. Leptoquark masses and couplings are constrained by the muon g-2 data and the current l{yields}l{sup '}{gamma} bounds. We predict Br(Z{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}) reaching the present limit (10{sup -5}) and Br(Z{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) reaching 2x10{sup -8}, which will be accessible by future linear colliders, whereas, the current bounds on LFV impose very strong constraints on the Br(Z{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}) and the ratio is too low to be observed in the near future.

  13. Dalitz Analysis of D0 to K0(S) Pi+ Pi- and Measurement of the CKM Angle Gamma in Charged B+- Decays to D(*) K+- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Yan-Pan

    2007-07-10

    Despite more than thirty years having elapsed since the discovery of CP violation, our understanding about the source and the nature of this phenomenon is still very limited. In the standard model of particle physics, CP violation is due to the presence of an non-irreducible weak phase in the Cabibbo-Kabayashi-Maskawa(CKM) matrix. Up to now, all the experimental results are in good agreement with the standard model. However, it is important for us to over-constrain the CKM quark-mixing matrix and explore the possibility of new physics beyond the standard model. The B meson provides an ideal place to measure CP violation due to its heavy mass and potentially large CP-violating effects. In particular, the angle {gamma} of the Unitary Triangle relating the elements of the CKM matrix is extremely crucial in terms of CP violation and constraints on the new physics models. Various methods using B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -} decays have been proposed to measure based on the interference between the V{sub cb} and V{sub ub} amplitudes. Despite the simple concept, the measurement turns out to be experimentally challenging due to the small branching fraction and the small value of {tau}{sub B}, the amplitude ratio between the two contributing Feynman diagrams. In this thesis a novel technique to measure {gamma} in B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)} K{sup -} decay using a Dalitz plot analysis of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub s}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is presented. Until the turn on of LHC{sub b} [1] later in the decade, this remains the most promising method to measure {gamma}. This thesis is roughly separated into two parts. The first part involves a study of hadron spectroscopy and the Dalitz plot analysis of the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The second part of the thesis involves the measurement of {gamma} in B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)} K{sup -} using the results of the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} dalitz plot analysis.

  14. {mu} {yields} e{gamma} decay versus the {mu} {yields} eee bound and lepton flavor violating processes in supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Lychkovskiy, O. V. Vysotsky, M. I.

    2012-03-15

    Even tiny lepton flavor violation (LFV) due to some New Physics is able to alter the conditions inside a collapsing supernova core and probably to facilitate the explosion. LFV emerges naturally in a see-saw type-II model of neutrino mass generation. Experimentally, the LFV beyond the Standard Model is constrained by rare lepton decay searches. In particular, strong bounds are imposed on the {mu} {yields} eee branching ratio and on the {mu}-e conversion in muonic gold. Currently, the {mu}{yields}e{gamma} is under investigation in the MEG experiment that aims at a dramatic increase in sensitivity in the next three years. We seek a see-saw type-II LFV pattern that fits all the experimental constraints, leads to Br({mu} {yields}e{gamma}) Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To Br({mu}{mu} {yields}eee), and ensures a rate of LFV processes in supernova high enough to modify the supernova physics. These requirements are sufficient to eliminate almost all freedom in the model. In particular, they lead to the prediction 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To Br({mu} {yields} e{gamma}) Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}, which will be testable by MEG in the nearest future. The considered scenario also constrains the neutrino mass-mixing pattern and provides lower and upper bounds on {tau}-lepton LFV decays. We also briefly discuss a model with a single bilepton in which the {mu} {yields} eee decay is absent at the tree level.

  15. Revisiting the U-238 thermal capture cross section and gamma-raymission probabilities from Np-239 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Trkov, A.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Firestone,R.B.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.; Moxon, M.C.

    2005-03-03

    The precise value of the thermal capture cross section of238U is uncertain, and evaluated cross sections from various sourcesdiffer by more than their assigned uncertainties. A number of theoriginal publications have been reviewed to assess the discrepant data,corrections were made for more recent standard cross sections andotherconstants, and one new measurement was analyzed. Due to the strongcorrelations in activation measurements, the gamma-ray emissionprobabilities from the beta decay of 239Np were also analyzed. As aresult of the analysis, a value of 2.683 +- 0.012 barns was derived forthe thermal capture cross section of 238U. A new evaluation of thegamma-ray emission probabilities from 239Np decay was alsoundertaken.

  16. Charmless B Decays from BABAR (B0->K*0 gamma and B0->pi+pi-,K+pi-,K+K-)

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, Mark R

    2001-06-08

    The BaBar experiment has completed its first year of data-taking during which 21 fb{sup -1} of data were accumulated. We present preliminary results on two types of charmless B decays based on this data sample. The first, B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}, is a so-called electromagnetic penguin. And the second, B{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +} h'{sup -} can be either a pion or kaon, can come from either penguin diagrams or Cabibbo suppressed tree diagrams.

  17. First observation of the competitive double-gamma (γγ/γ) decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietralla, N.; Walz, C.; Scheit, H.; Aumann, T.; Lefol, R.; Ponomarev, V. Yu

    2016-06-01

    First observation of the competitive double-γ decay process is presented. It is a second-order electromagnetic decay mode. The 662-keV transition from the 11/2‑ isomer of 137Ba to its ground state proceeds at a fraction of 2 x 10‑6 by simultaneous emission of two γ quanta instead of one. The angular correlation and energy distribution of coincident γ quanta are reproduced by a dominant M2-E2 and a minor E3-M1 contribution to the double-γ decay branch. The data are well accounted for by a calculation in the Quasiparticle Phonon Model.

  18. Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetry in $B^0 \\to K^{0}_s\\pi^0\\gamma$ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} decays with K*{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} based on 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In a sample containing 157 {+-} 16 signal decays, we measure S{sub K*{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.21 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.05 and C{sub K*{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.40 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.03, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We also explore B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays with 1.1 < m{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} and find 59 {+-} 13 signal events with S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = 0.9 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.2 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -1.0 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.2.

  19. Production spectrum of gamma rays in interstellar space through neutral pion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple representation is obtained of the observed invariant cross section for the production of neutral pions in proton-proton collisions. Using this representation, the differential and integral production spectra of gamma rays in the galaxy are calculated from interactions of cosmic ray nuclei with interstellar gas. It is shown that the uncertainties in deducing interstellar proton spectrum by demodulating the observed spectrum have only a limited effect on the gamma ray spectrum. Also determined is the gamma ray production spectrum through bremsstrahlung process for a typical interstellar electron spectrum derived from the radio spectrum in the galaxy.

  20. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  1. Shallow Decay of Early X-Ray Afterglows from Inhomogeneous Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Almost all the X-ray afterglows of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite have a shallow decay phase in their first few thousand seconds. We show that in an inhomogeneous-jet model (multiple-subjet or patchy-shell), the superposition of the afterglows of off-axis subjets (patchy shells) can produce the shallow decay phase. The necessary condition for obtaining the shallow decay phase is that γ-ray-bright subjets (patchy shells) have γ-ray efficiencies higher than previously estimated and that they be surrounded by γ-ray-dim subjets (patchy shells) with low γ-ray efficiency. Our model predicts that events with dim prompt emission will have a conventional afterglow light curve without a shallow decay phase, like GRB 050416A.

  2. Z{gamma}{gamma} production with leptonic decays and triple photon production at next-to-leading order QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzi, G.; Campanario, F.; Rauch, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2011-10-01

    We present a calculation of the O({alpha}{sub s}) QCD corrections to the production of a Z boson in association with two photons and to triple-photon production at hadron colliders. All final-state photons are taken as real. For the Z boson, we consider the decays both into charged leptons and into neutrinos including all off-shell effects. Numerical results are obtained via a Monte Carlo program based on the structure of the VBFNLO program package. This allows us to implement general cuts and distributions of the final-state particles. We find that the next-to-leading order QCD corrections are sizable and significantly exceed the expectations from a scale variation of the leading-order result. In addition, differential distributions of important observables change considerably. The prediction of two-photon-associated Z production with Z decays into neutrinos from the charged-lepton rate works well, once we use an additional cut on the invariant mass of the charged-lepton pair.

  3. New evaluation of the alpha and gamma emission intensities in the decay of (244)Cm.

    PubMed

    Badikov, Sergey A; Chechev, Valery P

    2016-03-01

    A method for self-consistent evaluation of the absolute emission probabilities for particles and photons accompanying radionuclide decays was applied to the evaluation of the (244)Cm alpha decay data. The absolute emission probabilities evaluated by the method meet the accurate balance relationships. The self-consistency of the results was reached through an iterative scheme of calculations, using the DDEP recommended probabilities for alpha transitions to the five (240)Pu highly excited levels as an initial approximation. PMID:26712410

  4. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S) -> gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2009-06-02

    The fundamental nature of mass is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. The Higgs mechanism is a theoretically appealing way to account for the different masses of elementary particles and implies the existence of a new, yet unseen particle, the Higgs boson. We search for evidence of a light scalar (e.g. a Higgs boson) in the radiative decays of the narrow {Upsilon}(3S) resonance: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such an object appears in extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction product {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) at (0.25 - 5.2) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV. We also set a limit on the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.8% at 90% C.L. The results are preliminary.

  5. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  6. Search for the neutrinoless muon decay. mu. /sup +/. -->. e/sup +/. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.L.

    1985-07-01

    Separate muon, electron, and tau numbers are conserved in the minimal standard model of electroweak interactions with massless neutrinos. However, in many extensions to the standard model, separate lepton numbers are not expected to be conserved quantities. A new search for muon number non-conserving processes has been undertaken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), specifically to look for three neutrinoless decay modes of the muon. The search for the decay of a muon to an electron and a photon is discussed here. A new detector facility, located in the LAMPF stopped muon channel, was developed for this experiment. This Crystal Box detector consists of a cylindrical drift chamber surrounded by a plastic scintillator hodoscope and a large solid angle, modularized, NaI(Tl) calorimeter. The apparatus measures the trajectories, relative timing, and energies of charged particles and photons from the decays of positive muons stopped in a central target. The assembly and calibration of the detector are described, and the procedure for taking data is discussed. The sample of 1.3 million candidate events, from the first data run of the Crystal Box, was analyzed using a maximum-likelihood method. The upper limit on the branching ratio, relative to normal muon decay, for a muon decaying to an electron and a photon is found to be consistent with previous measurements. With 90% confidence, the branching ratio for this neutrinoless decay is observed to be less than 2.8 x 10/sup 10/.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometry in the decay of (194)Ir to (194)Pt.

    PubMed

    Krane, K S

    2016-09-01

    As a complement to a resent high-resolution spectrometric investigation of the decay of (194)Au to levels of (194)Pt, a similar study has been undertaken of the decay of 19-h (194)Ir to (194)Pt. The two decays populate a similar set of levels in (194)Pt, and so the complementary investigations with similar resolution and efficiency permit a direct comparison of the two data sets. Overall there is excellent agreement between the energies of the common γ-ray transitions and also between the deduced energies of the excited states in (194)Pt. The (194)Ir half-life has been remeasured to be 19.20(2)h. PMID:27318151

  8. Study of {psi}(2S) decays to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp, and search for pp threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.

    2010-11-01

    The decays of {psi}(2S) into {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events obtained from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N{sup *} resonances in p{pi}{sup 0} and p{eta} channels in {pi}{sup 0}pp and {eta}pp decays, and f{sub 2} states in {gamma}pp decay. Branching fractions for decays of {psi}(2S) to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been determined. No evidence for pp threshold enhancements was found in the reactions {psi}(2S){yields}Xpp, where X={gamma}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a pp threshold enhancement in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}pp as previously reported by BES.

  9. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2. gamma. decays of. pi. sup 0 ,. eta. and. eta. prime

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  10. The Decay of Optical Emission from the gamma-Ray Burst GRB970228

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T.; Groot, P. J.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Petro, L.; Macchetto, F. D.; Heise, J.; Int Zand, J.; Strom, R. G.; Telting, J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Pettini, M.; Tanvir, N.; Bloom, J.

    1997-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the great unsolved mysteries in high-energy astrophysics for almost 30 years. The recent discovery of fading sources at X-ray and optical wavelengths coincident with the location of the gamma-ray burst GRB970228 therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nature of these high-energy events. The optical counterpart appears to be a transient point source embedded in a region of extended nebulosity, the latter having been tentatively identified as a high-redshift galaxy. This would seem to favour models that place gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances, although a range of mechanisms for producing the bursts is still allowed. A crucial piece of information for distinguishing between such models is how the brightness of the optical counterpart evolves with time. Here we re-evaluate the existing photometry of the optical counterpart of GRB970228 to construct an optical light curve for the transient event. We find that between 21 hours and six days after the burst, the R-band brightness decreased by a factor of approximately 40, with any subsequent decrease in brightness occurring at a much slower rate. As the point source faded, it also became redder. The initial behaviour of the source appears to be consistent with the 'fireball' model, but the subsequent decrease in the rate of fading may prove harder to explain.

  11. Search for dimuon decays of a light scalar boson in radiative transitions Upsilon-->gammaA0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Petigura, E; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolku, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-08-21

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Upsilon(2S) and Upsilon(3S) resonances: Upsilon(2S,3S)-->gammaA0, A0-->mu+mu-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 < or = mA0 < or = 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10(6) Upsilon(2S) and 122 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the etab meson: B(etab-->mu+mu-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level. PMID:19792717

  12. The Decay of Optical Emission Form the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 970228

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T.; Groot, P. J.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouvellotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.; Fishmans, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Petro, L.

    1997-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the great unsolved mysteries in high-energy astrophysics for almost 30 years. The recent discovery of fading sources at X-ray and optical wave-lengths coincident with the location of the gamma-ray burst GRB970228 therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nature of these high-energy events. The optical counterpart appears to be a transient point source embedded in a region of extended nebulosity, the latter having been tentatively identified as a high-redshift galaxy. This would seem to favour models that place gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances, although a range of mechanisms for producing the bursts is still allowed. A crucial piece of information for distinguishing between such models is how the brightness of the optical counterpart evolves with time. Here we re-evaluate the existing photometry of the optical counterpart of GRB970228 to construct an optical light curve for the transient event. We find that between 21 hours and six days after the burst, the R-band brightness decreased by a factor of approx. 50, with any subsequent decrease in brightness occurring at a much slower rate. As the point source faded, it also became redder. The initial behaviour of the source appears to be consistent with the 'fireball' model, in which the burst results from the merger of two neutron stars, but the subsequent decrease in the rate of fading may prove harder to explain. The gamma-ray burst of 28 February 1997, detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on board the BeppoSAX satellite, and located with an approx. 3 feet radius position with the Wide Field Camera on the same satellite, was the first for which a fading X-ray and optical counterpart were discovered. The optical Counterpart was discovered from a comparison of V- and I-band images taken with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on February 28.99 UT, and the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT; V band) and the WHT (I band) on March 8.8 uT.

  13. Study of Rare B-Meson Decays Related to the CPObservable sin(2beta+gamma) at the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orimoto, Toyoko Jennifer

    2007-08-21

    This study reports the observation of the decays B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)+}{sub S}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)-}K{sup +} in a sample of 230 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The branching fractions {beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{sub S}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.3 {+-} 0.3 (stat) {+-} 0.2 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{sub S}K{sup +}) = (2.5 {+-} 0.4 (stat) {+-} 0.4 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {beta}(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)+}{sub S}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.6 (stat) {+-} 0.5 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}, and {beta}(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)-}K{sup +}) = (2.0 {+-} 0.5 (stat) {+-} 0.4 (syst)) x 10{sup -5} are measured. The significance of the measurements to differ from zero are 5, 9, 6, and 5 standard deviations, respectively. This is a first observation of the decaysB{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)+}{sub S}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)-}K{sup +}. These results may potentially be useful in determining the CP asymmetry parameter sin(2{beta} + {gamma}) in the decays B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)+}{sub S}{pi}{sup -}.

  14. Photoproduction of 7pi0 on hydrogen with CLAS from 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV using e+e --gamma decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Michael C.

    Photoproduction of the pi0 meson was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident photon energies spanning the range Egamma = 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV. The measurement is performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction gammap → pe +e--(gamma). The final state of the reaction is the sum of two subprocesses for pi0 decay, the Dalitz decay mode of gamma0 → e +e--gamma and conversion mode where one photon from pi0 → gammagamma decay is converted into a e+e -- pair. This specific final state reaction avoided limitations caused by single prompt track triggering, while the span of incident photon energies allowed for measurements of gamma0 photoproduction to a domain never systematically measured before. We report the measurement of the gamma0 differential cross sections dsigma/dO and dsigma/dt. The angular distributions agree well with the SAID parametrization for incident beam energies below 3 GeV. As a result with this new data, the chi2/p.d.f. of the global fit in the SAID parametrization improved to 3.1 from 3.7. For incident beam energies greater than 3 GeV a comparison of a model based on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) with experimental data shows significant discrepancy, requiring further model developments to describe the data.

  15. Determination of X- and gamma-ray emission intensities in the decay of (131)I.

    PubMed

    Lépy, Marie-Christine; Brondeau, Laurine; Bobin, Christophe; Lourenço, Valérie; Thiam, Cheick; Bé, Marie-Martine

    2016-03-01

    The activity per unit mass of an iodine-131 solution was absolutely standardized by both the 4πβ-γ coincidence method and the 4πγ counting technique. The calibrated solution was used to prepare point sources after a preliminary deposit of AgNO3 to prevent the loss of volatile iodine. Relative and absolute photon emission intensities of 15 sgamma-rays and those of the two K X-rays of xenon were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry, with relative uncertainties of 0.8% for the three main emissions. PMID:26651173

  16. Borehole field calibration and measurement of low-concentration manganese by decay gamma rays ( Maryland, USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.; Lloyd, T.A.; Tanner, A.B.; Merritt, C.T.; Force, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Mn concentration in the Arundel clay formation, Prince Georges County, Maryland, was determined from a borehole by using delayed neutron activation. Then neutrons were produced by a 100 mu g 252Cf source. The 847 keV gamma ray of Mn was detected continuously, and its counting rate was measured at intervals of 15 s as the measuring sonde was moved at a rate of 0.5 cm/s. The borehole measurements compared favourably with a chemical core analysis and were unaffected by water in the borehole.-from Authors

  17. Spectrum of {gamma} rays from the decay of SD to normal states in {sup 191}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Gassmann, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-08-01

    In B.a.7. we propose that the statistical spectrum emitted from a sharp single excited state serves as a probe of pairing in excited states. A specific test of this proposal is the comparison of the spectra from even-even and odd-even nuclei. Whereas a pair gap exists in an even-even nucleus, it gets filled in an odd-even nucleus. Consequently, low-energy transitions can arise in the latter case, whereas they are calculated to be absent in the former case because very few levels exist in the cold gap region. In addition, transitions between 1.4 - 2.2 MeV, which {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes} across the gap, are predicted to have lower yield in the odd-even nuclei. Serendipitously, decay from a superdeformed state serves as a good initial excited sharp state. We extracted the spectrum pairwise-coincident with SD lines in {sup 191}Hg from Gammasphere data and compared it with the equivalent spectra from the even-even nuclei {sup 192,194}Hg. The differences that are predicted to occur are indeed observed. Thus, the data support our proposal that the reduction of pairing with thermal excitation energy can be probed with statistical decay spectra.

  18. On the Quality of ENSDF {gamma}-Ray Intensity Data for {gamma}-Ray Spectrometric Determination of Th and U and Their Decay Series Disequilibria, in the Assessment of the Radiation Dose Rate in Luminescence Dating of Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Corte, Frans de; Vandenberghe, Dimitri; Wispelaere, Antoine de

    2005-05-24

    In luminescence dating of sediments, one of the most interesting tools for the determination of the annual radiation dose is Ge {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Indeed, it yields information on both the content of the radioelements K, Th, and U, and on the occurrence - in geological times - of disequilibria in the Th and U decay series. In the present work, two methodological variants of the {gamma}-spectrometric analysis were tested, which largely depend on the quality of the nuclear decay data involved: (1) a parametric calibration of the sediment measurements, and (2) the correction for the heavy spectral interference of the 226Ra 186.2 keV peak by 235U at 185.7 keV. The performance of these methods was examined via the analysis of three Certified Reference Materials, with the introduction of {gamma}-ray intensity data originating from ENSDF. Relevant conclusions were drawn as to the accuracy of the data and their uncertainties quoted.

  19. Determining the photon polarization of the b{yields}s{gamma} using the B{yields}K{sub 1}(1270){gamma}{yields}(K{pi}{pi}){gamma} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recently the radiative B decay to the strange axial-vector mesons, B{yields}K{sub 1}(1270){gamma}, has been observed with a rather large branching ratio. This process is particularly interesting as the subsequent K{sub 1} decay into its three-body final state allows us to determine the polarization of the photon, which is mostly left- (right-)handed for B(B) in the SM while various new physics models predict additional right- (left-)handed components. A new method is proposed to determine the polarization, exploiting the full Dalitz plot distribution, which seems to reduce significantly the statistical errors. This polarization measurement requires, however, detailed knowledge of the K{sub 1{yields}}K{pi}{pi} strong interaction decays, namely, the various partial wave amplitudes into the several possible quasi-two-body channels, as well as their relative phases. The pattern of partial waves is especially complex for the K{sub 1}(1270). We attempt to obtain the information through the combination of an experimental input and a theoretical one, provided by the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-pair-creation model.

  20. Early ⁵⁶Ni decay gamma rays from SN2014J suggest an unusual explosion.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Roland; Siegert, Thomas; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Grebenev, Sergei A; Greiner, Jochen; Krause, Martin; Kromer, Markus; Maeda, Keiichi; Röpke, Friedrich; Taubenberger, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Type Ia supernovae result from binary systems that include a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and these thermonuclear explosions typically produce 0.5 solar mass of radioactive (56)Ni. The (56)Ni is commonly believed to be buried deeply in the expanding supernova cloud. In SN2014J, we detected the lines at 158 and 812 kiloelectron volts from (56)Ni decay (time ~8.8 days) earlier than the expected several-week time scale, only ~20 days after the explosion and with flux levels corresponding to roughly 10% of the total expected amount of (56)Ni. Some mechanism must break the spherical symmetry of the supernova and at the same time create a major amount of (56)Ni at the outskirts. A plausible explanation is that a belt of helium from the companion star is accreted by the white dwarf, where this material explodes and then triggers the supernova event. PMID:25081484

  1. Using Boosted Decision Trees to Separate Signal and Background in B to XsGamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, James; /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The measurement of the branching fraction of the flavor changing neutral current B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} transition can be used to expose physics outside the Standard Model. In order to make a precise measurement of this inclusive branching fraction, it is necessary to be able to effectively separate signal and background in the data. In order to achieve better separation, an algorithm based on Boosted Decision Trees (BDTs) is implemented. Using Monte Carlo simulated events, ''forests'' of trees were trained and tested with different sets of parameters. This parameter space was studied with the goal of maximizing the figure of merit, Q, the measure of separation quality used in this analysis. It is found that the use of 1000 trees, with 100 values tested for each variable at each node, and 50 events required for a node to continue separating give the highest figure of merit, Q = 18.37.

  2. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma) with partial reconstruction of B0-->D*-/+pi+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; SafaiTehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D(*-/+)pi(+/-), using approximately 82x10(6) BBmacr; events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum pi(+/-) from the B decay and the low-momentum pi(-/+) from the D(*-/+) decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063+/-0.024(stat)+/-0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2beta+gamma)|. PMID:15244996

  3. Search for electron and gamma-ray decay of the ^238fPu fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausang, C. W.; Gurdal, G.; Ressler, J.; Barton, C. J.; Caprio, M. A.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Zamfir, N. V.; Hauschild, K.; Korten, W.; Mergel, E.

    2002-04-01

    The reaction ^9Be + ^232Th arrow ^241Pu, at beam energies of 50 and 55 MeV, was used in an attempt to populate states in the second minimum (fission isomer) of ^238Pu via the 3n evaporation channel. Prompt gamma-rays, detected using YRAST Ball and conversion electrons, detected using ICE Ball, were collected in coincidence with delayed fission events measured using elements of the Yale SCARY array of solar cell detectors. The solar cell detectors were shielded so as not to view the large prompt fission flux from the target. Instead the detectors were located so that they could detect delayed fission events, originating from the 6 ns fission isomer state in ^238Pu, which occur downstream from the target position. Data analysis is in progress and results to date will be presented. This work is partly supported by the U.S. DOE under grant numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  4. Nuclear Decay Data for the International Reactor Dosimetry Library for Fission and Fusion (IRDFF): Updated Evaluations of the Half-Lives and Gamma Ray Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechev, Valery P.; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K.

    2016-02-01

    Updated evaluations of the half-lives and prominent gamma ray intensities have been presented for 20 radionuclides - dosimetry reaction residuals. The new values of these decay characteristics recommended for the IRDFF library were obtained using the approaches and methodology adopted by the working group of the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) cooperation. The experimental data published up to 2014 were taken into account in updated evaluations. The list of radionuclides includes 3H, 18F, 22Na, 24Na, 46Sc, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe, 57Co, 60Co, 57Ni, 64Cu, 88Y, 132Te, 131I, 140Ba, 140La, 141Ce, 182Ta, 198Au.

  5. The {rho} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} and {omega} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}} decays in quark-model approach and estimation of coupling for pion emission by quark

    SciTech Connect

    Anisovich, A. V.; Anisovich, V. V.; Dakhno, L. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.; Sarantsev, A. V.

    2010-03-15

    In the framework of the relativistic and gauge-invariant spectral integral technique, we calculate radiative decays {rho}(770) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) and {omega}(780) {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}(140) supposing all mesons ({pi}, {rho}, and {omega}) to be quark-antiquark states. The qq-bar wave functions found for mesons and photon lead to a reasonably good description of data ( {Gamma} (exp){rho} {+-} to {gamma} {pi} 68 {+-} 30 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {rho} 0 to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 77 {+-} 28 keV, {Gamma} (exp) {omega} to {gamma} {pi} 0 = 776 {+-} 45 keV) which makes it possible to estimate the coupling for the bremsstrahlung emission of pion by quarks g{sub {pi} {identical_to}} g{sub {pi}}(u {sup {yields}}d{pi}). We have found two values for the pion bremsstrahlung coupling: vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 16.7 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.3}{sup +0.1} (Solution I) and vertical bar g{sub {pi}}vertical bar = 3.0 {+-} 0.3{sub -2.1}{sup +0.1} (Solution II). Within SU(6) symmetry for nucleons, Solution I gives us for {pi}NN coupling the value 16.4 {<=} g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}(4{pi}) {<=} 23.2, which is in qualitative agreement with the {pi}N scattering data, g{sub {pi}NN}{sup 2}/(4{pi}) {r_brace}{approx} 14. For excited states, we have estimated the partial widths in Solution I as follows: {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup {+-} {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({rho}{sub 2S}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 10-130 keV, {Gamma}({omega}{sub 2S} {sup {yields} {gamma}{pi}}) {r_brace}{approx} 60-1080 keV. The large uncertainties emphasize the necessity to carry out measurements of the meson radiative processes in the region of large masses.

  6. The Observation of the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay XI0 ---> Lambda0 pi0 gamma at KTeV/E799, Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Huican

    2005-01-01

    The large sample of {Xi}{sup 0} hyperons available at KTeV 799 provides an opportunity to search for the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}. They present a branching fraction measurement of {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} based on the E799-II experiment data-taking in 1999 at KTeV, Fermilab. They used the principal decay of {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} where {Lambda} decays to a proton and a {pi}{sup -} as the flux normalization mode. This is the first observation of this interesting decay mode. 4 candidate events are found in the data. The branching ratio at 90% confidence level has been measured to be (1.67{sub -0.80}{sup +1.45}(stat.) {+-} 0.50(syst.)) x 10{sup -5} or (1.67{sub -0.69}{sup +1.16}(stat.) {+-} 0.50(syst.)) x 10{sup -5} at 68.27% confidence level.

  7. Evidence for Direct CP Violation in the Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Angle gamma with B-+ to D(*) K(*)-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We report the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating angle {gamma} through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decays to K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sup +}K{sup -} produced in the processes B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK{sup {-+}}, B{sup {-+}} {yields} D* K{sup {-+}} with D* {yields} D{pi}{sup 0}, D{gamma}, and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} with K*{sup {-+}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {-+}}, using 468 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. We measure {gamma} = (68 {+-} 14 {+-} 4 {+-} 3){sup o} (modulo 180{sup o}), where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the uncertainty in the description of the neutral D decay amplitudes. This result is inconsistent with {gamma} = 0 (no direct CP violation) with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations.

  8. Radiative B Meson Decay as a Probe of Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Time-Dependent CP Violation in B0 --> KS pi0 gamma and the B --> phi K gamma Branching Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Joseph Marion, IV; /Maryland U.

    2009-01-22

    The author presents measurements of radiative B meson decays to the final states K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and K{phi}{gamma} based on data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In a data sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs, the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays is measured in two regions of K{sub s}{sup 0}-{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass. In the K* region, 0.8 < m(K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.0 GeV/c{sup 2}, we find S{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.03 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and C{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.03; in the range 1.1 < m(K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, they find S{sub K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.09 and C{sub K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.36 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.04. With a sample of 228 million B{bar B} pairs they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{phi}{gamma}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6} and set the limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{phi}{gamma}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The direct CP asymmetry in B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{phi}{gamma} is found to be A{sub CP} = (-26 {+-} 14 {+-} 5)%. In each case the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  9. First observation of radiative B{sup 0}{yields}{phi}K{sup 0}{gamma} decays and measurements of their time-dependent CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, H.; Browder, T. E.; Nishimura, K.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Trabelsi, K.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Asner, D. M.; Fast, J. E.

    2011-10-01

    We report the first observation of the radiative decay B{sup 0}{yields}{phi}K{sup 0}{gamma} using a data sample of 772x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe a signal of 37{+-}8 events with a significance of 5.4 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. The measured branching fraction is B(B{sup 0}{yields}{phi}K{sup 0}{gamma})=(2.74{+-}0.60{+-}0.32)x10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We also report the first measurements of time-dependent CP-violation parameters: S{sub {phi}}K{sub S}{sup 0}{sub {gamma}}=+0.74{sub -1.05}{sup +0.72}(stat){sub -0.24}{sup +0.10}(syst) and A{sub {phi}}K{sub S}{sup 0}{sub {gamma}}=+0.35{+-}0.58(stat){sub -0.10}{sup +0.23}(syst). Furthermore, we measure B(B{sup +}{yields}{phi}K{sup +}{gamma})=(2.48{+-}0.30{+-}0.24)x10{sup -6}, A{sub CP}=-0.03{+-}0.11{+-}0.08, and find that the signal is concentrated in the M{sub {phi}}K mass region near threshold.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the dependence of double beta decay tracks in a Ge detector on particle and nuclear physics parameters and separation from gamma ray events

    SciTech Connect

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Titkova, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    The sizes of tracks of events of neutrinoless double-beta decay in a Germanium detector depend on particle physics and nuclear physics parameters such as neutrino mass, right-handed current parameters, etc., and nuclear matrix elements. In this paper for the first time Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-accompanied (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) and neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) events, and of various kinds of background processes such as multiple and other {gamma} interactions are reported for a Ge detector. The time history of the evolution of the individual events is followed and the sizes of the events (partial volumes in the detector inside which the energy of the event is released) are investigated. Effects of the angular correlations of the two electrons in {beta}{beta} decay, which again depend on the above nuclear and (for 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay) on particle physics parameters, are taken into account and have been calculated for this purpose for the first time on basis of the experimental half-life of {sup 76}Ge and of realistic nuclear matrix elements. The sizes determine, together with the location of the events in the detector, the pulse shapes to be observed. It is shown for {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 76}Ge, that {beta}{beta} events should be selectable with high efficiency by rejecting large size (high multiplicity) {gamma} events. Double-escape peaks of similar energy of {gamma} lines show concerning their sizes similar behavior as 0{nu}{beta}{beta} events, and in that sense can be of some use for corresponding 'calibration' of pulse shapes of the detector. The possibility to distinguish {beta}{beta} events from {gamma} events is found to be essentially independent of the particle physics parameters of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} process. A brief outlook is given on the potential of future experiments with respect to determination of the particle physics parameters ,<{lambda}>,<{eta}>.

  11. Bounds on Cross-sections and Lifetimes for Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay into Charged Leptons from Gamma-ray Observations of Dwarf Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2009-06-19

    We provide conservative bounds on the dark matter cross-section and lifetime from final state radiation produced by annihilation or decay into charged leptons, either directly or via an intermediate particle {phi}. Our analysis utilizes the experimental gamma-ray flux upper limits from four Milky Way dwarf satellites: HESS observations of Sagittarius and VERITAS observations of Draco, Ursa Minor, and Willman 1. Using 90% confidence level lower limits on the integrals over the dark matter distributions, we find that these constraints are largely unable to rule out dark matter annihilations or decays as an explanation of the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. However, if there is an additional Sommerfeld enhancement in dwarfs, which have a velocity dispersion {approx} 10 to 20 times lower than that of the local Galactic halo, then the cross-sections for dark matter annihilating through {phi}'s required to explain the excesses are very close to the cross-section upper bounds from Willman 1. Dark matter annihilation directly into {tau}'s is also marginally ruled out by Willman 1 as an explanation of the excesses, and the required cross-section is only a factor of a few below the upper bound from Draco. Finally, we make predictions for the gamma-ray flux expected from the dwarf galaxy Segue 1 for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We find that for a sizeable fraction of the parameter space in which dark matter annihilation into charged leptons explains the PAMELA excess, Fermi has good prospects for detecting a gamma-ray signal from Segue 1 after one year of observation.

  12. Radiative Penguin Decays at the BaBar Experiment B to K*gamma, B to rho gamma, B to omega gamma and B to X_s gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Grauges, E.

    2004-12-08

    A review of the results obtained from the analysis of the B meson decays that involve Radiative Penguin processes, recorded at the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II B-Factory, is presented. The physics interest of these processes and their SM prediction are discussed briefly. The most relevant selection techniques used in the analysis are described before quoting the latest results made public by the BaBar collaboration as of July 2003.

  13. Measurement of gamma in B-+ to D(*) K-+ and B-+ to D K*-+ Decays with a Dalitz Analysis of D to Ks pi- pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-04

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase {gamma} with a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D-meson decays to the K{sub S}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final state from B{sup {-+}} {yields} D{sup (*)}K{sup {-+}} and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} decays, using a sample of 227 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector. We measure {gamma} = (67 {+-} 28 {+-} 13 {+-} 11){sup o}, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. This result suffers from a two-fold ambiguity. The contribution to the Dalitz model uncertainty due to the description of the {pi}{pi} S-wave in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, evaluated using a K-matrix formalism, is found to be 3{sup o}.

  14. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays in approximately 88 x 10(6) upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum-likelihood fit we obtain the following for the CP-violating parameters: a=-0.022+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), a*=-0.068+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), c(lep)=+0.025+/-0.068 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst), and c*(lep)=+0.031+/-0.070 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst). Using other measurements and theoretical assumptions we interpret the results in terms of the angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle, and find |sin((2beta+gamma)|>0.69 at 68% confidence level. We exclude the hypothesis of no CP violation [sin(2beta+gamma)=0] at 83% confidence level. PMID:15244995

  15. The Search for the CP-violating emission of an E1 photon from the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    A search for the CP-violating electric dipole (E1) direct emission contribution to the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decay is performed using data from the 1997 KTeV/E832 experiment. Because the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decay mode is massively dominated by the CP-violating inner bremsstrahlung (IB) and the CP-conserving magnetic dipole (M1) direct emission processes, previous analyses have neglected the E1 contribution. Therefore, this measurement is the first attempt to directly quantify the size of the E1 decay process. This E1 transition is one of the very few CP-violating processes that is accessible to experiment and, in principle, will produce new insights into the structure of the neutral kaon. The result of this analysis is that the E1 contribution is below the threshold of sensitivity, and therefore an upper bound of |g{sub E1}| < 0.14 (90% CL) is reported. In the process of obtaining this upper limit, high resolution measurements of fit parameters ({tilde g}{sub M1} and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}) associated with the size and shape of the M1 direct emission peak are also extracted. The fit results for these parameters: {tilde g}{sub M1} = 1.229 {+-} 0.035 (stat) {+-} 0.087 (syst); a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = -0.733 {+-} 0.007 (stat) {+-} 0.014 (syst) are in strong agreement with previous measurements.

  16. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity–average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  17. Neutron capture by Ru: Neutron cross sections of {sup 96,102,104}Ru and gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K. S.

    2010-04-15

    Cross sections for radiative capture of neutrons have been measured for stable isotopes of Ru with mass numbers 96,102, and 104. From separate irradiations using thermal and epithermal neutrons, independent values for the thermal cross section and effective resonance integral have been determined. Spectroscopic studies of the gamma rays emitted in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru have enabled improvements in the precision of the energies and intensities of the radiations along with corresponding improvements in the beta-decay feeding intensities and the energies of the levels in the respective daughter nuclei. Similar spectroscopic measurements of the decays of {sup 105}Rh (daughter of {sup 105}Ru) and {sup 96}Tc (produced from n,p reactions on {sup 96}Ru) have resulted in improved gamma-ray energies and intensities in those decays.

  18. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2{gamma} decays of {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  19. {gamma}-ray decays in {sup 232}Th and the K{sup {pi}}=4{sup +} two-phonon {gamma} vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.; Garrett, P. E.; Kadi, M.; Warr, N.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2000-12-01

    A recent Coulomb excitation study has called into question the 4{sup +} spin assignment of the 1414-keV level in {sup 232}Th, which had earlier been interpreted as a two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational excitation, and had suggested instead a 3{sup -} assignment. Data obtained in the present neutron scattering study of {sup 232}Th are inconsistent with the 3{sup -} suggestion and support an I{sup {pi}}=4{sup +} assignment for the 1414-keV level, lending credence to the argument that it is a K{sup {pi}}=4{sup +} band head.

  20. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for the DecayB^{\\pm} to K^{*\\pm} gamma, K^{*\\pm} toK^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} with the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    koeneke, K.

    2006-09-08

    The branching fraction of the radiative penguin B meson decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}}{gamma} is measured at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, operating at a center of momentum energy of 10.58 GeV, the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. This document concentrates on the case K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}; {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. This analysis is based on a dataset of 88.2-million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events corresponding to 81.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector.

  1. Observational Signatures of High-Energy Emission during the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. W.; Liu, X. W.; Dai, Z. G.

    2007-12-01

    The widely existing shallow decay phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is generally accepted to be due to long-lasting energy injection. The outflows carrying the injecting energy, based on the component that is dominant in energy, fall into two possible types: baryon-dominated and lepton-dominated ones. The former type of outflow could be ejecta that is ejected during the prompt phase of a GRB and consists of a series of baryonic shells with a distribution of Lorentz factors, and the latter type could be an electron-positron pair wind that is driven by the postburst central engine. We here provide a unified description for the dynamics of fireballs based on these two types of energy injection and calculate the corresponding high-energy photon emission by considering synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering (including synchrotron self-Compton and combined inverse Compton) of electrons. We find that, in the two energy-injection models, there is a plateau (even a hump) in high-energy light curves during the X-ray shallow decay phase. In particular, a considerable fraction of the injecting energy in the lepton-dominated model can be shared by the long-lasting reverse shock since it is relativistic. Furthermore, almost all of the energy of the reverse shock is carried by leptons, and thus, the inverse Compton emission is enhanced dramatically. Therefore, this model predicts more significant high-energy afterglow emission than the baryon-dominated model. We argue that these observational signatures would be used to discriminate between different energy-injection models in the upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) era.

  2. Gamma-ray laser based on the collective decay of positronium atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Avetissian, A. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2015-08-01

    We consider, in general, the collective two-photon annihilation decay of positronium atoms arising from the second quantized formalism. It is shown that two-photon annihilation of positronium atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is unstable. Due to the BEC coherence, an absolute instability in such system takes place, i.e., the number of photons created as a result of positronium decay grows in every point within a BEC. The latter leads to an exponential buildup of a macroscopic population into the certain modes. Cooperative effects start for densities much smaller than the Dicke limit of spontaneous super radiation. For laserlike action, i.e., for directional radiation, we consider the BEC with elongated shape when the spontaneously emitted entangled and oppositely directed photon pairs are amplified, leading to an exponential buildup of a macroscopic population into the end-fire modes. We also consider the roles of confinement and interaction among positronium atoms in the amplification process.

  3. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma in B+/--->D*K+/- decays with a Dalitz analysis of D-->K0(S)pi-pi+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-16

    We report on a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0(S)pi-pi+ in the processes B+/- -->D*K+/-, D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma. Using a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure the amplitude ratios r(B)=0.12+/-0.03+/-0.04 and r*(B)=0.17+/-0.10+/-0.03+/-0.03, the relative strong phases delta(B)=(104+/-45(+17+16)(-21-24))degrees and delta*(B)=(-64+/-41(+14)(-12)+/-15) degrees between the amplitudes A(B- -->D*0K-) and A(B- -->D*0)K-), and gamma=(70+/-31(+12+14)(-10-11))degrees. The first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. The results for the strong and weak phases have a twofold ambiguity. PMID:16197065

  4. Possible Detection of Pi(exp 0)-Decay Gamma-Ray Emission from Cyg OB2 by EGRET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; White, R. L.; Bertsch, D.

    1996-01-01

    We report possible detection of pi (exp 0) decay radiation from Cyg OB2, a nearby (1.7 kpc) massive OB star association. The EGRET flux (greater than 100 MeV) maps clearly indicate a point source whose error circle includes both Cyg OB2 and Cyg X-3. We show that Cyg X-3 is unlikely to be the counterpart for the EGRET source, because of the marginal spatial consistency and the lack of the 4.8 hour modulation seen in other high energy emissions from Cyg X-3. If confirmed, this will be the first detection by EGRET of massive stars.

  5. Measurement of W + gamma Production in the W to Muon Decay Channel in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Naho

    2005-03-01

    The production cross section and the kinematic properties of the decay products of W{gamma} in the W {yields} {mu}{nu} decay channel from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. The measurement use the high p{sub T} muon data from the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The data were collected between March 2002 and September 2003. The total integrated luminosities are 192 pb{sup -1} with the muon detector which covers the pseudorapidity region of |{eta}| {le} 0.6 and 175 pb{sup -1} with the muon detector covering the region 0.6 {le} |{eta}| {le} 1.0. In the Standard Model the {mu}{nu}{gamma} final states occur due to W{gamma} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} production and via muon Bremsstrahlung, W {yields} {mu}{nu} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma}. W bosons are selected in their muon decay mode. Additionally, photons with transverse energy above 7 GeV, pseudorapidity in the central region (|{eta}| < 1.1) and muon-photon angular separation {Delta}R({mu},{gamma}) > 0.7 are selected. The author observes a total of 128 W{gamma} candidates, whereas the Standard Model expectation is 142.4 {+-} 9.5 events. The W{gamma} production cross section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma}) = 16.3 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.) {+-} 1.2(lum.) [pb]. The theoretical prediction for this cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} l{nu}{gamma}) = 19.3 {+-} 1.4(th.) [pb]. The Standard Model predictions for several kinematic + variables are compared with data for E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 7 GeV and {Delta}R({mu},{gamma}) > 0.7. The measured cross section and the photon and W boson production kinematics are found to agree with the Standard Model predictions.

  6. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  7. New Gammas and Levels of 76Se Observed in the 76Br(β++EC)76Se Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S. F.; Yan, Y. P.

    The decay of bromine-76 is studied by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. Bromine-76 is produced via two reactions: 75As(α, 3n)76Br and 76Se(p, n)76Br. The results of these experiments verify the previously reported levels of 76Se. In addition to the previously described transitions and levels, 37 new γ-rays and 15 new energy levels are found for the first time. In addition, in order to study the deformation of 76Se which lies in transitional region between strongly deformed and spherical nuclei, we calculate the total Routhian surfaces (TRS) of positive-parity states by cranking shell model formalism.

  8. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  9. RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS FROM BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2003-08-28

    Electroweak penguin decays provide a promising hunting ground for Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, which proceeds through an electromagnetic penguin loop, already provides stringent constraints on the supersymmetric (SUSY) parameter space. The present data samples of {approx}1 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} events allow to explore radiative penguin decays with branching fractions of the order of 10{sup -6} or less. In this brief report they discuss a study of B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decay modes and a search for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma} decays.

  10. Beta and gamma decay heat measurements between 0.1s - 50,000s for neturon fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu. Progress report, June 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schier, W.A.; Couchell, G.P.

    1997-05-01

    In the investigations reported here, a helium-jet/tape-transport system was used for the rapid transfer of fission products to a low-background environment where their aggregate beta and gamma-ray spectra were measured as a function of delay time after neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu. Beta and gamma-ray energy distributions have been deduced for delay times as short as 0.2 s and extending out to 100,000s. Instrumentation development during the initial phase of the project included: (1) assembly and characterization of a NaI(Tl) spectrometer for determining aggregate gamma-ray energy distributions, (2) development and characterization of a beta spectrometer (having excellent gamma-ray rejection) for measuring aggregate beta-particle energy distributions, (3) assembly and characterization of a Compton-suppressed HPGe spectrometer for determining gamma-ray intensities of individual fission products to deduce fission-product yields. Spectral decomposition and analysis codes were developed for deducing energy distributions from measured aggregate beta and gamma spectra. The aggregate measurements in the time interval 0.2 - 20s after fission are of special importance since in this region data from many short-lived nuclei are missing and summation calculations in this region rely on model calculations for a large fraction of their predicted beta and gamma decay heat energy spectra. Comparison with ENDF/B-VI fission product data was performed in parallel with the measurements through a close collaboration with Dr. T. England at LANL, assisted by one of our graduate students. Such aggregate measurements provide tests of the Gross Theory of beta decay used to calculated missing contributions to this data base. Fission-product yields deduced from the HPGe studies will check the accuracy of the semi-empirical Gaussian dispersion model used presently by evaluators in the absence of measured yields.

  11. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  12. Coasting External Shock in Wind Medium: An Origin for the X-Ray Plateau Decay Component in Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rongfeng; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    The plateaus observed in about one half of the early X-ray afterglows are the most puzzling feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Swift. By analyzing the temporal and spectral indices of a large X-ray plateau sample, we find that 55% can be explained by external, forward shock synchrotron emission produced by a relativistic ejecta coasting in a ρvpropr -2, wind-like medium; no energy injection into the shock is needed. After the ejecta collects enough medium and transitions to the adiabatic, decelerating blast wave phase, it produces the post-plateau decay. For those bursts consistent with this model, we find an upper limit for the initial Lorentz factor of the ejecta, Γ0 <= 46(epsilon e /0.1)-0.24(epsilon B /0.01)0.17; the isotropic equivalent total ejecta energy is E iso ~ 1053(epsilon e /0.1)-1.3(epsilon B /0.01)-0.09(tb /104 s) erg, where epsilon e and epsilon B are the fractions of the total energy at the shock downstream that are carried by electrons and the magnetic field, respectively, and tb is the end of the plateau. Our finding supports Wolf-Rayet stars as the progenitor stars of some GRBs. It raises intriguing questions about the origin of an intermediate-Γ0 ejecta, which we speculate is connected to the GRB jet emergence from its host star. For the remaining 45% of the sample, the post-plateau decline is too rapid to be explained in the coasting-in-wind model, and energy injection appears to be required.

  13. Excited levels of /sup 238/Np from spectroscopic measurements of the /sup 237/Np(n,. gamma. )/sup 238/Np reaction and /sup 242m/Am alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.; Ruhter, W.; Mann, L.

    1981-06-01

    The gamma rays and conversion electrons emitted following neutron capture in a /sup 237/Np target have been measured by use of the GAMS and BILL spectrometers at Grenoble. Gamma ray and alpha particle measurements of /sup 242m/Am alpha decay (Ge(Li)..gamma.. singles, ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, ..cap alpha.. singles) have been made at Livermore. The data from these measurements have been combined with earlier measurements (Ionescu 1979, Asaro 1964) to produce a more detailed level scheme for /sup 238/Np. Approximately 36 levels have been identified from all of the experimental evidence. The experimentally-observed bandhead energies can be compared with predicted values derived from a simple linear addition of excitation energies observed in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splitting of each configurational pair were obtained from theoretical calculations (Piepenbring 1978). We have assigned configurations to ten rotational bands whose bandhead energies range from 0 to 342 keV and which represent all but one of the configurations predicted to occur below 385 keV.

  14. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  15. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  16. Search for excited and exotic muons in the mu gamma decay channel in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Baylor U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present a search for excited and exotic muon states {mu}*, conducted using an integrated luminosity of 371 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron with the CDF II detector. They search for associated production of {mu}{mu}* followed by the decay {mu}* {yields} {mu}{gamma}, resulting in the {mu}{mu}{gamma} final state. They compare the data to model predictions as a function of the mass of the excited muon M{sub {mu}*}, the compositeness energy scale {Lambda}, and the gauge coupling factor f. No signal above the standard model expectation is observed in the {mu}{gamma} mass spectrum. In the contact interaction model, they exclude 107 < M{sub {mu}*} < 853 GeV/c{sup 2} for {Lambda} = M{sub {mu}*}; in the gauge-mediated model, they exclude 100 < M{sub {mu}*} < 410 GeV/c{sup 2} for f/{Lambda} = 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. These 95% confidence level exclusions extend previous limits and are the first hadron collider results on {mu}* production in the gauge-mediated model.

  17. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  18. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  19. Measurement of psi2S radiative decays.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, J H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, Fang; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Jian Liu Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Yiyun; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2007-07-01

    Using 14 x 10(6) psi(2S) events accumulated at the BESII detector, we report first measurements of branching fractions or upper limits for psi(2S) decays into gammapp, gamma2(pi+pi-), gammaKS0K+pi-+c.c., gammaK+K-pi+pi-, gammaK*0K-pi++c.c., gammaK*0K*0, gammapi+pi-pp, gamma2(K+K-), gamma3(pi+pi-), and gamma2(pi+pi-)K+K- with the invariant mass of hadrons below 2.9 GeV/c2. We also report branching fractions of psi(2S) decays into 2(pi+pi-)pi0, omegapi+pi-, omegaf2(1270), b1+/-pi-/+, and pi02(pi+pi-)K+K-. PMID:17678148

  20. {gamma} production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    1995-07-01

    We report on preliminary measurements of the {gamma}(1S), {gamma}(2S) and {gamma}(3S) differential and integrated cross sections in p{bar p} at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using a sample of 16.6 {+-} 0.6 pb{sup -1} collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The three resonances were reconstructed through the decay {gamma} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in the rapidity region {vert_bar}y{vert_bar} < 0.4. The cross section results are compared to theoretical models of direct bottomonium production.

  1. Low-spin states of /sup 250/Cf populated in the electron capture decay of 2. 22-h /sup 250/Es. [ULTIPOLE TRANSITIONS; PARITY; ROTATIONAL STATES; SPIN; VIBRATIONAL STATES; GAMMA SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Sjoblom, R.K.

    1980-09-01

    Low-spin states of /sup 250/Cf have been investigated by measuring ..gamma.. rays and conversion electrons associated with the electron capture decay of 2.22-h /sup 250/Es. Mass-separated /sup 250/Es samples produced by the /sup 249/Cf(d,n) reaction were used for these measurements. The ..gamma..-ray spectra were measured with a 25-cm/sup 3/ coaxial Ge(Li) spectrometer and the electron spectra were measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector. Multipolarities of intense transitions in /sup 250/Cf were deduced and logft values of electron capture transitions were derived from measured electron capture intensities. On the basis of the results of the present investigation the following bandheads were identified in /sup 250/Cf: E (keV),K,I..pi..=871.6, 2,2-; 1031.9, 2,2+; 1154.2, 0,0+; 1175.5, 1,1-; 1210.0, 2,2-; 1244.4, 2,2+; 1266.5, 0,0+; and 1658.1, 2,2+. The 2.22-h state in /sup 250/Es has been given a spin-parity assignment of 1- with configuration )n(734)9/2-; p(633)7/2+)/sub 1//sub -/.

  2. Fit to moments of inclusive B{yields}X{sub c}l{nu} and B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay distributions using heavy quark expansions in the kinetic scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmueller, O.L.; Flaecher, H. U.

    2006-04-01

    We present a fit to measured moments of inclusive distributions in B{yields}X{sub c}l{nu} and B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decays to extract values for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V{sub cb}|, the b- and c-quark masses, and higher-order parameters that appear in the heavy quark expansion. The fit is carried out using theoretical calculations in the kinetic scheme and includes moment measurements of the BABAR, Belle, CDF, CLEO, and DELPHI collaborations for which correlation matrices have been published. We find |V{sub cb}|=(41.96{+-}0.23{sub exp}{+-}0.35{sub HQE}{+-}0.59{sub {gamma}{sub S}{sub L}})x10{sup -3} and m{sub b}=4.590{+-}0.025{sub exp}{+-}0.030{sub HQE} GeV where the errors are experimental and theoretical respectively. We also derive values for the heavy quark distribution function parameters m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2} in different theoretical schemes that can be used as input for the determination of |V{sub ub}|.

  3. New results on radiative J/psi decays from MARK III at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wermes, N.

    1984-04-01

    Selected topics on radiative decays of the J/psi from MARK III at SPEAR are presented. These topics include the decay J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K anti K where the final state resonances f'(1515), theta(1700) and xi(2200) have been analyzed. The decay J/psi ..-->.. (..gamma.. vector vector) is presented in three final states, J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. phi phi, ..gamma.. rho rho and ..gamma omega omega.., providing the first measurement of the eta/sub c/ spin-parity (in ..gamma.. phi phi) and evidence for structures (in ..gamma.. rho rho and ..gamma omega omega..) near 1.7 GeV. 24 references.

  4. Chiral Quirkonium Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the two-body decay rates of quirkonium states formed from quirks that acquire mass solely through electroweak symmetry breaking. We consider SU(N){sub ic} infracolor with two flavors of quirks transforming under the electroweak group (but not QCD) of the standard model. In one case, the quirks are in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, while in the other case, a vectorlike representation. The differences in the dominant decay channels between 'chiral quirkonia' versus 'vectorlike quirkonia' are striking. Several chiral quirkonia states can decay into the unique two-body resonance channels WH, ZH, t{bar t}, t{bar b}/b{bar t}, and {gamma}H, which never dominate for vectorlike quirkonia. Additionally, the channels WW, WZ, ZZ, and W{gamma}, are shared among both chiral and vectorlike quirkonia. Resonances of dileptons or light quarks (dijets) can dominate for some vectorlike quirkonia states throughout their mass range, while these modes never dominate for chiral quirkonia unless the decays into pairs of gauge or Higgs bosons are kinematically forbidden.

  5. Heavy ion Coulomb excitation and gamma decay studies of the one and two phonon giant dipole resonances in {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, P.E.; Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.

    1993-12-01

    Projectile -- photon coincidences were measured for the scattering of an 80 MeV/nucleon {sup 64}Zn beam from {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi targets at the GANIL heavy ion accelerator facility. Projectile-like particles between 0.5{degrees} and 4.5{degrees} relative to the incident beam direction were detected in the SPEG energy loss spectrometer where their momentum, charge, and mass were determined. Photons were detected in the BaF{sub 2} scintillation detector array TAPS. Light charged particles produced in the reaction were detected in the KVI Forward Wall. The analysis of the data acquired in this experiment is focused on three different phenomena: (1) the two phonon giant dipole resonance, (2) time dependence of the decay of the one phonon giant dipole resonance, and (3) giant resonance strength in projectile nuclei.

  6. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, A.,; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  7. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-08-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons. We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  8. Abundance of low-energy gamma rays in the decay of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 227Ac, 226Ra and 214Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Ueno, K.

    1990-11-01

    Abundance of low-energy gamma rays emitted from 238U (49.5 keV), 227Ac (50.0 keV), 234U (53.2 keV), 214Pb (53.2 keV), 230Th (67.7 and 143.9 keV) and 226Ra (186 keV) was determined using a high-purity Ge low energy photon spectrometer. The results are: 49.5 keV (238U): 0.059±0.002%, 50.0 keV (227Ac): 8.18±0.17%, 53.2 keV (234U): 0.156±0.006%, 53.2 keV (214Pb): 0.927±0.025%, 67.7 keV (230Th): 0.463±0.012%, 143.9 keV (230Th): 0.078±0.007%, 186.0 keV (226Ra): 3.688±0.099%.

  9. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  10. STUDIES OF RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS AT BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, C

    2003-10-27

    The electromagnetic radiative ''penguin'' decays b {yields} s{gamma}, b {yields} d{gamma} are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors present recent studies made with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  11. Measurement of the polarization observables I(s) and I(c) for gamma-proton decaying to proton-pion-antipion using the CLAS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanretty, Charles

    the effects of the missing resonances as this final state topology accounts for most of the cross section above ≈ 1 GeV. A study of double-meson final states very well may fill the holes in the experimental data as the majority of analyses regarding this issue have come from the analysis of quasi 2-body final states (such as Npi, Neta, No, KΛ, and KSigma). It is also likely that these missing resonances decay to high mass intermediate states instead of directly into a meson and a ground state nucleon. Therefore the decay of these resonances is more of a chain (resulting in a two-meson-one-ground-state-nucleon state) than a direct decay. Presented in this work are the first ever measurements of the polarization observable Is for a final state with two pions and the first ever measurements of Ic for a final state containing charged pions (let alone the first measurements of both observables for the specialized case of g⃗p → p pi+pi- reactions). The presented measurements were made using the high-statistics data available in the CLAS g8b data set. This data were taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) from July 20 th to September 1st of 2005 using linearly polarized photons, an unpolarized liquid hydrogen (LH 2 target), and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The highly-polarized photons were produced via bremsstrahlung using an unpolarized electron beam provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator and a well-oriented diamond radiator. These polarized photons were produced at five different coherent edge energies: 1.3 GeV, 1.5 GeV, 1.7 GeV, 1.9 GeV, and 2.1 GeV. Considering the 200 MeV-wide window of highly polarized photons whose upper limit is the coherent edge energy, and the five different coherent edge energies used, highly polarized photons were produced covering an total energy range of 1 GeV. These data along with the utilized analysis tools have lead to clean, continuous, low

  12. Constraints on two-body lepton flavor violating decay processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nussinov, S.; Peccei, R. D.; Zhang, X. M.

    2001-01-01

    Simple ''unitarity inspired'' relations between two- and three-body lepton flavor violating decays are noted and discussed. In the absence of cancellations, the existing strong bounds on {mu}{yields}3e and {mu}{yields}e{gamma}{gamma} severely constrain two-body lepton flavor violating decays.

  13. Gamma ray astrophysics. [emphasizing processes and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Gamma ray production processes are reviewed, including Compton scattering, synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung interactions, meson decay, nucleon-antinucleon annihilations, and pion production. Gamma ray absorption mechanisms through interactions with radiation and with matter are discussed, along with redshifts and gamma ray fluxes.

  14. On some problems of gamma-astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.; Berezinsky, V. S.; Ginzburg, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma ray emissions from young supernova remnants are discussed and calculated. The positron annihilation line is also calculated. Decay of charged pions in remnants cause generation of high energy neutrinos. This emission of neutrinos is reviewed. The CR origin and gamma emission from Magellanic clouds help to establish the intensity gradient in the galaxy. This gamma astronomical data is briefly discussed.

  15. Radiative Penguin Decays at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Koneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS

    2007-11-16

    In this article, I review the most recent results in radiative penguin decays from the B factories Belle and BABAR. Most notably, I will talk about the recent new observations in the decays B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}) {gamma}, a new analysis technique in b {yields} s{gamma}, and first measurements of radiative penguin decays in the B{sup 0}{sub s} meson system. Finally, I will summarize the current status and future prospects of radiative penguin B physics at the B factories.

  16. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  17. Recent Results in Electroweak B Decays from the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Koeneke, Karsten

    2006-07-11

    A review of the most recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin B decays is presented. The focus of this paper is on the measurement of observables in the decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} B {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} (time-dependent analysis) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}.

  18. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M.

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  19. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  20. Measurement and analysis of quadruple ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) angular correlations for high spin states of {sup 24}Mg.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhover, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-10-30

    The high-lying, {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 24}Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of {alpha} and {gamma} emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the ({alpha}{gamma}) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated.

  1. Decay Chain Deduction of Uranium Fission Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiping; Tian, Chenyang; Wang, Xiaotian; Lv, Ning; Ma, Meng; Wei, Yingguang

    2016-07-01

    Delayed gamma spectrum is the fingerprint of uranium materials in arms control verification technology. The decay chain is simplified into basic state linear chain and excitation state linear chain to calculate and analyze the delayed gamma spectra of fission products. Formulas of the changing rule for nuclide number before and after zero-time are deduced. The C program for calculating the delayed gamma ray spectra data is constructed, and related experiments are conducted to verify this theory. Through analysis of the delayed gamma counts of several nuclides, the calculated results are found to be consistent with experimental values. PMID:27218290

  2. The weak decay of helium hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Athanas, M.J.

    1992-08-01

    A {Lambda} hyperon replaces a neutron in a nucleus to form a hypernucleus via the {sup A}X(K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}X reaction at 750 MeV/c (Brookhaven Experiment 788). The free {Lambda} decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}) and {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) are diminished due to Pauli blocking; but a non-mesonic decay mode, nucleon stimulated decay N{Lambda} {yields} Nn, is present and is detected via the energetic decay nucleon(s) ({approx} 400MeV/c). Measurements of the various hypernuclear decay rates {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup {minus}}), {Gamma}({Lambda} {yields} n{pi}{sup 0}) and {Gamma}({Lambda}n {yields} nn) provides insight into the strong modification of the weak interaction such as the baryon-baryon {Delta}I ={1/2} rule. The hypernuclear state is isolated by momentum analysis of (K{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}) target reaction. Out-of-beam large volume scintillation detectors and tracking chambers axe used to make particle identification of the hypernuclear decay products by time-of-flight, dE/dx, and range. The kinetic energy of the decay neutrons are measured by time of flight using the large volume 100 element neutron detector system. The hypernuclear lifetime is directly measured using precision scintillator counters and tracking chambers. Measurements of the various decay rates as well as the total lifetime are discussed for {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He.

  3. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  4. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  5. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  6. Testing the Standard Model with Radiative Penguin Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, J; /Maryland U.

    2008-04-22

    The author discusses two recent results in b {yields} s{gamma} decays from BABAR. The first is a measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum in the B meson frame of the decay B {yields} X{sub s{gamma}}. The second result probes the photon polarization via time-dependent CP violation in neutral B decays to K*{sup 0}{gamma}.

  7. Prospects for studying penguin decays in LHCb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barsuk, S. Ya. Pakhlova, G. V. Belyaev, I. M.

    2006-04-15

    Investigation of loop penguin decays of beauty hadrons seems promising in testing the predictions of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions and in seeking new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The possibility of studying the radiative penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} K*{sup 0}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {omega}{gamma} and the gluonic penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {phi}K{sup 0}{sub S} and B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{phi} in LHCb experiments is discussed.

  8. Rare Down Quark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Kwong-Kwai Humphrey

    1992-01-01

    The rare decays bto sX are sensitive to strong interaction corrections. The effects can be estimated by a renormalization group technique which requires the evaluation of QCD mixing among effective operators. In the dimensional reduction and the naive dimensional regularization methods, there are discrepancies in evaluating the QCD mixing of the four-quark operators with the bto sgamma and bto s+gluon dipole operators. In this thesis, the problem is investigated by considering the contributions of the epsilon -scalar field and the epsilon -dimensional operators that distinguish between the two methods. The discrepancies are shown to come from the epsilon-dimensional four-quark operators in dimensional reduction and not from the epsilon -scalar field. In the decay bto sl^+l^ -, the intermediate of cc pairs in the charm-penguin diagram can form the resonance states J/psi and psi^'. In the published literature, there is a sign discrepancy in the Breit-Wigner amplitude for the resonance effects. Here, the sign difference is settled by considering the unitarity limit of the amplitude in the Argand diagram. The effects of the resonances are quite substantial on the invariant mass spectrum for this decay. However, they are shown to be negligible on the dilepton energy spectrum below 0.95 GeV. The energy spectrum is, thus, more useful than the invariant mass spectrum for measurements of the top -quark mass. The decays Bto K^*X are well modeled by the quark-level decays bto sX. In the quark model, the hadronization is done using a nonrelativistic wave function. In the decay B to K^*gamma, the large K ^* recoil creates an uncertainty in calculating the branching ratio using the quark model. The problem is explored by considering other meson processes where data exist. The data on the pi form factor and the omegapi^0 transition form factor suggest the necessity to retain relativistic spinor and meson normalizations in the quark -model; however, the data do not resolve the

  9. Measurements of Gamma in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiori, G.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-08-30

    We report on the first measurements to the angle {gamma} of the Unitarity Triangle in B meson decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory in the years 1999-2004.

  10. Doubly charged Higgsino contribution to the decays {mu}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {mu}{r_arrow}3e and to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon {Delta}a{sub {mu}} within the left-right supersymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, G.; Koenig, H.; Frank, M.; Koenig, H.

    1997-10-01

    We present a detailed and complete calculation of the doubly charged Higgsino contribution to the decays {mu}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {mu}{r_arrow}3e and to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon {Delta}a{sub {mu}} within the left-right supersymmetric model. We include the mixing of the scalar partners of the left- and right-handed leptons, and show that it leads to a strong enhancement of the decay modes in certain scenarios. We find that the contribution of the doubly charged Higgsino can be close to the known experimental values and is reachable by future experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Study of the radiative pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-04-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of {pi}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F{sub V,A}) for the {pi}{yields}{gamma} transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  12. Probing supersymmetry in rare B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    We determine the ability of future experiments to observe supersymmetric contributions to the rare decays B {r_arrow} X{sub s}{gamma} and B {r_arrow} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -}. A global fit to the Wilson coefficients which contribute to these decays is performed from Monte Carlo generated data. This fit is then compared to supersymmetric predictions for several different patterns of the superpartner spectrum.

  13. Single-Majoron emission in. mu. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Pich, A.; Bernabeu, J.

    1985-11-01

    The ..mu -->..etheta and ..mu -->..erho/sub L/ decays, where theta is a Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with the B-L breakdown and rho/sub L/ is a very light neutral Higgs boson, are evaluated in the framework of the triplet model of Gelmini and Roncadelli. It is shown that the widths of these decay modes may be comparable to the ..mu -->..e..gamma.. one.

  14. Decay Data Evaluation Project: Evaluation of (52)Fe nuclear decay data.

    PubMed

    Luca, Aurelian

    2016-03-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project no. F41029, the evaluation of the nuclear decay data of (52)Fe, a radionuclide of interest in nuclear medicine, was performed. The main nuclear decay data evaluated are: the half-life, decay energy, energies and probabilities of the electron capture and β(+) transitions, internal conversion coefficients and gamma-ray energies and emission intensities. This new evaluation, made using the DDEP methodology and tools, was included in the DDEP database NUCLEIDE. PMID:26688358

  15. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  16. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity andmore » equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.« less

  17. Radiative decay of [ital D][sub 2][sup *](2460) and [ital D][sub 1](2420)

    SciTech Connect

    Fayyazuddin; Mobarek, O.H. )

    1994-08-01

    The [ital E]1 transition decay widths for the decays [ital D][sub 2][sup *][r arrow][ital D][sup *]+[gamma], [ital D][sub 1][r arrow][ital D]+[gamma], and [ital D][sub 1][r arrow][ital D][sup *]+[gamma] are calculated in the nonrelativistic quark model with recoil and relativistic corrections.

  18. Measurement of Lifetime and Decay-Width Difference in B_{s};{0}-->J/psivarphi Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-28

    We measure the mean lifetime tau=2/(Gamma_{L}+Gamma_{H}) and the decay-width difference DeltaGamma=Gamma_{L}-Gamma_{H} of the light and heavy mass eigenstates of the B_{s}{0} meson, B_{sL}{0} and B_{sH}{0}, in B_{s}{0}-->J/psivarphi decays using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp[over ] collider. Assuming CP conservation, a good approximation for the B_{s}{0} system in the standard model, we obtain DeltaGamma=0.076_{-0.063}{+0.059}(stat)+/-0.006(syst) ps{-1} and tau=1.52+/-0.04(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps, the most precise measurements to date. Our constraints on the weak phase and DeltaGamma are consistent with CP conservation. PMID:18517856

  19. {lambda}(1405)-induced nonmesonic decay in kaonic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sekihara, T.; Jido, D.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.

    2009-06-15

    Nonmesonic decay of kaonic nuclei is investigated under a {lambda}(1405) doorway picture in which the K absorptions in nuclei take place through the {lambda}(1405) resonance. Calculating {lambda}(1405)N{yields}YN transitions with one-meson exchange, we find that the nonmesonic decay ratio {gamma}{sub {lambda}}{sub N}/{gamma}{sub {sigma}{sup 0}}{sub N} depends strongly on the ratio of the couplings {lambda}(1405)-KN and {lambda}(1405)-{pi}{sigma}. Especially, a larger {lambda}(1405)-KN coupling leads to enhancement of the decay to {lambda}N. Using the chiral unitary approach for description of the KN amplitudes, we obtain {gamma}{sub {lambda}}{sub N}/{gamma}{sub {sigma}{sup 0}}{sub N}{approx_equal}1.2 almost independently of the nucleon density and find the total nonmesonic decay width calculated in uniform nuclear matter to be 22 MeV at the normal density.

  20. Cosmic-Ray Signatures of Dark Matter Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, David

    2010-02-10

    In light of recent observations of an anomalous excess of high-energy positrons and electrons by the PAMELA and Fermi LAT experiments, we investigate exotic cosmic-ray signatures in scenarios with unstable dark matter that decays with an extremely long lifetime. We identify decay modes capable of explaining the observed anomalies and mention constraints arising from measurements of antiprotons and gamma rays. We also discuss complementary tests by measurements of anisotropies in diffuse gamma rays which should be accessible to Fermi.

  1. Average Description of Dipole Gamma Transitions in Hot Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Gorbachenko, O. M.; Rovenskykh, E. P.; Zheltonozhskii, V. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new version of the modified Lorentzian approach for radiative strength function is proposed. It is based on renewed systematics for giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters. The gamma-decay strength functions are calculated using new GDR parameters and compared with experimental data. It is demonstrated that closed-form approaches with energy-dependent width of the gamma strength, as a rule, provide a reliable simple method for description of gamma-decay processes.

  2. Design and performance of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Yurkin, Yu. T.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2013-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01° (Eγ > 100 GeV), the energy resolution ~1% (Eγ > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor ~106. GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  3. Isospin violation and tensor-glueball decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, A.; Bagchi, B.

    1983-02-01

    We consider the possibility of an isospin-violating decay theta(1640)..-->..E(1440)..pi../sup 0/. We estimate its branching ratio and find GAMMA(theta..-->..E..pi../sup 0/)roughly-equal0.1 keV corresponding to B(theta..-->..etaeta) = 0.5

  4. Development of JENDL Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakura, J.

    2014-04-01

    Decay and fission yield data of fission products have been developed for decay heat calculations to constitute one of the special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Nuclear Data Library). The decay data in the previous JENDL decay data file have been updated based on the data extracted from ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) and those by Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) measurements reported recently. Fission yield data have also been updated in order to maintain consistency between the decay and yield data files. Decay heat calculations were performed using the updated decay and yield data, and the results were compared with measured decay heat data to demonstrate their applicability. The uncertainties of the calculated results were obtained by sensitivity analyses. The resulting JENDL calculations and their uncertainty were compared with those from the ENDF and JEFF evaluated files.

  5. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  6. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  7. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  8. Decay of /sup 150/Er

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.; Toth, K.S.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.A.; Cole, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    A new activity, T/sub 1/2/ = 20 +- 2 sec, was observed in /sup 12/C bombardments of /sup 144/Sm. Only one ..gamma.. ray, 476.0 +- 0.1 keV, was found to be associated with this nuclide. We identify the new isotope as /sup 150/Er and propose that it decays mainly to one level in /sup 150/Ho at an excitation energy of approx.476 keV by an allowed ..beta.. transition which connects states with the following configurations: O/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/, ..pi..h/sub 11/2/)..-->..1/sup +/(..pi..h/sub 11/2/,..nu..h/sub 9/2/). As part of the investigation, the decay properties of the high- and low-spin /sup 150/Ho isomers were reexamined.

  9. Tests of quantum chromodynamics in exclusive e sup + e sup minus and. gamma. gamma. processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Factorization theorem for exclusive processes; Electromagnetic form factors of baryons; Suppression of final state interactions; The {gamma}{pi}{sub 0} Transition form factor; Exclusive charmonium decays; The {pi}-{rho} puzzle; Time-like compton processes; Multi-hadron production; Heavy Quark exclusive states and form factor zeros in QCD; Exclusive {gamma}{gamma} reactions; Higher twist effects; and Tauonium and threshold {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} production. 41 refs., 15 figs. (LSP)

  10. Recent Results in Electroweak B Decays from the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Koeneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    A review of the most recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin B decays is presented. The focus of this paper is on the measurement of observables in the decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} B {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} (time-dependent analysis) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}.

  11. Decaying neutrinos: The long way to isotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Basboell, Anders; Bjaelde, Ole Eggers

    2010-06-15

    We investigate a scenario in which neutrinos are coupled to a pseudoscalar degree of freedom {phi} and where decays {nu}{sub 1{yields}{nu}2}+{phi} and inverse decays are the responsible mechanism for obtaining equilibrium. In this context we discuss the implication of the invisible neutrino decay on the neutrino-pseudoscalar coupling constant and the neutrino lifetime. Assuming the realistic scenario of a thermal background of neutrinos and pseudoscalar we update the bound on the (off-diagonal) neutrino-pseudoscalar coupling constant to g<2.6x10{sup -13} and the bound on the neutrino lifetime to {tau}>1x10{sup 13} s. Furthermore we confirm analytically that kinetic equilibrium is delayed by two Lorentz {gamma} factors--one for time dilation of the (decaying) neutrino lifetime and one from the opening angle. We have also confirmed this behavior numerically.

  12. Decay studies of {sup 145,147}Er, {sup 146}Ho and {sup 129}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, F.; Xu, S. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Xie, Y. X.; Zheng, Y.

    2011-11-30

    Based on a He-jet apparatus coupled with a tape transport system, Very neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 145,147}Er, {sup 146}Ho, and {sup 129}Nd were identified by p-{gamma}(X) or {gamma}-{gamma}(X) coincidence measurements, and their radioactive decay properties were studied.

  13. [sup 223]Ra levels fed in the [sup 223]Fr [beta] decay

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Hadi, A.; Barci, V.; Weiss, B.; Maria, H.; Ardisson, G. ); Hussonnois, M.; Constantinescu, O. )

    1993-01-01

    The [sup 223]Fr [beta] decay was reinvestigated using high-resolution single [gamma] spectrometry as well as [gamma]-[gamma] coincidence techniques. For single [gamma]-spectra measurements, radiochemically pure [sup 223]Fr sources were obtained by chromatographic separation from a 75 MBq activity [sup 227]Ac parent source and continuously purified of [sup 223]Ra and daughters. The analysis of the [gamma] spectra of 30 sources showed the existence of 131 [gamma] lines, of which 87 are reported for the first time in the [sup 223]Fr [beta] decay although many of them are observed following the [sup 227]Th [alpha] decay. The [sup 223]Fr half-life was remeasured and found to be [ital T][sub 1/2]=22.00[plus minus]0.07 min. [gamma]-[gamma]-[ital t] coincidence measurements were also carried out with [sup 223]Fr purified sources. The [sup 223]Ra level scheme was built on the basis of our [gamma] data, as well as [sup 227]Th [alpha]-decay data. Among the 32 excited [sup 223]Ra levels, of which 22 were also known from [sup 227]Th [alpha] decay, 13 are newly reported from [sup 223]Fr [beta] decay. Low energy levels ([ital E][lt]400 keV) may be classified as parity doublet bands according to the predictions of the reflection asymmetric rotor model. Above a 700 keV gap, a coexistence of symmetric and asymmetric shapes including both static and dynamic octupole correlations is suggested.

  14. Study of B-->D(*)sJ +-D(*) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-10-29

    We report a study of D(*)(sJ)(2317)(+) and D(sJ)(2460)(+) meson production in B decays. We observe the decays B+-->D((*)+)(sJ)D ((*)0) and B0-->D((*)+)(sJ)D((*)-) with the subsequent decays D(*)(sJ)(2317)(+)-->D(+)(s)pi(0), D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(+)(s)gamma, and D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(*+)(s)pi(0). Based on a data sample of 122.1 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory, we obtain branching fractions for these modes, including the previously unseen decays B-->D((*)+)(sJ)D(*). In addition, we perform an angular analysis of D(sJ)(2460)(+)-->D(+)(s)gamma decays to test the different D(sJ)(2460)(+) spin hypotheses. PMID:15525150

  15. Observation of Doppler broadening in β -delayed proton- γ decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartz, S. B.; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Bowe, A.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Cooper, N.; Irvine, D.; et al

    2015-09-14

    Background: The Doppler broadening of gamma-ray peaks is due to nuclear recoil from beta-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using beta-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than A = 10. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using gamma-ray peaks from the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of P-26 was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a P-26 beta-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect gamma rays frommore » the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in beta-delayed proton-gamma decay was observed for the first time. Moreover, the Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613-keV gamma-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776-keV gamma ray de-exciting the 2720 keV Al-25 level was observed in P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay for the first time and used to determine that the center-of-mass energy of the proton emission feeding the 2720-keV level is 5.1 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV, corresponding to a Si-26 excitation energy of 13.3 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV for the proton-emitting level. Conclusions: Finally, the Doppler broadening method has been demonstrated to provide practical measurements of the energies for beta-delayed nucleon emissions populating excited states of nuclear recoils at least as heavy as A = 25.« less

  16. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  17. Neutron inelastic scattering processes as a background for double-{beta} decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, D.-M.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Gehman, V.; Kazkaz, K.

    2008-05-15

    We investigate several Pb(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) and Ge(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reactions. We measure {gamma}-ray production from Pb(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reactions that can be a significant background for double-{beta} decay experiments which use lead as a massive inner shield. Particularly worrisome for Ge-based double-{beta} decay experiments are the 2041-keV and 3062-keV {gamma} rays produced via Pb(n,n{sup '}{gamma}). The former is very close to the {sup 76}Ge double-{beta} decay endpoint energy and the latter has a double escape peak energy near the endpoint. We discuss the implications of these {gamma} rays on past and future double-{beta} decay experiments and estimate the cross section to excite the level that produces the 3062-keV {gamma} ray. Excitation {gamma}-ray lines from Ge(n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reactions are also observed. We consider the contribution of such backgrounds and their impact on the sensitivity of next-generation searches for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay using enriched germanium detectors.

  18. Computation of large-scale statistics in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence to test the prediction of self-similar decay of the energy spectrum and to compute the decay exponents of the kinetic energy. In general, good agreement between the simulation results and the assumption of self-similarity were obtained. However, the statistics of the simulations were insufficient to compute the value of gamma which corrects the decay exponent when the spectrum follows a k(exp 4) wave number behavior near k = 0. To obtain good statistics, it was found necessary to average over a large ensemble of turbulent flows.

  19. Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase $\\mathrm{ \\phi_s }$ and the decay width difference $ \\Delta \\Gamma_{ \\mathrm{s} }$ using the $ \\mathrm{B^0_s} \\to \\mathrm{J} / \\psi \\phi(1020) $ decay channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-28

    The CP-violating weak phase φs of the B0 s meson and the decay width difference ΔΓs of the B0 s light and heavy mass eigenstates are measured with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data sample of B0 s →J/ψ φ(1020) → µ +µ -K+K- decays. Our analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Additionally, a total of 49 200 reconstructed B0 s decays are used to extract the values of φs and ΔΓs by performing a time-dependent and flavourtagged angular analysis of the µ +µ -K+K- final state. The weak phase is measured to be φs = -0.075 ± 0.097 (stat) ± 0.031 (syst) rad, and the decay width difference is ΔΓs = 0.095 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst) ps-1 .

  20. Two Photon Decays of Charmonia from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards

    2006-07-12

    We make the first calculation in lattice QCD of two-photon decays of mesons. Working in the charmonium sector, using the LSZ reduction to relate a photon to a sum of hadronic vector eigenstates, we compute form-factors in both the space-like and time-like domains for the transitions {eta}{sub c} {yields} {gamma}*{gamma}* and {chi}{sub c0} {yields} {gamma}*{gamma}*. At the on-shell point we find approximate agreement with experimental world-average values.

  1. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  2. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  3. Some problems of gamma-astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogiel, V. A.; Ginzburg, V. L.

    1989-04-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of gamma-ray emission (GRE) from astronomical objects are reviewed. Topics addressed include the basic observational parameters, bremsstrahlung GRE, the Compton effect, synchrotron and curvature radiation, pi0-meson and analogous decays, gamma line generation, gamma-ray absorption, and the Galactic GRE band. Consideration is given to discrete sources of soft GRE, gamma-ray bursts, the annihilation GRE line from the Galactic center, the Al-26 decay line, GRE lines from SN, diffuse GRE from the Galactic disk and halo, discrete GRE sources at 30-5000 MeV, and sources of GRE at energies greater than 1 TeV or 1 PeV. Diagrams, maps, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  4. Lightning: Ground observations of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, U. B.; Gusev, A. A.; Neri, J. A. C.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Talavera, K. C.

    Recent satellite and ground observations of emissions in x and gamma-rays ascribing association with lightning phenomena have triggered interest in this natural phenomena The incentive for this Ground Gamma Radiation GGR experiment in the Brazilian Geomagnetic Anomaly BGA region is due to the absence of satellite data As a first step we want to test and calibrate the system with rocket triggered lightning flashes in the International Lightning facility in our Campus The lightning associated gamma rays can be inferred as due to bremsstrahlung associated with electrons released moments after the return stroke and the likely radiation associated with radioactive decay products in the interactions of protons generated in the lightning with the atmospheric constituents Initially in 2005 to observe the later phenomena a very large area NaI Tl detector of 40 cm diameter with a PHA system monitoring every 10 s was set up near the two rocket launchers for the induced lightning In few months of operation in 2005 increases in gamma-rays above the ground radiation flux are observed due to many rain precipitation events and in one lightning event coincident with the rocket launch To identify the association of emission due to the lightning we investigated both the decay period and the spectral information of these gamma rays The radon progeny in rain has an associated decay period of sim 30 min but however the decay time associated with the lightning is different Although the spectral information indicates a power law index for both

  5. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  6. Beta-Decay Studies near 100Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Burkard, K.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The {beta}-decay of {sup 102}Sn was studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). A decay scheme has been constructed based on the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data. The total experimental Gamow-Teller strength B{sub GT}{sup exp} of {sup 102}Sn was deduced from the TAS data to be 4.2(9). A search for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays of {sup 100}Sn decay remained unsuccessful. However, a Gamow-Teller hindrance factor h = 2.2(3), and a cross-section of about 3nb for the production of {sup 100}Sn in fusion-evaporation reaction between {sup 58}Ni beam and {sup 50}Cr target have been estimated from the data on heavier tin isotopes. The estimated hindrance factor is similar to the values derived for lower shell nuclei.

  7. Moduli Decays and Gravitinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dine, Michael; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Morisse, Alexander; Shirman, Yuri

    2006-04-21

    One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inaton decay.

  8. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  9. Electro-Weak Penguin and Leptonic Decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lodovico, F.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-09-08

    Electro-weak penguin and leptonic decays provide an indirect probe for physics beyond the Standard Model and contribute to the determination of Standard Model parameters. Copious quantities of B mesons produced at the B-Factories permit precision measurements of the electro-weak penguin decays and searches for leptonic decays. We review the current experimental status of b {yields} s(d){gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{gamma}, b {yields} s{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and finally B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays at BABAR.

  10. {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{eta}{gamma}{gamma}: A primer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Rafel

    2012-10-23

    The electromagnetic rare decays {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} are analysed for the first time and their predicted branching ratios given. The vector meson exchange dominant contribution is treated using Vector Meson Dominance and the scalar component is estimated by means of the Linear Sigma Model. The agreement between our calculation and the measurement of the related process {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} is a check of the procedure. Scalar meson effects are seen to be irrelevant for {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}, while a significant scalar contribution due to the {sigma}(500) resonance seems to emerge in the case of {eta} Prime {yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}. Future measurements coming from KLOE-2, Crystal Ball, WASA, and BES-III will elucidate if any of these processes carry an important scalar contribution or they are simply driven by the exchange of vector mesons.

  11. Radiative Penguin and Leptonic Rare Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Paoloni, E

    2004-07-06

    Recent BABAR results on rare B decays involving flavour-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. New measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma}, B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported, as well as a new measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching fraction. Also reported are updated limits on B {yields} {mu}{nu} and recent measurements of B {yields} K(*){ell}{ell} and b {yields} s{ell}{ell}. The data sample comprises 123 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  12. Higgs boson decays in the littlest Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.A.; Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the two body Higgs boson decays in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. The decay H{yields}{gamma}Z is computed at one-loop-level and, using previous results, we evaluate the branching fractions in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. A wide range of the space parameter of the model is considered and possible deviations from the standard model are explored.

  13. {beta}-decay of {sup 23}Al and nova nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aeystoe, J.; Trache, L.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the {beta}-decay of {sup 23}Al with a novel detector setup at the focal plane of the MARS separator at the Texas A and M University to resolve existing controversies about the proton intensities of the IAS in {sup 23}Mg and to determine the absolute proton branching ratios by combining our results to the latest {gamma}-decay data. Experimental technique, results and the relevance for nova nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  14. Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ionized matter falling onto an isolated, rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000 M sub circled dot), black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th power engs/s, with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

  15. Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    Ionized matter falling onto an isolated rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000-solar mass) black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th erg/s with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

  16. Limits on neutrino radiative decay from SN1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Andrew H.; Fenimore, ED; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate limits on the properties of neutrinos using data from gamma ray detectors on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Solar Max Mission satellites. A massive neutrino decaying in flight from the supernova would produce gamma rays detectable by these instruments. The lack of such a signal allows us to constrain the mass, radiative lifetime, and branching ratio to photons of a massive neutrino species produced in the supernova.

  17. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  18. HIGGS PHYSICS WITH A GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDER BASED ON CLIC 1*.

    SciTech Connect

    ASNER,D.; BURKHARDT,H.; DE ROECK,A.; ELLIS,J.; GRONBERG,J.; HEINEMEYER,S.; SCHMITT,M.; SCHULTE,D.; VELASCO,M.; ZIMMERMAN,F.

    2001-11-01

    We present the machine parameters and physics capabilities of the CLIC Higgs Experiment (CLICHE), a low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider based on CLIC 1, the demonstration project for the higher-energy two-beam accelerator CLIC. CLICHE is conceived as a factory capable of producing around 20,000 light Higgs bosons per year. We discuss the requirements for the CLIC 1 beams and a laser backscattering system capable of producing a {gamma}{gamma} total (peak) luminosity of 2.0 (0.36) x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with E{sub CM}({gamma}{gamma}) 115 GeV. We show how CLICHE could be used to measure accurately the mass, {bar b}b, WW and {gamma}{gamma} decays of a light Higgs boson. We illustrate how these measurements may distinguish between the Standard Model Higgs boson and those in supersymmetric and more general two-Higgs-doublet models, complementing the measurements to be made with other accelerators. We also comment on other prospects in {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup -}{gamma} physics with CLICHE.

  19. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horns, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately 1011 eV and 1013 eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as ≈ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudoscalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarized briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  20. Exotic physics: search for excited and exotic electrons in the e gamma decay channel in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2005-02-21

    We present a search for excited and exotic electrons (e*) decaying to an electron and a photon, both with high transverse momentum. We use 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector. No signal above standard model expectation is seen for associated ee* production. We discuss the e* sensitivity in the parameter space of the excited electron mass M{sub e*} and the compositeness energy scale {Lambda}. In the contact interaction model, we exclude 132 GeV/c{sup 2} < M{sub e*} < 879 GeV/c{sup 2} for {Lambda} = M{sub e*} at 95% confidence level (C.L.). In the gauge-mediated model, we exclude 126 GeV/c{sup 2} < M{sub e*} < 430 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% C.L. for the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  1. Enhanced Electroweak Penguin Amplitude in B{yields}VV Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Rohrer, J.; Yang, D.

    2006-04-14

    We discuss a novel electromagnetic penguin contribution to the transverse helicity amplitudes in B decays to two vector mesons, which is enhanced by two powers of m{sub B}/{lambda} relative to the standard penguin amplitudes. This leads to unique polarization signatures in penguin-dominated decay modes such as B{yields}{rho}K* similar to polarization effects in the radiative decay B{yields}K*{gamma} and offers new opportunities to probe the magnitude and chirality of flavor-changing neutral current couplings to photons.

  2. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  3. Temperature dependence of the time decay of the magnetization in particulate media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseroff, S. B.; Clark, D.; Schultz, S.; Shtrikman, S.

    1985-01-01

    The time decay of magnetization in commercial CrO2, gamma-Fe2O3, and Co-doped gamma-Fe2O3 tapes is investigated experimentally at temperatures 6, 50, 100, 200, 250, and 300 K. The decay is found to be linearly dependent on temperature in all four tapes tested, but when the curves are extrapolated to 0 K, there is a large finite intercept - in contrast to similar measurements on ferromagnetic materials and rocks.

  4. phi. yields K sup + K sup minus. gamma. and its relation to. phi. yields K sup 0 K sup 0. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, J.J. ); Lucio, J.L.M.; Vargas, M. )

    1992-05-10

    In this paper, the authors calculate {Gamma}({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{gamma}) using Low's soft photon theorem and compare it with a model dependent calculation in which the process proceeds through the chain of decays {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} {yields} f{sub 0} + {gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{gamma}.

  5. Axions from string decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C., LLNL

    1998-07-09

    We have studied numerically the evolution and decay of axion strings. These global defects decay mainly by axion emission and thus contribute to the cosmological axion energy density. The relative importance of this source relative to misalignment production of axions depends on the spectrum. Radiation spectra for various string loop configurations are presented. They support the contention that the string decay contribution is of the same order of magnitude as the contribution from misalignment.

  6. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... results are sent to the Gamma Knife®'s planning computer system. Together, physicians ( radiation oncologists and neurosurgeons) and medical physicists delineate targets and normal anatomical structures. They use a planning computer program to determine the exact spatial relationship between ...

  7. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  8. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  9. Study of the single neutral top pion production process at {gamma}{gamma} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuelei; Wang Xiaoxue

    2005-11-01

    {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sub t}{sup 0} is the major production mechanism of the neutral top pion at the linear colliders. In this paper, we calculate the cross section of the process {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sub t}{sup 0} and discuss the potential to observe the neutral top pion via its various decay modes at the planned International Linear Collider. The study shows that, among the various neutral top-pion production processes at the linear colliders, the cross section of {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sub t}{sup 0} is the largest one which can reach the level of 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} fb. Because of the existence of the tree-level flavor-changing coupling {pi}{sub t}{sup 0}tc, {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sub t}{sup 0}{yields}tc can provide enough number of typical signals to identify the neutral top pion with the clean SM background. Therefore, the process {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sub t}{sup 0} plays an important role in searching for the neutral top pion and tests the TC2 model.

  10. Proton energy spectra in the nonmesonic weak decay of 12lambdaC and 28lambdaSi hypernuclei.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, O; Ajimura, S; Aoki, K; Bhang, H; Hasegawa, T; Hotchi, H; Kim, Y D; Kishimoto, T; Maeda, K; Noumi, H; Ohta, Y; Omata, K; Outa, H; Park, H; Sato, Y; Sekimoto, M; Shibata, T; Takahashi, T; Youn, M

    2002-01-28

    Numbers of protons per Gamma hypernuclear weak decay were measured as a function of proton energy above 40 MeV, explicitly identifying production of Gamma hypernuclei by the (pi+,K+) reaction. The ratios between the neutron-stimulated to proton-stimulated nonmesonic decay widths, Gamma((Lambda)n-->nn)/Gamma((Lambda)p-->np) ( = Gamma(n)/Gamma(p)) were extracted by fitting the proton energy spectra. The present result claims that the proton yields are suppressed and the Gamma(n)/Gamma(p) ratios are close to 1 both for 12LambdaC and 28LambdaSi in contradiction to theoretical expectations based on meson exchange models. PMID:11801115

  11. NEANDC specialists meeting on yields and decay data of fission product nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.; Burrows, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers presented. Workshop reports on decay heat, fission yields, beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and delayed neutrons are included. An appendix contains a survey of the most recent compilations and evaluations containing fission product yield, fission product decay data, and delayed neutron yield information. (WHK)

  12. Measurements of Branching Fractions for B+ -> rho+ gamma, B0 -> rho0 gamma, and B0 -> omega gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-08-15

    The authors present branching fraction measurements for the radiative decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}. The analysis is based on a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). They find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.20{sub -0.37}{sup +0.42} {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.97{sub -0.22}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, and a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.9 x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They also measure the isospin-violating quantity {Lambda}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma})/2{Lambda}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) - 1 = -0.43{sub -0.22}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.10.

  13. Radiative decays of radially excited mesons {pi}{sup 0'}, {rho}{sup 0'}, and {omega}{sup '} in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuraev, E. A.; Volkov, M. K.; Arbuzov, A. B.

    2010-12-15

    Radiative decays {pi}{sup 0}({pi}{sup 0'}){yields}{gamma}+{gamma}, {pi}{sup 0'{yields}{rho}0}({omega})+{gamma}, {rho}{sup 0'}({omega}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sup 0}+{gamma}, and {rho}{sup 0'}({omega}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sup 0'}+{gamma} are considered in the framework of the SU(2)xSU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Radially excited mesons are described with the help of a simple polynomial form factor. In spite of mixing of the ground and excited meson states in this model, the decay widths of {pi}{sup 0{yields}{gamma}}+{gamma} and {rho}{sup 0}({omega}){yields}{pi}{sup 0}+{gamma} are found to be in good agreement with experimental data, as in the standard NJL model. Our predictions for decay widths of radially excited mesons can be verified in future experiments.

  14. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  15. 511 keV line and diffuse gamma rays from moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2006-03-15

    We obtain the spectrum of gamma-ray emissions from the moduli whose decay into e{sup +}e{sup -} accounts for the 511 keV line observed by SPI/INTERGRAL. The moduli emit gamma rays through internal bremsstrahlung, and also decay directly into two gammas via tree and/or one-loop diagrams. We show that the internal bremsstahlung constrains the mass of the moduli below {approx}40 MeV model-independently. On the other hand, the flux of two gammas directly decayed from the moduli through one-loop diagrams will exceed the observed galactic diffuse gamma-ray background if the moduli mass exceeds {approx}20 MeV in the typical situation. Moreover, forthcoming analysis of SPI data in the range of 1-8 MeV may detect the line emisson with the energy half the moduli mass in the near future, which confirms the decaying moduli scenario.

  16. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  17. Measurement of Branching Fractions of Radiative Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-08-18

    We present a measurement of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo-favored radiative decay, D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{gamma}, and the Cabibbo-suppressed radiative decay, D{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma}. These measurements are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 387.1 fb{sup -1}, recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy collider operating at center-of-mass energies 10.58 and 10.54 GeV. We measure the branching fractions relative to the well-studied decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and find {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{gamma})/{Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (8.43 {+-} 0.51 {+-} 0.70) x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma})/{Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (7.15 {+-} 0.78 {+-} 0.69) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the first measurement of {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {gamma}).

  18. Rare top quark decays in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2007-06-19

    We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t {yields} H0 + c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t {yields} c + {gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  19. First Results in Inclusive Radiative Penguin Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Colin P

    2000-11-17

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the exclusive penguin decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}{sup 0} using (8.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays B(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}{sup 0}) = (5.42 {+-} 0.82(stat.) {+-} 0.47(sys.)) x 10{sup -5}. In addition they search for the related penguin decays with a lepton pair in the final state, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  20. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in semileptonic Bs0 decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Holubyev, K; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-04-13

    We have performed the first direct measurement of the time-integrated flavor untagged charge asymmetry in semileptonic Bs0 decays ASLs,unt by comparing the decay rate of Bs0-->micro+Ds-nuX, where Ds- -->phipi- and phi-->K+K-, with the charge-conjugate Bs0 decay rate. This sample was selected from 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain ASLs,unt=[1.23+/-0.97(stat)+/-0.17(syst)]x10(-2). Assuming that Deltam(s)/Gamma(s)>1, this result can be translated into a measurement of the CP-violating phase in Bs0 mixing: DeltaGamma(s)/Deltam(s)tanphi(s)=[2.45+/-1.93(stat)+/-0.35(syst)]x10(-2). PMID:17501335

  1. Beta Decay of 101Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Kavatsyuk, O.; Mazzocchi, C.; Janas, Z.; Banu, A.; Batist, L.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Jungclaus, A.; Karny, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Klepper, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2007-01-01

    The {beta} decay of the very neutron-deficient isotope 101Sn was studied at the GSI on-line mass separator using silicon detectors for recording charged particles and germanium detectors for {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Based on the {beta}-delayed proton data the production cross-section of 101Sn in the 50Cr + 58Ni fusion-evaporation reaction was determined to be about 60nb. The half-life of 101Sn was measured to be 1.9(3)s. For the first time {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays of 101Sn were tentatively identified, yielding weak evidence for a cascade of 352 and 1065keV transitions in 101In. The results for the 101Sn decay as well as those from previous work on the 103Sn decay are discussed by comparing them to predictions obtained from shell model calculations employing a new interaction in the 88Sr to 132Sn model space.

  2. Data Evaluation for 56Co epsilon + beta+ Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Baglin, Coral M.; MacMahon, T. Desmond

    2005-02-28

    Recommended values for nuclear and atomic data pertaining to the {var_epsilon} + {beta}{sup +} decay of {sup 56}Co are provided here, followed by comments on evaluation procedures and a summary of all available experimental data. {sup 56}Co is a radionuclide which is potentially very useful for Ge detector efficiency calibration because it is readily produced via the {sup 56}Fe(p,n) reaction, its half-life of 77.24 days is conveniently long, and it provides a number of relatively strong {gamma} rays with energies up to {approx}3500 keV. The transition intensities recommended here for the strongest lines will be included in the forthcoming International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Programme document ''Update of X- and Gamma-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration and Other Applications'', and the analysis for all transitions along with relevant atomic data have been provided to the Decay Data Evaluation Project.

  3. - and -delayed neutron- decay of neutron-rich copper isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Korgul, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Gross, Carl J; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Borzov, Ivan N; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Hamilton, Joseph H; Krolas, W.; Liddick, S. N.; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Nowacki, F.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Sieja, K.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2012-01-01

    The {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu isotopes produced in proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data were collected using high-resolution online mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy methods. An improved decay scheme of N = 49 {sup 78}Cu and the first observation of N = 50 {sup 79}Cu {beta}-delayed neutron decay followed by a gamma transition are reported. Spin and parity (5{sup -}) are deduced for {sup 78gs}Cu. The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}n}) for the {sup 77}Cu and {sup 79}Cu precursors are analyzed with the help of nuclear structure models.

  4. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  5. U-spin predictions of the transition magnetic moments of the electromagnetic decay of the {Sigma}{sup ∗}(1385) baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin M.; Hicks, Kenneth H.

    2013-05-01

    The transition magnetic moments for decuplet-to-octet baryon electromagnetic decays are calculated from the CLAS experimental results and are compared with calculations to first order in the 1/N{sub c} expansion of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and new U-spin predictions. Using the U-spin predictions for the {Sigma} *{sup 0} --> {Sigma}{sup 0} {gamma} and {Sigma} *{sup +} → {Sigma}{sup +} {gamma} decays, the SU(3)-forbidden transition {Sigma} *{sup -} → {Sigma}{sup -} {gamma} is obtained. In addition, the doubly strange baryon radiative decay {Xi} *{sup 0} → {Xi} {gamma} is predicted using U-spin.

  6. Gamma ray cosmology: The extra galactic gamma spectrum and methods to detect the underlying source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, David B.

    1990-01-01

    The possible sources of extragalactic gamma rays and methods to distinguish the different sources are discussed. The sources considered are early universe decays and annihilation of Particles, active galactic nuclei (AGN) sources, and baryon-antibaryon annihilation in a baryon symmetric cosmology. The energy spectrum and possible angular fluctuations due to these sources are described.

  7. Solar gamma-ray lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite has observed emissions produced by nuclear reactions in over 20 separate solar flares. The observed intensity from different flares ranges over a factor of 100, and the time scale for their production ranges from 10-s pulses to complete events lasting over 1000 s. The emissions include narrow and broadened prompt gamma-ray lines from numerous isotopes from Li-7 to Fe-56 and cover the energy range from 0.431 MeV (Be-7) to 7.12 MeV (O-16). The instrument has also observed emissions at energies greater than 10 MeV from the decay of pi0 mesons, from electron bremsstrahlung, and from the direct observation of greater-than-100-MeV solar neutrons. The intensity, temporal and spectral properties of these emissions are reviewed from the point of view that solar flares represent an astrophysical particle-acceleration site.

  8. Measurement of the branching fraction and polarization for the decay B--->D*0K*-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-04-01

    We present a study of the decay B--->D(*0)K(*-) based on a sample of 86 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fraction B(B--->D(*0)K(*-))=(8.3+/-1.1(stat)+/-1.0(syst)) x 10(-4), and the fraction of longitudinal polarization in this decay to be Gamma(L)/Gamma=0.86+/-0.06(stat)+/-0.03(syst). PMID:15089528

  9. Studies of Nuclear Structure and Decay Properties of Actinide Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Moore, E. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Kellett, M. A.; Nichols, A. L.

    2009-01-28

    The identification of single-particle states in heavy actinide nuclei by means of studying their decay schemes plays a seminal role in understanding the structure of the heaviest elements and testing the predictive power of modern theoretical models. The heaviest odd-mass nuclides available in sufficient quantity for detailed decay spectroscopic studies are 20-h {sup 255} Fm(for neutrons) and 20-d {sup 253}Es(for protons). Decay spectra of these isotopes, together with those for the odd-odd 276-d {sup 254}Es nuclide, were measured using a variety of {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy techniques. Well-defined decay data are also essential pre-requisites for the detection and accurate characterization of fissile radionuclides. The parameters of greatest relevance include actinide half-lives, branching fractions, and {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray energies and emission probabilities. Their quantification to good accuracy provides the means of monitoring their presence, behavior and transport in nuclear facilities as well as any clandestine movement and usage. As a consequence of recommendations made at recent IAEA research coordination meetings on 'Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides,' measurements were undertaken to determine specific decay data of the more inadequately defined radionuclides.

  10. Positron annihilation gamma rays from novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.; Clayton, Donald D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for observing annihilation gamma rays from novae is investigated. These gamma rays, a unique signature of the thermonuclear runaway models of novae, would result from the annihilation of positrons emitted by beta(+)-unstable nuclei produced near the peak of the runaway and carried by rapid convection to the surface of the nova envelope. Simple models, which are extensions of detailed published models, of the expansion of the nova atmospheres are evolved. These models serve as input into investigations of the fate of nearby Galactic fast novae could yield detectable fluxes of electron-positron annihilation gamma rays produced by the decay of N-13 and F-18. Although nuclear gamma-ray lines are produced by other nuclei, it is unlikely that the fluxes at typical nova distances would be detectable to present and near-future instruments.

  11. COBRA - Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2012-08-01

    The COBRA experiment is searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The main focus is on Cd-116, with a decay energy of 2814keV well above the highest naturally occurring gamma lines. Furthermore, Te-130, with a high natural abundance, and Cd-106, a double β+ emitter, are under investigation. Advantageous is the possibility to operate the detectors at room temperature. Besides coplanar grid detectors, pixelised detectors are considered. The latter ones would allow for particle discrimination, therefore providing efficient background reduction. The current status of the experiment is described, including the upgrade of the R&D set-up in spring 2011 at the LNGS underground laboratory, the different detector concepts and the latest half -life limits. Furthermore, studies on the use of liquid scintillator for background suppression and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented.

  12. Antimatter signatures of gravitino dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: david.tran@desy.de

    2008-07-15

    The scenario of gravitino dark matter with broken R-parity naturally reconciles three paradigms that, albeit very well motivated separately, seem to be in mutual conflict: supersymmetric dark matter, thermal leptogenesis and standard big bang nucleosynthesis. Interestingly, the products of the gravitino decay could be observed, opening the possibility of indirect detection of gravitino dark matter. In this paper, we compute the positron and the antiproton fluxes from gravitino decay. We find that a gravitino with a mass of m{sub 3/2}{approx}150 GeV and a lifetime of {tau}{sub 3/2}{approx}10{sup 26} s could simultaneously explain the EGRET anomaly in the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background and the HEAT excess in the positron fraction. However, the predicted antiproton flux tends to be too large, although the prediction suffers from large uncertainties and might be compatible with present observations for certain choices of propagation parameters.

  13. The production and decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Hypernuclei have been studied for the last 35 years using several techniques. Since 1970, the {sup A}Z (K{sup {minus}},{pi}{sup {minus}}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z strangeness-exchange reaction has been used at CERN, BNL, and KEK to produce hypernuclei and study their spectroscopic properties. These studies also include experiments where decay gamma rays and hypernuclear weak decay products are detected in coincidence with hypernuclear production. Recent experiments at BNL and KEK have proven the utility of the {sup A}Z ({pi}{sup +},K{sup +}) {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z reaction to study hypernuclear spectroscopy. Although I have no hope of covering this field in much detail, I write this paper as an introduction to the subject and highlights some of the recent experimental developments. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Beta decay study of the N=Z nucleus {sup 72}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Piqueras, I.; Borge, M. J. G.; Dessagne, Ph.; Giovinazzo, J.; Longour, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Tengblad, O.

    1999-11-16

    Beta decay of the N=Z even-even nucleus {sup 72}Kr has been studied at the ISOLDE PSB facility at CERN. {sup 72}Kr has been produced by fragmentation of a niobium target using the 1 GeV proton beam of the PS Booster. Delayed charged particles has been search for, X-ray, {gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences have been measured. Our results enrich the decay scheme in 15 unreported levels. Information on the Gamow-Teller strength distribution has been obtained for the region of the Q{sub EC} window accessible to us.

  15. Exotic decays of heavy B quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2016-01-08

    Heavy vector-like quarks of charge –1/3, B, have been searched for at the LHC through the decays B → bZ, bh, tW. In models where the B quark also carries charge under a new gauge group, new decay channels may dominate. We focus on the case where the B is charged under a U(1)' and describe simple models where the dominant decay mode is B → bZ' → b(bb¯¯). With the inclusion of dark matter such models can explain the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic center. We develop a search strategy for this decay chain and estimate thatmore » with integrated luminosity of 300 fb–1 the LHC will have the potential to discover both the B and the Z' for B quarks with mass below ~ 1.6 TeV, for a broad range of Z' masses. Furthermore, a high-luminosity run can extend this reach to 2 TeV.« less

  16. Axions from wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  17. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  18. Combinedatomic-nuclear decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyublik, A. Ya.

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed in details the combined decay of the atomic-nuclear state, which consists of the excited 3/2+ level of 63 153 Eu and K hole, formed in the K capture by 153Gd. This decay proceeds in two stages. First, the nucleus transfers its energy to 2 p electron, which flies into the continuum spectrum, and then returns into 1s hole, emitting γ quantum with the energy equal to the sum of energies of the nuclear and atomic transitions. We estimated the decay probability to be 2.2 × 10-13, that is much less than the recent experimental findings.

  19. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  20. CP violation in fourth generation quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Hou Weishu

    2009-10-01

    We show that, if a fourth generation is discovered at the Tevatron or LHC, one could study CP violation (CPV) in b{sup '}{yields}s decays. Asymmetries could reach 30% for b{sup '}{yields}sZ for m{sub b{sup '}} < or approx. 350 GeV, while it could be greater than 50% for b{sup '}{yields}s{gamma} and extend to higher m{sub b{sup '}}. Branching ratios are 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5}, and CPV measurement requires tagging. Once measured, however, the CPV phase can be extracted with little theoretical uncertainty.

  1. QCD challenges in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Misiak, M.

    2010-12-22

    Radiative decays of the B meson are known to provide important constraints on the MSSM and many other realistic new physics models in the sub-TeV range. The inclusive branching ratio B(B-bar{yields}X{sub s{gamma}}) being the key observable is currently measured to about {+-}7% accuracy. Reaching a better precision on the theory side is a challenge both for the perturbative QCD calculations and for analyses of non-perturbative hadronic effects. The current situation is briefly summarized here.

  2. Radiative decays of the Sigma0(1385) and Lambda(1520) hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor; Gordon Mutchler; CLAS Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetic decays of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and {Lambda}(1520) hyperons were studied in photon-induced reactions {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. We report the first observation of the radiative decay of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and a measurement of the {Lambda}(1520) radiative decay width. For the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we measured a partial width of 479 {+-} 120(stat){sub -100}{sup +81}(sys) keV, larger than all of the existing model predictions. For the {Lambda}(1520) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we obtained a partial width of 167 {+-} 43(stat){sub -12}{sup +26}(sys) keV.

  3. Detection of the characteristic pion-decay signature in supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Cillis, A N; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kataoka, J; Katsuta, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mignani, R P; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Romoli, C; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Simeon, P E; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stecker, F W; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yamazaki, R; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2013-02-15

    Cosmic rays are particles (mostly protons) accelerated to relativistic speeds. Despite wide agreement that supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sources of galactic cosmic rays, unequivocal evidence for the acceleration of protons in these objects is still lacking. When accelerated protons encounter interstellar material, they produce neutral pions, which in turn decay into gamma rays. This offers a compelling way to detect the acceleration sites of protons. The identification of pion-decay gamma rays has been difficult because high-energy electrons also produce gamma rays via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We detected the characteristic pion-decay feature in the gamma-ray spectra of two SNRs, IC 443 and W44, with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This detection provides direct evidence that cosmic-ray protons are accelerated in SNRs. PMID:23413352

  4. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  5. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... chap 304. Ribeiro NM, Ribeiro MA. Breastfeeding and early childhood caries: a critical review. J Pediatr (Rio J) . ...

  6. {mu}{yields}e{gamma}-MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Ryu

    2009-12-17

    The MEG experiment started a search for a lepton violating (LFV) muon decay, {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{gamma}, at Paul Scherrer Institut(PSI) in Switzerland. The LFV muon decay does not occur in the standard model, while new theories, such as super symmetric grand unified theory and seesaw model of neutrinos, predict observable branching ratio just below the current upper limit (1.2x10{sup -12}). MEG is designed to improve the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude. In this article, the system of the MEG experiment and its data taking in 2008 are described.

  7. Gamma-Ray background spectrum and annihilation rate in the baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to extract experimental data on baryon symmetry by observing annihilation products. Specifically, gamma rays and neutrons with long mean free paths were analyzed. Data cover absorption cross sections and radiation background of the 0.511 MeV gamma rays from positron annihilations and the 70 MeV gamma rays from neutral pion decay.

  8. Nonperturbative charming penguin contributions to isospin asymmetries in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chul; Mehen, Thomas; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental data on the radiative decays B{yields}V{gamma}, where V is a light vector meson, find small isospin violation in B{yields}K*{gamma} while isospin asymmetries in B{yields}{rho}{gamma} are of order 20%, with large uncertainties. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate isospin asymmetries in these radiative B decays up to O(1/m{sub b}), also including O(v{alpha}{sub s}) contributions from nonperturbative charming penguins (NPCP). In the absence of NPCP contributions, the theoretical predictions for the asymmetries are a few percent or less. Including the NPCP can significantly increase the isospin asymmetries for both B{yields}V{gamma} modes. We also consider the effect of the NPCP on the branching ratio and CP asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}V{sup {+-}}{gamma}.

  9. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  10. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  11. Decay of metastable topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. ); Vilenkin, A. Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 )

    1993-03-15

    We systematically analyze the decay of metastable topological defects that arise from the spontaneous breakdown of gauge or global symmetries. Quantum-mechanical tunneling rates are estimated for a variety of decay processes. The decay rate for a global string, vortex, domain wall, or kink is typically suppressed compared to the decay rate for its gauged counterpart. We also discuss the decay of global texture, and of semilocal and electroweak strings.

  12. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  13. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurements using STEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitt, A. J.; Smith, A. G.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    An ongoing investigation into the angular momentum generated during the fission of 252Cf is currently under way using the SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fragments (STEFF). Measurements have been made of the fold distribution (measured multiplicity) with STEFF. These have been compared to a Monte-carlo simulation to determine a value for the average angular momentum Jrms = 6hslash which is comparable to previous measurements [1]. Measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity were performed whilst gating on different fragment mass regions. The result was compared with a sum of the lowest 2+ energies from both fragment and complementary in the mass gate. The results support the view that gamma-ray multiplicity is largely determined by the decay of the nucleus through near yrast transitions that follow the statistical decay.

  14. Decay properties of the 1{sup -+} hybrid state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huaxing; Cai Zixing; Huang Pengzhi; Zhu Shilin

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the QCD sum rules, we consider the three-point correlation function, work at the limit q{sup 2}{yields}0 and m{sub {pi}}{yields}0, and pick out the singular term {approx}(1/q{sup 2}) to extract the pionic coupling constants of the 1{sup -+} hybrid meson. Then, we calculate the decay widths of different modes. The decay width of the S-wave modes b{sub 1{pi}}, f{sub 1{pi}} increases quickly as the hybrid meson mass and decay momentum increase. But for the low mass hybrid meson around 1.6 GeV, the P-wave decay mode {rho}{pi} is very important and its width is around 180 MeV, while the widths of {eta}{pi} and {eta}{sup '{pi}} are strongly suppressed. We suggest the experimental search of {pi}{sub 1}(1600) through the decay chains at the Beijing Spectrometer: J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{gamma} or J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{rho}, where the {pi}{sub 1} state can be reconstructed through the decay modes {pi}{sub 1}{yields}{rho}{pi}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} or {pi}{sub 1}{yields}f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup 0}. It is also interesting to look for {pi}{sub 1} using the available BELLE/BABAR data through the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}*{yields}{rho}{pi}{sub 1}, b{sub 1}{pi}{sub 1}, {gamma}{pi}{sub 1}, etc.

  15. B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} constraints on the top quark anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Xingbo; Hao Yang; Yang Yadng

    2011-01-01

    Observation of the top quark flavor changing neutral process t{yields}c+{gamma} at the LHC would be the signal of physics beyond the standard model. If anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling exists, it will affect the precisely measured B(B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}). In this paper, we study the effects of a dimension 5 anomalous tc{gamma} operator in B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay to derive constraints on its possible strength. It is found that, for real anomalous t{yields}c{gamma} coupling {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}, the constraints correspond to the upper bounds B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<6.54x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}>0) and B(t{yields}c+{gamma})<8.52x10{sup -5} (for {kappa}{sub tcR}{sup {gamma}}<0), respectively, which are about the same order as the 5{sigma} discovery potential of ATLAS (9.4x10{sup -5}) and slightly lower than that of CMS (4.1x10{sup -4}) with 10 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity operating at {radical}(s)=14 TeV.

  16. Top ten models constrained by b {yields} s{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The radiative decay b {yields} s{gamma} is examined in the Standard Model and in nine classes of models which contain physics beyond the Standard Model. The constraints which may be placed on these models from the recent results of the CLEO Collaboration on both inclusive and exclusive radiative B decays is summarized. Reasonable bounds are found the parameters in some of the models.

  17. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Oliviero

    2016-05-01

    After more than 3/4 of century from its proposal, Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (NLDBD) is still missing observation and continues to represent the only practical method for investigating the Dirac/Majorana nature of neutrinos. In case neutrinos would be Majorana particles, NLDBD would provide unique informations on their properties (absolute mass scale and Majorana phases). Boosted by the discovery of neutrino oscillations, a number of experiments with improved sensitivity have been proposed in the past decade. Some of them have recently started operation and others are ready to start. They will push the experimental sensitivity on the decay halflife beyond 1026 year, starting to analyze the region of the inverted mass hierarchy. The status and perspectives of the ongoing experimental effort are reviewed. Uncertainties coming from the calculation othe decay nuclear matrix elements (NME) as well as the recently suggested possibility of a relevant quenching of the axial coupling constant are also discussed.

  18. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  20. Z{yields}jets+{gamma} as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  1. Z yields jets+. gamma. as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  2. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  3. Isomeric decay spectroscopy of the Bi217 isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardo, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Benzoni, G.; Lunardi, S.; Gadea, A.; Algora, A.; Al-Dahan, N.; de Angelis, G.; Ayyad, Y.; Bazzacco, D.; Benlliure, J.; Boutachkov, P.; Bowry, M.; Bracco, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Bunce, M.; Camera, F.; Casarejos, E.; Cortes, M. L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Deo, A. Y.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Doncel, M.; Engert, T.; Eppinger, K.; Farrelly, G. F.; Farinon, F.; Farnea, E.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Grebosz, J.; Gregor, E.; Habermann, T.; Hoischen, R.; Janik, R.; John, P. R.; Klupp, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lenzi, S. M.; Leoni, S.; Mandal, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Modamio, V.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Naqvi, F.; Nicolini, R.; Nociforo, C.; Pfützner, M.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Prochazka, A.; Prokopowicz, W.; Recchia, F.; Regan, P. H.; Reed, M. W.; Rudolph, D.; Sahin, E.; Schaffner, H.; Sharma, A.; Sitar, B.; Siwal, D.; Steiger, K.; Strmen, P.; Swan, T. P. D.; Szarka, I.; Ur, C. A.; Walker, P. M.; Weick, H.; Wieland, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2014-09-01

    The structure of the neutron-rich bismuth isotope Bi217 has been studied for the first time. The fragmentation of a primary U238 beam at the FRS-RISING setup at GSI was exploited to perform γ-decay spectroscopy, since μs isomeric states were expected in this nucleus. Gamma rays following the decay of a t1/2=3 μs isomer were observed, allowing one to establish the low-lying structure of Bi217. The level energies and the reduced electric quadrupole transition probability B (E2) from the isomeric state are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations.

  4. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Guglielmo; /Naples U.

    2011-11-11

    The authors present the most recent results on the leptonic B decays B {yields} lv, B {yields} lv{gamma}, based on the data collected by the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Leptonic B decays are an excellent probe for new Physics, branching fraction measurements being complementary to the direct searches at high energy machines. Current experimental measurements are in agreement with Standard Model expectations, but, being already capable to constrain parameters of New Physics models today, they will be golden channels for the foreseen super flavor factories.

  5. {beta} decay of the 21/2{sup +} isomer in {sup 93}Mo and level structure of {sup 93}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, T.; Masue, T.; Odahara, A.; Kura, K.; Tajiri, K.; Shimoda, T.; Fukuchi, T.; Suzuki, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Gono, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    2009-09-15

    The {gamma} rays associated with {beta} decay of the 21/2{sup +} isomer in {sup 93}Mo (E{sub x}=2.425 MeV, T{sub 1/2}=6.85 h) were measured with a selective sensitivity to long-lived isomer decays. A new 1262-keV transition was found in the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence measurement, and it was attributed to a transition in {sup 93}Nb, which is the daughter nucleus of the {beta} decay of the {sup 93}Mo isomer, from the 2.753- to the 1.491-MeV levels. Accurate {gamma}-ray intensity balances have determined the {beta}-decay intensity from the {sup 93}Mo isomer to the 2.753-MeV level in {sup 93}Nb and placed no appreciable intensity for the previously reported {beta}-decay branching to the 2.180-MeV level, for which a recent in-beam {gamma}-ray experiment assigned to be I{sup {pi}} = 17/2{sup -}. Based on the {gamma}-ray intensities from the 2.753-MeV level, spin-parity assignment of this level was revised from 21/2{sup +} to 19/2{sup +}. The observed {beta}-decay intensity and the spin-parity assignment were explained by the jj-coupling shell model calculations.

  6. Measurement of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter array

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Becvar, F.; Kroll, J.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-07-15

    The {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction was measured with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter (consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The multiplicity distributions of the {gamma} decay were used to determine the resonance spins up to E{sub n}=300 eV. The {gamma}-ray energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured for the s-wave resonances. The shapes of these spectra were compared with simulations based on the use of the DICEBOX statistical model code. Simulations showed that the scissors mode is required not only for the ground-state transitions but also for transitions between excited states.

  7. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Zverev, V. G.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work.

  8. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  9. Search for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for decays is performed using 3 .0 fb1- of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The f 0(980) meson is reconstructed through its decay to the π + π - final state in the mass window 900 MeV /c 2 < m( π + π -) < 1080 MeV /c 2. No significant signal is observed. The first upper limits on the branching fraction of are set at 90 % (95 %) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Decay of relativistic hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Majlingova, Olga

    2008-05-12

    The contribution is focused on the analysis of the hypernuclei decay. Hypernuclei, nuclei composed of nucleons and hyperon, enable us to more precise study baryon-baryon interaction, both weak and strong. Several experiments for study new hypernuclear objects are presently taking data or are planned in several laboratories in Italy, Germany, Russia, Japan and USA. The aim of the contribution is the introduction the catalogue of all possible decays of light hypernuclei (A{<=}12). Created catalogue could be exploited for planning next experiments.

  11. Determination of (n,{gamma}) cross sections in the rare-earth region using the surrogate ratio method

    SciTech Connect

    Goldblum, B. L.; Prussin, S. G.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Younes, W.; Guttormsen, M.

    2008-12-15

    The surrogate ratio method was used to convert experimentally determined relative {gamma}-decay probabilities for excited {sup 171}Yb and {sup 161}Dy nuclei, populated using ({sup 3}He, {sup 3}He{sup '}) and ({sup 3}He, {alpha}) reactions, into neutron-induced {gamma}-decay cross sections in an equivalent neutron energy range of 165-465 keV. The relative {gamma}-decay probabilities were measured using the CACTUS array at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory and were found to agree with the ratio of neutron-induced {gamma}-decay cross sections for the same compound nuclei over the range of excitation energies measured. No significant entrance-channel effects on the extracted (n,{gamma}) cross sections were observed. The cross sections obtained using the surrogate ratio method were compared to directly measured neutron-capture cross sections and found to agree within the total estimated uncertainty over the range of equivalent neutron energies measured.

  12. Measuring the branching ratio of the rare decay pi0 --> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Niclasen, Rune

    2006-02-01

    A precise branching ratio measurement of the rare decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} has been made. The measurement was made with the rare kaon decay experiment KTeV at Fermilab where the source of {pi}{sup 0}s was K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decaying in flight. A total of 794 fully reconstructed K{sub L} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} events consistent with two of the intermediate {pi}{sup 0}s decaying into {gamma}{gamma} and one into e{sup +}e{sup -} were collected. An estimated 53.2 {+-} 11.0 of these events were expected to be background. Normalizing to the {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz decay they found Br({pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, (m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}/m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sup 2} > 0.95) = (6.44 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.22(syst)) x 10{sup -8} where internal radiation, {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}({gamma}), was limited by the requirement (m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}/m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sup 2} > 0.95 which separated it from the tree level Dalitz decay, {pi}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}P{gamma}.

  13. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  14. Beta Decay Study of the Tz = - 256Zn Nucleus and the Determination of the Half-Lives of a Few fp-shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, B.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Kucuk, L.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Adachi, T.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; de France, G.; Ganioğlu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grevy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Kozer, H. C.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Marqués, F. M.; Molina, F.; Oktem, Y.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Perrot, L.; Popescu, L.; Raabe, R.; Rogers, A. M.; Srivastava, P. C.; Susoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper concerns the experimental study of the β decay properties of few proton-rich fp-shell nuclei. The nuclei were produced at GANIL in fragmentation reactions, separated with the LISE spectrometer and stopped in an implantation detector surrounded by Ge detectors. The β-delayed gammas, β-delayed protons and the exotic β-delayed gamma-proton emission have been studied. Preliminary results are presented. The decay of the Tz = - 2 nucleus 56Zn has been studied in detail. Information from the β-delayed protons and β-delayed gammas has been used to deduce the decay scheme. The exotic beta-delayed gamma-proton decay has been observed for the first time in the fp-shell. The interpretation of the data was made possible thanks to the detailed knowledge of the mirror Charge Exchange (CE) process and the gamma de-excitation of the states in 56Co, the mirror nucleus of 56Cu.

  15. Formation and Decay of {sup 24}Mg in the {sup 13}N+{sup 11}B Collision

    SciTech Connect

    P. Figuera; F. Amorini; W. Bradfield-Smith; M. Cabibbo; G. Cardella; T. Davinson; A. DiPietro; W. Galster; P. Leleux; A. Musumarra; A. Ninane; M. Papa; G. Pappalardo; F. Rizzo; A.C. Shotter; C. Sukosd; S. Tudisco; P.J. Woods

    1999-12-31

    Different aspects of the formation and decay of {sup 24}Mg in the collision {sup 13}N+{sup 11}B have been studied using a large solid angle and highly segmented Silicon strip detector. Results concerning the fusion cross section, the 6 {alpha} decay of {sup 24}Mg and the GDR gamma ray emission are discussed.

  16. Formation and decay of {sup 24}Mg in the {sup 13}N+{sup 11}B collision

    SciTech Connect

    Figuera, P.; Amorini, F.; Cabibbo, M.; Papalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.; Bradfield-Smith, W.; Davinson, T.; Di Pietro, A.; Shotter, A. C.; Woods, P. J.; Cardella, G.; Papa, M.; Galster, W.; Leleux, P.; Musumarra, A.; Ninane, A.; Sukosd, C.

    1999-11-16

    Different aspects of the formation and decay of {sup 24}Mg in the collision {sup 13}N+{sup 11}B have been studied using a large solid angle and highly segmented Silicon strip detector. Results concerning the fusion cross section, the 6 {alpha} decay of {sup 24}Mg and the GDR gamma ray emission are discussed.

  17. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  18. Chiral quirkonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.

    2011-08-01

    We calculate the two-body decay rates of quirkonium states formed from quirks that acquire mass solely through electroweak symmetry breaking. We consider SU(N)ic infracolor with two flavors of quirks transforming under the electroweak group (but not QCD) of the standard model. In one case, the quirks are in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, while in the other case, a vectorlike representation. The differences in the dominant decay channels between “chiral quirkonia” versus “vectorlike quirkonia” are striking. Several chiral quirkonia states can decay into the unique two-body resonance channels WH, ZH, tt¯, tb¯/bt¯, and γH, which never dominate for vectorlike quirkonia. Additionally, the channels WW, WZ, ZZ, and Wγ, are shared among both chiral and vectorlike quirkonia. Resonances of dileptons or light quarks (dijets) can dominate for some vectorlike quirkonia states throughout their mass range, while these modes never dominate for chiral quirkonia unless the decays into pairs of gauge or Higgs bosons are kinematically forbidden.

  19. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  20. Gamma rays from pulsar wind shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    A shock forming in the wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs from a pulsar, as a result of confinement by surrounding material, could convert part of the pulsar spin-down luminosity to high energy particles through first order Fermi acceleration. High energy protons could be produced by this mechanism both in supernova remnants and in binary systems containing pulsars. The pion-decay gamma-rays resulting from interaction of accelerated protons with surrounding target material in such sources might be observable above 70 MeV with EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) and above 100 GeV with ground-based detectors. Acceleration of protons and expected gamma-ray fluxes from SN1987A, Cyg X-3 type sources and binary pulsars are discussed.

  1. Gamma rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of cosmic and gamma radiation by SAS-2 satellite are summarized and analyzed to determine processes responsible for producing observed galactic radiation. In addition to the production of gamma rays in discrete galactic objects such as pulsars, there are three main mechanisms by which high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) radiation is produced by high-energy interactions involving cosmic rays in interstellar space. These processes, which produce what may be called diffuse galactic gamma-rays, are: (1) the decay of pi mesons produced by interactions of cosmic ray nucleons with interstellar gas nuclei; (2) the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by cosmic ray electrons interacting in the Coulomb fields of nuclei of interstellar gas atoms; and (3) Compton interactions between cosmic ray electrons and low-energy photons in interstellar space.

  2. Nuclear isomer suitable for gamma ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jha, S.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of gamma ray lasers (gasers) are studied. It is assumed that the nuclear isomers mentioned in previously published papers have inherent limitations. It is further assumed that the judicious use of Bormann effect or the application of the total external reflection of low energy gamma radiation at grazing angle of incidence may permit the use of a gaser crystal sufficiently long to achieve observable stimulated emission. It is suggested that a long lived 0(+) isomer decaying by low energy gamma ray emission to a short lived 2(+) excited nuclear state would be an attractive gaser candidate. It is also suggested that the nuclear isomer be incorporated in a matrix of refractory material having an electrostatic field gradient whose principal axis lies along the length of the medium. This results in the preferential transmission of electric quadrupole radiation along the length of the medium.

  3. Anatomy of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lennaert; De Bruyn, Kristof; Fleischer, Robert; Mulder, Mick; Tuning, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The decays B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} probe the CP-violating mixing phases ϕ d and ϕ s , respectively. The theoretical uncertainty of the corresponding determinations is limited by contributions from penguin topologies, which can be included with the help of the U-spin symmetry of the strong interaction. We analyse the currently available data for B {/d, s 0} → D {/d, s -} D {/d, s +} decays and those with similar dynamics to constrain the involved non-perturbative parameters. Using further information from semileptonic B {/d 0} → D {/d -} ℓ + ν ℓ decays, we perform a test of the factorisation approximation and take non-factorisable SU(3)-breaking corrections into account. The branching ratios of the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +}, B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +}, B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/s +} decays show an interesting pattern which can be accommodated through significantly enhanced exchange and penguin annihilation topologies. This feature is also supported by data for the B {/s 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} channel. Moreover, there are indications of potentially enhanced penguin contributions in the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} decays, which would make it mandatory to control these effects in the future measurements of ϕ d and ϕ s . We discuss scenarios for high-precision measurements in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade.

  4. Gamma ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  5. Monticello BWR spent fuel assembly decay heat predictions and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    This report compares pre-calorimetry predictions of rates of six 7 x 7 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies with measured decay heat rates. The assemblies were from Northern States Power Company's Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant and had burnups of 9 to 21 GWd/MTU and cooling times of 9 to 10 years. Conclusions are: The agreement between ORIGEN2 predictions and decay heat measurements of Monticello spent fuel is dependent on the method used to calibrate the calorimeter and to make the decay heat measurements. The agreement between predictions and measurements of decay heat rates of Monticello fuel is the same as that for Cooper and Dresden fuel if the same measurement method is used. The predictions are within a standard deviation of +-15 W of the measurements. Using a different measurement method, ORIGEN2 underpredicts the measured decay heat output of Monticello fuel assemblies by a constant 20 +- 2 W. The 20-W offset appears to be an artifact of the calibration procedure. The constant term in the calibration curve (i.e., q/sub DH/ = mx + b) can account for measurement differences of 40 W based on the 1983, 1984, and 1985 calibration curves. The difference between ORIGEN2 predictions and calorimeter decay heat measurements does not appear to be dependent on the magnitude of decay heat output. Predicted axial decay heat profiles are in good agreement with measured axial gamma radiation profiles. Recommendations are: Predictions using other decay heat codes should be compared to experimental data contained in this report, to evaluate prediction capabilities. The source of the differences that exist among calorimeter calibration curves needs to be determined. Calorimeter operational methods need to be investigated further to determine cause and effect relationships between operational method and calorimeter precision and accuracy.

  6. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  7. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  8. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  9. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  10. Searches for Charmless Decays B0 --> eta omega, B0 --> eta K0, B+ --> eta rho+, and B+ --> eta' pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-13

    The authors report results for measurements of the decay branching fractions of B{sup 0} to the charmless final states {eta}{omega} and {eta}K{sup 0}, and of B{sup +} to {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}'{pi}{sup +}. None of these decays have been observed definitively. Measurements of the related decays B{sup +} --> {eta}K{sup +}, B{sup +} --> {eta}{pi}{sup +}, and B --> {eta}'K were published recently. Charmless decays with kaons are usually expected to be dominated by b --> s loop (''penguin'') transitions, while b --> u tree transitions are typically larger for the decays with pions and {rho} mesons. However the B --> {eta}K decays are especially interesting since they are suppressed relative to the abundant B --> {eta}'K decays due to destructive interference between two penguin amplitudes. The CKM-suppressed b --> u amplitudes may interfere significantly with penguin amplitudes, possibly leading to large direct CP violation in B{sup +} --> {eta}{rho}{sup +} and B{sup +} --> {eta}'{pi}{sup +}; numerical estimates are available in a few cases. The authors search for such direct CP violation by measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub ch} {equivalent_to} ({Gamma}{sup -} - {Gamma}{sup +})/({Gamma}{sup -} + {Gamma}{sup +}) in the rates {Gamma}{sup {+-}} = {Gamma}(B{sup {+-}} --> f{sup {+-}}), for each observed charged final state f{sup {+-}}. Charmless B decays are becoming useful to test the accuracy of theoretical predictions. Phenomenological fits to the branching fractions and charge asymmetries can be used to understand the importance of tree and penguin contributions and may provide sensitivity to the CKM angle {gamma}.

  11. New Measurement of the {pi}{sup 0} Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I.; McNulty, D.; Prok, Y.; Bernstein, A. M.; Kowalski, S.; Clinton, E.; Martel, P.; Miskimen, R.; Wood, M.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Benton, L.; Danagoulian, S.; Demirchyan, R.; Gasparian, A.; Hardy, K.; Mtingwa, S.; Overby, S.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.

    2011-04-22

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9-5.5 GeV to extract the {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is {Gamma}({pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=7.82{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.17(syst) eV. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current Particle Data Group average of this fundamental quantity, and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  12. A search for radiative neutrino decay from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard S.; Svoboda, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This document presents the data analysis procedures proposed for use with the COMPTEL instrument aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in the search for radiative neutrino decay from supernovae. The proposed analysis methodology is an extension of a standard procedure used by the COMPTEL team in searching for a variety of source types. We have applied the procedures to a set of simulated data to demonstrate the feasibility of the method to this project.

  13. Experimental search for radiative decays of the pentaquark baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540)

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the reactions K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0{gamma}}X and K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup +{gamma}}X, obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, have been analyzed for possible radiative decays of the {Theta}{sup +}(1540) baryon: {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma} and {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}. No signals have been observed, and we derive the upper limits {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p) < 0.032 and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 0.041 which, using our previous measurement of {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}KN) = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV, translate to {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma}) < 8 keV and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 11 keV at 90% confidence level. We have also measured the cross sections of K{sup +}-induced reactions involving emission of a neutral pion: {sigma}(K{sup +}n {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{pi}{sup 0}) = 68 {+-} 18 {mu}b and {sigma}(K{sup +}N {sup {yields}}K{sup +}N{pi}{sup 0}) = 30 {+-} 8 {mu}b for incident K{sup +} momentum of 640 MeV.

  14. Recoil Decay Tagging Study Of Transitional Proton Emitters 145,146,147Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.P.; Woods, P.J.; Davinson, T.; Liu, Z.; Davids, C.N.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Hammond, N.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Mukherjee, G.; Sinha, S.; Blank, B.; Freeman, S.J.; Hoteling, N.; Shergur, J.; Walters, W.B.; Scholey, C.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Woehr, A.

    2005-04-05

    Gamma rays from the transitional proton emitting nuclei 145,146,147Tm have been observed using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The ground state band of 147Tm was confirmed and extended and the unfavoured signature sequence was observed. A ground state rotational band with properties of a decoupled h11/2 band was observed in 145Tm. In addition coincidences between the proton fine structure line and the 2+{yields}0+ {gamma}-ray transition in 144Er were detected at the focal plane of the FMA. This is the first time that coincidences between proton radioactive decays and {gamma} rays have been seen. The particle decay of 146Tm has been measured with improved statistics and a rotational band similar to 147Tm has been observed.

  15. Beta-decay measurements of neutron-deficient cesium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, R.F.

    1983-03-01

    Beta decay endpoint energy measurements of the neutron deficient cesium isotopes were done using an energy spectrum shape fitting technique. This was a departure from the typical method of endpoint energy analysis, the Fermi-Kurie plot. A discussion of the shape fitting procedure and its improved features are discussed. These beta endpoint measurements have led to total decay energies (Q/sub EC/) of the neutron deficient /sup 119/ /sup 123/Cs isotopes. The total decay energies of /sup 122m/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.95 +- 0.25 MeV) and /sup 119/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.26 +- 0.29 MeV) were new measurements. The total decay energies of /sup 123/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 4.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 122g/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 121/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 5.21 +- 0.22 MeV), and /sup 120/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.38 +- 0.23 MeV) were measurements with significantly improved uncertainties as compared to the literature. Further, a combination of the energy levels derived from previous literature gamma-gamma coincident measurements and the experimental beta-coincident gamma decay energies has supported an improved level scheme for /sup 121/Xe and the proposal of three new energy levels in /sup 119/Xe. Comparison of the experimental cesium mass excesses (determined with our Q/sub EC/ values and known xenon mass excesses) with both the literature and theoretical predicted values showed general agreement except for /sup 120/Cs. Possible explanations for this deviation are discussed.

  16. Hadronic decays of the D/sub s/ meson

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserbaech, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    The D/sub s//sup +/ is the lowest-lying pseudoscalar meson containing charm and anti-strange quarks. Evidence for this state was first reported in 1977, although more recent observations disagree with some of the early results. Since 1983 the weakly decaying D/sub s//sup +/ has been observed in many experiments. Relative branching fractions have been measured for many non-leptonic decay modes, including D/sub s//sup +/ /yields/ /phi//pi//sup +/, /phi//pi//sup +//pi//sup +//pi//sup /minus//, /bar K/*/sup 0/K/sup +/, and f/sub 0/(975)/pi//sup +/. The absolute branching fractions are estimated in high energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilation from the observed numbers of reconstructed D/sub s//sup +/ decays and the expected D/sub s//sup +/ production cross section. The lowest-lying vector c/bar s/ meson, the D/sub s/*/sup +/, has also been seen in its decay to /gamma/D/sub s//sup +/. Weak decays of the heavy quark and lepton flavors are relevant to the development of the Standard Model of both the electroweak and the strong interactions. Measurements of charmed particle weak decay are useful for determining the parameter of the Standard Model and for testing phenomenological models which include strong effects. 83 refs., 56 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Strong decay patterns of the 1{sup -+} exotic hybrid mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Pengzhi; Chen Huaxing; Zhu Shilin

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the coupling constants of the decay modes 1{sup -+}{yields}{rho}{pi}, f{sub 1}{pi}, b{sub 1}{pi}, {eta}{pi}, {eta}{sup '}{pi}, a{sub 1}{pi}, f{sub 1}{eta} within the framework of the light-cone QCD sum rule. Then we calculate the partial width of these decay channels, which differ greatly from the existing calculations using phenomenological models. For the isovector 1{sup -+} state, the dominant decay modes are {rho}{pi}, f{sub 1}{pi}. For its isoscalar partner, its dominant decay mode is a{sub 1}{pi}. We also discuss the possible search of the 1{sup -+} state at BESIII, for example through the decay chains J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{gamma} or J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{rho}, where {pi}{sub 1} can be reconstructed through the decay modes {pi}{sub 1}{yields}{rho}{pi}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} or {pi}{sub 1}{yields}f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup 0}. Hopefully the present work will be helpful to the experimental establishment of the 1{sup -+} hybrid meson.

  18. Decay from the superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Superdeformed bands in {sup 194}H g were studied using the early implementation of Gammasphere. The response functions for the Ge detectors were measured for the first time as part of this experiment. Experiments were performed with both a backed target (where the residue stopped in the Au backing) and a thin target (where the residue recoiled into vacuum). This will permit measurements of the decay times of the quasicontinuum {gamma}rays. The spectrum in coincidence with the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg reveals the same features as found in the quasicontinuum structure in {sup 192}Hg. These features include: statistical {gamma}rays feeding the SD band, a pronounced E2 peak from transitions feeding the SD band, a Ml/E2 bump at low energies that is associated with the last stages of feeding of the superdeformed band, and a quasicontinuous distribution from {gamma}rays linking SD and normal states, including a sizable clustering of strength around 1.7 MeV. The remarkable similarity of the spectra coincident with SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg provides additional support for a statistical process for decay out of the SD states. This similarity contrasts with differences observed in the spectrum coincident with the SD band in the odd-even {sup 191}Hg, confirming the predictions about the role of pairing (in normal states) in influencing the shape of the decay-out spectrum.

  19. Study of the decay Bs(0)-->Ds(*)Ds(*).

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Walder, J; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-12-14

    We report a study of the decay Bs(0)-->Ds(*)Ds(*) using a data sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. One Ds(*) meson was partially reconstructed in the decay Ds-->phi mu nu, and the other Ds(*) meson was identified using the decay Ds-->phi pi where no attempt was made to distinguish Ds and Ds(*) states. For the branching fraction Br(Bs(0)-->Ds(*)Ds(*)) we obtain a 90% C.L. range [0.002,0.080] and central value 0.039(-0.017)(+0.019)(stat)(-0.015)(+0.016)(syst). This was subsequently used to make the most precise estimate of the width difference DeltaGamma(s)CP in the Bs(0)-Bs(0) system: DeltaGamma(s)CP/Gamma(s)=0.079(-0.035)(+0.038)(stat)(-0.030)(+0.031)(syst). PMID:18233437

  20. The gamma-ray telescope Gamma-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimov, V. V.; Nesterov, V. E.; Rodin, V. G.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Balibanov, V. M.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Leikov, N. G.; Bielaoussov, A. S.; Dobrian, L. B.; Poluektov, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    French and Soviet specialists have designed and built the gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-1 to detect cosmic gamma rays above 50 MeV. The sensitive area of the detector is 1400 sq cm, energy resolution is 30% at 300 MeV, and angular resolution 1.2 deg at 300 MeV (and less than 20' arc when a coded aperture mask is used). Results on calibration of the qualification model and Monte-Carlo calculations are presented.

  1. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  2. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  3. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Assuming cosmic rays pervade the Galaxy, they necessarily produced high energy gamma-rays as they interact with the instellar matter and photons. The cosmic ray nucleon interactions five rise to gamma rays primarily through the decay of pi mesons, giving a unique spectrum with a maximum at approximately 68 MeV. Cosmic ray electrons produce gamma rays through bremsstrahlung, but with a markedly different energy spectral shape, one which decreases monotonically with energy. Cosmic ray electrons also interact with the interstellar starlight, optical and infrared photons, and the blackbody radiation through the Compton process. A model of galactic gamma ray production is discussed, and the predicted spatial distribution and energy spectra are presented. Considering the uncertainty in the point source contributions, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems quite reasonable.

  4. Study of rare radiative Phi decays at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Emil Frlez

    1999-07-01

    The RadPhi Collaboration has proposed using the intense tagged photon beam in Hall B at TJNAF to produce {phi} mesons and measure the branching ratios of {phi}'s decaying into the a0(980)g and f0(980){gamma} all-neutral final states. The comparison of branching ratios for these two decay modes should provide crucial information on the quark substructure of a0(980) and f0(980) scalar mesons. Three engineering runs conducted so far measured the photon beam profile, instantaneous rates, pileups and dead times in the detector components, as well as energy and timing resolutions of RadPhi detectors. The measurements demonstrated that the proposed experiment is capable of detecting rare radiative {phi} decays with branching ratios greater than 10{sup -5}.

  5. Detecting the Radiative Decay Mode of the Neutron

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, B. M.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gentile, T. R.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Coakley, K. J.; Beise, E. J.; Kiriluk, K. G.; Byrne, J.

    2005-01-01

    Beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and electron antineutrino is occasionally accompanied by the emission of a photon. Despite decades of detailed experimental studies of neutron beta-decay, this rare branch of a fundamental weak decay has never been observed. An experiment to study the radiative beta-decay of the neutron is currently being developed for the NG-6 fundamental physics endstation at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). The experiment will make use of the existing apparatus for the NIST proton-trap lifetime experiment, which can provide substantial background reduction by providing an electron-proton coincidence trigger. Tests and design of a detector for gamma-rays in the 10 keV to 200 keV range are under development. The need for a large solid-angle gamma-ray detector that can operate in a strong magnetic field and at low temperature has led us to consider scintillating crystals in conjunction with avalanche photodiodes. The motivation and experimental technique will be discussed. PMID:27308161

  6. Azimuthal correlations and alignment of particles in gamma families

    SciTech Connect

    Yuldashbaev, T. S. Chudakov, V. M.; Nuritdinov, Kh.

    2008-11-15

    Azimuthal angular correlations and the alignment of photons are studied in gamma families recorded by the Pamir Collaboration in a carbon x-ray emulsion chamber. The present interpretation of these experimental data is based on a model of semihard parton scattering in nucleon-nucleus collisions and on arguments favoring the production of exotic beam strings and heavy leading resonances undergoing quasicoplanar decays.

  7. Gamma-Ray Line Flux Ratios as Diagnostics of SN Ia Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Juan; The, Lih-Sin; Leising, Mark

    2004-05-01

    The ^56Ni decay chain that powers the optical output of Type Ia supernovae produces gamma-ray lines at 158, 812 ( ^56Ni decay ) and 847, 1238 keV ( ^56Co decay ). The detection of the line fluxes have been used to show indeed that ^56Ni is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis. We investigate the measurement precision required to use the flux ratios of these lines to each other and to the compton X-ray continuum to distinguish among a variety of SN Ia models. We compare this to using gamma-ray line profiles to distinguish among models.

  8. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Processes in Exclusive B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskyi, Dmytro; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2011-06-14

    A review of recent BABAR results on exclusive B {yields} ({rho}/{Omega}){gamma}, B {yields} {pi}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B {yields} K(*) l{sup +}l{sup -} decays is presented. It was found that {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}] = (1.01 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -6}, {bar {Beta}}[B{sup +} {yields} {pi}l{sup +}l{sup -}] < 7.9 x 10{sup -8} at 90% C.L., {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} Kl{sup +}l{sup -}] = (0.84 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -6} and {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} K*l{sup +}l{sup -}] = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -6}. it was also found that different asymmetry measurements are consistent with Standard Model expectations. Based on these results an independent estimate of the |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| matrix element of the CKM matrix is derived to be |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.171{sub -0.021-0.014}{sup +0.018+0.017}. A first evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} decays was found and last year's observation of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma} was confirmed.

  9. Leptonic radiative decay in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-Y.; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis together with exact numerical calculations on one-loop contributions to the branching ratio of the radiative decay of {mu} and {tau}, namely {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}e{gamma}, and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} from supersymmetry without R parity, focusing on contributions involving bilinear couplings. A numerical study is performed to obtain explicit bounds on the parameters under the present experimental limit. We present, and use in the calculation, formulas for exact mass eigenstate effective couplings. In this sense, we present an exact analysis free from approximation for the first time. After comparing our results against the closest early analysis, we discovered a major difference in resulted constraints on some {mu}{sub i}*B{sub j} combinations. Constraints from neutrino masses on the parameters were considered. Our result indicates that the branching ratio measurement on {mu}{yields}e{gamma} down to 10{sup -13}-10{sup -14} and beyond, as targeted by the MEG experiment, has a chance of observing decay from the R-parity violating scenario.

  10. Experimental Limits on Weak Annihilation Contributions to b{yields}ul{nu} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; Adam, N.E.; Alexander, J.P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.

    2006-03-31

    We present the first experimental limits on high-q{sup 2} contributions to charmless semileptonic B decays of the form expected from the weak annihilation (WA) decay mechanism. Such contributions could bias determinations of vertical bar V{sub ub} vertical bar from inclusive measurements of B{yields}X{sub u}l{nu}. Using a wide range of models based on available theoretical input we set a limit of {gamma}{sub WA}/{gamma}{sub b{yields}}{sub u}<7.4% (90% confidence level) on the WA fraction, and assess the impact on previous inclusive determinations of vertical bar V{sub ub} vertical bar.

  11. Charmless b decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  12. Decay data of radionuclides along the valley of nuclear stability for astrophysical applications.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Huang, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    Several directions of the demand for decay data in nuclear astrophysics are discussed for radionuclides near the valley of nuclear stability. The current half-life and gamma-ray intensity evaluation results are presented for some radionuclides of astrophysical interest. An extended list of such nuclides is offered for their nuclear characteristics to be further evaluated by the Decay Data Evaluation Project collaboration participants. PMID:26275948

  13. Search for factorization-suppressed B-->chi(c)K(*) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-05-01

    We search for the factorization-suppressed decays B-->chi(c0)K(*) and B-->chi(c2)K(*), with chi(c0) and chi(c2) decaying into J/psi gamma, using a sample of 124 x 10(6) BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find no significant signal and set upper bounds for the branching fractions. PMID:15904279

  14. Decay rates of charmonia within a quark-antiquark confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smruti, Patel; Vinodkumar, P. C.; Shashank, Bhatnagar

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the spectroscopy and decay rates of charmonia within the framework of the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation by employing an approximate inter quark-antiquark potential. The spin hyperfine, spin-orbit and tensor components of the one gluon exchange interaction are employed to compute the spectroscopy of the excited S states and a few low-lying P and D waves. The resultant wave functions at zero inter-quark separation as well as some finite separations are employed to predict the di-gamma, di-leptonic and di-gluon decay rates of charmonia states using the conventional Van Royen-Weisskopf formula. The di-gamma and di-leptonic decay widths are also computed by incorporating the relativistic corrections of order v 4 within the NRQCD formalism. We have observed that the NRQCD predictions with their matrix elements computed at finite radial separation yield results which are found to be in better agreement with experimental values for both di-gamma and di-leptonic decays. The same scenario is seen in the case when di-gamma and di-leptonic decay widths are computed with the Van Royen-Weisskopf formula. It is also observed that the di-gluon decay width with the inclusion of binding energy effects are in better agreement with the experimental data available for 1S-2S and 1P. The di-gluon decay width of 3S and 2P waves waves are also predicted. Thus, the present study of decay rates clearly indicates the importance of binding energy effects. Supported by Major Research Project NO. F. 40-457/2011(SR), UGC, India

  15. Study of Rare Radiative B Decay to K*(1430) Meson Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qinghua; /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-09-14

    Radiative B Meson decay through the b {yields} s{gamma} process has been one of the most sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model, because of its importance in understanding the phenomenon of CP violation, which is believed to be necessary to explain the excess of matter over anti-matter in our universe. The inclusive picture of the b {yields} s{gamma} process is well established; however, our knowledge of the exclusive final states in radiative B meson decays is rather limited. We have investigated one of them, the exclusive, radiative B decay to the charmless K*{sub 2}(1430) meson, in a sample of 88.5 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. We present a measurement of the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup 0}{gamma}) = (1.22 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup +}){gamma} = (1.45 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.15) x 10{sup -5}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, we have performed the first search for direct CP violation in this decay with the measured asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup 0}{gamma} of {Alpha}{sub CP} = -0.08 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.01.

  16. Search for Hadronic Decays of a Light Higgs Boson in the Radiative Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.

    2012-02-16

    The authors search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) produced in radiative decays of an {Upsilon}(2S) or {Upsilon}(3S) meson, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}. The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) center of mass energies, and include (121.3 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and (98.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions {beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) {center_dot} {beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) (n = 2 or 3) that range from 1 x 10{sup -6} for an A{sup 0} mass of 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} to 8 x 10{sup -5} at 7 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Measurement of the Branching Ratios Gamma(D*+s -> D+s pi0)/Gamma(D*+s ->D+s gamma) and Gamma(D*0 ->D0 pi0)/Gamma(D*0 -> D0gamma)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-23

    Data samples corresponding to the isospin-violating decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and the decays D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}, D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{gamma} are reconstructed using 90.4 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The following branching ratios are extracted: {Lambda}(D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma}) = 0.062 {+-} 0.005(stat.) {+-} 0.006(syst.) and {Lambda}(D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{gamma}) = 1.74 {+-} 0.02(stat.) {+-} 0.13(syst.). Both measurements represent significant improvements over present world averages.

  18. Recent progress and speculations in gamma-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Gilbert R.; Rezaie-Serej, Shokrollah; McDermott, Walter C., III; Johnson, David E.

    Because of our interest in the development of gamma-ray lasers, we have been led into three areas of research. These are: the search for the Moessbauer effect using the first-excited 88-keV nuclear level in Ag-109, and the search for `anomalous emission' and `anomalous temporal decay' of nuclear-resonant radiation using internal sources located inside single crystals. We have confirmed the observation of the Moessbauer effect in Ag-109. This is a surprising result since the lifetime of the level is approximately = 40 sec and hence has a natural linewidth (Gamma) of 10(exp -17) eV. Our results can be interpreted in terms of an effective linewidth (Gamma(sub e)). We find that Gamma(sub e) is approximately = 100 Gamma. Complete understanding of the Moessbauer effect in this case is not yet available. However, one knows from earlier `time filtering' studies that the line shape can be markedly changed when radiation passes through resonant material. Thus, we have returned to the study of time filtering as part of our general study of anomalous temporal decay. Anomalous emission is associated with the Borrmann effect which follows from the dynamical theory of optics. Our preliminary results using Co-57-doped iron single crystals tend to support both the anomalous emission and the anomalous temporal decay behaviors.

  19. On the gamma-ray emission from Markarian 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Ding, W. K. Y.

    1994-08-01

    Gamma radiation in various energy ranges from 50 MeV to 10 GeV and even up to TeV has been detected from Markarian 421. We suggest that relativistic neutrons with energy approximately 1017 eV are expected to be produced in the acceleration region via the process of photopion production. We predict that ultra-high energy (approximately PeV) gamma rays will be emitted from Mkn 421 resulting from the decay of neutral pions which are produced by collisions between the ultra-high energy neutrons and blobs of material ejected from the accretion disk of the supermassive blackhole. At the same time, the decay of charged pions can eventually decay to produce electrons and positrons, which radiate synchrotron radiation in various energy ranges from TeV to 50 MeV. Comparison with the observed data and model results and the implications to other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are discussed in the text.

  20. gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    gamma - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( gamma - HCH ) ; CASRN 58 - 89 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asse

  1. Photocounting distributions for exponentially decaying sources.

    PubMed

    Teich, M C; Card, H C

    1979-05-01

    Exact photocounting distributions are obtained for a pulse of light whose intensity is exponentially decaying in time, when the underlying photon statistics are Poisson. It is assumed that the starting time for the sampling interval (which is of arbitrary duration) is uniformly distributed. The probability of registering n counts in the fixed time T is given in terms of the incomplete gamma function for n >/= 1 and in terms of the exponential integral for n = 0. Simple closed-form expressions are obtained for the count mean and variance. The results are expected to be of interest in certain studies involving spontaneous emission, radiation damage in solids, and nuclear counting. They will also be useful in neurobiology and psychophysics, since habituation and sensitization processes may sometimes be characterized by the same stochastic model. PMID:19687829

  2. Two-proton decay from Isobaric Analog States of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kyle

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University using the charged-particle array HiRA and the gamma-ray array CAESAR have shed light on a new class of two-proton emitters associated with Isobaric Analog States (IAS). The two-proton decay is to the Isobaric Analog state of the daughter, which then gamma decays. These isospin-allowed transitions occur when one-proton decays are forbidden by either energy or isospin conservation, and when two-proton decay to the ground state is isospin forbidden. Three possible examples of this decay path will be discussed (8BIAS, 12NIAS, and 16FIAS) . The known IAS of 8C in 8B was confirmed to decay by two-proton emission to the 3.56 MeV IAS in 6Li. While the IAS in 8B was previously known, it was measured in this experiment with unbiased statistics and in coincidence with the 3.56 MeV gamma-ray. The IAS in 16F was investigated for the first time in this experiment and is still under investigation. Previous work on the IAS of 12O in 12N at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M will also be presented.

  3. Electromagnetic decays of radially excited mesons {pi}{sup 0 Prime }, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }, {omega}{sup 0 Prime }, and production of {pi}{sup 0 Prime} at lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuzov, A. B. Kuraev, E. A.; Volkov, M. K.

    2011-05-15

    Radiative decays {pi}{sup 0}({pi}{sup 0 Prime }) {yields} {gamma} + {gamma}, {pi}{sup 0 Prime} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}({omega}) + {gamma}, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }({omega} Prime ) {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + {gamma}, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }({omega} Prime ) {yields} {pi}{sup 0 Prime} + {gamma}, and some processes of {pi}{sup 0 Prime} production at lepton colliders are considered in the framework of the nonlocal SU(2) Multiplication-Sign SU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Mixing of the radially excited and the ground meson states is taken into account. Numerical results for the decay and production processes are presented.

  4. Electroweak physics: measurement of w gamma and z gamma production in pp-bar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-02-02

    The Standard Model predictions for W{gamma} and Z{gamma} production are tested using an integrated luminosity of 200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured by selecting leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons, and photons with transverse energy E{sub T} > 7 GeV that are well separated from leptons. The production cross sections and kinematic distributions for the W{gamma} and Z{gamma} data are compared to SM predictions.

  5. Dual Gamma Neutron Directional Elpasolite Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2013-09-01

    Some applications, particularly in homeland security, require detection of both neutron and gamma radiation. Typically, this is accomplished with a combination of two detectors registering neutrons and gammas separately. We have investigated a new type of neutron/gamma (n/γ) directional detection capability. We explored a new class of scintillator, cerium (Ce)-doped Elpasolites such as Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC), Cs2LiLaCl6 (CLLC), Cs2LiLaBr6:Ce (CLLB), or Cs2LiYBr6:Ce (CLYB). These materials are capable of providing energy resolution as good as 2.9% at 662 keV (FWHM), which is better than that of NaI:Tl. Because they contain 6Li, Elpasolites can also detect thermal neutrons. In the energy spectra, the full energy thermal neutron peak appears near or above 3 GEEn MeV. Thus, very effective pulse height discrimination is possible. In addition, the core-to-valence luminescence (CVL) provides Elpasolites with different temporal responses under gamma and neutron excitation, and, therefore, may be exploited for effective pulse shape discrimination. For instance, the CLLC emission consists of two main components: (1) CVL spanning from 220 nm to 320 nm and (2) Ce emission found in the range of 350 to 500 nm. The former emission is of particular interest because it appears only under gamma excitation. It is also very fast, decaying with a 2 ns time constant. The n/γ discrimination capability of Elpasolite detectors may be optimized by tuning the cerium doping content for maximum effect on n/γ pulse shape differences. The resulting Elpasolite detectors have the ability to collect neutron and gamma data simultaneously, with excellent discrimination. Further, an array of four of these Elpasolites detectors will perform directional detection in both the neutron and gamma channels simultaneously.

  6. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  7. Observation of Doppler broadening in β -delayed proton- γ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S. B.; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Bowe, A.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Cooper, N.; Irvine, D.; McNeice, E.; Montes, F.; Naqvi, F.; Ortez, R.; Pain, S. D.; Pereira, J.; Prokop, C.; Quaglia, J.; Quinn, S. J.; Sakstrup, J.; Santia, M.; Shanab, S.; Simon, A.; Spyrou, A.; Thiagalingam, E.

    2015-09-14

    Background: The Doppler broadening of gamma-ray peaks is due to nuclear recoil from beta-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using beta-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than A = 10. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using gamma-ray peaks from the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of P-26 was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a P-26 beta-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect gamma rays from the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in beta-delayed proton-gamma decay was observed for the first time. Moreover, the Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613-keV gamma-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776-keV gamma ray de-exciting the 2720 keV Al-25 level was observed in P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay for the first time and used to determine that the center-of-mass energy of the proton emission feeding the 2720-keV level is 5.1 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV, corresponding to a Si-26 excitation energy of 13.3 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV for the proton-emitting level. Conclusions: Finally, the Doppler broadening method has been demonstrated to provide practical measurements of the energies for beta-delayed nucleon emissions populating excited states of nuclear recoils at least as heavy as A = 25.

  8. ESR identification of gamma-irradiated albendazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Seyda

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is a well-established technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma-irradiated solid albendazole samples is investigated at different temperatures in the dose range of 3-34 kGy by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiation with gamma radiation produced two different radical species in albendazole. They were fairly stable at room temperature but relatively unstable above room temperature, giving rise to an unresolved ESR spectrum consisting of three resonance peaks centered at g=2.0057. Decay activation energies of the contributing radical species were calculated to be 47.8 (±13.5) and 50.5 (±9.7) kJ/mol using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to best describe the experimental dose-response data. Albendazole does not present the characteristics of good dosimetric materials. However, the discrimination of irradiated albendazole from its unirradiated form was possible even 6 months after storage in normal conditions. Based on these findings, it is concluded that albendazole and albendazole-containing drugs can be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  9. Near ground gamma radiation associated with lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, K.; Greenfield, M. B.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    Increases in the atmospheric gamma radiation of 22 to 82above normal background have been observed after the onset of lightning fifteen times since March 2001[1]. Gamma rays have been observed with up to four 12.9 cm3 NaI detectors and recently with a high resolution Ge detector positioned 6-21 m and 15 m above ground, respectively. The tail of the observed background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR were fitted with exponential decay curves yielding typical correlation coefficients of 0.95 to 0.99 and half-lives of 52.7 +/-4.81 min and 52.8+/-10.95 min, without and with precipitation, respectively. The GRR above 300 KeV from radon progeny due to precipitation were subtracted [2]. The 3x3 Ge detector with 2 KeV resolution positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors observed increases in GRR minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay which was concurrently observed in the NaI detector. [1] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-1844. [2] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 9 (2003) pp 5733-5741.

  10. A search for narrow states in radiative upsilon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    A search for new states produced in radiative UPSILON(1S) decays is accomplished by observing the inclusive photon energy spectrum. A narrow resonance in the energy spectrum indicates the existence of a new state X produced by the process UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X. The analysis is based on approximately 0.44 x 10/sup 6/ UPSILON(1S) events produced at the DORIS II e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. These data were collected with the Crystal Ball detector between April 1983 and May 1986. This analysis finds no evidence for a new state, so upper limits on the branching ratio BR(UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X) are derived, assuming the state X decays primarily to high-multiplicity hadronic final states. In particular, if the state X were a minimal Higgs particle, its primary decay mode would be to the heaviest fermion-antifermion pair energetically available. For the radiative UPSILON(1S) decays studied here, the heavy fermions would be c anti c or s anti s quark states, over most of the relevant Higgs' mass range. The resulting upper limit for BR(UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma..X) is highly energy dependent but for X mass between 1.5 GeV and 8.0 GeV, the 90% confidence level upper limit is better than 8.0 x 10/sup -4/. For a Higgs' mass near 5.0 GeV, the upper limit is about 2.0 x 10/sup -4/ which is approximately equal to the lowest order calculation for the Wilczek mechanism. The Wilczek calculation with QCD radiative corrections predict branching ratios below the limits set here for all Higgs' masses.

  11. Conversion-electron experiment to characterize the decay of the /sup 237/Np shape isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Bauer, R.W.; Gardner, D.G.; Decman, D.J.; Meyer, R.A.; Roy, N.; Sale, K.E.

    1987-12-08

    Conversion electrons from the decay of low-lying levels of /sup 237/Np have been measured to detect the population of these levels by gamma-ray decay of the /sup 237/Np shape isomer. Analysis of the 208-keV transition L conversion-electron peak gives an upper limit of about 17 ..mu..b for the population of the 3/2/sup -/ 267-keV level in /sup 237/Np from the shape isomer decay. Model calculations are compared with the measured limit. Improvements are suggested for this experiment. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Determination of |Vub| from measurements of the electron and neutrino momenta in inclusive semileptonic B decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-01

    We present a determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| based on the analysis of semileptonic B decays from a sample of 88 x 10(6) Gamma(4S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using measurements of the electron energy and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair. We obtain |Vub| =(3.95 +/- 0.26(+0.58)(-0.42) +/- 0.25) x 10(-3), where the errors represent experimental uncertainties, heavy quark parameter uncertainties, and theoretical uncertainties, respectively. PMID:16196998

  13. Spectra and decay rates of bb¯ meson using Gaussian wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Ajay Kumar; Devlani, Nayneshkumar; Kher, Virendrasinh H.

    2015-05-01

    Using the Gaussian wave function mass spectra and decay rates of bb¯ meson are investigated in the framework of phenomenological quark anti-quark potential (coulomb plus power) model consisting of relativistic corrections to the kinetic energy term. The spin-spin, spin-orbit and tensor interactions are employed to obtain the pseudoscalar and vector meson masses. The decay constants (fP/V) are computed using the wave function at the origin. The di-gamma and di-leptonic decays of the bb¯ meson are investigated using Van-Rayan Weisskopf formula as well as in the NRQCD formalism.

  14. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Rehabilitation of gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynton, Charles A.

    1998-07-01

    Gamma characterizes the reproduction of tone scale in an imaging system. Gamma summarizes, in a single numerical parameter, the nonlinear relationship between code value--in an 8-bit system, from 0 through 255--and physical intensity. Nearly all image coding systems are nonlinear, and so involve values of gamma different from unity. Owing to poor understanding of tone scale reproduction, and to misconceptions about nonlinear coding, gamma has acquired a terrible reputation in computer graphics and image processing. In addition, the world-wide web suffers from poor reproduction of grayscale and color images, due to poor handling of nonlinear image coding. This paper aims to make gamma respectable again.

  16. Decay data: review of measurements, evaluations and compilations.

    PubMed

    Nichols, A L

    2001-07-01

    Decay data represent an important means of characterising and quantifying radioactive material, as well as providing an important route to our understanding of the structure of the nucleus. The principle decay parameters are defined in this review, prior to undertaking an applications-based assessment of the most relevant contemporary measurements, evaluations and compilations. Emphasis has been placed on the demands of a series of IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programmes that focus on decay data and gamma-ray standards. Some of the more important decay-data issues are also reviewed with respect to recent measurements that address the anomalies associated with intermediate- and long-lived radionuclides. Short-lived fission products pose significant characterisation problems due to their high degree of instability, although a combination of mass separation and complex detector arrays has resulted in rapid analyses and major advances in our understanding of their nuclear properties and structure. Finally, a select number of decay-data evaluations and compilations are discussed in terms of the powerful manipulation and communication capabilities of PCs, CD-ROMs and the Internet. PMID:11339533

  17. Search for the electromagnetic decay of {Delta}(1232) resonance in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Riggi, F.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Bonasera, A.

    1998-01-01

    In order to inquire into the existence and significance of non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in the intermediate-energy regime, the production of protons and high-energy photons (E{sub {gamma}}{gt}30 MeV) emitted in the reaction {sup 36}Ar+{sup 27}Al at 95 MeV/nucleon has been studied. The quantitative analysis of the ({gamma}-p) invariant-mass and relative-angle distributions shows evidences of {Delta}(1232)-resonance excitation and {Delta}{r_arrow}N{gamma} decay. Experimental data are in agreement with microscopic theoretical calculations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Experimental limits on the radiative decay of SN 1987A neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Reppin, Claus

    1989-01-01

    SMM gamma-ray spectrometer data are examined to look for gamma-ray emission coincident with the about-10-s neutrino burst from SN 1987A. The absence of a detectable signal suggests that the energy radiated into MeV gamma rays by neutrino decay (or any other process) is less than 10 to the -10th of that in supernova neutrinos above 9 MeV. The results are used to set a direct limit on the lifetime of any massive neutrino type generated in the core collapse leading to SN 1987A.

  19. Determination of K-capture Probability in the Decay of {sup 139}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Ganbaatar, N.; Ichinkhorloo, D.; Tserenchimeg, E.

    2009-03-31

    We have been studying the KX and gamma rays spectra in the electron capture decay of {sup 139}Ce{yields}{sup 139}La, which were measured by Ge-spectrometer. The absolute intensity of KX and the 165.8 keV gamma rays has been determined and the known conversion coefficients of the 165.8 keV gamma transition of {sup 139}La were used. The probability P{sub K} was determined as 0.755{+-}0.054. Our results have good agreement with the results of other works.

  20. Measurement of B --> K*gamma branching fractions and charge asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Zisman, M S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, Sh; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P-A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de La Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, Ph; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Berger, J P; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Hryn'ova, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J T; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J R; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M B; Neal, H

    2002-03-11

    The branching fractions of the exclusive decays B0-->K(*0)gamma and B+-->K(*+)gamma are measured from a sample of (22.74+/-0.36)x10(6) BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e(+)e(-) collider. We find B (B0-->K(*0)gamma) = [4.23+/-0.40(stat)+/-0.22(syst)]x10(-5), B(B+-->K(*+)gamma) = [3.83+/-0.62(stat)+/-0.22(syst)]x10(-5) and constrain the CP-violating charge asymmetry to be -0.170K(*)gamma)<0.082 at 90% C.L. PMID:11909345

  1. Alpha decay in electron surrounding

    SciTech Connect

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of atomic electron shells on the constant of alpha decay of heavy and mediummass nuclei was considered in detail. A method for simultaneously taking into account the change in the potential-barrier shape and the effect of reflection of a diverging Coulomb wave in the classically allowed region was developed. The ratios of decay probabilities per unit time for a bare nucleus and the respective neutral atom were found for some alpha-decaying isotopes.

  2. Search for rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutyin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have searched for decays b → sgluon through full reconstruction of a whole event. Two B overlineB decays were found with one of B meson decaying into a final state without charmed particles. We also obtained an upper limit of Br(B + → τ+ντ) of 1.04% at 90% CL.

  3. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Studying top quark decay into the polarized W boson in the topcolor-assisted technicolor model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuelei; Zhang Qiaoli; Qiao Qingpeng

    2005-01-01

    We study the decay mode of the top quark decaying into Wb in the topcolor-assisted technicolor (TC2) model where the top quark is distinguished from other fermions by participating in a strong interaction. We find that the TC2 correction to the decay width {gamma}(t{yields}bW) is generally several percent and the maximum value can reach 8% for the currently allowed parameters. The magnitude of such a correction is comparable with the QCD correction and larger than that of the minimal supersymmetric model. Such a correction might be observable in the future colliders. We also study the TC2 correction to the branching ratio of top quark decay into the polarized W bosons and find the correction is below 1%. After considering the TC2 correction, we find that our theoretical predictions about the decay branching ratio are also consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Testing pulse density distribution for terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukhaled, Marwan; Allen, Edward; Guessoum, Nidhal

    2014-07-01

    Maximum likelihood fits for the time profiles of 51 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (from Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment and Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor) were calculated for five proposed probability densities. A lognormal distribution, which had been used by other researchers, was compared with piecewise Gaussian, piecewise exponential, inverse Gaussian, and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck probability density functions. The piecewise Gaussian and piecewise exponential distributions are justified physically through assuming exponential growth and decay of the electron avalanches which result in the gamma ray bursts and are therefore highly relevant in this context. However, identifying the electron avalanche phenomenon as a form of stochastic exit time process, the inverse Gaussian and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck are reasonable alternatives. Results of the maximum likelihood calculations indicate that the five probability densities fit the gamma ray pulse data equally well. By this comparison, our aim is to indicate to terrestrial gamma ray flash researchers these other at least equally valid distribution functions, which may give insights into the physical processes that the electrons (and the positrons) undergo in the gamma ray flashes.

  6. Higgs-boson and Z-boson flavor-changing neutral-current decays correlated with B-meson decays in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Han Xiaofang; Wang Lei; Yang Jinmin

    2008-10-01

    In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity new flavor-changing interactions between mirror fermions and the standard model (SM) fermions can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current decays for B-mesons, the Z-boson, and the Higgs boson. Since all these decays induced in the littlest Higgs with T-parity model are correlated, in this work we perform a collective study for these decays, namely, the Z-boson decay Z{yields}bs, the Higgs-boson decay h{yields}bs, and the B-meson decays B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}, B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and B{yields}X{sub s}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. We find that under the current experimental constraints from the B-decays, the branching ratios of both Z{yields}bs and h{yields}bs can still deviate from the SM predictions significantly. In the parameter space allowed by the B-decays, the branching ratio of Z{yields}bs can be enhanced up to 10{sup -7} (about one order above the SM prediction) while h{yields}bs can be much suppressed relative to the SM prediction (about one order below the SM prediction)

  7. Mass and beta decay of the N = Z isotope {sup 68}Se

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.; Lister, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    An experiment to measure the mass and beta decay of the N = Z nuclide {sup 68}Se was performed. The properties of {sup 68}Se are important for determining the abundance of proton-rich nuclei such as {sup 60}Ni and {sup 64}Zn, which are thought to be formed in the alpha-rich freezeout stage of a giant star. The abundances of the even-even N = Z nuclei such as {sup 60}Zn, {sup 64}Ge, and {sup 68}Se depend on the competition between ({alpha},{gamma}) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions, whose rates depend sensitively on the reaction Q-values. In addition, the half-life of {sup 68}Se is important in determining the path of the explosive rp-process, since reactions such as (p,{gamma}) must compete with beta decay in order to push the rp path to heavier nuclei. Using the moving tape collector system and the {sup 12}C({sup 58}Ni,2n){sup 68}Se reaction at 200 MeV, recoils were mass-selected by a slit at the FMA focal plane and implanted into the tape. After a 50-second collection period, the accumulated activity was moved to the counting position between two Ge gamma-ray detectors or a plastic scintillator beta detector and a Ge detector. The half-life of {sup 68}Se was determined to be 37 {plus_minus} 5 s, in agreement with other measurements. Gamma-gamma and beta-gamma coincidence data are under analysis, to produce the decay scheme and the electron capture decay energy.

  8. Reconstruction of B- to D*0 e- anti_nu_e Decays and Determination of |Vcb|

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, Jens

    2007-08-21

    In this analysis the decay B- {yields} D*{sup 0}e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e} is measured. The underlying data sampel consists of about 226 million B{bar B}-pairs accumulated on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider PEP-II. The reconstruction of the decay uses the channels D*{sup 0}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. The neutrino is not reconstructed. Since the rest frame of the B meson is unknown, the boost w of the D*{sup 0} meson in the B meson rest frame is estimated by {bar w}. The {bar w} spectrum of the data is described in terms of the partial decay width d{Gamma}/dw into an expectation of the measured {bar w} spectrum. d{Gamma}/dw depends on a form factor F(w) parameterizing the strong interaction in the decay process. To find the best descriptive d{Gamma}/dw a fit to the data determines the following two parameters of d{Gamma}/dw: (i) F(1)|V{sub cb}|, the product between F at zero D*{sup 0} recoil and the CKM matrix element |V{sub cb}|; (ii) {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1}, a parameter of the form factor F(w). The former parameter scales the height of d{Gamma}/dw and {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1} varies the shape of it.

  9. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  10. CP violation in K decays and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1996-12-01

    The present status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is reviewed. In addition selected rare decays of both K and B mesons are discussed. The emphasis is in particular on observables that can be reliably calculated and thus offer the possibility of clean tests of standard model flavor physics. 105 refs.

  11. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  12. Branching Fraction Measurements of B+ to rho+ gamma,B0 to rho0 gamma, and B0 to omega gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-01-03

    The authors present a study of the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}. The analysis is based on data containing 347 million B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}) = (1.10{sub -0.33}{sup +0.37} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (0.79{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -6}, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 0.78 x 10{sup -6}. They also measure the isospin-averaged branching fraction {Beta}[B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}] = (1.25{sub -0.24}{sup +0.25} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, from which they determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.200{sub -0.020}{sup +0.021} {+-} 0.015, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second is theoretical.

  13. Deformation in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes: Radioactive decay scheme studies in the neodymium, promethium, and samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbach, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Several experiments were performed at the UNISOR isotope separator facility at HHIRF at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes. Data for the decay chain {sup 133}Sm {yields} {sup 133}Pm {yields} {sup 133}Nd was obtained, consisting of multiscaled spectra of {gamma} rays, X rays, and conversion electrons, as well as {gamma}{gamma}t, X{gamma}t, e{gamma}t and eXt coincidences. Gamma rays associated with the decay of {sup 133}Sm and {sup 133}Pm were observed for the first time. The decay of a new low-spin (1/2) isomeric state, with a half life of about 70 sec was established for {sup 133}Nd. The level schemes for {sup 133}Nd and {sup 133}Pr were constructed. An M3 and two E1 isomers are established in {sup 133}Nd and an E3 isomer is confirmed in {sup 133}Pr. The energy level systematics for the nuclear region bounded by Z {ge} 58 and N {le} 78 is discussed. Theoretical interpretations are based on the particle-plus-triaxial rotor model calculations. In the framework of these calculations, the {beta}{sub 2} deformation is moderate for these nuclei ({beta}{sub 2} {approx} 0.20-0.25). A sudden onset of strong deformation is not observed, in contrast with the theoretical predictions by Leander and Moeller [Lea82].

  14. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  15. Decay Studies of Very Neutron Rich Nuclei near 78Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.; Gross, Carl J; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J. H.; Krolas, W.; Liddick, Sean; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Zganjar, E. F.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of beta-gamma and beta-delayed neutron emission from 76-79Cu and 83-85Ga were measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Selected results on the decay properties of copper isotopes are briefly presented and discussed.

  16. Stochastic Mixing Model with Power Law Decay of Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedotov, S.; Ihme, M.; Pitsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    Here we present a simple stochastic mixing model based on the law of large numbers (LLN). The reason why the LLN is involved in our formulation of the mixing problem is that the random conserved scalar c = c(t,x(t)) appears to behave as a sample mean. It converges to the mean value mu, while the variance sigma(sup 2)(sub c) (t) decays approximately as t(exp -1). Since the variance of the scalar decays faster than a sample mean (typically is greater than unity), we will introduce some non-linear modifications into the corresponding pdf-equation. The main idea is to develop a robust model which is independent from restrictive assumptions about the shape of the pdf. The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. In Section 2 we derive the integral equation from a stochastic difference equation describing the evolution of the pdf of a passive scalar in time. The stochastic difference equation introduces an exchange rate gamma(sub n) which we model in a first step as a deterministic function. In a second step, we generalize gamma(sub n) as a stochastic variable taking fluctuations in the inhomogeneous environment into account. In Section 3 we solve the non-linear integral equation numerically and analyze the influence of the different parameters on the decay rate. The paper finishes with a conclusion.

  17. Probing the Order-to-Chaos Region in Superdeformed {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb Nuclei with Continuum {gamma} Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Mason, P.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.

    2008-10-03

    The {gamma} decay associated with the warm rotation of the superdeformed nuclei {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb has been measured with the EUROBALL IV array. Several independent quantities provide a stringent test of the population and decay dynamics in the superdeformed well. A Monte Carlo simulation of the {gamma} decay based on microscopic calculations gives remarkable agreement with the data only assuming a large enhancement of the B(E1) strength for 1-2 MeV {gamma} rays, which may be related to the evidence for octupole vibrations in both mass regions.

  18. Synchrotron signature of a relativistic blast wave with decaying microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, M.

    2013-01-01

    Microphysics of weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shock waves, corroborated by recent high performance numerical simulations, indicates the presence of a microturbulent layer of large magnetic field strength behind the shock front, which must decay beyond some hundreds of skin depths. This paper discusses the dynamics of such microturbulence, borrowing from these same numerical simulations, and calculates the synchrotron signature of a power law of shock accelerated particles. The decaying microturbulent layer is found to leave distinct signatures in the spectro-temporal evolution of the spectrum Fν ∝ t-αν-β of a decelerating blast wave, which are potentially visible in early multiwavelength follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts. This paper also discusses the influence of the evolving microturbulence on the acceleration process, with particular emphasis on the maximal energy of synchrotron afterglow photons, which falls in the GeV range for standard gamma-ray burst parameters. Finally, this paper argues that the evolving microturbulence plays a key role in shaping the spectra of recently observed gamma-ray bursts with extended GeV emission, such as GRB 090510.

  19. {gamma}-vibrational states in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Long Guilu; Al-Khudair, Falih; Sheikh, Javid A.

    2008-04-15

    Recent experimental advances have made it possible to study excited structure in superheavy nuclei. The observed states have often been interpreted as quasiparticle excitations. We show that in superheavy nuclei collective vibrations systematically appear as low-energy excitation modes. By using the microscopic Triaxial Projected Shell Model, we make a detailed prediction on {gamma}-vibrational states and their E2 transition probabilities to the ground state band in fermium and nobelium isotopes where active structure research is going on, and in {sup 270}Ds, the heaviest isotope where decay data have been obtained for the ground-state and for an isomeric state.

  20. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  1. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  2. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  3. Counterflow driven by swirl decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, Vladimir N.; Borissov, Anatoli A.

    2010-06-01

    The global meridional circulation of a viscous fluid, caused by swirl decay in a cylindrical container, is studied. To this end, a new solution to the Navier-Stokes equations is obtained, and simple experiments are performed to verify the predictions of the theory. The swirl decay mechanism explains elongated counterflows in hydrocyclones and vortex tubes sometimes extending over a hundred diameters.

  4. Role of five-quark components in radiative and strong decays of the LAMBDA(1405) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    An, C. S.; Saghai, B.

    2010-04-15

    Within an extended chiral constituent quark model, the three- and five-quark structure of the S{sub 01} resonance LAMBDA(1405) is investigated. Helicity amplitudes for electromagnetic decays [LAMBDA(1405)->LAMBDA(1116)gamma, SIGMA(1194)gamma] and transition amplitudes for strong decays [LAMBDA(1405)->SIGMA(1194)pi, K{sup -}p] are derived, as well as the relevant decay widths. The experimental value for the strong decay width, GAMMA{sub LAMBDA}{sub (1405)-}>{sub (SIGMA{sub pi})}{sup o} =50+-2 MeV, is well reproduced with about 50% of a five-quark admixture in the LAMBDA(1405). Important effects owing to the configuration mixing among LAMBDA{sub 1}{sup 2}P{sub A}, LAMBDA{sub 8}{sup 2}P{sub M}, and LAMBDA{sub 8}{sup 4}P{sub M} are found. In addition, transitions between the three- and the five-quark components in the baryons turn out to be significant in both radiative and strong decays of the LAMBDA(1405) resonance.

  5. Binary reaction decays from {sup 24}Mg+{sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Zafra, A. Sanchez i; Azaiez, F.; Bednarczyk, P.; Courtin, S.; Curien, D.; Dorvaux, O.; Lebhertz, D.; Nourreddine, A.; Rousseau, M.; Thummerer, S.; Oertzen, W. von; Gebauer, B.; Wheldon, C.; Kokalova, Tz.; Angelis, G. de; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S.; Szilner, S.

    2009-09-15

    Charged-particle and {gamma} decays in {sup 24}Mg* are investigated for excitation energies where quasimolecular resonances appear in {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C collisions. Various theoretical predictions for the occurrence of superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with resonance structures with low spin are discussed within the measured {sup 24}Mg* excitation energy region. The inverse kinematics reaction {sup 24}Mg+{sup 12}C is studied at E{sub lab}({sup 24}Mg)=130 MeV, an energy that enables the population of {sup 24}Mg states decaying into {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C resonant breakup states. Exclusive data were collected with the Binary Reaction Spectrometer in coincidence with Euroball IV installed at the Vivitron tandem facility at Strasbourg. Specific structures with large deformation were selectively populated in binary reactions, and their associated {gamma} decays studied. Coincident events associated with inelastic and {alpha}-transfer channels have been selected by choosing the excitation energy or the entry point via the two-body Q values. The analysis of the binary reaction channels is presented with a particular emphasis on {sup 24}Mg-{gamma}, {sup 20}Ne-{gamma}, and {sup 16}O-{gamma} coincidences. New information (spin and branching ratios) is deduced on high-energy states in {sup 24}Mg and {sup 16}O, respectively.

  6. Logarithmic decays of unstable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the survival amplitude of unstable quantum states deviates from exponential relaxations and exhibits decays that depend on the integral and analytic properties of the energy distribution density. In the same scenario, model independent dominant logarithmic decays t -1- α0log t of the survival amplitude are induced over long times by special conditions on the energy distribution density. While the instantaneous decay rate exhibits the dominant long time relaxation 1 / t, the instantaneous energy tends to the minimum value of the energy spectrum with the dominant logarithmic decay 1/( tlog 2 t) over long times. Similar logarithmic relaxations have already been found in the dynamics of short range potential systems with even dimensional space or in the Weisskopf-Wigner model of spontaneous emission from a two-level atom. Here, logarithmic decays are obtained as a pure model independent quantum effect in general unstable states.

  7. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  8. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  9. Radiative and Leptonic B-meson Decays from the B-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, John; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-11-14

    Radiative and leptonic decays of B-mesons represent an excellent laboratory for the search for New Physics. I present here recent results on radiative and leptonic decays from the Belle and BABAR collaborations. Radiative penguin and leptonic B-meson decays are excellent probes for investigating the effects of New Physics. Although current measurements are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, they are still quite useful for setting bounds on possible NP models. The B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} and B {yields} {tau}{nu} measurements, for example, put strong constraints on the mass of charged Higgs bosons in Type II two-Higgs double models. The B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} branching fraction measurements also constrain models with universal extra dimensions.

  10. Observation of the acceleration by an electromagnetic field of nuclear beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    2008-02-01

    Measurements are reported of the acceleration of the first-forbidden beta decay of 137Cs by exposure to intense, low-frequency electromagnetic fields. Two separate experiments were done: one in a coaxial cavity, and the other in a coaxial transmission line. The first showed an increase in the beta decay rate of (6.8±3.2)×10-4 relative to the natural rate, and the other resulted in an increase of (6.5±2.0)×10- 4. In addition, a Fourier analysis of the rate of 662 keV gamma emission following from the beta decay in the standing-wave experiment showed a clear indication of the frequency with which the external field was switched on and off. A simultaneously detected gamma emission from a placebo nucleus showed no such peak.

  11. Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano; Jeltema, Tesla E. E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

  12. Measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy moments of B-->Xs gamma and A(CP)(B --> X(s+d gamma)).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L

    2006-10-27

    The photon spectrum in B-->Xs gamma decay, where Xs is any strange hadronic state, is studied using a data sample of 88.5 x 10(6) e+ e- --> Upsilon(4S) --> BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The partial branching fraction, DeltaB(B --> Xs gamma) = (3.67+/-0.29(stat)+/-0.34(syst)+/-0.29(model)) x 10(-4), the first moment gamma> = 2.288+/-0.025+/-0.017+/-0.015 GeV, and the second moment E2(gamma) = 0.0328+/-0.0040+/-0.0023+/-0.0036 GeV2 are measured for the photon energy range 1.9 GeV < E gamma < 2.7 GeV. They are also measured for narrower E gamma ranges. The moments are then fit to recent theoretical calculations to extract the heavy quark expansion parameters m(b) and mu2(pi) and to extrapolate the partial branching fraction to E gamma > 1.6 GeV. In addition, the direct CP asymmetry A(CP)(B-->X(s+d gamma) is measured to be -0.110+/-0.115(stat)+/-0.017(syst). PMID:17155462

  13. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  14. phi-meson photoproduction on Hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Seraydaryan, Helena; Amaryan, Moscov J.; Gavalian, Gagik; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes A.; Weinstein, Larry

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the $\\phi$ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p\\phi(K_SK_L)$. The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy $1.6 \\le E_\\gamma \\le 3.6$ GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The $p \\phi$ final state is identified via reconstruction of $K_S$ in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p K_S X$ to be $K_L$. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on $\\phi$-photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of $\\phi$ photoproduction.

  15. Beauty meson decays to charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Alexey Valerievich

    2001-10-01

    We study decays of beauty (B) mesons into the final states containing charmonium mesons. The data were collected by the CLEO experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring from 1990 to 1999. First, we describe a technique that significantly improves the reconstruction efficiency for decays of J/ y and y (2S) mesons into a pair of leptons. This reconstruction method is used in all the analyses presented in this dissertation. Then we present a study of B decays to the χc 1 and χc2 charmonium states and compare our results with the predictions of different theoretical models of charmonium production. After that we report the first observation of the decay B --> J/ y φK, which is the first B meson decay requiring a creation of an additional ss¯ quark pair. Then we measure the B0 and B+ meson masses from B0 --> y (') K0S and B+ --> y (') K+ decays. The method employed eliminates the dominant systematic uncertainty associated with the previous B meson mass measurements at the e+e- colliders and results in a significant improvement in precision. After that we present a study of three B0 decay modes useful for time-dependent CP asymmetry measurements. In this study we reconstruct B0 --> J/ y K0S , B0 --> χc 1 K0S , and B0 --> J/ y π0 decays. The latter two decay modes are observed for the first time. We describe a K0S --> π0π0 detection technique and its application to the reconstruction of the decay B 0 --> J/ y K0S . Then we present a sensitivity study for the measurement of the mixing-induced CP violation in the neutral B meson system (parameter sin 2β) at CLEO using the method that requires a measurement of the decay time of only one meson in a B0overline B0 pair. Finally, we search for direct CP violation in decays B+/- --> J/ y K+/- and B +/- --> y (2S) K+/- . The results of this search are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and provide the first experimental test of the assumption that direct CP violation is negligible in B --> y (') K decays.

  16. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  17. Conversion electron spectroscopy at the FMA focal plane: Decay studies of proton-rich N {approximately} 82 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    The FMA has proven to be an ideal instrument for the detailed study of the decay of microsecond isomers behind the focal plane following mass selection. In reactions leading to the population of nuclei with isomeric lifetimes longer than their flight time through the device, decay gamma rays and conversion electrons can be detected in an environment free from the backgrounds of prompt radiation and delta electrons. This was a very successful technique to study proton (h{sub 11/2}){sup n} seniority isomers in nuclei with Z > 64 and N {approximately} 82. Since isomeric decay gamma rays are emitted isotropically, conversion electrons are essential for the assignment of multipolarities in these nuclei. Furthermore, the low-energy transitions that depopulate isomeric states are typically highly converted and can escape gamma-ray detection, but they can be identified by their conversion electrons.

  18. Measurements of branching fractions for B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, and B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    We present branching fraction measurements for the radiative decays B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, and B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{gamma}. The analysis is based on a data sample of 465x10{sup 6} BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find B(B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{gamma})=(1.20{sub -0.37}{sup +0.42}{+-}0.20)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma})=(0.97{sub -0.22}{sup +0.24}{+-}0.06)x10{sup -6}, and a 90% C.L. upper limit B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{gamma})<0.9x10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the isospin-violating quantity {gamma}(B{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}{gamma})/2{gamma}(B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma})-1=-0.43{sub -0.22}{sup +0.25}{+-}0.10.

  19. Gamma-rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    The relation of SAS-2 observations of galactic gamma-rays to the large scale distribution of cosmic rays and interstellar gas in the galaxy is reviewed. Starting with a discussion of production rates, the case for pion decay being the predominant production mechanism in the galactic disk above 100 MeV is reestablished, and it is also pointed out that Compton gamma-rays can be a significant source near l = 0. The concepts of four distinct galactic regions are defined, viz. the nebulodisk, ectodisk, radiodisk and exodisk. Bremsstrahlung and pion decay gamma-rays are associated with the first two (primarily the first) regions, and Compton gamma-rays and synchrotron radiation are associated with the latter two regions. On a large scale, the cosmic rays, interstellar gas (primarily H2 clouds in the inner galaxy) and gamma-ray emissivity all peak between 5 and 6 kpc from the galactic center. This correlation is related to correlation with other population I phenomena and is discussed in terms of the density wave concept of galactic structure.

  20. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  1. Electro and gamma nuclear physics in Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Wellisch; M. Kossov; P. Degtyarenko

    2003-03-01

    Adequate description of electro and gamma nuclear physics is of utmost importance in studies of electron beam-dumps and intense electron beam accelerators. I also is mandatory to describe neutron backgrounds and activation in linear colliders. This physics was elaborated in Geant4 over the last year, and now entered into the stage of practical application. In the Geant4 Photo-nuclear data base there are at present about 50 nuclei for which the Photo-nuclear absorption cross sections have been measured. Of these, data on 14 nuclei are used to parametrize the gamma nuclear reaction cross-section The resulting cross section is a complex, factorized function of A and e = log(E{gamma}), where E{gamma} is the energy of the incident photon. Electro-nuclear reactions are so closely connected with Photo-nuclear reactions that sometimes they are often called ''Photo-nuclear''. The one-photon exchange mechanism dominates in Electro-nuclear reactions, and the electron can be substituted by a flux of photons. Folding this flux with the gamma-nuclear cross-section, we arrive at an acceptable description of the electro-nuclear physics. Final states in gamma and electro nuclear physics are described using chiral invariant phase-space decay at low gamma or equivalent photon energies, and quark gluon string model at high energies. We will present the modeling of this physics in Geant4, and show results from practical applications.

  2. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  3. The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, I.V.; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2008-03-25

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  4. Sterile neutrino decay explanation of LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Claudio; Helo, Juan Carlos; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    We examine a recently proposed explanation of the liquid scintillator neutrino detector and MiniBooNE anomalies, given in terms of a sterile neutrino N of the mass 40MeV < or approx. m{sub N} < or approx. 80MeV mixed with {nu}{sub {mu}} at the strength 10{sup -3} < or approx. |U{sub {mu}N}|{sup 2} < or approx. 10{sup -2} and which dominantly decays into a light neutrino and photon: N{yields}{nu}{gamma}. We check compatibility of this scenario with the existing experimental data on radiative {tau}-lepton and K-meson decays. We find that neither of these data are able to totally rule out the above indicated region of m{sub N}-|U{sub {mu}N}|{sup 2}. However, we show that the current experimental data on K{yields}{mu}{nu}{gamma} decay exclude a significant part of this region. We propose experimental cuts on this decay allowing to improve its sensitivity to the region in question. We also show that measurements of K{yields}{mu}{nu}ee decay have good prospects for testing the decaying sterile neutrino scenario.

  5. Decaying radiolabelled lymphocytes and method of using same background of the invention

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, G.P.

    1994-12-30

    Decaying radiolabelled lymphocytes and a method of using same are disclosed. A radiolabelled T-cell lymphocyte including a T-cell containing a Beta-emitting isotope which decays to an alpha-emitting isotope is provided. Alternatively, the T-cell may contain a Beta-emitting isotope which decays one of an x-ray and gamma-emitting isotope. A therapeutic radioisotope treatment method includes the steps of removing a cancerous nodule containing T-cells from a mammal, introducing into the T-cells a Beta-emitting isotope which decays to an alpha-emitting isotope and infusing the T-cells containing the Beta-emitting isotope which decays to an alpha-emitting isotope into the mammal. As an alternative, the treatment method may introduce into the T-cells a Beta-emitting isotope which decays to an x-ray or gamma-emitting isotope. Then, according to the alternative method, after the radioactive T- cells are infused into the mammal, the patient is monitored with a radiation detector to determine the location of T-cells containing the isotopes.

  6. Early optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst afterglow.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Carole G; Steele, Iain A; Smith, Robert J; Kobayashi, Shiho; Melandri, Andrea; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Gomboc, Andreja; Mottram, Chris J; Clarke, David; Monfardini, Alessandro; Carter, David; Bersier, David

    2007-03-30

    We report the optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow, obtained 203 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB 060418, using a ring polarimeter on the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our robust (2sigma) upper limit on the percentage of polarization, less than 8%, coincides with the fireball deceleration time at the onset of the afterglow. The combination of the rate of decay of the optical brightness and the low polarization at this critical time constrains standard models of GRB ejecta, ruling out the presence of a large-scale ordered magnetic field in the emitting region. PMID:17363631

  7. Neutron stars and the distance to gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, Charles D.; Hurley, Kevin C.

    1991-01-01

    Assuming that gamma-ray bursts originate from galactic neutron stars, an analytic method for studying their statistical properties is outlined. If a significant fraction of all neutron stars are born with space velocities of less than approximately 100 km/s, as suggested by studies of pulsar statistics, then the sampling distance to gamma-ray burst sources should be less than about several hundred pc. These results have important implications on theories of radio-pulsar evolution and magnetic-field decay.

  8. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C.; Coldwell, R. L.; Dunnam, F. E.; Eichhorn, G.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray lines from the dirction of supernova 1987A have been observed with a Ge detector flown on a high-altitude balloon platform over Antarctica in January 1988. Gamma rays at 844.1 + or - 1.0 and 1239.9 + or - 1.5 keV, with fluxes 0.0023 + or - 0.002 and 0.0021 + or - 0.001 photons/sq cm sec, respectively, are attributed to the radioactive decay of Co-56. Errors quoted do not include possible systematic effects.

  9. Development of Fast, Segmented Trigger Detector for Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshudifat, Mohammad; Grzywacz, Robert; Paulauskas, Stan

    2013-10-01

    Segmented scintillation detector was developed for decay studies. The detector is build with use of position sensitive photo-multiplier (PSPMT) Hamamatsu H8500 coupled with fast (16 × 16) pixelated plastic scintillator (Eljen EJ-204). The PSPMT anodes form a (8 × 8) two dimensional matrix which is used for position reconstruction, position resolution with average FWHM of ~ 1 . 1 mm was achieved with 137Cs gamma-source. Signals derived from non-segmented dynode are used for timing. Digital pulse shape analysis algorithm was used for this analysis and the 500 ps timing resolution was achieved. This detector is intended to use in fragmentation type experiments which require segmented detectors in order to enable recoil-decay correlations for applications requiring good timing resolution, e.g. for the neutron time-of-flight experiments using VANDLE array.

  10. Quantitative imaging of disease signatures through radioactive decay signal conversion

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel LJ; Ogirala, Anuja; Beattie, Bradley J; Grimm, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine there is an urgent need for in vivo techniques able to sensitively detect and quantify molecular activities. Sensitive imaging of gamma rays is widely used, but radioactive decay is a physical constant and signal is independent of biological interactions. Here we introduce a framework of novel targeted and activatable probes excited by a nuclear decay-derived signal to identify and measure molecular signatures of disease. This was accomplished utilizing Cerenkov luminescence (CL), the light produced by β-emitting radionuclides such as clinical positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. Disease markers were detected using nanoparticles to produce secondary Cerenkov-induced fluorescence. This approach reduces background signal compared to conventional fluorescence imaging. In addition to information from a PET scan, we demonstrate novel medical utility by quantitatively determining prognostically relevant enzymatic activity. This technique can be applied to monitor other markers and facilitates a shift towards activatable nuclear medicine agents. PMID:24013701

  11. The Majorana Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, K.; Majorana Collaboration

    2005-06-01

    The Majorana experiment[ nucl-ex/0311013] is a proposed 76Ge-based search for neutrinoless double-beta (0 νββ) decay and dark matter (DM). It will use segmented, enriched germanium detectors in a close-pack configuration. With 500 kg of germanium, Majorana would be expected to reach a sensitivity to the 0 νββ decay half-life of 10 27 years, corresponding to a neutrino mass near the atmospheric mass scale. Current development efforts are presented, along with performance expectations and background reduction methods. Additionally, the status of the related detectors SEGA (Segmented Enriched Germanium Assembly) and MEGA[Kazkaz, K., Aalseth, C.E., Hossbach, T.W., Gehman, V.M., Kephart, J.D., Miley, H.S., IEEE Trans. Nuc. Sci. 51 (2004) 1029] (Multi-Element Gamma Assay) are presented. Current simulation efforts will be presented in a parallel poster by Reyco Henning.

  12. Model independent predictions for rare top decays with weak coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran

    2010-04-01

    Measurements at B factories have provided important constraints on new physics in several rare processes involving the B meson. New physics, if present in the b quark sector may also affect the top sector. In an effective Lagrangian approach, we write down operators, where effects in the bottom and the top sector are related. Assuming the couplings of the operators to be of the same size as the weak coupling g of the standard model and taking into account constraints on new physics from the bottom sector as well as top branching ratios, we make predictions for the rare top decays t{yields}cV, where V={gamma}, Z. We find branching fractions for these decays within possible reach of the LHC. Predictions are also made for t{yields}sW.

  13. Decay studies of neutron deficient rare earth isotopes with OASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilat, J.; Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A.; Vierinen, K.; Firestone, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    We report results on the decay of /sup 124/Pr, /sup 124,125/Ce, /sup 124,125/La, /sup 134-136/Eu, /sup 134-136/Sm, /sup 134-136/Pm, /sup 144/Ho, /sup 141,142,144/Dy, /sup 140,141,142,144/Tb, /sup 140-142/Gd, and /sup 140-142/Eu, produced by /sup 92/Mo(H.I.,xpyn) reactions at the Berkeley SuperHILAC, and studied with the OASIS on-line mass separator facility. Half-lives, delayed proton branching ratios, ..gamma..-ray energies and intensities, partial decay schemes and several J/sup ..pi../ assignments are presented. Level systematics of the even mass Nd and Sm isotopes and of the nu h/sub 11/2/ - nu s/sub 1/2/ isomers for N = 77 are discussed.

  14. A search for neutrinoless double beta decay of tellurium-130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Adam Douglas

    This dissertation describes an experimental search for neutrinoless double beta (0nubetabeta) decay of 130Te. An observation of 0nubetabeta decay would establish that neutrinos are Majorana fermions and would constrain the neutrino mass scale. The data analyzed were collected by two bolometric experiments: CUORICINO and an R&D experiment for CUORE known as the Three Towers Test. Both experiments utilized arrays of TeO 2 crystals operated as bolometers at ˜10 mK in a dilution refrigerator. The bolometers measured the energy deposited by particle interactions in the crystals by recording the induced change in crystal temperature. Between the two experiments, there were 81 TeO2 bolometers used in the analysis, each of which was an independent detector of nuclear decays as well as a source of 130Te. The experiments were conducted underground at a depth of about 3300 meters water equivalent in Hall A of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Assergi, Italy, in order to shield the detectors from cosmic rays. The data analyzed represent an exposure of 19.9 kg · y of 130Te (18.6 kg · y from CUORICINO and 1.3 kg · y from the Three Towers Test). In addition to the combined analysis of the two experiments, an analysis of CUORICINO data alone is presented in order to compare with an independent analysis being carried out by collaborators at the University of Milano-Bicocca. No signal due to 0nubetabeta decay is observed, and therefore a limit on the partial half-life for the decay is set. From a simultaneous fit to the 81 independent detectors, the rate of 0nubetabeta decay of 130Te is measured to be Gamma0nubetabeta( 130Te) = (-0.6+/-1.4 (stat.) +/- 0.4 (syst.)) x 10-25 y-1, which corresponds to a lower limit on the partial half-life for 0nubetabeta decay of 130Te of T0nbb1/2 (130Te) > 3.0x1024 y (90% C.L.). Converting the half-life limit to an upper limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass, mbetabeta, using a set of recent nuclear matrix element calculations

  15. Search for B+ to X(3872) K+, X(3872) to J/psi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-07-31

    In a study of B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}K{sup +} decays, they find evidence for the radiative decay X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma} with a statistical significance of 3.4{sigma}. They measure the product of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} X(3872)K{sup +}) {center_dot} {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}) = (3.3 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. They also measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K{sup +}) = (4.9 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -4}. These results are obtained from (287 {+-} 3) million B{bar B} decays collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC.

  16. Charm counting in b decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  17. Glueball decay in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tan, C.-I; Terashima, Seiji

    2008-04-15

    Using holographic QCD based on D4-branes and D8-anti-D8-branes, we have computed couplings of glueballs to light mesons. We describe glueball decay by explicitly calculating its decay widths and branching ratios. Interestingly, while glueballs remain less well understood both theoretically and experimentally, our results are found to be consistent with the experimental data for the scalar glueball candidate f{sub 0}(1500). More generally, holographic QCD predicts that decay of any glueball to 4{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed, and that mixing of the lightest glueball with qq mesons is small.

  18. Optimizing VANDLE for Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, N. T.; Taylor, S. Z.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Vandle Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the decay properties of neutron rich isotopes has well established importance to the path of the r-process and to the total decay heat for reactor physics. Specifically, the half-life, branching ratio and spectra for β-n decay is of particular interest. With that in mind, we have continued attempts to improve upon the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) in terms of efficiency and TOF resolution through the use of new and larger scintillators. Details of the new implementation, design and characterization of the array will be shown and compared to previous results.

  19. Mixing and decays of the antidecuplet in context of approximate SU(3) symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, V.

    2005-06-14

    We consider mixing of the antidecuplet with three JP = 1/2+ octets (the ground-state octet, the octet containing N(1440), {lambda}(1600), {sigma}(1660) and {xi}(1690) and the octet containing N(1710), {lambda}(1800), {sigma}(1880) and {xi}(1950)) in the framework of approximate flavor SU(3) symmetry and in the limit of small mixing angles. We give general expressions for the partial decay widths of all members of the antidecuplet as functions of the two mixing angles and {gamma}{theta}+ and {sigma}{pi}N. Identifying N10 with the N(1670) observed by the GRAAL experiment, we show that the considered mixing scenario can accommodate all present experimental and phenomenological information on the {theta}+ and N10 decays: {theta}+ could be as narrow as 1 MeV; the N10 {yields} N{eta} decay is sizable, while the N10 {yields} N{pi} decay is suppressed and the N10 {yields} {lambda}K decay is possibly suppressed. Constraining the mixing angles by the N10 decays, we make definite predictions for the {sigma}10 decays. We point out that {sigma}10 with mass near 1770 MeV could be searched for in the available data on KSp invariant mass spectrum, which already revealed the {theta}+ peak. It is important to experimentally verify the decay properties of {sigma}(1770) because its mass and JP = 1/2+ make it an attractive candidate for {sigma}10.

  20. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  1. Directional gamma detector

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  2. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  4. Registered particles onboard identification in the various apertures of GAMMA-400 space gamma-telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene

    2016-07-01

    GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the gamma-telescope onboard international satellite gamma-observatory designed for particle registration in the wide energy band. Its parameters are optimized for detection of gamma-quanta with the energy ˜ 100 GeV in the main aperture. The main scientific goals of GAMMA-400 are to investigate fluxes of γ-rays and the electron-positron cosmic ray component possibly generated by dark matter particles decay or annihilation and to search for and study in detail discrete γ-ray sources, to investigate the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse γ-rays, and to study γ-ray bursts and γ-emission from the active Sun. This article presents analysis of detected events identification procedures and energy resolution in three apertures provide particles registration both from upper and lateral directions based on GAMMA-400 modeling due special designed software. Time and segmentation methods are used to reject backsplash (backscattering particles created when high energy γ-rays interact with the calorimeter's matter and move in the opposite direction) in the main aperture while only energy deposition analysis allows to reject this effect in the additional and lateral ones. The main aperture provides the best angular (all strip layers information analysis) and energy (energy deposition in the all detectors studying) resolution in the energy range 0.1 - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The energy resolution in this band is 1%. Triggers in the main aperture will be formed using information about particle direction provided by time of flight system and presence of charged particle or backsplash signal formed according to analysis of energy deposition in combination of all two-layers anticoincidence systems individual detectors. In the additional aperture gamma-telescope allows to register events in the energy band 10 × 10^{-3} - 3 × 10^{3} GeV. The additional aperture energy resolution provides due to

  5. Observation of the Upsilon(13DJ ) Bottomonium State through Decays to pi+pi-Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-02

    Based on 122X10{sup 6} {upsilon}(3S) events collected with the BABAR detector, we have observed the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}) bottomonium state through the {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{pi}{sub +}{pi}{sub -}{upsilon}(1S) decay chain. The significance is 6.2 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. The mass of the J = 2 member of the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}) triplet is determined to be 10164.5{-+}0.8 (stat.) {-+} 0.5 (syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. We use the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass and decay angular distributions to confirm the consistency of the observed state with the orbital angular momentum and parity assignments of the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}).

  6. Improved Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Schuemann, J.; Limosani, A.

    2008-11-23

    We report a fully inclusive measurement of the flavor changing neutral current decay B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} in the energy range 1.7 GeV{<=}E{sub {gamma}}{sup c.m.s}{<=}2.8 GeV, covering 97% of the total spectrum, where c.m.s is the center of mass system. Using 605 fb{sup -1} of data, we obtain in the rest frame of the B-meson B(B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}}:E{sub {gamma}}{sup B}>1.7 GeV) = (3.31{+-}0.19{+-}0.37{+-}0.01)x10{sup -4}, where the errors are statistical, systematic and from the boost correction needed to transform from the rest frame of the {upsilon}(4S)(c.m.s) to that of the B-meson, respectively. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum as functions of various energy thresholds, which extend down to 1.7 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  7. Relationships between nonmesonic weak decays in different hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Krmpotic, Franjo

    2010-11-15

    Using as a tool the s-wave approximation (sWA), this work demonstrates that the nonmesonic weak decay transition rates {Gamma}{sub n} and {Gamma}{sub p} can be expressed in all hypernuclei up to {sub {Lambda}}{sup 29}Si (and very likely in heavier ones too) in the same way as in the s-shell hypernuclei, i.e., as a linear combination of only three elementary transition rates. This finding leads to the analytic prediction that, independently of the transition mechanism, all hypernuclei that are on the stability line (N=Z), i.e., {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}Li, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 9}Be, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 11}B, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 13}C, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 17}O, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 29}Si, etc., should roughly have the same ratio {Gamma}{sub n}/{Gamma}{sub p}, the magnitude of which rapidly increases when one approaches the neutron drip line (N>>Z), and the opposite happens when one goes toward the proton drip line (N<

  8. Design of Dataflow Monitoring and Searches for B to omega gamma, B to phi gamma and B to phi K-short gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, J

    2004-03-16

    In May 2003 PEP-II achieved instantaneous luminosities in excess of 6 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, twice the design luminosity. To permit BABAR to operate in this challenging environment, development work on the data acquisition system continued after detector commissioning. A vital part of this process is understanding the performance of the data acquisition system. Considerable effort was invested in the design and implementation of an application capable of collecting performance statistics from hundreds of CPUs in the data acquisition system during data collection. The monitoring application and some examples of its operation are presented in this thesis. Also presented here are the searches for the exclusive radiative one-loop decays, B {yields} {omega}{gamma}, B {yields} {phi}{gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}, using a sample of 89 million B{bar B} events. No significant signal is seen in any of the channels. Upper limits on the branching ratios, {Beta}, were found to be {Beta}(B {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 3.0 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B {yields} {phi}{gamma}) < 2.9 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 3.8 x 10{sup -6}, at the 90% confidence level.

  9. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  10. Optical gamma thermometer

    DOEpatents

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  11. Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerard Ortego, Carlos-Kjell

    1992-01-01

    Two previous independent reports of 2 nubetabeta-decay by the ITEP-YPI collaboration, rm T_sp{1/2} {2nu}=(9+/- 1) times 10^ {20} yr (1sigma), and PNL-USC group, rm T_sp{1/2 }{2nu}=(1.12_sp{-0.26} {+0.48}) times 10^{21} yr (2sigma), were confirmed using a 0.25 Kg Ge(Li) detector isotopically enriched to 86% in ^{76}Ge. The detector was operated in the PNL-USC ultralow background facility in the Homestake gold mine for 168 days. Following a single correction to the data, a spectrum resembling that of the earlier PNL-USC experiment, with about the same intensity per ^{76}Ge atom, per year, was observed with a measured half life of rm T_sp{1/2}{2nu}=(9.2 _sp{-0.4}{+0.7} times 10 ^{20} y (2sigma). This experiment is one of two presented in this dissertation as original work. The half-life of the 2nubeta beta-decay of ^{100} Mo to the 1130 keV level of ^{100 }Ru has been measured to be rm T_{1/2}=(1.1_sp{-0.2} {+0.3}) times 10^{21} y (90% C.L.), by observing the 590.76 and 539.53 keV gamma rays emitted in the 0_sp{1}{+ }to 2^+to 0^+ de -excitation cascade. A review of the most relevant nuclear structure calculations is given, and their predictions are compared to the measurements from our two experiments.

  12. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  13. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  14. Overview of rare K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1995-05-01

    The status and future prospects of searches for and studies of forbidden and highly suppressed K decays are reviewed. Here the author discusses three areas of recent activity in rare K decay. These are lepton-flavor violating decays, which are entirely forbidden in the Standard Model, K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}, which is of interest from the point of view of CP-violation, and `one loop` decays of the form K{sup 0,{+-}} {yields} ({pi}{sup 0,{+-}})l{bar l}, that can throw light on Standard Model CP-violation and determine parameters such as V{sub td}.

  15. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Proton decay and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alvioli, M.; Strikman, M.; Benhar, O.; Ericson, M.

    2010-04-15

    The kinematics of the decay of a bound proton is governed by the proton spectral function. We evaluate this quantity in {sup 16}O using the information from nuclear physics experiments. It also includes a correlated part. The reliability of this evaluation is sufficient to open the possibility of correlated cuts in the missing mass and momentum variables to identify the decay events from the bound protons with a possible increase of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Thermal corrections to Electroweak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina

    2016-03-01

    We study the electroweak processes at finite temperatures. This includes the decay rates of electroweak gauge bosons and beta decays. Major thermal corrections come from QED type radiative corrections. Heavy mass of the electroweak gauge bosons helps to suppress the radiative corrections due to the electroweak gauge boson loops. Therefore, dominant thermal corrections are due to the photon loops. We also discuss the relevance of our results to astrophysics and cosmology.

  18. Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Alexei; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2010-08-26

    The study of the semileptonic B-meson decays is the most accessible and cleanest way to determine the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and V{sub ub}. These decays also provide experimental access to study the QCD form-factors, heavy quark masses, and HQE parameters. The theoretical description of semileptonic B-meson decays at the parton level is very simple because there is no interaction between leptonic and hadronic currents. At the hadron level one needs to introduce corrections due to the strong interaction between quarks. Especially in the description of the inclusive B-meson decays the motion of the b-quark inside the B-meson plays a crucial role. All these effects are described in the frameworks of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) and Lattice QCD (LQCD). We give an overview about results of studies of semileptonic B-meson decays collected with the BABAR and Belle detectors at the PEP-II and the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings. We present recent results on hadronic moments measured in inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and B {yields} X{sub u}lv decays and extracted heavy quark masses m{sub b} and m{sub c} and dominant non-perturbative Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) parameters. We also report the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| in inclusive and in exclusive semileptonic B-meson decays. We describe the studies of the form-factor parameters for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}l{sup +}v and present the measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}l{sup +}v form-factor shape.

  19. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-15

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required.

  20. Reionization and dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldengott, Isabel M.; Boriero, Daniel; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth τreio, but weaker constraints on the spectral index ns than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to Γeff < 2.9 × 10‑25/s at 95% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit of Γ < 5.3 × 10‑26/s at 95% C.L. Specifying the decay channels, we apply our result to the case of keV-mass sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates and obtain constraints on their mixing angle and mass, which are comparable to the ones from the diffuse X-ray background.