Science.gov

Sample records for gamma angular correlations

  1. Measurement and analysis of quadruple ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) angular correlations for high spin states of {sup 24}Mg.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhover, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-10-30

    The high-lying, {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 24}Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of {alpha} and {gamma} emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the ({alpha}{gamma}) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated.

  2. A new all-digital time differential {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, Matthias; Vetter, Ulrich; Uhrmacher, Michael; Hofsaess, Hans

    2010-07-15

    A new digital time differential perturbed angular correlation spectrometer, designed to measure the energy of and coincidence time between correlated detector signals, here correlated {gamma} photons, is presented. The system overcomes limitations of earlier digital approaches and features improved performance and handling. By consequently separating the data recording and evaluation, it permits the simultaneous measurement of decays with several {gamma}-ray cascades at once and avoids the necessity of premeasurement configuration. Tests showed that the spectrometer reaches a time resolution of 460 ps [using a {sup 60}Co sample and Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LYSO) scintillators, otherwise better than 100 ps], an energy resolution that is equivalent to the limit of the used scintillation material, and a processing capability of more than 200 000 {gamma} quanta per detector and second. Other possible applications of the presented methods include nuclear spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, time of flight studies, lidar, and radar.

  3. Stability of erythrocyte ghosts: a gamma-ray perturbed angular correlation study.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C A; Tin, G W; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1983-01-01

    The structural integrity of erythrocyte ghosts made by the preswell and slow-dialysis techniques has been studied in vitro by use of gamma-ray perturbed angular correlation (PAC) techniques and also by standard in vitro leakage methods employing sequestered labeled markers. Complexes of 111In3+ and nitrilotriacetate were encapsulated in ghosts made from human, rabbit, rat, and mouse erythrocytes, and their leakage was monitored by both methods. In addition, 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin was encapsulated, and ghost integrity was monitored by conventional leakage measurements. With the PAC technique the percentage of material released from human ghosts was determined quantitatively, and the results were equivalent to those obtained by the conventional method. In addition, at various times after intravenous injection, tissue distribution of the ghosts in the mouse was studied. The percent injected dose per gram of tissue of the labeled surface proteins of erythrocyte ghosts in circulation approximated that of the entrapped labeled albumin. This suggests that the ghost membrane and contents are strongly associated in vivo. Large 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin molecules and small 111In3+-nitrilotriacetate complexes were delivered in high quantitites to the lung initially, and to the liver and spleen. Because erythrocyte ghosts have the ability to entrap a wide range of substances and deliver them to specific organs, ghosts may be preferable to other drug carriers or drug therapy for treatment of certain disorders. PMID:6572379

  4. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  5. A weak magnetism observed in SnO2 doped with Fe by means of Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. M.; Carbonari, A. W.; Martucci, T.; Costa, M. S.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Macedo, M. A. V.; Saxena, R. N.

    Nano-structured samples of SnO2 doped with Fe prepared by the sol-gel method were studied by the Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy using 111In (111Cd) probe nuclei as well as by 57Fe Mšssbauer spectroscopy. The samples were prepared from very pure metallic Sn and Fe. Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced during the sol-gel process of sample preparation for PAC measurements. The PAC measurements were carried out after annealing the samples at different temperatures and the results show a combined electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole interaction for probe nuclei that do not occupy the regular Sn sites. The hyperfine parameters revealed weak magnetic interactions.

  6. Gamma Ray Emission Tomography and Angular Correlation Measurements to Study the Distribution and Binding Site of Selenium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahni, Anwar

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The distribution of ^ {75}Se in tissue equivalent materials was investigated employing Gamma ray Emission Topography with a rectilinear scanner utilizing NaI(Tl) and BGO detectors. The reconstructed images, using Filtered Back Projection and Iterative techniques were presented in 2D colour and 3D representations. Using a lead collimator of aperture 1.5 x 20 mm and 70 length, the distribution of selenium with variation of volume and concentration was examined and clearly seen. Several corrections such as background, scattering, attenuation compensation and X-ray characteristic suppression, were performed to improve the quality of the images which was evaluated in terms of the fidelity factor. The possibility of quantifying an image was considered with regard to spatial resolution and least detectable concentration. The spatial resolution was measured using two small vials containing the same concentration of selenium, the value obtained was the same as the width of the collimator aperture. The value of the least detectable concentration of selenium however, was difficult to find, due to the many ambiguous factors involved. The binding site of selenium which is based on quadrupole interaction with the surrounding electric field, was investigated employing Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experiments using NaI(Tl) and BaF_2 detectors. Using NaI(Tl) detectors, it was difficult to observe the perturbation, due to the poor time resolution. The BaF_2 detector according to the literature has a shorter light emission decay time constant (0.6 ns), suggested that a better time resolution than that found with the NaI(Tl) detectors could be obtained. A Perturbed Angular Correlation experiment employing BaF _2 detectors and a fast-slow coincidence system was set up. The time differential PAC of selenium in solution showed an unperturbed angular correlation pattern. The main problem is the very short half life of the

  7. Understanding GRETINA using angular correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Madeline

    2015-10-01

    The ability to trace the path of gamma rays through germanium is not only necessary for taking full advantage of GRETINA but also a promising possibility for homeland security defense against nuclear threats. This research tested the current tracking algorithm using the angular correlation method by comparing results from raw and tracked data to the theoretical model for Co-60. It was found that the current tracking method is unsuccessful in reproducing angular correlation. Variations to the tracking algorithm were made in the FM value, tracking angle, number of angles of separation observed, and window of coincidence in attempt to improve correlation results. From these variations it was observed that having a larger FM improved results, reducing the number of observational angles worsened correlation, and that overall larger tracking angles improved with larger windows of coincidence and vice-verse. Future research would be to refine the angle of measurement for raw data and to explore the possibility of an energy dependence by testing other elements. This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357

  8. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  9. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  10. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from {sup 235}U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to vertical bar D{sub n} vertical bar < 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D{sub {alpha}} = (170{+-}20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5 Degree-Sign to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 {+-} 0.20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, while at the angle of 67.5 Degree-Sign it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt {gamma}-rays.

  11. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  12. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  13. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  14. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from 235U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 × 10-5. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to | D n | < 6 × 10-5 at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D α = (170±20) × 10-5. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5° to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 ± 0.20) × 10-4, while at the angle of 67.5° it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt γ-rays.

  15. The angular resolution of air shower gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    1985-01-01

    A crucial charactristic of air shower arrays in the field of high energy gamma-ray astronomy is their angular resolving power, the arrival directions being obtained by the time of flight measurements. A small air shower array-telescope is used to study the resolution in the definition of the shower front as a function of the shower size.

  16. Delocalized correlations in twin light beams with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Marino, A M; Boyer, V; Pooser, R C; Lett, P D; Lemons, K; Jones, K M

    2008-08-29

    We generate intensity-difference-squeezed Laguerre-Gauss twin beams of light carrying orbital angular momentum by using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. The conservation of orbital angular momentum in the four-wave mixing process is studied as well as the spatial distribution of the quantum correlations obtained with different configurations of orbital angular momentum. Intensity-difference squeezing of up to -6.7 dB is demonstrated with beams carrying orbital angular momentum. Delocalized spatial correlations between the twin beams are observed. PMID:18851611

  17. Azimuthal correlations and alignment of particles in gamma families

    SciTech Connect

    Yuldashbaev, T. S. Chudakov, V. M.; Nuritdinov, Kh.

    2008-11-15

    Azimuthal angular correlations and the alignment of photons are studied in gamma families recorded by the Pamir Collaboration in a carbon x-ray emulsion chamber. The present interpretation of these experimental data is based on a model of semihard parton scattering in nucleon-nucleus collisions and on arguments favoring the production of exotic beam strings and heavy leading resonances undergoing quasicoplanar decays.

  18. Angular distributions of sequentially emitted particles and gamma rays in deep inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    A general theory for the angular distribution of sequentially emitted particles and gamma rays is developed. Comparison with experimental data allows one to obtain information on the fragment spin and misalignment. Angular distributions of sequentially emitted gammas, alphas, and fission fragments are discussed in detail. It is shown that the experimental data are consistent with the thermal excitation of angular momentum-bearing modes. The anomaly of sequential fission suggests the presence of a prompt or direct fission component. 13 figures.

  19. Fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herden, C.; Röder, J.; Gardner, J. A.; Becker, K. D.

    2008-09-01

    A new generation time differential perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectrometer has been designed and built. The design strategy and details of the data collection and reduction methodology are reported. First results obtained by the new spectrometer are reported and compared with PAC data obtained by more conventional means.

  20. Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-08-01

    The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Angular correlation in the two-electron continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2006-02-15

    Following absorption of a single photon, angles of simultaneous emission of two electrons from a He(n {sup 1}S) atom become more correlated with increasing n. We find that the strength of this correlation is due to the two-electron continuum of the electron-impact ionization of the He{sup +}(ns) ion. The strength is determined by the width of the momentum profile of the ionic ns state but not the strength of the electron correlation in the He initial state. This can explain the increasing (over He) angular correlation strength found in double photoionization of targets such as Be, Ne, and H{sub 2}.

  2. Mechanisms of excitation of T-odd correlations for prescission gamma rays and structure of these correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2009-08-01

    Conditions for the appearance and observation of prescission gamma rays emitted by a fissioning nucleus prior to its separation into fission fragments were investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. It is shown that these conditions are realizable in the gamma decay of isovector electric giant dipole resonances in a fissile nucleus that are excited because of nonadiabaticity of the collective deformation motion of the nucleus at the ultimate stages of its prefission evolution. Angular and energy distributions of prescission gamma rays emitted by unpolarized fissioning nuclei are analyzed. Features of T-odd correlations in angular distributions of gamma rays arising in the fission of unpolarized target nuclei that is induced by polarized cold neutrons are investigated, and it is shown that these correlations are similar in nature to T-odd ROT correlations discovered earlier for alpha particles emitted in the ternary fission of nuclei.

  3. GeV gamma-ray astronomy telescopes with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, B.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-ray telescopes flown on satellites have poor angular resolution with typical point source error circles of a few square degrees. It is shown that a major improvement in angular resolution for the detection of gamma-rays in the GeV region can be obtained with a single crystal as converter. The electron produced by a gamma ray incident at a small angle to a major crystal axis or plane is captured into channeling and radiates gamma rays. The channeling radiation and the electron-positron pair can be detected and yield point source locations with a precision of 5 arcseconds at 10 GeV. This is an improvement of three orders of magnitude on the angular precision of telescopes sensitive to gamma-rays above 50 MeV flown on Satellites.

  4. Angular and Energy Characteristics of Gamma Field at the New Safe Confinement Construction Sit

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, Valeriy; Glebkin, S; Pavlovskiy, L; Pravdyvyi, O; Rudko, Vladimir; Shcherbin, Vladimir; Stojanov, O; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2005-08-08

    To results of measurements of angular y and energy distribution of gamma-radiation at the cites of New Safe Confinement erection. The data analysis permitted to identify the main sources of gamma-radiation and to systematize the obtained results.

  5. Directional correlation measurements for gamma transitions in /sup 127/Te

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, M.O.M.D.; Saxena, R.N.

    1985-02-01

    The directional correlation of coincident ..gamma.. transitions in /sup 127/Te has been measured following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 127/Sb (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.9 d) using Ge(Li)-Ge(Li) and Ge(Li)-NaI(T1) gamma spectrometers. Measurements have been carried out for 14 gamma cascades resulting in the determination of multipole mixing ratios delta(E2/M1) for 15 ..gamma.. transitions. The present results permitted a definite spin assignment of (7/2) for the 785 keV level and confirmation of several previous assignments to other levels in /sup 127/Te. The g factor of the 340 keV ((9/2)/sup -/) level has also been measured using the integral perturbed angular correlation method in the hyperfine magnetic field of a Te in Ni matrix. The results of the g factor as well as the mixing ratio for the 252 keV ((9/2)/sup -/..-->..(11/2)/sup -/) transition support the earlier interpretation of this state as an anomalous coupling state.

  6. Studying oxygen vacancies in ceramics by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Han-Tzong; Wang, Ruiping; Fuchs, H.; Gardner, J.A. . Dept. of Physics); Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics); Sommers, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation measurements in tetragonal and cubic zirconia and in ceria are described. A physically reasonable and self-consistent interpretation of these data implies that oxygen vacancies are trapped at a second neighbor position by Cd in tetragonal zirconia and by In in ceria. For Cd in tetragonal zirconia, the vacancy trap energy is found to be 0.44 eV, and the energy barrier between adjacent trap sites is approximately 0.8 eV. The activation energy of an oxygen vacancy hopping between trap sites around {sup 111}Cd in ceria is found to be 0.55 eV. The activation energy for oxygen vacancy hopping in cubic zirconia, as detected by {sup 181}Ta PAC, is about 1.0 eV and independent of the Y concentration. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  7. /sup 12/C(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 16/O. -->. cap alpha. +/sup 12/C reaction mechanism by means of angular correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Imme, G.; Pappalardo, G.; Raciti, G.; Saunier, N.

    1980-06-01

    The particle-particle angular correlation method is applied to the reaction /sup 12/C(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 16/O ..-->.. ..cap alpha..+/sup 12/C. Deuterons were detected at theta/sup lab//sub d/=10/sup 0/. Information on the reaction mechanism is obtained by analyzing the shape and the angular shift of the experimental data. A dominant direct transfer mechanism is found for the primary reaction. The ratios GAMMA..cap alpha../sub 0//GAMMA and the ..cap alpha..-reduced widths ..gamma cap alpha../sub 0/ are deduced.

  8. On the Angular Resolution of the AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavani, M.; Trois, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A.; Del Monte, E.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Morselli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Caraveo, P.

    2015-08-01

    We present a study of the angular resolution of the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID) that has been operational in space since 2007 April. The AGILE instrument is made of an array of 12 planes that are each equipped with a tungsten converter and silicon microstrip detectors, and is sensitive in the energy range 50 MeV-10 GeV. Among the space instruments devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics, AGILE uniquely exploit an analog readout system with dedicated electronics coupled with silicon detectors. We show the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out to reproduce the gamma-ray detection by the GRID and we compare them to in-flight data. We use the Crab (pulsar + Nebula) system for discussion of real data performance, since its {E}-2 energy spectrum is representative of the majority of gamma-ray sources. For Crab-like spectrum sources, the GRID angular resolution (FWHM of ˜ 4^\\circ at 100 MeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8 at 1 GeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 9 integrating the full energy band from 100 MeV to tens of GeV) is stable across a large field of view, characterized by a flat response up to 30^\\circ off-axis. A comparison of the angular resolution obtained by the two operational gamma-ray instruments, AGILE/GRID and Fermi/LAT (Large Area Telescope), is interesting in view of future gamma-ray missions, which are currently under study. The two instruments exploit different detector configurations that affect the angular resolution: the former is optimized in the readout and track reconstruction, especially in the low-energy band, the latter is optimized in terms of converter thickness and power consumption. We show that despite these differences, the angular resolution of both instruments is very similar, between 100 MeV and a few GeV.

  9. The Effect of Weak Gravitational Lensing on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. L. R.

    1996-12-01

    If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cosmologically distributed standard candles and are associated with the luminous galaxies, then the observed angular distribution of all GRBs is altered as a result of weak gravitational lensing of bursts by density inhomogeneities. The amplitude of the effect is generally small. For example, if the current catalogs extend to z_max_ ~ 1 and we live in a flat {OMEGA} = 1 universe, the angular autocorrelation function of GRBs will be enhanced by ~8% as a result of lensing, on all angular scales. For an extreme case of z_max_ = 1.5 and ({OMEGA}, {LAMBDA}) = (0.2, 0.8), an enhancement of ~33% is predicted. If the observed distribution of GRBs is used in the future to derive power spectra of mass density fluctuations on large angular scales, the effect of weak lensing should probably be taken into account.

  10. Automated and Angular Time-Synchronized Directional Gamma-Ray Scintillation Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Stan Kronenberg; George J. Brucker

    1998-12-31

    The authors' previous research resulted in directional sensors for gamma rays and X rays that have a 4{pi} solid angle of acceptance and, at the same time, a high angular resolution that is limited only by our ability to measure small angles. Angular resolution of {approx}1 s of arc was achieved. These sensors are capable of operating and accurately detecting high and very low intensity radiation patterns. Such a system can also be used to image broad area sources and their scattering patterns.

  11. Modes of correlated angular motion in live cells across three distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew W; Kenwright, David A; Waigh, Thomas A; Woodman, Philip G; Allan, Victoria J

    2013-06-01

    Particle tracking experiments with high speed digital microscopy yield the positions and trajectories of lipid droplets inside living cells. Angular correlation analysis shows that the lipid droplets have uncorrelated motion at short time scales (τ < 1 ms) followed by anti-persistent motion for lag times in the range of 1 ⩽ τ ⩽ 10 ms. The angular correlation at longer time scales, τ > 10 ms, becomes persistent, indicating directed movement. The motion at all time scales is associated with the lipid droplets being tethered to and driven along the microtubule network. The point at which the angular correlation changes from anti-persistent to persistent motion corresponds to the cross over between sub-diffusive and super diffusive motion, as observed by mean square displacement analysis. Correct analysis of the angular correlations of the detector noise is found to be crucial in modelling the observed phenomena. PMID:23574726

  12. A Note on the Ratio of Positively Correlated Gamma Variates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    The density function and corresponding moments for the ratio of correlated gamma distributed variates were derived. A class of bivariate gamma distributions was also considered, and additional distributional results which use this class of functions were also derived. Similar results, by using a different class of bivariate gamma distributions, are presented.

  13. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of Its Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic γ-ray background (CGB), at a level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter on scales from a few tens of arcminutes to several degrees, together with complementary GLAST observations of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazar luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  14. Shower disc sampling and the angular resolution of gamma-ray shower detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the design study for the new UHE gamma ray detector being constsructed at Haverah Park, a series of experiments using scintillators operated side-by-side in 10 to the 15th power eV air showers are undertaken. Investigation of the rms sampling fluctuations in the shower disc arrival time yields an upper limit to the intrinsic sampling uncertainty, sigma sub rms = (1.1 + or - 0.1)ns, implying an angular resolution capability 1 deg for an inter-detector spacing of approximately 25 m.

  15. Studies of point-defect interactions in solids using perturbed angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhmann, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Vacancy defect production and migration in {sup 111}In doped Au, Pt and Ni following plastic deformation are studied via {sup 111}Cd perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlations (TDPAC). In all three metals, deformation produces the same defect species as are seen following irradiation. In Au, a particular In-vacancy complex which is probably a trapped divacancy exists in two distinct configurations. Thermal conversion from one configuration to the other occurs near 200K. In Pt, an In-vacancy complex exhibits a strongly temperature dependent electric field gradient, indicating the presence of local resonant modes. In Ni, a relaxed In-trivacancy complex forms via simple, single-step trapping of a migrating trivacancy. Once formed, the In-trivacancy complex in Ni can trap up to four guest H or D atoms. These are bound to the complex with an energy of {approximately}0.5 eV, irrespective of isotopic mass. By monitoring the damping of the TDPAC precession not associated with a bound defect, the author observed release of untrapped interstitial H from the lattice. These experiments give a consistent, microscopic picture of H diffusion and release from Ni. The use of BaF{sub 2} scintillators allows for an eightfold improvement in TDPAC time resolution. This makes possible experiments in systems previously inaccessible due to large precessional frequencies. The author demonstrates the utility of BaF{sub 2} in several examples, including {sup 100}RhNi, {sup 99}TcFe, {sup 101}RuFe, {sup 100}RhCo and {sup 100}RhFe, systems which had not been studied previously due to time resolution limitation. The Larmor frequency for {sup 100}RhFe, 5565 Mrad/s, is the highest frequency ever measured via TDPAC.

  16. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies of the 133Ba ion uptake in bone crystals.

    PubMed

    Rimbert, J N; Kellershohn, C; Dumas, F; Hubert, C

    1981-03-01

    TDPAC measurements of the 356-81 keV gamma-ray cascade resulting from electron capture decay of 133Ba have been performed at room temperature on BaCl2 (aqueous solution and polycrystalline powder), and on samples where the 133Ba nucleus is bound to bone powder, and also to synthesised hydroxylapatite, all after absorption in vitro. As expected, the angular correlation is not perturbed in the solution. However, in the polycrystalline chloride the time dependence of the anisotropy of the cascade of 133Cs nuclide indicates that the decaying nucleus undergoes electric interactions due to different electric field gradients acting at the site of the nucleus. In 133Ba-bone powder the results show a static quadrupolar interaction differing with the absorption contact time during sample preparation, indicating that depth of 133Ba ion fixation in the bone crystal is dependent on this contact time. These results seem to be confirmed by the TDPAC measurements performed on 133Ba-hydroxylapatite samples where the contact times for absorption of active-ion 133Ba and hydroxylapatite in suspension were very different. PMID:7220599

  17. New Statistical Results on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, Lajos G.; Horvath, Istvan; Vavrek, Roland

    2008-05-22

    We presented the results of several statistical tests of the randomness in the angular sky-distribution of gamma-ray bursts in BATSE Catalog. Thirteen different tests were presented based on Voronoi tesselation, Minimal spanning tree and Multifractal spectrum for five classes (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) of gamma-ray bursts, separately. The long1 and long2 classes are distributed randomly. The intermediate subclass, in accordance with the earlier results of the authors, is distributed non-randomly. Concerning the short subclass earlier statistical tests also suggested some departure from the random distribution, but not on a high enough confidence level. The new tests presented in this article suggest also non-randomness here.

  18. Angular correlations in gluon production at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-02-01

    We present a general, model independent argument demonstrating that gluons produced in high energy hadronic collision are necessarily correlated in rapidity and also in the emission angle. The strength of the correlation depends on the process and on the structure/model of the colliding particles. In particular we argue that it is strongly affected (and underestimated) by factorized approximations frequently used to quantify the effect.

  19. The Angular Power Spectrum of BATSE 3B Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegmark, Max; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Briggs, Michael S.; Meegan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the angular power spectrum C(sub l) from the BATSE 3B catalog of 1122 gamma-ray bursts and find no evidence for clustering on any scale. These constraints bridge the entire range from small scales (which probe source clustering and burst repetition) to the largest scales (which constrain possible anisotropics from the Galactic halo or from nearby cosmological large-scale structures). We develop an analysis technique that takes the angular position errors into account. For specific clustering or repetition models, strong upper limits can be obtained down to scales l approx. equal to 30, corresponding to a couple of degrees on the sky. The minimum-variance burst weighting that we employ is visualized graphically as an all-sky map in which each burst is smeared out by an amount corresponding to its position uncertainty. We also present separate bandpass-filtered sky maps for the quadrupole term and for the multipole ranges l = 3-10 and l = 11-30, so that the fluctuations on different angular scales can be inspected separately for visual features such as localized 'hot spots' or structures aligned with the Galactic plane. These filtered maps reveal no apparent deviations from isotropy.

  20. Correlation of radio and gamma emissions in lightning initiation.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Thu, W M; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2013-10-18

    The results of simultaneous radio and gamma emission measurements during thunderstorms are presented. A gamma detector situated at the height 3840 m and two radio detectors of Tien-Shan Mountain Scientific Station (altitude 3340 m) registered intensive gamma flashes and radio pulses during the time of lightning initiation. The radio-gamma correlation grows abruptly at the initial moment (a few hundred microseconds), and the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9-0.95. The gamma-energy spectrum measured during lightning initiation is close to the characteristic spectrum of runaway breakdown. Radio pulses observed at the same time have highest amplitudes. Combined observation of gamma and radio emissions confirm the conception of lightning initiation due to multiple simultaneous electric discharges at hydrometeors stimulated and synchronized by low-energy electrons generated in the runaway breakdown process. PMID:24182272

  1. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Markus; Butz, Tilman; Iwig, Kornelius

    2011-06-15

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the {gamma}-{gamma} correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a {sup 60}Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF{sub 2} scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a {sup 44}Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using {sup 22}Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 x 10{sup 6} {gamma} quanta per detector and second.

  2. ISOTROPY IN THE TWO-POINT ANGULAR CORRELATION FUNCTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sophie

    2012-04-01

    We study the directional dependence of the angular two-point correlation function in maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose two new statistics: one which measures the correlation of each point in the sky with a ring of points separated an angle {theta} away, and a second one that measures the missing angular correlation above 60 deg as a function of direction. Using these statistics, we find that most of the low power in cut-sky maps measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment comes from unusually low contributions from the directions of the lobes of the quadrupole and the octupole. These findings may aid a future explanation of why the CMB exhibits low power at large angular scales.

  3. Angular signatures of dark matter in the diffuse gamma ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2007-06-01

    Dark matter annihilating in our galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this paper, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation, in particular the deterministic ones. We discuss the effect, pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if ~10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies at the sub-per cent level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

  4. Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if {approx} 10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies down to the 0.1% level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

  5. Investigation of the reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O, f): Folding angular distributions of fission fragments and gamma-ray multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rusanov, A. Ya. Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Chubarian, G. G.

    2007-10-15

    Correlations between folding angular distributions of fission fragments and the gamma-ray multiplicity are studied for {sup 18}O + {sup 208}Pb interactions at energies of the beam of {sup 18}O ions in the range E{sub lab} = 78-198.5 MeV. The probabilities are determined for complete-and incomplete-fusion processes inevitably followed by the fission of nuclei formed in these processes. It is found that the probability of incomplete fusion followed by fission increases with increasing energy of bombarding ions. It is shown that, for the incomplete-fusion process, folding angular distributions of fission fragments have a two-component structure. The width of folding angular distributions (FWHM) for complete fusion grows linearly with increasing energy of {sup 18}O ions. The multiplicity of gamma rays from fission fragments as a function of the linear-momentum transfer behaves differently for different energies of projectile ions. This circumstance is explained here by the distinction between the average angular momenta of participant nuclei in the fusion and fission channels, which is due to the difference in the probabilities of fission in the cases where different numbers of nucleons are captured by the target nucleus.

  6. Angular correlations in radiative cascades following resonant electron capture by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Matula, O.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the angular correlations between the photons emitted in the dielectronic recombination (DR) of initially hydrogenlike heavy ions. The theoretical analysis is performed based on a density-matrix approach and Dirac's relativistic theory. Special emphasis has been placed upon the effects of the higher-order, nondipole terms in the expansion of the electron-photon interaction. To illustrate these effects, we present and discuss detailed calculations for K-LL DR of initially hydrogenlike xenon, gold, and uranium. These computations show that the angular correlations are significantly affected by interference between the leading electric-dipole (E1) and the magnetic-quadrupole (M2) transitions.

  7. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information. PMID:19642631

  8. Theory and imaging applications of the angular correlation of multiply-scattered optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brian Gilday

    Through analysis of the field angular correlation the scattering of quasimonochromatic optical fields is considered as a coherence-based process well into the multiple scattering regime. Coherence analysis leads to the prediction of coherent effects in multiply-scattered light that can be applied to perform computed amplitude- phase imaging through turbid media and noninvasive laser material characterization. With the incentive of improved imaging through turbid media an experiment is described that directly compares the degradations, with the number of scattering mean free paths, of the field angular correlation and the correlation of the scattered wave with an unscattered reference wave, both of which can be used to form gates for imaging techniques in scattered light. Results for 20μ m polymer spheres show that the former correlation is consistently larger well into the multiple scattering regime (up to 10 mean free paths) for wavevector separations less than at least 50mm -1, and that the two correlations tend to merge in this scattering regime for larger wavevector separations. The implications of the results for imaging applications are considered. Complementary theoretical formulations of coherence effects in multiply-scattered fields are presented. Relations of the spatial coherence properties to the angular characteristics of the scattered field are established. A coherence-based model of multiple scattering processes is derived. The model predicts radiative-transfer-like behavior for restricted observational parameters, but also shows that the coherence-based process is required for an accurate description of the scattered field over an observational parameters. The applicability of the model to noninvasive laser material characterization is emphasized. A wavefront-sensor method is presented for measurement of the complex field angular correlation function of a three-dimensional turbid medium. The angular correlation function is measured at a series of

  9. Correlation of angular and lateral distributions of electrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Legumina, Remigiusz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the weak correlation of the angular and lateral deflections of electrons in extensive air showers in the primary energy range 1016-1019 eV, when compared with that in some models of electron propagation. We derive analytical formulae for the correlation coefficient in the multiple scattering model with energy losses and show a strong role of the ionisation in diminishing the correlation. By considering a Heitler-like model of an electromagnetic cascade we show also that the presence of photons, parent to electrons, causes a decrease of the correlation, roughly explaining quantitatively the small correlation in air showers.

  10. Matrix elements of explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with arbitrary angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Tennesse; Varga, Kálmán

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for calculating the Hamiltonian matrix elements with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions for quantum-mechanical calculations of atoms with arbitrary angular momentum is presented. The calculations are checked on several excited states of three and four electron systems. The presented formalism can be used as unified framework for high accuracy calculations of properties of small atoms and molecules.

  11. Effects of angular correlations on particle-particle propagation in infinite nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, J.; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of angular correlations on self-consistent solutions for single-particle (sp) potentials in infinite nuclear matter is investigated. To this end we treat explicitly the angular dependence of the particle-particle (pp) propagator in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) equation for the g matrix. It is observed that the exact angular dependence of the pp propagator yields highly fluctuating structures, posing stringent difficulties in the actual search of self-consistent solutions for the sp energy. A perturbative approach is presented to evaluate the effect of the angular correlations in the self-consistent solutions. Solutions at Fermi momenta kF in the range 1.20 - 1.75 fm-1 are reported using Argonne v 18 nucleon- nucleon potential. Although the sp potentials are sensitive to the treatment of the angular behaviour of the propagator, such sensitivity appears at momenta well above the Fermi surface. As a result, the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter differ marginally from those calculated using angle-averaged energy denominators in pp propagators.

  12. Automated and angular time-synchronized directional gamma-ray scintillation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The authors` previous research resulted in directional sensors for gamma rays and X rays that have a 4{pi} solid angle of acceptance and, at the same time, a high angular resolution that is limited only by their ability to measure small angles. Angular resolution of {approximately}1 s of arc was achieved. These sensors are capable of operating and accurately detecting high and very low intensity radiation patterns. Such a system can also be used to image broad area sources and their scattering patterns. The principle of operation and design of directional sensors used in this study was described elsewhere; however, for convenience, a part of that text is repeated here. It was shown analytically that the angular distribution of radiation incident on the sensor is proportional to the first derivative of the scan data, that is, of the events` count rate versus orientation of the detector. The previously published results were obtained with a annual operating system. The detector assembly was set at a specific angle, and a pulse rate count was made. This was repeated at numerous other angles of orientation, a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. Recently, the authors automated this system, which is based on the detection of scintillations. The detector, which consists of a stack of plates of Lucite, plastic scintillator, and lead foils, rotates by means of a motor in front of a stationary photomultiplier tube (PMT). One revolution per second was chosen for the motor. At time zero, a trigger indicates that a revolution has started. The angle of orientation of the detector in the laboratory system is proportional to the time during one revolution. The process repeats itself a desired number of times. The trigger signal initiates a scan of a multichannel scalar (MCS). The detector assembly is allowed to rotate in the radiation field, and the MCS scans are repeated in an accumulated mode of operation until enough events are collected for the location of the

  13. Measurements on B-hadron angular correlations at 7 TeV with the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Leonardo; CMS Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A measurement of the angular correlations between beauty and anti-beauty hadrons produced in LHC proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV is presented, probing for the first time the small angular separation region. The B hadrons are identified by the presence of secondary vertices from their decays and their kinematics reconstructed combining the decay vertex with the primary interaction vertex. The results are compared with predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations at leading and next-to-leading order.

  14. The impact of angular separation on the performance of biplane correlation imaging for lung nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasab, Nariman Majdi; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of biplane correlation imaging (BCI) using a set of off-angle projections acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom. BCI reduces the effect of anatomical noise, which would otherwise impact the detection subtle lesions in planar images. BCI also minimizes the number of false positives (FPs) when used in conjunction with computer aided diagnosis (CAD) applied to a set of coronal chest x-ray projections by eliminating non-correlated nodule candidates. In BCI, two digital images of the chest are acquired within a short time interval from two slightly different posterior projections. The image data are then incorporated into the CAD algorithm in which nodules are detected by examining the geometrical correlation of the detected signals in the two views, thus largely "canceling" the impact of anatomical noise. Seventy-one low exposure posterior projections were acquired of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing tissue equivalent lesions with small angular separations (0.32 degree) over a range of 20 degrees, [-10°, +10°], along the vertical axis. The data were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the technique as a function of angular separation. The results indicated that the best performance was obtained when the angular separation of the projection pair was greater than 6 degrees. Within the range of optimum angular separation, the number of FPs per image, FPpI, was ~1.1 with average sensitivity around 75% (supported by a grant from the NIH R01CA109074).

  15. Correlations among angular wave component amplitudes in elastic multiple-scattering random media.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Brian G; Deslauriers, Louis; Grannell, Shawn M; Ahmed, Rizwan E; Dilworth, David S; Athey, Brian D; Leith, Emmett N

    2002-02-01

    The propagation of scalar waves through random media that provide multiple elastic scattering is considered by derivation of an expression for the angular correlation of the scattered wave amplitudes. Coherent wave transmission is shown to occur through a mechanism similar to that responsible for coherent backscattering. While the properties of the scattered wave are generally consistent with radiative-transfer theory for sufficiently small incident and scattering angles, coherent transmission provides corrections to radiative-transfer results at larger angles. The theoretical angular correlation curves are fit, by specifying the probability densities of two random variables that correspond to material parameters, to measured data of laser light scattering from various polymer microsphere suspensions. PMID:11863685

  16. Soft gluon resummations in dijet azimuthal angular correlations in hadronic collisions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Feng

    2014-12-01

    We derive all order soft gluon resummation in dijet azimuthal angular correlation in hadronic collisions at the next-to-leading logarithmic level. The relevant coefficients for the Sudakov resummation factor, the soft and hard factors, are calculated. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental data from D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron. This provides a benchmark calculation for the transverse momentum dependent QCD resummation for jet productions in hadron collisions. PMID:25526118

  17. Diffraction limited gamma-ray optics using Fresnel lenses for micro-arc second angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, G.; von Ballmoos, P.; Gehrels, N.; Krzmanic, J.

    2003-03-01

    Refractive indices at gamma-ray wavelengths are such that material thicknesses of the order of millimeters allow the phase of a wavefront to be changed by up to 2π . Thus a phase Fresnel lens can be made from a simple profiled thin disk of, for example, aluminium or plastic. Such a lens can easily have a collecting area of several square meters and an efficiency >90%. Ordinary engineering tolerances allow the manufacture of a lens which can be diffraction limited in the pico-meter wavelength band (up to ˜MeV) and thus provides a simple optical system with angular resolution better than a micro arc second i.e. the resolution necessary to resolve structures on the scale of the event horizon of super-massive black holes in AGN. However the focal length of such a lens is very long - up to a million km. Nevertheless studies have shown that a mission `Fresnel' using a detector and a phase Fresnel lens on two station-keeping spacecraft separated by such a distance is feasible. Results from these studies and work on other proof of concept studies are presented.

  18. LACK OF ANGULAR CORRELATION AND ODD-PARITY PREFERENCE IN COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the angular correlation in the recent cosmic microwave background data. In addition to the known large-angle correlation anomaly, we find the lack of correlation at small angles with high statistical significance. We have investigated various non-cosmological contamination as well as the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team's simulated data. However, we have not found a definite cause. In the angular power spectrum of WMAP data, there exists anomalous odd-parity preference at low multipoles. Noting the equivalence between the power spectrum and the correlation, we have investigated the association between the lack of large-angle correlation and the odd-parity preference. From our investigation, we find that the odd-parity preference at low multipoles is, in fact, a phenomenological origin of the lack of large-angle correlation. Further investigation is required to find out whether the origin of the anomaly is cosmological or due to unaccounted systematics. The data from the Planck surveyor, which has systematics distinct from WMAP, will greatly help us to resolve its origin.

  19. Angular momenta correlation in kinematically constrained reactions. II. Application to the B + OH BO + H system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Margarita; Gimenez, Xavier; Aguilar, Antonio; Gonzalez Urena, Angel

    Extensive quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out to study the disposal of both rotational and orbital angular momentum in the B + OH BO + H reaction. The potential energy surface (PES) of this reaction shows two minima associated with the HOB and HBO configurations. In addition, two distinct PESs were used each having a different geometrical structure of the HOB intermediate: bent for surface 1 and linear for surface 2. For the title reaction the product angular momentum disposal shows significant deviations from the kinematic limit expected for a heavy + heavy-light (HH L) reaction. The analysis of the product angular momenta distribution clearly indicates a correlation with the topology of the PES used. It was found that while the insertion mechanism associated with PES1 (HOB bent intermediate) favours a significant disposal into product rotational and orbital momenta, little disposal into both momenta is obtained for reactive trajectories occurring through the collinear HOB intermediate of PES2, for which BO is highly stretched. A simple modification of the conventional kinematic expressions, aimed at incorporating the effect of the dynamics into the angular momenta transfer, is proposed and tested. Modified expressions give results strongly consistent with those obtained from QCT calculations.

  20. Perturbed angular correlation experiments on the pressure-induced structural modification of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ceolín, M

    2000-09-11

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by means of the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (up to 4.1 kbar) applied to the sample. The results have clearly shown that at moderated pressures (around 1.5 kbar) the BSA molecule suffers structural modifications which produces an increase of the molecular volume and the rotational correlation time of the molecule. About the reversibility of the process, our results indicate that the changes are fully irreversible. Our experiments are the first devoted to the study of the high-pressure behaviour of biological molecules using the PAC technique. PMID:10989128

  1. Angular correlations in the two-photon decay of heliumlike heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surzhykov, A.; Fratini, F.; Volotka, A.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.; Plunien, G.; Stoehlker, Th.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-04-15

    The two-photon decay of heavy, helium-like ions is investigated based on second-order perturbation theory and Dirac's relativistic equation. Special attention has been paid to the angular emission of the two photons (i.e., how the angular correlation function depends on the shell structure of the ions in their initial and final states). Moreover, the effects from the (electric and magnetic) nondipole terms in the expansion of the electron-photon interaction are discussed. Detailed calculations have been carried out for the two-photon decay of the 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1}, and 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0} states of helium-like Xe{sup 52+}, Au{sup 77+}, and U{sup 90+} ions.

  2. Hyperspherical explicitly correlated Gaussian approach for four-body systems with finite angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, D.; Blume, D.

    2012-06-01

    It has been predicted that four-body systems with angular momentum L=1 and parity π=+1 exhibit four-body resonances [1,2] and Efimov physics [3]. To treat these phenomena in the hyperspherical framework, we extend the work of von Stecher and Greene [4] to finite angular momenta. In particular, we employ explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with global vectors to solve the hyperangular Schr"odinger equation for four-body systems with L^π=1^+ and 1^- symmetry. We apply the approach to four-fermion systems with unequal masses.[4pt] [1] K. M. Daily and D. Blume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 170403 (2010).[0pt] [2] S. Gandolfi and J. Carlson, arXiv: 1006.5186v1.[0pt] [3] Y. Castin, C. Mora and L. Pricoupenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 223201 (2010).[0pt] [4] J. von Stecher and C. H. Greene, Phys. Rev. A. 80, 022504 (2009).

  3. Angular Correlation of Electrons Emitted by Double Auger Decay of K-Shell Ionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Philip

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated in detail the 4-body continuum state produced when core-ionized neon undergoes Double-Auger (DA) decay, using COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS ). We conducted the experiment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (LBNL-ALS) beamline 11.0.2. The synchrotron operated in 2-bunch mode and outputted an elliptically polarized, pulsed photon beam (hn=872.9eV), sufficient to K-shell ionize neon just above threshold. Our analysis supports research showing that Auger electrons tend to share energy asymmetrically. We qualitatively compared this result to Photo-Double Ionization (PDI) of helium. Further, we confirm research that shows how Auger electrons that share energy symmetrically can be modeled by the elastic-like knock-out process plus Post-Collision Interaction ( PCI) effects. New observations include the angular correlation between the photo-electron and each respective Auger electron, for specific ranges of energy sharing. We identify a broad feature in the asymmetric case that shows a level of interaction between electrons that until recently, has disagreed with theory. Additionally, we consider the angular correlation between the photo-electron and the momentum sum of the Auger electrons. We observe that the angular correlation between this sum and the photo-electron in the highly asymmetric case is nearly identical to the correlation between just the fast-Auger and the photo-electron - as expected. In the case of symmetric energy sharing, the sum momentum vector appears to be isotropic, particularly for small angles of interaction. Finally, we acknowledge two novel methods of calibration. The first, uses well known line-energies to calibrate the spectrometer. These lines correspond to the decay channels of core-excited neon, Ne(1 s-13p). The second, describes a method to statistically weight list-mode data in order to calibrate it to well known physical features (e.g., isotropic distributions).

  4. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  5. KINEMATIC ORIGIN OF CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il

    2012-04-20

    Recently, several new correlations between gamma-ray burst (GRB) observables have been discovered. Like previously well-established correlations, they challenge GRB models. Here, we show that in the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, the newly discovered correlations have the same simple kinematic origin as those discovered earlier. They all result from the strong dependence of the observed radiations on the Lorentz and Doppler factors of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates.

  6. Angular correlation of the cosmic microwave background in the Rh = ct Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, F.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The emergence of several unexpected large-scale features in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has pointed to possible new physics driving the origin of density fluctuations in the early Universe and their evolution into the large-scale structure we see today. Aims: In this paper, we focus our attention on the possible absence of angular correlation in the CMB anisotropies at angles larger than ~60°, and consider whether this feature may be the signature of fluctuations expected in the Rh = ct Universe. Methods: We calculate the CMB angular correlation function for a fluctuation spectrum expected from growth in a Universe whose dynamics is constrained by the equation-of-state p = -ρ/3, where p and ρ are the total pressure and density, respectively. Results: We find that, though the disparity between the predictions of ΛCDM and the WMAP sky may be due to cosmic variance, it may also be due to an absence of inflation. The classic horizon problem does not exist in the Rh = ct Universe, so a period of exponential growth was not necessary in this cosmology in order to account for the general uniformity of the CMB (save for the aforementioned tiny fluctuations of 1 part in 100 000 in the WMAP relic signal). Conclusions: We show that the Rh = ct Universe without inflation can account for the apparent absence in CMB angular correlation at angles θ ≳ 60° without invoking cosmic variance, providing additional motivation for pursuing this cosmology as a viable description of nature.

  7. Thermalization of positronium atoms studied with time-resolved angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, S.; Iwata, T.; Kawashima, K.; Saito, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Hyodo, T.

    2000-06-01

    Time dependence of the kinetic energy of positronium atoms in the free space between the grains of a pressed tablet (1 g/cm 3) of ultrafine silica powder (Cab-O-Sil EH-5) has been measured with time-resolved angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) apparatus. The apparatus has a momentum resolution of 1.29×10 -3 mc in full width at half maximum and a time resolution of 2.7 ns in full width at half maximum. It is found that the energy of positronium falls below 0.1e V in ˜10 ns after the formation.

  8. Perturbed angular correlation study of radiation-induced defects in Rh metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawda, M.; Patel, N.; Sebastian, K. C.; Somayajulu, D. R. S.; Sarkar, M.; Singh, R. P.; Murlithar, S.; Awasthi, D. K.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation-induced defects are studied in cubic rhodium metal, using the local probe technique 'Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) at liquid N-2 temperature. Isochronal annealing was done at 300, 1073 and 1473 K temperatures. The irradiated sample showed two quadrupole interaction frequencies at 1150 and 93 MHz. The low frequency disappeared at room-temperature annealing, which was assigned to In trapped at a vacancy, whereas the higher frequency remained up to high temperatures and was attributed to In trapped at Rh-C complexes in the Rh matrix.

  9. A Precision Measurement of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations with Polarized Pulsed Cold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Pil-Neyo

    2004-05-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing an experiment to measure the neutron beta decay angular correlations, a, b, B, A, to 0.1the very high pulsed cold neutron intensities in a new nuclear physics beam line that is under construction at SNS. The design of the experiment is based on three important technical advances: the pulsed cold neutron beam, a polarized ^3He neutron spin filter, and large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both electrons and protons resulting from the decay will be guided in the spectrometer by electric and magnetic fields and then detected in coincidence with two 2π large-segmented silicon detectors. Measuring the correlations in the same apparatus provides a redundant measurement of λ=G_A/G_V. I will describe the experiment and report the status of the development.

  10. Angular correlation between photoelectrons and auger electrons from K-shell ionization of neon.

    PubMed

    Landers, A L; Robicheaux, F; Jahnke, T; Schöffler, M; Osipov, T; Titze, J; Lee, S Y; Adaniya, H; Hertlein, M; Ranitovic, P; Bocharova, I; Akoury, D; Bhandary, A; Weber, Th; Prior, M H; Cocke, C L; Dörner, R; Belkacem, A

    2009-06-01

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process. PMID:19658860

  11. Angular Correlation between Photoelectrons and Auger Electrons from K-Shell Ionization of Neon

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, A. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Bhandary, A.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Titze, J.; Akoury, D.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Lee, S. Y.; Adaniya, H.; Hertlein, M.; Weber, Th.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Bocharova, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2009-06-05

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process.

  12. Mitigating systematic errors in angular correlation function measurements from wide field surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C. B.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present an investigation into the effects of survey systematics such as varying depth, point spread function size, and extinction on the galaxy selection and correlation in photometric, multi-epoch, wide area surveys. We take the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) as an example. Variations in galaxy selection due to systematics are found to cause density fluctuations of up to 10 per cent for some small fraction of the area for most galaxy redshift slices and as much as 50 per cent for some extreme cases of faint high-redshift samples. This results in correlations of galaxies against survey systematics of order ˜1 per cent when averaged over the survey area. We present an empirical method for mitigating these systematic correlations from measurements of angular correlation functions using weighted random points. These weighted random catalogues are estimated from the observed galaxy overdensities by mapping these to survey parameters. We are able to model and mitigate the effect of systematic correlations allowing for non-linear dependences of density on systematics. Applied to CFHTLenS, we find that the method reduces spurious correlations in the data by a factor of 2 for most galaxy samples and as much as an order of magnitude in others. Such a treatment is particularly important for an unbiased estimation of very small correlation signals, as e.g. from weak gravitational lensing magnification bias. We impose a criterion for using a galaxy sample in a magnification measurement of the majority of the systematic correlations show improvement and are less than 10 per cent of the expected magnification signal when combined in the galaxy cross-correlation. After correction the galaxy samples in CFHTLenS satisfy this criterion for zphot < 0.9 and will be used in a future analysis of magnification.

  13. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-21

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pT’s of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f˜0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  14. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pT?s of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f?0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  15. Characteristics of angular cross correlations studied by light scattering from two-dimensional microsphere films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, M. A.; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.

    2014-07-01

    Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψl(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψl(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.

  16. Neutron-neutron angular correlations in spontaneous and neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, such average fission models have limited interaction-by-interaction capabilities. Energy is not explicitly conserved and no correlations are available because all particles are emitted isotropically and independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications, including detecting small amounts of material and detector development. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Such codes, when included in broader Monte Carlo transport codes, like MCNP, can be made broadly available. We compare results from our fast event-by-event fission code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) with available neutron-neutron angular correlation data and study the sensitivities of these observables to the model inputs. This work was done under the auspices of the US DOE by (RV) LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by (JR) LBNL, Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  17. Monte-Carlo studies of the angular resolution of a future Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of this observational technique, providing high sensitivity and an angular resolution of {approx}0.1 deg. per event above an energy threshold of {approx}100 GeV. Planned future arrays of IACTs such as AGIS or CTA are aiming at significantly improving the angular resolution. Preliminary results have shown that values down to {approx}1' might be achievable. Here we present the results of Monte-Carlo simulations that aim to exploring the limits of angular resolution for next generation IACTs and investigate how the resolution can be optimised by changes to array and telescope parameters such as the number of pixel in the camera, the field of view of the camera, the angular pixel size, the mirror size, and also the telescope separation.

  18. Magnetic interaction in NdScGe: a local investigation by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. N.; Dhar, S. K.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions for the 111Cd probe nucleus in the equi-atomic ferromagnetic compound NdScGe (T_{\\mathrm {c}}\\sim 200 K) have been investigated by the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The Cd probe occupying the Sc site experiences a large magnetic hyperfine field with saturation value Bhf(0) = -8.5 T. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data in Nd metal and estimates made with the RKKY interaction, we find an indication for sizeable spin polarization of the conduction electrons in NdScGe. In addition, we find evidence of lattice softening near the Curie temperature reflected by an abrupt decrease in the quadrupole interaction frequency ngrQ(T).

  19. Hyperfine magnetic field at Ta impurities in nickel: Perturbed angular correlation and first principle calculation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekić, B. Dj.; Umićević, A. B.; Belošević-Čavor, J. N.; Koteski, V. J.; Ivanovski, V. N.; Stojković, M. N.

    2008-03-01

    The hyperfine magnetic field (H) in 0.2 at.% Hf-Ni alloy is measured at the 181Ta probe using the time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method, in the temperature range 78-675 K. The obtained value of 8.6 (3) T at room temperature is in good agreement with the previously reported measurements for similar Hf concentrations in Ni. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments confirmed that small atomic concentrations of Hf atoms (<1 at.%) mainly substitute on Ni lattice sites in the fcc crystal lattice without forming any intermetallic phase. In addition, ab-initio calculation using all-electron augmented plane waves plus local orbitals (APW+lo) formalism is performed and the obtained result for the hyperfine magnetic field at Ta site is in accordance with the measurement.

  20. The muon capture in {sup 16}O: the angular and polarization correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Isakov, V. I.

    2012-02-15

    Longitudinal polarization of the daughter nuclei {sup 16}N which arises in Micro-Sign {sup -} capture on {sup 16}O as a function of the recoil angle, together with the angular distribution and the alignment of the recoil nucleus are calculated. The neutrinos born escape mainly along the muon spin. The polarization is found to vary from zero (recoil momentum counter to the muon spin direction) up to 50% (along the muon spin direction). The results can be applied to the experimental tests of T conservation, to the analysis of the projects of constructing the powerful mono-energetic neutrino sources, to the experimental study of the pseudo-scalar form factor and the K-electron capture, and to other spin-polarization correlation experiments.

  1. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, J. P.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal.

  2. Neural correlates for angular head velocity in the rat dorsal tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J P; Taube, J S

    2001-08-01

    Many neurons in the rat lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) fire selectively in relation to the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane independent of the rat's location or behavior. One hypothesis of how this representation is generated and updated is via subcortical projections from the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN). Here we report the type of activity in DTN neurons. The majority of cells (75%) fired as a function of the rat's angular head velocity (AHV). Cells exhibited one of two types of firing patterns: (1) symmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with AHV during head turns in both directions, and (2) asymmetric, in which the firing rate was positively correlated with head turns in one direction and correlated either negatively or not at all in the opposite direction. In addition to modulation by AHV, some of the AHV cells (40.1%) were weakly modulated by the rat's linear velocity, and a smaller number were modulated by HD (11%) or head pitch (15.9%). Autocorrelation analyses indicated that with the head stationary, AHV cells displayed irregular discharge patterns. Because afferents from the DTN are the major source of information projecting to the LMN, these results suggest that AHV information from the DTN plays a significant role in generating the HD signal in LMN. A model is proposed showing how DTN AHV cells can generate and update the LMN HD cell signal. PMID:11466446

  3. LORENTZ-FACTOR-ISOTROPIC-LUMINOSITY/ENERGY CORRELATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Jing; Zou Yuanchuan; Lei Weihua; Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong; Zhang Bing; Lue Houjun; Liang Enwei E-mail: leiwh@hust.edu.cn

    2012-05-20

    The bulk Lorentz factor of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta ({Gamma}{sub 0}) is a key parameter to understanding GRB physics. Liang et al. have discovered a correlation between {Gamma}{sub 0} and isotropic {gamma}-ray energy: {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}E{sup 0.25}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. By including more GRBs with updated data and more methods to derive {Gamma}{sub 0}, we confirm this correlation and obtain {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 91E{sup 0.29}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. Evaluating the mean isotropic {gamma}-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma},iso} of the GRBs in the same sample, we discover an even tighter correlation {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 249L{sup 0.30}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. We propose an interpretation to this later correlation. Invoking a neutrino-cooled hyperaccretion disk around a stellar mass black hole as the central engine of GRBs, we derive jet luminosity powered by neutrino annihilation and baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind. Applying beaming correction, we finally derive {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.22}{sub {gamma},iso}, which is consistent with the data. This suggests that the central engine of long GRBs is likely a stellar mass black hole surrounded by a hyper-accreting disk.

  4. Local structure reconstruction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon from angular correlation and synchrotron diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, D. T.; Minani, E.; Knoesen, D.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Furlan, F.; Giles, C.; Härting, M.

    2006-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a widely used thin film semiconductor material which is still incompletely understood. It is generally assumed to form a continuous random network, with a high concentration of coordination defects (dangling bonds), which are hydrogen terminated. Neither the exact nature of these sites nor the degree of medium range order has been fully determined. In this paper, we present the first results for the local structure, from a combined study using angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) and synchrotron radiation diffraction. Reciprocal space information is obtained directly, for the mesoscale structure and the local defect structure, from the orientation dependent diffraction and 2D-ACAR patterns, respectively. Furthermore, inversion of both patterns yields a comparison of real space information through maps of the silicon-silicon pair correlation function and the electron-positron autocorrelation function B2 γ( r). From this information, it is possible to identify the dominant structural defect as a vacancy-size dangling bond cluster, around which the network strain is fully relaxed.

  5. Herschel-ATLAS: The Angular Correlation Function of Submillimetre Galaxies at High and Low Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, S. J.; Dunne, L.; Rigby, E.; Eales, S.; Cooray, A.; Scott, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Benford, D.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Dye, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected from the first field of the H-ATLAS survey. Careful removal of the background from galactic cirrus is essential, and currently dominates the uncertainty in our measurements. For our 250 micrometer-selected sample we detect no significant clustering, consistent with the expectation that the 250 pm-selected sources are mostly normal galaxies at z < or equal to 1. For our 350 micrometer and 500 micrometer-selected samples we detect relatively strong clustering with correlation amplitudes A of 0.2 and 1.2 at 1', but with relatively large uncertainties. For samples which preferentially select high redshift galaxies at z approx. 2-3 we detect significant strong clustering, leading to an estimate of r(0) approx. 7-11/h Mpc. The slope of our clustering measurements is very steep. delta approx. 2. The measurements are consistent with the idea that sub-mm sources consist of a low redshift population of normal galaxies and a high redshift population of highly clustered star-bursting galaxies.

  6. Parameterization of the Angular Distribution of Gamma Rays Produced by P-P Interaction in Astronomical Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-24

    We present the angular distribution of gamma rays produced by proton-proton interactions in parameterized formulae to facilitate calculations in astrophysical environments. The parameterization is derived from Monte Carlo simulations of the up-to-date proton-proton interaction model by Kamae et al. (2005) and its extension by Kamae et al. (2006). This model includes the logarithmically rising inelastic cross section, the diffraction dissociation process and Feynman scaling violation. The extension adds two baryon resonance contributions: one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other representing multiple resonances around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. We demonstrate the use of the formulae by calculating the predicted gamma-ray spectrum for two different cases: the first is a pencil beam of protons following a power law and the second is a fanned proton jet with a Gaussian intensity profile impinging on the surrounding material. In both cases we find that the predicted gamma-ray spectrum to be dependent on the viewing angle.

  7. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  8. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  9. Angular correlations in emission of prescission neutrons from {sup 235}U fission induced by slow polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Wilpert, T.; Granz, P.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Mezei, F.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Russina, M. V.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2008-12-15

    A new approach to searching for and studying scission neutrons, which is based on the analysis of specific angular correlations in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons, is described and used to evaluate the fraction of scission neutrons in the total number of prompt neutrons of {sup 235}U fission emitted perpendicularly to the fission axis.

  10. Angular Resolution of an EAS Array for Gamma Ray Astronomy at Energies Greater Than 5 x 10 (13) Ev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apte, A. R.; Gopalakrishnan, N. V.; Tonwar, S. C.; Uma, V.

    1985-01-01

    A 24 detector extensive air shower array is being operated at Ootacamund (2300 m altitude, 11.4 deg N latitude) in southern India for a study of arrival directions of showers of energies greater than 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV. Various configurations of the array of detectors have been used to estimate the accuracy in determination of arrival angle of showers with such an array. These studies show that it is possible to achieve an angular resolution of better than 2 deg with the Ooty array for search for point sources of Cosmic gamma rays at energies above 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV.

  11. Tunable angular-dependent magnetoresistance correlations in magnetic films and their implications for spin Hall magnetoresistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. K.; Zhang, Y.; Gu, L.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, L.

    2016-02-01

    Angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) is considered to be intrinsic to spintronic materials, represented by the classical anisotropic MR (AMR) phenomenon and the recently emerged spin Hall MR (SMR). So far, isotropic AMR, AMR with geometric size effect and interfacial effect, and SMR have been treated separately to explain distinct MR correlations observed in various systems. Current study shows all four types of MR correlations can be reproduced in Fe thin films depending on the film thickness, texture, interface, and morphology. Results suggest previous explanations of the thin-film MR correlations are incomplete and it is inappropriate to use a specific MR angular-dependent correlation as the sole criterion in determining the origin of AMR or ascertaining the exclusive existence of SMR.

  12. Inconsistent [ital K]-[ital L] x-ray angular correlations in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, T.; Maxwell, J.A.; Teesdale, W.J.; Campbell, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Angular correlations between [ital K][alpha][sub 1] x rays and subsequent [ital L][sub 3] x-ray transitions were measured using a [sup 233]Pa radionuclide source and high-resolution x-ray detectors. The results provide separately the values of [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 1]) and [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 2]) as opposed to the compound quantity [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha]). For the [ital Ll] and [ital L][alpha][sub 2] transitions, the [ital A][sub 22] values agreed closely with those based upon theoretical (Hartree-Fock) [ital E]1 and [ital M]2 transition rates. For the less intense [ital L][beta][sub 6] and [ital L][beta][sub 2,15] transitions, agreement was also observed, although within larger uncertainties. In contrast, the value of [ital A][sub 22]([ital K][alpha][sub 1-][ital L][alpha][sub 1]) was 0.085[plus minus]0.007, which is somewhat larger than the predicted value of 0.073. Possible causes for this discrepancy are explored.

  13. Perturbed angular correlation study of the ion exchange of indium into silicalite zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramallo-López, J. M.; Requejo, F. G.; Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Miró, E. E.

    1999-09-01

    Two indium-containing silicalite zeolites (In/H ZSM5) catalysts prepared by wet impregnation and ionic exchange were characterized by the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique using 111In as probe to determine the nature of the indium species. Some of these species take part in the catalytic reaction of the selective reduction (SCR) of NOx with methane. PAC experiments were performed at 500ºC in air before and after reduction reoxidation treatments on the catalysts in order to determine the origin of the different hyperfine interactions and then the degree of ionic exchange. Complementary catalytic activity characterizations were also performed. PAC experiments performed on the catalyst obtained by wet impregnation showed that all In-atoms form In2O3 crystallites while almost 70% of In-atoms form In2O3 in the catalyst obtained by ionic exchange. The PAC experiments of both catalysts performed after the reduction reoxidation treatment revealed the presence of two hyperfine interactions, different from those corresponding to indium in In2O3. These hyperfine interactions should be associated to disperse In species responsible of the catalytic activity located in the ionic exchange-sites of the zeolites.

  14. RADIAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND MAGNETIC BARRIER FOR SHORT-TYPE GAMMA-RAY-BURST CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Hou Shujin; Liang Enwei; Lei Weihua; Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Dai Zigao

    2012-11-20

    Soft extended emission (EE) following initial hard spikes up to 100 s was observed with Swift/BAT for about half of known short-type gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). This challenges the conversional central engine models of SGRBs, i.e., compact star merger models. In the framework of black-hole-neutron-star merger models, we study the roles of radial angular momentum transfer in the disk and the magnetic barrier around the black hole in the activity of SGRB central engines. We show that radial angular momentum transfer may significantly prolong the lifetime of the accretion process, which may be divided into multiple episodes by the magnetic barrier. Our numerical calculations based on models of neutrino-dominated accretion flows suggest that disk mass is critical for producing the observed EE. In the case of the mass being {approx}0.8 M {sub Sun }, our model can reproduce the observed timescale and luminosity of both the main and the EE episodes in a reasonable parameter set. The predicted luminosity of the EE component is lower than the observed EE within about one order of magnitude and the timescale is shorter than 20 s if the disk mass is {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun }. Swift/BAT-like instruments may be not sensitive enough to detect the EE component in this case. We argue that the EE component could be a probe for the merger process and disk formation for compact star mergers.

  15. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  16. Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2009-10-25

    We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45°, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45° cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

  17. Three-hadron angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions from perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Ortiz, Antonio; Paic, Guy; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-08-15

    We study three-hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider at midrapidity. We use the leading-order parton matrix elements for 2{yields}3 processes and include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using the modified fragmentation function approach. For the case when the produced hadrons have either the same or not too different momenta, we observe two away-side peaks at 2{pi}/3 and 4{pi}/3. We consider the dependence of the angular correlations on energy loss parameters that have been used in studies of single inclusive hadron production at RHIC. Our results on the angular dependence of the cross section agree well with preliminary data by the PHENIX Collaboration. We comment on the possible contribution of 2{yields}3 processes to dihadron angular correlations and how a comparison of the two processes may help characterize the plasma further.

  18. The Radio–Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron–proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  19. The Radio-Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron-proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  20. Professional tennis players' serve: correlation between segmental angular momentums and ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Kulpa, Richard; Delamarche, Paul; Bideau, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the relationships between segmental angular momentum and ball velocity between the following events: ball toss, maximal elbow flexion (MEF), racket lowest point (RLP), maximal shoulder external rotation (MER), and ball impact (BI). Ten tennis players performed serves recorded with a real-time motion capture. Mean angular momentums of the trunk, upper arm, forearm, and the hand-racket were calculated. The anteroposterior axis angular momentum of the trunk was significantly related with ball velocity during the MEF-RLP, RLP-MER, and MER-BI phases. The strongest relationships between the transverse-axis angular momentums and ball velocity followed a proximal-to-distal timing sequence that allows the transfer of angular momentum from the trunk (MEF-RLP and RLP-MER phases) to the upper arm (RLP-MER phase), forearm (RLP-MER and MER-BI phases), and the hand-racket (MER-BI phase). Since sequence is crucial for ball velocity, players should increase angular momentums of the trunk during MEF-MER, upper arm during RLP-MER, forearm during RLP-BI, and the hand-racket during MER-BI. PMID:23724603

  1. A NOVEL APPROACH IN THE WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE QUEST: CROSS-CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY ANISOTROPIES AND COSMIC SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, Stefano; Fornasa, Mattia; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Both cosmic shear and cosmological gamma-ray emission stem from the presence of dark matter (DM) in the universe: DM structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak-lensing regime and those same objects can emit gamma rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by DM annihilations (or decays, depending on the properties of the DM particle). Such gamma rays should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this Letter, we compute the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive particle DM, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable provides novel information on the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB), since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal strongly depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range), although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear makes such signal potentially detectable by combining Fermi Large Area Telescope data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like the Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, the same signal would demonstrate that the weak-lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of general relativity.

  2. A Correlated Optical and Gamma Emission from GRB 081126A

    SciTech Connect

    Gendre, B.; Klotz, A.; Atteia, J. L.; Boeer, M.; Coward, D. M.; Imerito, A. C.

    2010-10-15

    We present an analysis of time-resolved optical emissions observed from the gamma-ray burst GRB 081126 during the prompt phase. The analysis employed time-resolved photometry using optical data obtained by the TAROT telescope, BAT data from the Swift spacecraft and time-resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the GBM instrument onboard the Fermi spacecraft. The optical emission of GRB 081126 is found to be compatible with the second gamma emission pulse shifted by a positive time-lag of 8.4{+-}3.9 sec. This is the first well resolved observation of a time lag between optical and gamma emissions during a gamma-ray burst. Our observations could potentially provide new constraints on the fireball model for gamma ray burst early emissions. Furthermore, observations of time-lags between optical and gamma ray photons provides an exciting opportunity to constrain quantum gravity theories.

  3. Angular dependence of multiple scattered photons and saturation thickness for certain elements by gamma scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, K. U.; Ravindraswami, K.; Eshwarappa, K. M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple scattering of gamma photons obtained from 0.215 GBq 137Cs source in both forward and backward hemisphere for 4 elements viz., carbon, aluminium, iron and copper are detected by a 76 mm ×76 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The variation of saturation thicknesses of 4 elements are studied experimentally at 60°, 80°, 90°, 100°, 120° and 135°. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulation of multiple scattering and variation in saturation thicknesses is carried out for 40°, 60°, 80°, 90°, 100°, 120°, 135°, 160° and 180° for four elements. The variation of the intensity of multiple scattered photons in different scattering angles is found to be different in forward and backward hemispheres. The intensity of multiple scattered photons is found to be minimum at around 90°. Saturation thicknesses for 40° and 60° are found to be less than saturation thicknesses for 80°, 90°, 100°, 120°, 135°, 160° and 180° in spite of the fact that the scattered energy is more for lower scattering angles. The behaviour of variation of saturation thicknesses as a function of scattering angles obtained from MCNP simulation agrees well with experimentally obtained values.

  4. Normalization of the Matter Power Spectrum via Higher Order Angular Correlations of Luminous Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Brunner, Robert J.; Myers, Adam D.

    2008-08-01

    We present a novel technique with which to measure σ8. It relies on measuring the dependence of the second-order bias of a density field on σ8, using two separate techniques. Each technique employs area-averaged angular correlation functions (bar omegaN), one relying on the shape of bar omega2, the other relying on the amplitude of s3 (s3 = bar omega3/bar omega22). We confirm the validity of this method by testing it on a mock catalog drawn from Millennium Simulation data and finding a value of σ8 - σtrue8 = - 0.002 +/- 0.062. We create a catalog of photometrically selected LRGs from SDSS DR5 and separate it into three distinct data sets by photometric redshift, with median redshifts of 0.47, 0.53, and 0.61. Measurements of c2 and σ8 are made for each data set, with the assumption of a flat geometry and WMAP3 best-fit priors on Ωm, h, and Γ. We find, with increasing redshift, that c2 = 0.09 +/- 0.04, 0.09 +/- 0.05, and 0.09 +/- 0.03, and σ8 = 0.78 +/- 0.08, 0.80 +/- 0.09, and 0.80 +/- 0.09. We combine these three consistent σ8 measurements to produce σ8 = 0.79 +/- 0.05. Allowing the parameters Ωm, h, and Γ to vary within their WMAP3 1 σ error, we find that the best-fit value of σ8 does not change by more than 8%, and we are thus confident that our measurement is accurate to within 10%. We anticipate that future surveys, such as Pan-STARRS, DES, and LSST, will be able to employ this method in order to measure σ8 to great precision, and this will serve as an important check, complementarily, on the values determined via more established methods.

  5. Detailed Study of the Angular Correlations in the Prompt Neutron Emission in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatch, Yu.; Chietera, A.; Stuttgé, L.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Chernysheva, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hanappe, F.; Mezentseva, Z.; Telezhnikov, S.

    An experiment has been performed at IPHC Strasbourg, aimed at the detailed investigation of angular correlations in the neutron emission from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Fission fragments were measured by the angle-sensitive double ionization chamber CODIS while neutrons were detected by a set of 60 DEMON scintillator counters. The main aim of the experiment is the observation of the correlation between the fragment spins and neutron emission anisotropy. Preliminary results, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations, as well as the preliminary analysis of the experimental data are shown.

  6. Angular correlations of projectilelike and fission fragments in the reaction [sup 16]O+[sup 238]U at 110 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, A.; Aiello, S.; De Filippo, E.; Lanzano, G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Milone, C. ); Mermaz, M.C. )

    1994-08-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane angular correlations of fission fragments detected in coincidence with projectilelike residues produced in the nuclear collisions [sup 16]O+[sup 238]U at 110 MeV have been investigated. The data present the essential features of a targetlike sequential fission process. A quantitative description of the experimental angular anisotropies requires the storage in the fissioning nucleus of a mean angular momentum in agreement with a dominant mass transfer mechanism.

  7. Angular correlations in beauty production at the Tevatron at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaarden, Daniel A

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of the b quark production cross section at the Tevatron and at Hera in the final decades of the 20th century have consistently yielded higher values than predicted by Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) QCD. This discrepancy has led to a large efforts by theorists to improve theoretical calculations of the cross sections and simulations of b quark production. As a result, the difference between theory and experiment has been much reduced. New measurements are needed to test the developments in the calculations and in event simulation. In this thesis, a measurement of angular correlations between b jets produced in the same event is presented. The angular separation between two b jets is directly sensitive to higher order contributions. In addition, the measurement does not depend strongly on fragmentation models or on the experimental luminosity and efficiency, which lead to a large uncertainty in measurements of the inclusive cross section. At the Tevatron, b{bar b} quark pairs are predominantly produced through the strong interaction. In leading order QCD, the b quarks are produced back to back in phase space. Next-to-leading order contributions involving a third particle in the final state allow production of b pairs that are very close together in phase space. The Leading Order and NLO contributions can be separated into three different processes: flavour creation, gluon splitting and flavour excitation. While the separation based on Feynman diagrams is ambiguous and the three processes are not each separately gauge invariant in NLO QCD, the distinction can be made explicitly in terms of event generators using LO matrix elements. Direct production of a b{bar b} quark pair in the hard scatter interaction is known as flavour creation. The quarks emerge nearly back to back in azimuth. In gluon splitting processes, a gluon is produced in the hard scatter interaction. The gluon subsequently splits into a b{bar b} quark pair. The quarks are very close in phase

  8. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-10-31

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  9. Is v3 necessary or even informative in describing angular correlation data from RHIC and the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Lanny; Trainor, Thomas; Prindle, Duncan

    2013-10-01

    One of the more interesting observations from the heavy-ion program at RHIC and now at the LHC are long-range correlations on relative pseudorapidity at small azimuth opening angles. In 2010 Alver and Roland suggested that this so-called same-side ridge could be explained in terms of higher-order, azimuth cosine distributions generated by event-wise energy density fluctuations in the initial-state plus hydrodynamic flow. Applications of third- and higher-order harmonics in analysis of angular correlations from heavy-ion collisions have become ubiquitous in the literature. However, we question the introduction of ``higher harmonics'' to the 2D data description. Extending previous work we examine the necessity and utility of v3. We find that the net effect of v3 is to accommodate minor non-Gaussian structure in the same-side 2D peak for pt-integral correlations from RHIC. A single Gaussian hypothesis for those data is not falsified within statistics. Model ambiguities and instabilities resulting from v3 are discussed and resolved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the 0-1% angular correlation data for 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions from ATLAS do not require a v3 component. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  10. ON THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2013-09-20

    Recently, many correlations between the prompt {gamma}-ray emission properties and the X-ray afterglow properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been inferred from a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of more than 650 GRBs measured with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (Swift/XRT) during the years 2004-2010. We show that these correlations are predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs. They result from the dependence of GRB observables on the bulk motion Lorentz factor and viewing angle of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates. Moreover, despite their different physical origins, long GRBs (LGRBs) and short-hard bursts (SHBs) in the CB model share similar kinematic correlations, which can be combined into triple correlations satisfied by both LGRBs and SHBs.

  11. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  12. High angular momentum states of lithium atom, studied with symmetry-projected explicitly correlated Gaussian lobe functions

    SciTech Connect

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2014-07-28

    Method of construction of wave functions approximating eigenfunctions of the L{sup ^2} operator is proposed for high angular momentum states of few-electron atoms. Basis functions are explicitly correlated Gaussian lobes, projected onto irreducible representations of finite point groups. Variational calculations have been carried out for the lowest states of lithium atom, with quantum number L in the range from 1 to 8. Nonrelativistic energies accurate to several dozens of nanohartree have been obtained. For 2{sup 2}P, 3{sup 2}D, and 4{sup 2}F states they agree well with the reference results. Transition frequencies have been computed and compared with available experimental data.

  13. Angular correlation of annihilation radiation associated with vacancy defects in electron-irradiated 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasuso, A.; Chiba, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2005-05-15

    Electron-positron momentum distributions associated with vacancy defects in 6H-SiC after irradiation with 2-MeV electrons and annealing at 1000 deg. C have been studied using angular correlation of annihilation radiation measurements. It was confirmed that the above vacancy defects have dangling bonds along the c axis and the rotational symmetry around it. The first-principles calculation suggested that the vacancy defects are attributable to either carbon-vacancy-carbon-antisite complexes or silicon-vacancy-nitrogen pairs, while isolated carbon vacancies, silicon vacancies, and nearest neighbor divacancies are ruled out.

  14. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV–PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

  15. SER Analysis of MPPM-Coded MIMO-FSO System over Uncorrelated and Correlated Gamma-Gamma Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaf, Haitham S.; Garrido-Balsells, José M.; Shalaby, Hossam M. H.; Sampei, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    The performance of multiple-input multiple-output free space optical (MIMO-FSO) communication systems, that adopt multipulse pulse position modulation (MPPM) techniques, is analyzed. Both exact and approximate symbol-error rates (SERs) are derived for both cases of uncorrelated and correlated channels. The effects of background noise, receiver shot-noise, and atmospheric turbulence are taken into consideration in our analysis. The random fluctuations of the received optical irradiance, produced by the atmospheric turbulence, is modeled by the widely used gamma-gamma statistical distribution. Uncorrelated MIMO channels are modeled by the α-μ distribution. A closed-form expression for the probability density function of the optical received irradiance is derived for the case of correlated MIMO channels. Using our analytical expressions, the degradation of the system performance with the increment of the correlation coefficients between MIMO channels is corroborated.

  16. Detailed angular correlation analysis with 4{pi} spectrometers: Spin determinations and multipolarity mixing measurements in {sup 128}Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.; Vogel, O.; Klein, H.; Dewald, A.; von Brentano, P.; Gableske, J.; Nicolay, N.; Gelberg, A.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Janssens, R.V.; Carpenter, M.P.; Kruecken, R.; Petkov, P.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Bazzacco, D.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Pavan, P.; de Angelis, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D.R.; Frauendorf, S.; Doenau, F.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze for the first time the full {gamma}{gamma} directional correlations from oriented states (DCO) in an experiment performed with the GASP detector array. Our analysis is based on a transformation of the directional information into expansion coefficients of an orthogonal basis. With this method, which we call SpeeDCO (spectral expansion of DCO), the complete DCO information is concentrated in 12 {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra. The analysis is applicable to all detector arrays which uniformly cover the solid angle. We show that the complete DCO information can be used for a reliable and unique determination of spins and multipolarity mixing ratios in weakly populated bands. We were able to establish the spins and the positive parity of the {Delta}I=1 {open_quotes}M1 band{close_quotes} in {sup 128}Ba and multipolarity mixing ratios of nine M1/E2 in-band transitions were derived as well. The measured values are in good agreement with those expected for a high-K rotational band. thinsp thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Proximal distributions from angular correlations: A measure of the onset of coarse-graining

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    In this work we examine and extend the theory of proximal radial distribution functions for molecules in solution. We point out two formal extensions, the first of which generalizes the proximal distribution function hierarchy approach to the complete, angularly dependent molecular pair distribution function. Second, we generalize from the traditional right-handed solute-solvent proximal distribution functions to the left-handed distributions. The resulting neighbor hierarchy convergence is shown to provide a measure of the coarse-graining of the internal solute sites with respect to the solvent. Simulation of the test case of a deca-alanine peptide shows that this coarse-graining measure converges at a length scale of approximately 5 amino acids for the system considered. PMID:24320368

  18. Proximal distributions from angular correlations: A measure of the onset of coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2013-12-01

    In this work we examine and extend the theory of proximal radial distribution functions for molecules in solution. We point out two formal extensions, the first of which generalizes the proximal distribution function hierarchy approach to the complete, angularly dependent molecular pair distribution function. Second, we generalize from the traditional right-handed solute-solvent proximal distribution functions to the left-handed distributions. The resulting neighbor hierarchy convergence is shown to provide a measure of the coarse-graining of the internal solute sites with respect to the solvent. Simulation of the test case of a deca-alanine peptide shows that this coarse-graining measure converges at a length scale of approximately 5 amino acids for the system considered.

  19. Angular dependence in proton-proton correlation functions in central 40Ca + 40Ca and 48Ca + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Kilburn, M. A.; Chajęcki, Z.; Henzlova, D.; Lynch, W. G.; Brown, D.; Chbihi, A.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Danielewicz, P.; Desouza, R. T.; Famiano, M.; Herlitzius, C.; Hudan, S.; Lee, Jenny; Lukyanov, S.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sobotka, L. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Vander Molen, A.; Verde, G.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of proton-proton correlation functions is studied in central 40Ca+40Ca and 48Ca+48Ca nuclear reactions at E/A=80 MeV. Measurements were performed with the High Resolution Array (HiRA) complemented by the 4π Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. A striking angular dependence in the laboratory frame is found within proton-proton correlation functions for both systems that greatly exceeds the measured and expected isospin dependent difference between the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems. Sources measured at backward angles reflect the participant zone of the reaction, while much larger sources observed at forward angles reflect the expanding, fragmenting, and evaporating projectile remnants. The decrease of the size of the source with increasing momentum is observed at backward angles while a weaker trend in the opposite direction is observed at forward angles. The results are compared to the theoretical calculations using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model.

  20. Multipolarity of the 2-→1- , ground-state transition in 210Bi via multivariable angular correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-07-01

    The multipolarity of the main transition leading to the ground state in 210Bi was investigated using the angular correlations of γ rays. The analyzed γ -coincidence data were obtained from the 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi experiment performed at Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. The EXILL (EXOGAM at the ILL) multidetector array, consisting of 16 high-purity germanium detectors, was used to detect γ transitions. The mixing ratio of the 320-keV γ ray was defined by minimizing a multivariable χΣ2 function constructed from the coefficients of angular correlation functions for seven pairs of strong transitions in 210Bi. As a result, the almost pure M 1 multipolarity of the 320-keV γ ray was obtained, with an E 2 admixture of less than 0.6% only (95% confidence limit). Based on this multipolarity the neutron-capture cross section leading to the ground state in 210Bi, that decays in turn to radiotoxic 210Po, was determined to be within the limits 21.3(9) and 21.5(9) mb. This result is important for nuclear reactor applications.

  1. Angular correlation functions of X-ray point-like sources in the full exposure XMM-LSS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyiv, A.; Clerc, N.; Plionis, M.; Surdej, J.; Pierre, M.; Basilakos, S.; Chiappetti, L.; Gandhi, P.; Gosset, E.; Melnyk, O.; Pacaud, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to study the large-scale structure of different types of AGN using the medium-deep XMM-LSS survey. Methods: We measure the two-point angular correlation function of 5700 and 2500 X-ray point-like sources over the 11 sq. deg. XMM-LSS field in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) bands. For the conversion from the angular to the spatial correlation function we used the Limber integral equation and the luminosity-dependent density evolution model of the AGN X-ray luminosity function. Results: We have found significant angular correlations with the power-law parameters γ = 1.81 ± 0.02, θ0 = 1.3'' ± 0.2'' for the soft, and γ = 2.00 ± 0.04, θ0 = 7.3'' ± 1.0'' for the hard bands. The amplitude of the correlation function w(θ) is higher in the hard than in the soft band for fx ≲ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 and lower above this flux limit. We confirm that the clustering strength θ0 grows with the flux limit of the sample, a trend which is also present in the amplitude of the spatial correlation function, but only for the soft band. In the hard band, it remains almost constant with r0 ≃ 10h-1 Mpc, irrespective of the flux limit. Our analysis of AGN subsamples with different hardness ratios shows that the sources with a hard-spectrum are more clustered than soft-spectrum ones. This result may be a hint that the two main types of AGN populate different environments. Finally, we find that our clustering results correspond to an X-ray selected AGN bias factor of 2.5 for the soft band sources (at a median bar{z} ≃ 1.1) and 3.3 for the hard band sources (at a median bar{z} ≃ 1), which translates into a host dark matter halo mass of 1013h-1M⊙ and 1013.7h-1M⊙ for the soft and hard bands, respectively. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Olivier Garcet who has initiated the present work just before his sudden death.

  2. Measurement of inclusive two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Valle Wemans, A. Do; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. 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A.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Paleari, C. P.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Radloff, P.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schoning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Volpini, G.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Ohsugi, T.

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of two-particle angular correlations in proton- proton collisions at √{s} = 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The collision events were collected during 2009 and 2010 with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider using a single-arm minimum bias trigger. Correlations are measured for charged particles produced in the kinematic range of transverse momentum p T > 100 MeV and pseudorapidity | η| < 2.5. A complex structure in pseudorapidity and azimuth is observed at both collision energies. Results are compared to pythia 8 and herwig++ as well as to the AMBT2B, DW and Perugia 2011 tunes of pythia 6. The data are not satisfactorily described by any of these models.

  3. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, E.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttge, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-22

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  4. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  5. Structure of low-lying states in 128Ba from gamma-gamma angular correlations and polarization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Zamfir, N.V.; Caprio, M.A.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D.S.; Pietralla, N.; Gill, R.L.; Casten, R.F.; Beausang, C.W.; Kruecken, R.; Zyromski, K.E.; Barton, C.J.; Cooper, J.R.; Hecht, A.A.; Newman, H.; Novak, J.R.; Cederkall, J.

    2002-08-27

    A study of the low-lying levels of 128Ba was performed using three clover detectors in a compact arrangement. The decay properties of several low-lying states were investigated, spin assignments were made for two states, and several E2/M1 mixing ratios were determined.

  6. Correlation Analysis of Prompt Emission from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothapragada, Sriharsha

    Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibits very rapid, complicated temporal and spectral evolution. This diverse variability in the light-curves reflects the complicated nature of the underlying physics, in which inter-penetrating relativistic shells in the outflow are believed to generate strong magnetic fields that vary over very small scales. We use the theory of jitter radiation to model the emission from such regions and the resulting overall prompt gamma ray emission from a series of relativistic collisionless shocks. We present simulated GRB light-curves developed as a series of "pulses" corresponding to instantaneously illuminated "thin-shell" regions emitting via the jitter radiation mechanism. The effects of various geometries, viewing angles, and bulk Lorentz factor profiles of the radiating outflow jets on the spectral features and evolution of these light-curves are explored. Our results demonstrate how an anisotropic jitter radiation pattern, in conjunction with relativistic shock kinematics, can produce certain features observed in the GRB prompt emission spectra, such as the occurrence of hard, synchrotron violating spectra, the "tracking" of observed flux with spectral parameters, and spectral softening below peak energy within individual episodes of the light curve. We highlight predictions in the light of recent advances in the observational sphere of GRBs.

  7. TEMPORAL CORRELATIONS BETWEEN OPTICAL AND GAMMA-RAY ACTIVITY IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Daniel P.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zheng, WeiKang; Li, Weidong; Romani, Roger W.; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2014-12-20

    We have been using the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory to optically monitor a sample of 157 blazars that are bright in gamma-rays being detected with high significance (≥10σ) in one year by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We attempt to observe each source on a three-day cadence with KAIT, subject to weather and seasonal visibility. The gamma-ray coverage is essentially continuous. KAIT observations extend over much of the five-year Fermi mission for several objects, and most have >100 optical measurements spanning the last three years. These blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects) exhibit a wide range of flaring behavior. Using the discrete correlation function (DCF), here we search for temporal relationships between optical and gamma-ray light curves in the 40 brightest sources in hopes of placing constraints on blazar acceleration and emission zones. We find strong optical-gamma-ray correlation in many of these sources at time delays of ∼1 to ∼10 days, ranging between –40 and +30 days. A stacked average DCF of the 40 sources verifies this correlation trend, with a peak above 99% significance indicating a characteristic time delay consistent with 0 days. These findings strongly support the widely accepted leptonic models of blazar emission. However, we also find examples of apparently uncorrelated flares (optical flares with no gamma-ray counterpart and gamma-ray flares with no optical counterpart) that challenge simple, one-zone models of blazar emission. Moreover, we find that flat-spectrum radio quasars tend to have gamma-rays leading the optical, while intermediate- and high-synchrotron peak blazars with the most significant peaks have smaller lags/leads. It is clear that long-term monitoring at high cadence is necessary to reveal the underlying physical correlation.

  8. Temporal Correlations between Optical and Gamma-Ray Activity in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Daniel P.; Romani, Roger W.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Lott, Benoit; Zheng, WeiKang; Li, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    We have been using the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory to optically monitor a sample of 157 blazars that are bright in gamma-rays being detected with high significance (>=10σ) in one year by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We attempt to observe each source on a three-day cadence with KAIT, subject to weather and seasonal visibility. The gamma-ray coverage is essentially continuous. KAIT observations extend over much of the five-year Fermi mission for several objects, and most have >100 optical measurements spanning the last three years. These blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects) exhibit a wide range of flaring behavior. Using the discrete correlation function (DCF), here we search for temporal relationships between optical and gamma-ray light curves in the 40 brightest sources in hopes of placing constraints on blazar acceleration and emission zones. We find strong optical-gamma-ray correlation in many of these sources at time delays of ~1 to ~10 days, ranging between -40 and +30 days. A stacked average DCF of the 40 sources verifies this correlation trend, with a peak above 99% significance indicating a characteristic time delay consistent with 0 days. These findings strongly support the widely accepted leptonic models of blazar emission. However, we also find examples of apparently uncorrelated flares (optical flares with no gamma-ray counterpart and gamma-ray flares with no optical counterpart) that challenge simple, one-zone models of blazar emission. Moreover, we find that flat-spectrum radio quasars tend to have gamma-rays leading the optical, while intermediate- and high-synchrotron peak blazars with the most significant peaks have smaller lags/leads. It is clear that long-term monitoring at high cadence is necessary to reveal the underlying physical correlation.

  9. HARPO: beam characterization of a TPC for gamma-ray polarimetry and high angular-resolution astronomy in the MeV-GeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaobo; Bernard, Denis; Bruel, Philippe; Frotin, Mickael; Geerebaert, Yannick; Giebels, Berrie; Gros, Philippe; Horan, Deirdre; Louzir, Marc; Poilleux, Patrick; Semeniouk, Igor; Attié, David; Calvet, Denis; Colas, Paul; Delbart, Alain; Sizun, Patrick; Götz, Diego; Amano, Sho; Kotaka, Takuya; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Minamiyama, Yasuhito; Takemoto, Akinori; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Miyamoto, Shuji; Daté, Schin; Ohkuma, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    A time projection chamber (TPC) can be used to measure the polarization of gamma rays with excellent angular precision and sensitivity in the MeV-GeV energy range through the conversion of photons to e+e- pairs. The Hermetic ARgon POlarimeter (HARPO) prototype was built to demonstrate this concept. It was recently tested in the polarized photon beam at the NewSUBARU facility in Japan. We present this data-taking run, which demonstrated the excellent performance of the HARPO TPC.

  10. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  11. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  12. A Perturbed-Angular-Correlation Study of Hyperfine Interactions at 181Ta in α-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquevich, A. F.; Junqueira, A. C.; Carbonari, A. W.; Saxena, R. N.

    2004-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions at 181Ta ions on Fe3+ sites in α-Fe2O3 (hematite) were studied in the temperature range 11 1100 K by means of the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique. The 181Hf(β-)181Ta probe nuclei were introduced chemically into the sample during the preparation. The hyperfine interaction measurements allow to observe the magnetic phase transition and to characterize the supertransferred hyperfine magnetic field Bhf and the electric field gradient (EFG) at the impurity sites. The angles between Bhf and the principal axes of the EFG were determined. The Morin transition was also observed. The results are compared with those of similar experiments carried out using 111Cd probe.

  13. Perturbed Angular Correlation of the stretched cascade in the decay of 180mHf using a digital spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Markus; Butz, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    We report on the measurement of the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) at Hf sites using the nuclear probe 180mHf in HfF4·HF·2H2O at 300 K by exploiting all possible start quanta in the stretched cascade with a digital Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (TDPAC) spectrometer. With conventional spectrometers, multiple prompt start signals would paralyze the router. The gain in coincidence rate is about a factor of 5 compared to a conventional spectrometer using a single start only. With multiple starts 180mHf is a promising new isomeric nuclear probe in TDPAC experiments. As an additional feature we implemented the possibility to measure up to four cascades simultaneously in order to save data collection time or to measure isobaric contaminations like 111mCd and 111In.

  14. Nuclear quadrupole interaction at 181Ta in hafnium dioxide fiber: Time differential perturbed angular correlation measurements and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Das, P.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal behavior of hafnium dioxide fiber has been investigated with the aid of time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique along with XRD and SEM measurements. This study has proved a good thermal stability of the fibrous material up to 1173 K and the fiber loses its crystallinity to a meager extent at 1673 K. No phase transition has been observed up to 1673 K in this fiber. TDPAC parameters for the HfO2 fiber annealed at 1173 K are ωQ=124.6 (3) Mrad/s and η=0.36 (1). These values remain unaltered for the HfO2 fiber annealed even at 1673 K. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) for HfO2 doped with tantalum impurity have been performed and the calculated EFG parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.

  15. Dynamical evolution, hadronization and angular de-correlation of heavy flavor in a hot and dense QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-12-01

    We study heavy flavor evolution and hadronization in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium evolution of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin framework that incorporates both collisional and radiative energy loss mechanisms. The subsequent hadronization process for heavy quarks is calculated with a fragmentation plus recombination model. We find significant contribution from gluon radiation to heavy quark energy loss at high pT; the recombination mechanism can greatly enhance the D meson production at medium pT. Our calculation provides a good description of the D meson nuclear modification at the LHC. In addition, we explore the angular correlation functions of heavy flavor pairs which may provide us a potential candidate for distinguishing different energy loss mechanisms of heavy quarks inside the QGP.

  16. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were

  17. Interleukin-4 but not gamma interferon production correlates with the severity of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Morris, L; Troutt, A B; McLeod, K S; Kelso, A; Handman, E; Aebischer, T

    1993-08-01

    For murine cutaneous leishmaniasis, data to date suggest a correlation between the presence of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and resistance in C57BL/6 mice and the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and disease in BALB/c mice. In this study, 13 inbred strains of mice covering the range of susceptibility to disease were infected with Leishmania major to determine whether the subsequent expression of IFN-gamma or IL-4 is a reliable indicator of cure or progressive disease. The presence of IL-4 and IFN-gamma mRNAs in the draining lymph nodes was examined 9 weeks after infection, when differences in disease severity became obvious. There were large differences in the levels of IL-4 mRNA among the different strains, whereas IFN-gamma mRNA was detected at similar levels in all strains. The levels of IL-4 mRNA correlated with lesion score, with susceptible and intermediate strains containing up to 100-fold more than any of the resistant strains. Differences in the levels of IFN-gamma mRNA were within only a fourfold range, with significant overlap among susceptible, intermediate, and resistant strains. Similarly, the levels of IFN-gamma secreted in vitro by lymph node cells from infected mice in response to L. major antigens were within a 10-fold range for most strains, and there was no correlation with lesion score. Analysis of Leishmania-specific antibody levels revealed a correlation between immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) titers and lesion score, consistent with the role of IL-4 as a switch factor for IgG1. In contrast, there was no correlation between IgG2a titers and lesion score, supporting the notion that IFN-gamma synthesis (which promotes IgG2a production) is not correlated with disease state. These data suggest that along the spectrum of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis, IL-4 is a reliable indicator of disease, but IFN-gamma is not prognostic for resistance. PMID:8335376

  18. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Wavefront propagation in turbulence: an unified approach to the derivation of angular correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Molodij, Guillaume

    2011-08-01

    A general expression of the spatial correlation functions of quantities related to the phase fluctuations of a wave that have propagated through the atmospheric turbulence are derived. A generalization of the method to integrand containing the product of an arbitrary number of hypergeometric functions is presented. The formalism is able to give the coefficients of phase-expansion functions orthogonal over an arbitrary circularly symmetric weighting function for an isotropic turbulence spectrum, as well as to describe the effect of the finite outer and inner scales of the turbulence and to describe the spherical propagation or to derive the effects of the analytical operators acting on the phase such as the derivatives of any order. The derivation of the generalized integrals with multiparameters is based on the Mellin transforms integration method. PMID:21811336

  20. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  1. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (ηΔ,φΔ)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity η of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that themore » glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although η elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.« less

  2. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Markus; Iwig, Kornelius; Butz, Tilman

    2011-06-01

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the γ-γ correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a (60)Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr(3)(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF(2) scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a (44)Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using (22)Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 × 10(6) γ quanta per detector and second. PMID:21721728

  3. A compact digital time differential perturbed angular correlation-spectrometer using field programmable gate arrays and various timestamp algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Markus; Iwig, Kornelius; Butz, Tilman

    2011-06-01

    A user-friendly fully digital time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC)-spectrometer with six detectors and fast digitizers using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) is described and performance data are given. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and a time resolution such as conventional analog spectrometers. Its calculation intensive part was implemented inside the digitizer. This gives the possibility to change parameters (energy windows, constant fraction trigger delay) and see their influence immediately in the γ-γ correlation diagrams. Tests were performed which showed that the time resolution using a 60Co source with energy window set at 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV is 265 ps with LaBr3(Ce) scintillators and 254 ps with BaF2 scintillators. A true constant fraction algorithm turned out to be slightly better than the constant fraction of amplitude method. The spectrometer performance was tested with a TDPAC measurement using a 44Ti in rutile source and a positron lifetime measurement using 22Na. The maximum possible data rate of the spectrometer is 1.1 × 106 γ quanta per detector and second.

  4. E1 and E2 S factors of {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}{sub 0}){sup 16}O from {gamma}-ray angular distributions with a 4 {pi}-detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Assuncao, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Boukari-Pelissie, C.; Coc, A.; Correia, J.J.; Grama, C.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; LeDu, D.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Meunier, R.; Thibaud, J.P.; Beck, C.; Courtin, S.

    2006-05-15

    A new experiment to determine the thermonuclear cross section of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction has been performed in regular kinematics using an intense {alpha}-particle beam of up to 340 {mu}A from the Stuttgart DYNAMITRON. For the first time, a 4{pi}-germanium-detector setup has been used to measure the angular distribution of the {gamma} rays at all angles simultaneously. It consisted of an array of nine EUROGAM high-purity Ge detectors in close geometry, actively shielded individually with bismuth germanate crystals. The {sup 12}C targets were isotopically enriched by magnetic separation during implantation. The depth profiles of the implanted carbon in the {sup 12}C targets were determined by Rutherford backscattering for purposes of cross-section normalization and absolute determination of the E1 and E2 S factors. Angular distributions of the {gamma} decay to the {sup 16}O ground state were measured in the energy range E{sub c.m.}=1.30-2.78 MeV and in the angular range (lab.) 30 deg. -130 deg. . From these distributions, astrophysical E1 and E2 S-factor functions vs energy were calculated, both of which are indispensable to the modeling of this reaction and the extrapolation toward lower energies. The separation of the E1 and E2 capture channels was done both by taking the phase value {phi}{sub 12} as a free parameter and by fixing it using the results of elastic {alpha}-particle scattering on {sup 12}C in the same energy range.

  5. The optical-gamma correlation in BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, Claudia M.; Villata, Massimo; D'Ammando, Filippo; Larionov, Valeri M.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Mirzaqulov, Davron O.; Smith, Paul S.; Carnerero, Maria Isabel

    2013-12-01

    We present multifrequency light curves of BL Lacertae from February 2008 to October 2012. Lowenergy data (optical and millimetre) were acquired in the framework of a GASP-WEBT project. High-energy data (ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray) come from observations of the Swift, RXTE, and Fermi satellites. After a period of moderate activity, in May 2011 the source suddenly started to flare at γ and optical-UV frequencies. Activity at millimetre wavelengths and X rays began 3-4 months later. This behaviour offered a good opportunity to study the correlation among flux variability in different bands, in particular between the best-sampled optical and γ-ray light curves. However, even in this fortuitous case, we can only define a general correlation with likely no time lag, but with a lag uncertainty of ±1 day. Indeed, the data reveal a complex relationship between the γ and optical fluxes, which cannot be unveiled because of the small gaps in the sampling of this extremely variable source.

  6. Angular Cross-correlation of Spitzer IRAC and Herschel Spire Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Cooray, A.; Wang, L.; HerMES Consortium

    2011-01-01

    The Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) each provide deep and wide coverage, centered on the Bootes field, at infrared and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The SDWFS covers approximately 8.5 square degrees with sensitivities of galaxies out to z 3. From the public SDWFS source catalog, we remove stars and contaminants by concentration, using selection methods based on IRAC and optical colors; optical photometry is provided by the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Photometric redshifts of detected IRAC sources are then determined using the 1.6 micron spectral feature (or 'bump'). We classify three different kinds of bumps, (bump 1- bump 3), with redshifts ranging approximately from 0-1.3, 1.3-2, and 2-3 respectively. The number of bump 1 sources in the SDWFS catalogs were found to be in excess of 25,000 at the 5 sigma detection limit of the 3.6 micron channel of the IRAC instrument. Bump 2 and bump 3 source identification yielded similar, but slightly fewer counts. We also extract a separate catalog of 2500 or so dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) at z 2 using 24 micron and r-band fluxes. As part of HerMES observations with SPIRE, the Bootes field contain more than 15,000 clearly detected SPIRE sources at 250 microns, In this paper we report on the cross correlation function of these bump sources with the source catalogs from three bands of the SPIRE instrument onboard Herschel. The aim is to broadly reconstruct the redshift distribution of SPIRE sources using redshift distributions of bump and DOGs in the bootes field and the relative clustering strengths.

  7. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Domínguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalogue (together referred to as `VHE-like' sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10 and 500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalogue, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalogue. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2 per cent less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ˜ 5, we estimate that the attenuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10 per cent. This decrease, although non-negligible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  8. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV fluxmore » and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  9. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  10. Methodological problems with gamma-ray burst hardness/intensity correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    The hardness and intensity are easily measured quantities for all gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and so, many past and current studies have sought correlations between them. This Letter presents many serious methodological problems with the practical definitions for both hardness and intensity. These difficulties are such that significant correlations can be easily introduced as artifacts of the reduction procedure. In particular, cosmological models of GRBs cannot be tested with hardness/intensity correlations with current instrumentation and the time evolution of the hardness in a given burst may be correlated with intensity for reasons that are unrelated to intrinsic change in the spectral shape.

  11. Anomalous correlation between hadron and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between hadrons and electromagnetic particles were studied in the hadron-gamma families observed in the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that there exist a number of hadrons which associate electromagnetic showers in extraordinarily close vicinity. The probability to have such a large number of hadrons associating electromagnetic showers, expected from background calculation, is found to be negligibly small and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade.

  12. A study of the correlation of EHE cosmic rays with Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1998-06-15

    A study of space angles and temporal spacing was made for extremely-high energy (EHE) cosmic ray events to see if there are any correlation with Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB's) recorded by the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The results on the most generic correlation using all the recorded GRB's and EHECR's show no significant correlation. Nevertheless, the highest-energy cosmic ray ''pair'' events observed by the AGASA experiments appear to be correlated with the very high fluence GRB's. Some basis to form a GRB and a fireball is discussed. Empirical analysis of the GRB events strongly implied that the photonic field energy density in the source region should have exceeded the electric energy density of Schwinger field. A possible generation of an initial GRB, its fireball and relativistic shocks therein, is considered in terms of Schwinger field generated by radiation pressure of transient, high luminosity photons provided by collective nuclear collisions of neutron matter. Acceleration of electrons, and some protons, may be possible in the radial electrostatic Schwinger field. Ultra-relativistic shocks might also accelerate particles to certain high energies ({gamma}{<=}10{sup 12{center_dot}}{sup 15}). Neutral secondaries, including gamma rays, neutrinos, ''strangelets,'' and Farrar's SUSY S{sub 0} particles, are discussed as plausible EHECR pair candidates from GRB fireballs. The OWL/AIRWATCH may be able to explore them from 4x10{sup 19} eV to well beyond 10{sup 21} eV.

  13. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jânio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Methods: We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. Results: A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). Conclusions: CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle). PMID:26229733

  14. D0 results on three-jet production, multijet cross-section ratios, and minimum bias angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; /Louisiana Tech. U.

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of the cross-section for three-jet production and the ratio of inclusive three-jet to two-jet cross-sections, as well as a study of angular correlations in minimum bias events, based on data taken with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The differential inclusive three-jet cross section as a function of the invariant three-jetmass (M{sub 3jet}) is measured in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The measurement is performed in three rapidity regions (|y| < 0.8, |y| < 1.6 and |y| < 2.4) and in three regions of the third (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momenta (p{sub T3} > 40 GeV, p{sub T3} > 70 GeV, p{sub T3} > 100 GeV) for events with leading jet transverse momentum larger than 150 GeV and well separated jets. NLO QCD calculations are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the measured cross sections. Based on the same data set, we present the first measurement of ratios of multi-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The ratio of inclusive trijet and dijet cross sections, R{sub 3/2}, has been measured as a function of the transverse jet momenta. The data are compared to QCD model predictions in different approximations. Finally, we present a new way to describe minimum bias events based on angular distributions in {approx}5 million minimum bias p{bar p} collisions collected between April 2002 and February 2006 with the D0 detector. We demonstrate that the distribution of {Delta}{phi} in the detector transverse plane between the leading track and all other tracks is a robust observable that can be used for tuning of multiple color interaction models. Pseudorapidity correlations of the {Delta}{phi} distributions are also studied.

  15. Low temperature structural modification in Rb2ZrF6: Investigations by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Dey, C. C.; Saha, S.

    2016-06-01

    Temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in crystalline compounds Rb2ZrF6 and Cs2HfF6 have been performed in the temperature range 298-753 K. In Rb2ZrF6, four discrete quadrupole interaction frequencies have been observed at room temperature which correspond to four minor structural modifications. From previous measurements, on the other hand, two structural modifications of this compound were known. A displacive phase transition, probably, occurs at low temperature due to rotation of the ZrF62- octahedron and produces different structural modifications. From present measurements in Rb2ZrF6, two quadrupole interaction frequencies [ωQ=26.1(3) Mrad/s, η=0.55(2), δ=5(1)% and ωQ=148.7(3) Mrad/s, η=0.538(5), δ=1.2%] have been found at room temperature which were not found from previous studies. In Cs2HfF6, these new structural modifications have not been observed.

  16. Study of the equilibrium vacancy ensemble in aluminum using 1D- and 2D-angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Berko, S.; Chakraborty, B.; Hoffmann, K.R.; Lippel, P.; Siegel, R.W.

    1985-03-12

    One- and two-dimensional angular correlation of positron-electron annihilation radiation (1D and 2D-ACAR) data have been obtained between 293 and 903 K for single crystals of aluminum. The peak counting rates vs temperature, which were measured using the 1D-ACAR technique, provide a model independent value for the temperature dependence of the positron trapping probability. Using these results it is possible to strip out the Bloch state contribution from the observed 2D-ACAR surfaces and then compare the resulting defect ACAR surfaces to calculated 2D-ACAR surfaces for positrons annihilating from the Bloch, monovacancy, and divacancy-trapped states. The result of this comparison is that the presence of an increasing equilibrium divacancy population is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of ACAR data at high temperature in Al and that the present results when compared to earlier studies on Al indicate that the ratio of the trapping rates at divacancies and monovacancies is of order two.

  17. Oxidation of Hafnium and Diffusion of Hafnium Atoms in Hexagonal Close-Packed Hafnium; Microscopic Investigations by Perturbed Angular Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Chandi C.

    2012-11-01

    Time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies in hafnium metal (~5%Zr) have been carried out at different temperatures. It is found that hafnium metal on heating at 873 K continuously for two days in air, transforms partially and abruptly to HfO2 while no component of oxide has been observed for heating up to 773 K and during initial heating at 873 K for 1 day. This result is strikingly different to that expected from the Arrhenius theory. Also, a strong nuclear relaxation effect has been observed at 873 K due to rapid fluctuation of hafnium atoms in hexagonal closepacked (hcp) hafnium. At this temperature, ~ 5% probe nuclei experience static perturbation due to monoclinic HfO2, ~ 50% experience fluctuating interaction, and ~ 5% produce static defect configuration of hcp hafnium. With lowering of temperature, defect configurations of hafnium increase at the cost of fluctuating interaction. An almost total fluctuating interaction observed in hcp hafnium at a temperature much lower than its melting point is another interesting phenomenon.

  18. PAC (perturbed angular correlation) analysis of defect motion by Blume's stochastic model for I = 5/2 electric quadrupole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, W.E. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Gardner, J.A.; Wang, Ruiping . Dept. of Physics); Su, Han-Tzong ); McKale, A.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Using Blume's stochastic model and the approach of Winkler and Gerdau, we have computed-time-dependent effects on perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectra due to defect motion in solids in the case of I = (5/2) electric quadrupole interactions. We report detailed analysis for a family of simple models: XYZ + Z'' models, in which the symmetry axis of an axial efg is allowed to fluctuate among orientations along x, y, and z axes, and a static axial efg oriented along the z axis is added to the fluctuating efgs. When the static efg is zero, this model is termed the XYZ'' model. Approximate forms are given for G{sub 2}(t) in the slow and rapid fluctuation regimes, i.e. suitable for the low and high temperature regions, respectively. Where they adequately reflect the underlying physical processes, these expressions allow one to fit PAC data for a wide range of temperatures and dopant concentrations to a single model, thus increasing the uniqueness of the interpretation of the defect properties. Application of the models are given for zirconia and ceria ceramics. 14 refs.

  19. Exploring the behaviour of long gamma-ray bursts with intrinsic afterglow correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Samantha

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation observed in both the optical and X-ray afterglows of long duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), between the initial luminosity (measured at restframe 200s) and average afterglow decay rate. This correlation does not depend on the presence of specific light curve features and is potentially applicable to all long GRB afterglows. We explore how the correlation parameters from the optical and X-ray bands relate to each other and to the prompt emission phase. We will also explore the implications and test if the observations are consistent with the expectations of the standard afterglow model.

  20. Determination of solar flare accelerated ion angular distributions from SMM gamma ray and neutron measurements and determination of the He-3/H ratio in the solar photosphere from SMM gamma ray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Comparisons of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations of gamma-ray line and neutron emission with theoretical calculation of their expected production by flare accelerated ion interactions in the solar atmosphere have led to significant advances in the understanding of solar flare particle acceleration and interaction, as well as the flare process itself. These comparisons have enabled the determination of, not only the total number and energy spectrum of accelerated ions trapped at the sun, but also the ion angular distribution as they interact in the solar atmosphere. The Monte Carlo program was modified to include in the calculations of ion trajectories the effects of both mirroring in converging magnetic fields and of pitch angle scattering. Comparing the results of these calculations with the SMM observations, not only the angular distribution of the interacting ions can be determined, but also the initial angular distribution of the ions at acceleration. The reliable determination of the solar photospheric He-3 abundance is of great importance for understanding nucleosynthesis in the early universe and its implications for cosmology, as well as for the study of the evolution of the sun. It is also essential for the determinations of the spectrum and total number of flare accelerated ions from the SMM/GRS gamma-ray line measurements. Systematic Monte Carlo calculations of the time dependence were made as a function of the He-3 abundance and other variables. A new series of calculations were compared for the time-dependent flux of 2.223 MeV neutron capture line emission and the ratio of the time-integrated flux in the 2.223 MeV line to that in the 4.1 to 6.4 MeV nuclear deexcitation band.

  1. A search for luminosity - Spectral hardness correlations in SIGNE gamma-ray burst data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargatis, Vincent E.; Liang, Edison P.; Hurley, Kevin C.

    1992-01-01

    We use simple 2-parameter models to fit gamma-ray burst spectra from the SIGNE experiments aboard the Venera 13 and 14 spacecraft in order to estimate burst luminosity and spectral hardness. We then look for correlations between these two parameters. The hardness is characterized by kT and Ec for thermal bremsstrahlung and thermal synchrotron fits, respectively. The spectra are integrated over 1/2 s or longer, depending on photon statistics. We find that generally luminosity increases with spectral hardness. We fit power laws of the form L varies as kT sup gamma to 12 bursts. A wide range of indices with gamma = 0.5-2.5 is found, broader than that reported by Golenetskii et al. (1983).

  2. Time correlations between low and high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Activities covered the following areas: (1) continuing analysis of the Cygnus Experiment data on the shadowing of cosmic rays by the moon and sun, which led to a direct confirmation of the angular resolution of the CYGNUS EAS array; and (2) development of analysis methods for the daily search overlapping with EGRET targets. To date, no steady emission of ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma rays from any source has been detected by the Cygnus Experiment, but some evidence for sporadic emission had been found. Upper limits on steady fluxes from 49 sources in the northern hemisphere have been published. In addition, a daily search of 51 possible sources over the interval April 1986 to June 1992 found no evidence for emission. From these source lists, four candidates were selected for comparison with EGRET data.

  3. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an astrophysical population

  4. A study of the correlation of EHE cosmic rays with Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1998-06-01

    A study of space angles and temporal spacing was made for extremely-high energy (EHE) cosmic ray events to see if there are any correlation with Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB's) recorded by the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The results on the most generic correlation using all the recorded GRB's and EHECR's show no significant correlation. Nevertheless, the highest-energy cosmic ray ``pair'' events observed by the AGASA experiments appear to be correlated with the very high fluence GRB's. Some basis to form a GRB and a fireball is discussed. Empirical analysis of the GRB events strongly implied that the photonic field energy density in the source region should have exceeded the electric energy density of Schwinger field. A possible generation of an initial GRB, its fireball and relativistic shocks therein, is considered in terms of Schwinger field generated by radiation pressure of transient, high luminosity photons provided by collective nuclear collisions of neutron matter. Acceleration of electrons, and some protons, may be possible in the radial electrostatic Schwinger field. Ultra-relativistic shocks might also accelerate particles to certain high energies (γ<=1012.15). Neutral secondaries, including gamma rays, neutrinos, ``strangelets,'' and Farrar's SUSY S0 particles, are discussed as plausible EHECR pair candidates from GRB fireballs. The OWL/AIRWATCH may be able to explore them from 4×1019 eV to well beyond 1021 eV.

  5. Measurement of $B\\bar{B}$ Angular Correlations based on Secondary Vertex Reconstruction at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the angular correlations between beauty and anti-beauty hadrons (B B-bar) produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the CERN LHC is presented, probing for the first time the region of small angular separation. The B hadrons are identified by the presence of displaced secondary vertices from their decays. The B hadron angular separation is reconstructed from the decay vertices and the primary-interaction vertex. The differential B B-bar production cross section, measured from a data sample collected by CMS and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 inverse picobarns, shows that a sizable fraction of the B B-bar pairs are produced with small opening angles. These studies provide a test of QCD and further insight into the dynamics of b b-bar production.

  6. Temperature dependence of electric field gradient in LaCoO3 perovskite investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, Astrogildo C.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Saxena, Rajendra N.; Mestnik-Filho, José; Dogra, Rakesh

    2005-11-01

    The time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique was used to study the temperature dependence of electric field gradient (EFG) in LaCoO3 perovskite using {}^{111}\\mathrm {In}\\rightarrow {}^{111}\\mathrm {Cd} and {}^{181}\\mathrm {Hf} \\rightarrow {}^{181}\\mathrm {Ta} nuclear probes. The radioactive parent nuclei 111In and 181Hf were introduced into the oxide lattice through a chemical process during sample preparation and were found to occupy only the Co sites in LaCoO3. The PAC measurements with 111Cd and 181Ta probes were made in the temperature range of 4.2-1146 K and 4.2-1004 K, respectively. No long-range magnetic order was observed up to 4.2 K. The EFGs at 111Cd and 181Ta show very similar temperature dependences. They increase slowly between 4.2 and about 77 K and then decrease almost linearly with increasing temperature until about 500-600 K, where a broad peak-like structure is observed, followed by linear decrease at still higher temperatures. These discontinuities at about 77 K and 500-600 K have been interpreted as thermally activated spin state transitions from the low-spin (t2g6eg0) ground state configuration to the intermediate-spin (t2g5eg1) state and from the intermediate-spin to the high-spin (t2g4eg2) state of the Co3+ ion, confirming previous observation in other recent studies. An indication of a Jahn-Teller distortion, which stabilizes the intermediate-spin state with orbital ordering, is also pointed out.

  7. Spectra and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma rays from 0.3 to 10 MeV at lambda = 40 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, J. C.; Gruber, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the spectral and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma sq cm rays in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV over Palestine, Texas, at residual depths of 2.5 and 70 g/sq cm are reported. In confirmation of the general features of a model prediction, the measurements show at 2.5 g/sq cm upward moving fluxes greater than the downward moving fluxes, the effect increasing with energy, and approximate isotropy at 70 g/sq cm. Numerous characteristic gamma-ray lines were observed, most prominently at 0.511, 1.6, 2.3, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV. Their intensities were also compared with model predictions. Observations were made with an actively shielded scintillator counter with two detectors, one of aperture 50 deg FWHM and the other of 120 deg FWHM. Above 1 MeV, contributions to the counting rate from photons penetrating the shield annulus and from neutron interactions were large; they were studied by means of a Monte Carlo code and are extensively discussed.

  8. Correlation analysis of 1 to 30 MeV celestial gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a method of producing celestial sky maps from the data generated by the University of California, Riverside's double Compton scatter gamma ray telescope. The method makes use of a correlation between the telescope's data and theoretical calculated response functions. The results of applying this technique to northern hemisphere data obtained from a 1978 balloon flight from Palestine, Texas are included.

  9. Constant time tensor correlation experiments by non-gamma-encoded recoupling pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yun; Tsai, Tim W. T.; Chan, Jerry C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Constant-time tensor correlation under magic-angle spinning conditions is an important technique in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the measurements of backbone or side-chain torsion angles of polypeptides and proteins. We introduce a general method for the design of constant-time tensor correlation experiments under magic-angle spinning. Our method requires that the amplitude of the average Hamiltonian must depend on all the three Euler angles bringing the principal axis system to the rotor-fixed frame, which is commonly referred to as non-gamma encoding. We abbreviate this novel approach as COrrelation of Non-Gamma-Encoded Experiment (CONGEE), which exploits the orientation-dependence of non-gamma-encoded sequences with respect to the magic-angle rotation axis. By manipulating the relative orientation of the average Hamiltonians created by two non-gamma-encoded sequences, one can obtain a modulation of the detected signal, from which the structural information can be extracted when the tensor orientations relative to the molecular frame are known. CONGEE has a prominent feature that the number of rf pulses and the total pulse sequence duration can be maintained to be constant so that for torsion angle determination the effects of systematic errors owing to the experimental imperfections and/or T2 effects could be minimized. As a proof of concept, we illustrate the utility of CONGEE in the correlation between the C' chemical shift tensor and the Cα-Hα dipolar tensor for the backbone psi angle determination. In addition to a detailed theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments measured for [U-13C, 15N]-L-alanine and N-acetyl-[U-13C, 15N]-D,L-valine are used to validate our approach at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz.

  10. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  11. Long Term Correlations between X-rays and Gamma-rays in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, Muhammed Diyaddin; Guver, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the brightest continuous objects in the universe. Non-termal radiation is produced by synchrotron radiation that is accelarated by the magnetic fields in the jet. Relativistic electrons interact with photons via inverse-Compton scattering to generate highly energetic photons , which is also called as 'synchrotron self-Compton (SSC)' that the seed photons are generated by relativistic electron particles. According to the SSC models, relativistic electron particles are responsible for production of high energy photons such as hard x-rays and gamma-rays. We here present the results of ZDCF (Z-Transform Discrete Correlation Function) analysis of 19 BL Lac objects and 13 Seyfert 1 galaxies. We aimed to understand the correlation between gamma-rays (0.1-300 GeV obtained with Fermi LAT) and X-rays (MAXI 2-20 keV, Swift/BAT 15-150 keV) in these two different types of objects. Strong Correlation coefficients and time lags were found both for the BL Lac objects and Seyfert 1 galaxies. Our results are consistent with SSC model and Leptonic model in which the x-rays and gamma-rays are produced in same electron population and same physical region.

  12. Correlation between indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K

    1998-09-01

    A correlation between the indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation is studied using the results of nationwide indoor radon and external exposure surveys, although the surveys were not conducted at the same time nor at the same location. The radon concentration shows a log-normal-like distribution, whereas the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in air shows a normal-like distribution. A log-linear scatterplot for each pair of the indoor radon concentration and gamma-ray dose rate in air in each city reveals a clear relationship. The average, maximum, and minimum as well as regression line of radon concentration were found to increase with the gamma-ray dose rate in air. The group in higher quantile of radon concentration shows larger dependence on the gamma-ray dose rate. The rate of increase of radon concentration with the gamma-ray dose rate in air depends on the house structure. The wooden house has a larger rate of increase than the concrete house, and the regression lines cross at high air dose rate. Based on the finding in the present study a certain criterion level of air dose rate could be established and used for an effective survey to find out which houses might require a remedial action in conjunction with other screening tools. The criterion level of air dose rate might be more effective if the level is set for each house structure since the rate of increase of radon concentration depends on house structure. PMID:9721838

  13. Spontaneous fast gamma activity in the septal hippocampal region correlates with spatial learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, B R; Overstreet, C; Grillon, C

    2014-03-15

    Hippocampal neuronal populations exhibit multiple kinds of activity patterns, from the dominant theta rhythm during active exploration to high-frequency ripple-like activity during periods of relative inactivity. In animals, evidence is rapidly accruing that these high-frequency ripple activity patterns subserve retention of spatial learning performance. In a translational effort to address the possible function of offline hippocampal processes in humans, we measured spontaneous gamma activity during an awake rest period within a virtual spatial learning context. Whole-head magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings were taken while healthy participants (N=24) quietly rested (eyes open) between encoding and retrieval phases of a hippocampal-dependent virtual Morris water maze task. Results are that fast gamma activity (80-140 Hz) in the septal or posterior region of the hippocampus (bilaterally) was positively correlated across participants with subsequent within-session spatial learning rate. Fast gamma did not predict initial retrieval performance following rest, failing to provide evidence of a direct link between spontaneous high-frequency activity patterns during awake rest and consolidation of previous spatial memories. The findings nevertheless are consistent with a prospective role for offline human hippocampal processes in spatial learning and indicate that higher spontaneous gamma activity in the septal hippocampal region is related to faster updating of spatial knowledge in familiar virtual surroundings. PMID:24388977

  14. Exploring the canonical behaviour of long gamma-ray bursts using an intrinsic multiwavelength afterglow correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, S. R.; Racusin, J. L.; De Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Smith, P. J.; Breeveld, A. A.; Kuin, N. P. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the relationship, reported by Oates et al., between the optical/UV afterglow luminosity (measured at restframe 200 s) and average afterglow decay rate (measured from restframe 200 s onwards) of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We extend the analysis by examining the X-ray light curves, finding a consistent correlation. We therefore explore how the parameters of these correlations relate to the prompt emission phase and, using a Monte Carlo simulation, explore whether these correlations are consistent with predictions of the standard afterglow model. We find significant correlations between: log LO, 200 s and log LX, 200 s; αO, >200 s and αX, >200 s, consistent with simulations. The model also predicts relationships between log Eiso and log L200 s; however, while we find such relationships in the observed sample, the slope of the linear regression is shallower than that simulated and inconsistent at ≳3σ. Simulations also do not agree with correlations observed between log L200 s and α> 200 s, or logE_{iso} and α> 200 s. Overall, these observed correlations are consistent with a common underlying physical mechanism producing GRBs and their afterglows regardless of their detailed temporal behaviour. However, a basic afterglow model has difficulty explaining all the observed correlations. This leads us to briefly discuss alternative more complex models.

  15. Mapping Correlation of Two Point Sources in the Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Alexander

    2015-08-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been taking data on high energy photons or γ rays since June 11th, 2008, and people have been cataloging and profiling point sources of these γ rays ever since. After roughly one year of being in operation over 1400 sources were cataloged. Now, in 2015 we have 3033 sources cataloged. With the increasing amount of sources it’s important to think about the limitations of likelihood analysis for highly correlated sources. In this paper I will present the problems of using likelihood analysis for sources that are highly correlated as well as show under what circumstances sources can be considered highly correlated. Dark matter over densities may show up as a point source, so it is a necessary step to learn how the two signals will interact to allow for a proper search for dark matter.

  16. Correlation between the Gamma-Ray Luminosity and the Light Cylinder Magnetic Field Strength of Fermi-LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Yi, Shuxu; Hou, Xian; Li, Jian

    2015-08-01

    We analyze statistically the differences between gamma-ray loud and quiet samples of the radio pulsars that have been searched with the Fermi satellite. Among many pulsar parameters considered in this paper, our Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distributions of magnetic field strength at the light cylinder of the two samples are the most inconsistent, but that of radio spectral index are the least discrepant. Significant correlations are found between the gamma-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength at the light cylinder of Fermi-LAT pulsars in the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray pulsars, for normal pulsars and millisecond pulsars respectively. Using the above correlations, we give a list of gamma-ray pulsar candidates with their predicted gamma-ray energy flux.

  17. Cross-correlation of the extragalactic gamma-ray background with luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Yoshida, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the cross-correlation between the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and large-scale structure provide a novel probe of dark matter on extragalactic scales. We focus on luminous red galaxies (LRGs) as optimal targets to search for the signal of dark matter annihilation. We measure the cross-correlation function of the EGB taken from the Fermi Large Area Telescope with the LRGs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Statistical errors are calculated using a large set of realistic mock LRG catalogs. The amplitude of the measured cross-correlation is consistent with null detection. Based on an accurate theoretical model of the distribution of dark matter associated with LRGs, we exclude dark matter annihilation cross-sections over ⟨σ v ⟩=3 ×10-25- 1 0-26 cm3 s-1 for a 10 GeV dark matter. We further investigate systematic effects due to uncertainties in the Galactic gamma-ray foreground emission, which we find to be an order of magnitude smaller than the current statistical uncertainty. We also estimate the contamination from astrophysical sources in the LRGs by using known scaling relations between gamma-ray luminosity and star-formation rate, finding them to be negligibly small. Based on these results, we suggest that LRGs remain ideal targets for probing dark matter annihilation with future EGB measurement and galaxy surveys. Increasing the number of LRGs in upcoming galaxy surveys such as LSST would lead to big improvements of factors of several in sensitivity.

  18. SIMILAR RADIATION MECHANISM IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BLAZARS: EVIDENCE FROM TWO LUMINOSITY CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Yi, S. X.; Dai, Z. G.

    2014-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful astrophysical events with relativistic jets. In this Letter, the broadband spectral properties of GRBs and well-observed blazars are compared. The distribution of GRBs is consistent with the well-known blazar sequence including the νL {sub ν}(5 GHz) – α{sub RX} and νL {sub ν}(5 GHz) – ν{sub peak} correlations, where α{sub RX} is defined as the broadband spectral slope in radio-to-X-ray bands, and ν{sub peak} is defined as the spectral peak frequency. Moreover, GRBs occupy the low radio luminosity end of these sequences. These two correlations suggest that GRBs could have a radiation process, i.e., synchrotron radiation, similar to blazars both in the prompt emission and afterglow phases.

  19. Meson and baryon correlation studies using the PEP-TPC/2. gamma. Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1991-03-01

    Results on vector meson, and strange and charmed-baryon production are presented for data taken during the period 1982--1986 using the TPC/2{gamma} detector at PEP. Vector mesons ({rho}{sup 0}, K{sup *} and {phi}) with 0, 1 and 2 strange quarks are used to obtain redundant measures of strange-quark suppression and of the vector to pseudoscalar ratio in hadronization. Measurements of the production rates of {Lambda}, {Xi}{sup {minus}}, {Omega} and {Xi}{sup *0} hyperons and for the {Lambda}{sub c} and of rapidity correlations between {Lambda}{bar {Lambda}} pairs provide sensitive tests of baryon production in fragmentation models. In addition, two- and three-particle correlations between like sign pions provide further evidence for the Bose-Einstein effect in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions including the relativistic motion of particle sources. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Near Infrared Activity Close to the Crab Pulsar Correlated with Giant Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Alexander R.; Max, Claire E.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe activity observed in the near-infrared correlated with a giant gamma-ray flare in the Crab Pulsar. The Crab Pulsar has been observed by the Fermi and AGILE satellites to flare for a period of 3 to 7 days, once every 1-1.5 years, increasing in brightness by a factor of 3-10 between 100MeV and 1GeV. We used Keck NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics imaging to observe the Crab Pulsar and environs before and during the March 2013 flare. We discuss the evidence for the knot as the location of the flares, and the theoretical implications of these observations. Ongoing target-of-opportunity programs hope to confirm this correlation for future flares.

  1. COSMOLOGY WITH THE Ep,i - Eiso CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo

    2012-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the brightest sources in the universe, emit mostly in the hard X-ray energy band and have been detected at redshifts up to about 8.2. Thus, they are in principle very powerful probes for cosmology. I shortly review the researches aimed to use GRBs for the measurement of cosmological parameters, which are mainly based on the correlation between spectral peak photon energy and total radiated energy or luminosity. In particular, based on an enriched sample of 120 GRBs, I will provide an update of the analysis by Amati et al. (2008) aimed at extracting information on ΩM and, to a less extent, on ΩΛ, from the Ep,i - Eiso correlation.

  2. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatikos, Michael; Sakamoto, Takanori; Band, David L.

    2008-05-22

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (E{sub peak}) values, for a conservative annual estimate of {approx}30 GRBs. The addition of BAT/s spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the {approx}20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND and Suzaku-WAM, would enable the study of broad-band spectral and temporal evolution of prompt GRB emission over three energy decades, thus potentially increasing science return without placing additional demands upon mission resources throughout their contemporaneous orbital tenure over the next decade.

  3. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Burgess, J.; Preece, Robert D.; Ryde, Felix; Axelsson, Magnus; Veres, Peter; Mészáros, Peter; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, P. N.; Pelassa, Veronique; Pe'er, Asaf; Iyyani, Shabnam; Goldstein, Adam; Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola; Paciesas, William S. E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov E-mail: veres@gwu.edu; and others

    2014-04-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal γ-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E {sub p} and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E {sub p}∝T {sup α} which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index α indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  4. Effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U and 235U nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2014-06-01

    The results of an experiment devoted to searches for effects of rotation of fissioning nuclei in the angular distributions of prompt neutrons and gamma rays originating from the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 233U nuclei are presented. The effects discovered in these angular distributions are opposite in sign to their counterparts in the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 235U nuclei. This is at odds with data on the relative signs of respective effects in the angular distribution of alpha particles from the ternary fission of the same nuclei and may be indicative of problems in the model currently used to describe the effect in question. The report on which this article is based was presented at the seminar held at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics and dedicated to the 90th anniversary of the birth of Yu.G. Abov, corresponding member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Editor in Chief of the journal Physics of Atomic Nuclei.

  5. Particle gamma correlations in 12C measured with the CsI(Tl) based detector array CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell`Aquila, D.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Minniti, T.; Morgana, E.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-11-01

    The gamma decay of the first excited 4.44 MeV 2+level of 12C, populated by inelastic scattering of proton and 16O beams at various energies was studied in order to test γ-ray detection efficiency and the quality of angular distribution information given by the CsI(Tl) detectors of the 4π CHIMERA array. The γ-decay was measured in coincidence with ejectile scattered particles in an approximately 4π geometry allowing to extract the angular distribution in the reference frame of recoiling 12C target. The typical sin2 (2θ) behavior of angular distribution was observed in the case of 16O beam. Besides that, for the proton beam, in order to explain the observed distribution, the addition of an incoherent flat contribution was required. This latter is the effect of proton spin flip events allowing the population of M=±1 magnetic substates, that is not possible in reactions induced by 16O beam. A comparison with previously collected data, obtained measuring only in and out of plane proton-γ-ray coincidences, confirms the good quality of the angular distribution information given by the apparatus. Possible applications with radioactive beams are outlined.

  6. Time-differential perturbed angular correlation study of the electric field gradient in Ti2Rh MoSi2-type compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodniecki, P.; Kulińska, A.; Wodniecka, B.

    The electric field gradient (EFG) at the 181Hf→181Ta site in Ti2Rh C11 b -type compound was measured as a function of temperature using time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The room temperature results show one EFG with the parameters of: ν Q =336(1) MHz→V zz =5.9×1017 V cm-2, η=0.1. Very week linear temperature dependence of this EFG was measured with the slope of 3.6 (2)×10-5 K-1. The results are compared with those for other isostructural compounds.

  7. Time-differential perturbed angular correlation study of the electric field gradient in Ti2Rh MoSi2-type compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodniecki, P.; Kulińska, A.; Wodniecka, B.

    2007-06-01

    The electric field gradient (EFG) at the 181Hf→181Ta site in Ti2Rh C11 b -type compound was measured as a function of temperature using time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. The room temperature results show one EFG with the parameters of: ν Q = 336(1) MHz→V zz =5.9 × 1017 V cm - 2, η = 0.1. Very week linear temperature dependence of this EFG was measured with the slope of 3.6 (2) × 10 - 5 K - 1. The results are compared with those for other isostructural compounds.

  8. Angular correlations between heavy and light fragments in the reaction sup 32 S+ sup 26 Mg at E sub lab =163. 5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S. ); Prete, G. ); Viesti, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Angular correlation measurements between heavy residues ({ital Z}{sub {ital R}}=23--13) and light fragments ({ital Z}{sub {ital L}}=2--10) have been performed for the reaction {sup 32}S+{sup 26}Mg at {ital E}{sub lab}=163.5 MeV. The binary nature of the mechanisms competing with fusion-evaporation is evidenced. Linear momentum analysis and velocity plots indicate contributions of binary reactions also for those elements that are generally believed to be produced by fusion-evaporation mechanisms.

  9. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; El-Khateeb, E; Elkafrawy, T; Mohamed, A; Salama, E; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K

    2016-04-29

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270  nb^{-1}. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η|<2.4) and over the full azimuth (ϕ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (p_{T}). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη|>2.0), near-side (Δϕ≈0) structure emerges in the two-particle Δη-Δϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0correlation strength similar to that found in earlier pp data at sqrt[s]=7  TeV. The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities N_{ch}∼180, a region so far unexplored in pp collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies. PMID:27176516

  10. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in p p Collisions at √{s }=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.

    2016-04-01

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1 . The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η | <2.4 ) and over the full azimuth (ϕ ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT ). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δ η | >2.0 ), near-side (Δ ϕ ≈0 ) structure emerges in the two-particle Δ η -Δ ϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 correlation strength similar to that found in earlier p p data at √{s }=7 TeV . The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities Nch˜180 , a region so far unexplored in p p collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in p p , p Pb , and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  11. The observed radio/gamma-ray emission correlation for blazars with the Fermi-LAT and the RATAN-600 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufakharov, T.; Mingaliev, M.; Sotnikova, Yu.; Naiden, Ya.; Erkenov, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the correlation between gamma-ray and radio band radiation for 123 blazars, using the Fermi-LAT first source catalogue (1FGL) and the RATAN-600 data obtained at the same period of time (within a few months). We found an apparent positive correlation for BL Lac and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sources from our sample through testing the value of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. The BL Lac objects show higher values of the correlation coefficient than FSRQs at all frequencies, except 21.7 GHz, and at all bands, except 10-100 GeV, typically at high confidence level (>99 per cent). At higher gamma-ray energies the correlation weakens and even becomes negative for BL Lacs and FSRQs. For BL Lac blazars, the correlation of the fluxes appeared to be more sensitive to the considered gamma-ray energy band, than to the frequency, while for FSRQ sources the correlation changed notably both with the considered radio frequency and gamma-ray energy band. We used a data randomization method to quantify the significance of the computed correlation coefficients. We find that the statistical significance of the correlations we obtained between the flux densities at all frequencies and the photon flux in all gamma-ray bands below 3 GeV is high for BL Lacs (chance probability ˜10-3-10-7). The correlation coefficient is high and significant for the 0.1-0.3 GeV band and low and insignificant for the 10-100 GeV band for both types of blazars for all considered frequencies.

  12. Measurement of long-range near-side two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Our results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η| < 2.4) and over the full azimuth (Φ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη| > 2.0), near-side (ΔΦ≈ 0) structure emerges in the two-particle Dh–Df correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 < pT < 2.0 GeV/c and an approximately linear increase with the charged particle multiplicity. The overall correlation strength at √s = 13 TeV is similar to that found in earlier pp data at √s = 7 TeV, but is measured up to much higher multiplicity values. We observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  13. A search for correlations between gamma-ray burst variability and afterglow onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, S. A.; Moore, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    We compared the time (or time limit) of onset for optical afterglow emission to the γ-ray variability V in 76 gamma-ray bursts with redshifts. In the subset (25 cases) with the rise evident in the data, we fit the shape of the onset peak as well and compared the rising and decaying indices to V. We did not find any evidence for any patterns between these properties and there is no statistical support for any correlations. This indicates a lack of connection between irregularities of the prompt γ-ray emission and the establishment of the afterglow phase. In the ordinary prompt internal shocks interpretation, this would indicate a lack of relationship between V and the bulk Lorentz factor of the event.

  14. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean

    2011-08-15

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  15. Minijet deformation and charge-independent angular correlations on momentum subspace (η,ϕ) in Au-Au collisions at sNN=130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reid, J. G.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; H. G., Ritter; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wetzler, A.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2006-06-01

    Measurements of two-particle correlations on angular difference variables η1-η2 (pseudorapidity) and ϕ1-ϕ2 (azimuth) are presented for all primary charged hadrons with transverse momentum 0.15≤pt≤2 GeV/c and |η|≤1.3 from Au-Au collisions at sNN=130 GeV. Large-amplitude correlations are observed over a broad range in relative angles where distinct structures appear on the same-side and away-side (i.e., relative azimuth less than π/2 or greater than π/2). The principal correlation structures include that associated with elliptic flow plus a strong, same-side peak. It is hypothesized that the latter results from correlated hadrons associated with semi-hard parton scattering in the early stage of the heavy-ion collision which produces a jet-like correlation peak at small relative angles. The width of the jet-like peak on η1-η2 increases by a factor 2.3 from peripheral to central collisions, suggesting strong coupling of semi-hard scattered partons to a longitudinally-expanding medium. The new methods of jet analysis introduced here provide access to scattered partons at low transverse momentum well below the kinematic range where perturbative quantum chromodynamics and standard fragmentation models are applicable.

  16. Exploring Blazar Jet Dynamics with Optical and Gamma Ray Cross-Correlations Using the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope Public Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 9 years Western Kentucky University has been monitoring approximately 50 Blazar sources at the R-band optical wavelengths. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope provides a source of gamma-ray data publicly available for cross correlation analysis, and the recent release of the data has made this possible. Such an analysis will prove useful in understanding the processes present in the jets producing the observed emission in these AGN. This type of analysis is being conducted at Western Kentucky University, pulling together the optical data from the WKU telescope network as well as other public databases and comparing them to the released FGST data. Here we present the initial results from the cross-correlation analysis and apply it to sources of interest. This research is funded by the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium.

  17. A Precision Measurement of Neutron {beta}-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons -- The abBA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J.D.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Mitchell, G.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Wilburn, W.S.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Chupp, T.E.; Cianciolo, T.V.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Young, G.R.; Desai, D.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Souza, R.T. de; Snow, W.M.; Frlez, E.; Pocanic, D.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G.L.

    2005-05-24

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2{pi} solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter {lambda}=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  18. A Precision Measurement of Neutron β-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons — The abBA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J. R.; Chupp, T. E.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Desai, D.; De Souza, R. T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Frlež, E.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Hersman, F. W.; Jones, G. L.; Mitchell, G. S.; Penttilä, S. I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, G. R.

    2005-05-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2π solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter λ=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  19. Microstructure quantification and correlation with flow stress of ultrafine grained commercially pure Al fabricated by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Reihanian, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Moshksar, M.M.; Terada, D.; Tsuji, N.

    2008-09-15

    Commercial purity Al was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to eight passes using route B{sub C}. The deformation microstructure was characterized quantitatively by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural homogeneity was investigated by EBSD at various locations from center to surface of the samples on a longitudinal section parallel to the pressing direction. Structural parameters including mean boundary spacing, boundary misorientation angle and fraction of high angle grain boundaries were measured and characterized through the section of the ECAP samples. EBSD scans revealed a homogeneous ultrafine grained microstructure after 8 passes. The analysis showed that the fraction of high angle grain boundaries was more than 70% at most locations of the sample section. Also, an average boundary spacing of 380 nm was obtained by the linear intercept method. TEM analysis was used for more detailed characterization of the microstructure, such as low angle boundaries with misorientation angles smaller than 2 deg. Using the structural parameters-flow stress relationship, the flow stress was estimated based on the EBSD and TEM/Kikuchi-line analyses and compared with measured values.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A TIGHT CORRELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH 'CANONICAL' LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michal; Willingale, Richard; Capozziello, Salvatore; Cardone, Vincenzo Fabrizio E-mail: mio@oa.uj.edu.p E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.i

    2010-10-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts z>8 are fascinating objects to study due to their still unexplained relativistic outburst mechanisms and their possible use to test cosmological models. Our analysis of 77 GRB afterglows with known redshifts revealed a physical subsample of long GRBs with the canonical plateau breaking to power-law light curves with a significant luminosity L*{sub X}-break time T*{sub a} correlation in the GRB rest frame. This subsample forms approximately the upper envelope of the studied distribution. We have also found a similar relation for a small sample of GRB afterglows that belong to the intermediate class between the short and the long ones. It proves that within the full sample of afterglows there exist physical subclasses revealed here by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. The afterglows with regular ('canonical') light curves obey not only the mentioned tight physical scaling, but-for a given T*{sub a}-the more regular progenitor explosions lead to preferentially brighter afterglows.

  1. Transient suppression of broadband gamma power in the default-mode network is correlated with task complexity and subject performance.

    PubMed

    Ossandón, Tomas; Jerbi, Karim; Vidal, Juan R; Bayle, Dimitri J; Henaff, Marie-Anne; Jung, Julien; Minotti, Lorella; Bertrand, Olivier; Kahane, Philippe; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2011-10-12

    Task performance is associated with increased brain metabolism but also with prominent deactivation in specific brain structures known as the default-mode network (DMN). The role of DMN deactivation remains enigmatic in part because its electrophysiological correlates, temporal dynamics, and link to behavior are poorly understood. Using extensive depth electrode recordings in humans, we provide first electrophysiological evidence for a direct correlation between the dynamics of power decreases in the DMN and individual subject behavior. We found that all DMN areas displayed transient suppressions of broadband gamma (60-140 Hz) power during performance of a visual search task and, critically, we show for the first time that the millisecond range duration and extent of the transient gamma suppressions are correlated with task complexity and subject performance. In addition, trial-by-trial correlations revealed that spatially distributed gamma power increases and decreases formed distinct anticorrelated large-scale networks. Beyond unraveling the electrophysiological basis of DMN dynamics, our results suggest that, rather than indicating a mere switch to a global exteroceptive mode, DMN deactivation encodes the extent and efficiency of our engagement with the external world. Furthermore, our findings reveal a pivotal role for broadband gamma modulations in the interplay between task-positive and task-negative networks mediating efficient goal-directed behavior and facilitate our understanding of the relationship between electrophysiology and neuroimaging studies of intrinsic brain networks. PMID:21994368

  2. Investigation of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O, f) fission reaction: Mass-energy distributions of fission fragments and their correlation with the gamma-ray multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rusanov, A. Ya.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Chubarian, G. G.

    2008-06-15

    The mass-energy distributions of fragments originating from the fission of the compound nucleus {sup 226}Th and their correlations with the multiplicity of gamma rays emitted from these fragments are measured and analyzed in {sup 18}O + {sup 208}Pb interaction induced by projectile oxygen ions of energy in the range E{sub lab} = 78-198.5 MeV. Manifestations of an asymmetric fission mode, which is damped exponentially with increasing E{sub lab}, are demonstrated. Theoretical calculations of fission valleys reveal that only two independent valleys, symmetric and asymmetric, exist in the vicinity of the scission point. The dependence of the multiplicity of gamma rays emitted from both fission fragments on their mass, M{sub {gamma}}(M), has a complicated structure and is highly sensitive to shell effects in both primary and final fragments. A two-component analysis of the dependence M{sub {gamma}}(M) shows that the asymmetric mode survives in fission only at low partial-wave orbital angular momenta of compound nuclei. It is found that, for all E{sub lab}, the gamma-ray multiplicity M{sub {gamma}}as a function of the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fragments, M{sub {gamma}}(TKE), decreases linearly with increasing TKE. An analysis of the energy balance in the fission process at the laboratory energy of E{sub lab} = 78 MeV revealed the region of cold fission of fragments whose total kinetic energy is TKE {approx}Q{sub max}.

  3. Comparison of magnetic and gamma ray logging for correlations in chronology and lithology: example from the Aquitanian Basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibal, J.; Etchecopar, A.; Pozzi, J.-P.; Barthès, V.; Pocachard, J.

    1999-06-01

    Precise time and facies correlations between drilled holes are fundamental for a better understanding of the geological evolution of sedimentary basins. A downhole magnetic measurement device called the geological high-sensitivity magnetic tool (GHMT) has been run within two wells drilled by Gaz de France in the Landes oil-field (southwest France) as part of a gas storage exploration program. The method of interpretation of downhole magnetic measurements yielded a magnetostratigraphy within each well, allowing absolute dating and time correlations between the wells. Magnetic susceptibility and natural gamma ray intensity are useful parameters for establishing high-resolution lithological correlations at a basin scale. We present a correlation parameter established from a simultaneous analysis of the susceptibility and the gamma ray logs within each well. The correlation parameter appears to provide a new tool for delineating lithological elements when local lithological changes are too subtle to show clear well-to-well correlations either from susceptibility logs or from gamma ray logs. This new approach is interpreted as a sensitive way to detect relative variations between the detrital and clay content of the penetrated sediment.

  4. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  5. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, M.; Martinez, A.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2008-09-01

    We have calculated the radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers both charged and neutral decaying baryons and is restricted to the so-called three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the center-of-mass frame of the emitted baryon. We have considered terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  6. Online time-differential perturbed angular correlation study with an 19O beam - Residence sites of oxygen atoms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Ueno, H.; Watanabe, H.; Miyoshi, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ito, T.; Shimada, K.; Kaihara, J.; Suda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Ohkubo, Y.; Asahi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The online time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method was applied to a study of the physical states of a probe 19F, the β- decay product of 19O (t1/2 = 26.9 s), implanted in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The observed magnitude of the electric field gradient at the probe nucleus, ∣Vzz∣ = 2.91(17) × 1022 V m-2, suggests that the incident 19O atoms are stabilized at an interlayer position with point group C3v. Exhibiting observed TDPAC spectra having a clear sample-to-detector configuration dependence, we demonstrate the applicability of the present online method with a short-lived radioactive 19O beam.

  7. Dynamic lattice distortions in Sr2RuO4: microscopic studies by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. N.; Rots, M.; Cottenier, S.

    2010-09-01

    Applying time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we have investigated possible lattice instabilities in Sr2RuO4 by studying the electric quadrupole interaction of a 111Cd probe at the Ru site. We find evidence for a dynamic lattice distortion, revealed from the observations of: (i) a rapidly fluctuating electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor showing non-Arrhenius relaxation, (ii) an anomalous temperature dependence of the quadrupole interaction frequency, and (iii) a monotonic increase of the EFG asymmetry (η) below 300 K. We argue that the observed dynamic lattice distortion is caused by strong spin fluctuations associated with the inherent magnetic instability in Sr2RuO4.

  8. Dynamic lattice distortions in Sr2RuO4: microscopic studies by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S N; Rots, M; Cottenier, S

    2010-09-29

    Applying time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we have investigated possible lattice instabilities in Sr(2)RuO(4) by studying the electric quadrupole interaction of a (111)Cd probe at the Ru site. We find evidence for a dynamic lattice distortion, revealed from the observations of: (i) a rapidly fluctuating electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor showing non-Arrhenius relaxation, (ii) an anomalous temperature dependence of the quadrupole interaction frequency, and (iii) a monotonic increase of the EFG asymmetry (η) below 300 K. We argue that the observed dynamic lattice distortion is caused by strong spin fluctuations associated with the inherent magnetic instability in Sr(2)RuO(4). PMID:21386555

  9. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  10. Reaction ({gamma},2e) and (e,3e) as probe of electron correlation in atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    Cross sections of the ({gamma},2e) and (e,3e) reactions contain information about the two vacancy-energy spectrum and electron-pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. The simplest mechanisms are discussed, demonstrating some features which await experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and the relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from the nonrelativistic case. The origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms, and possible means of their detection, are discussed. In addition, the role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feshbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are considered, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules, and clusters. The modification of these reactions due to photon emission is discussed. The future of the domain is outlined.

  11. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  12. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. Long-range angular correlations of π, K and p in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; D Erasmo, G.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-10-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger particles and various species of charged associated particles (unidentified particles, pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons) are measured by the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV in the transverse-momentum range 0.3correlations expressed as associated yield per trigger particle are obtained in the pseudorapidity range |ηlab|<0.8. Fourier coefficients are extracted from the long-range correlations projected onto the azimuthal angle difference and studied as a function of pT and in intervals of event multiplicity. In high-multiplicity events, the second-order coefficient for protons, v2p, is observed to be smaller than that for pions, v2π, up to about pT=2 GeV/c. To reduce correlations due to jets, the per-trigger yield measured in low-multiplicity events is subtracted from that in high-multiplicity events. A two-ridge structure is obtained for all particle species. The Fourier decomposition of this structure shows that the second-order coefficients for pions and kaons are similar. The v2p is found to be smaller at low pT and larger at higher pT than v2π, with a crossing occurring at about 2 GeV/c. This is qualitatively similar to the elliptic-flow pattern observed in heavy-ion collisions. A mass ordering effect at low transverse momenta is consistent with expectations from hydrodynamic model calculations assuming a collectively expanding system.

  14. Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at sNN=62 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Daugherity, M. S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schaub, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations measured with the STAR detector on relative pseudorapidity η and azimuth ϕ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at sNN=62 and 200 GeV with transverse momentum pt≥0.15 GeV/c, |η|≤1, and 2π in azimuth. Observed correlations include a same-side (relative azimuth <π/2) 2D peak, a closely related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until midcentrality, where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within one 10% centrality bin. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly relative to binary-collision scaling, the η width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly (η elongation), and the ϕ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are in marked contrast with conventional expectations for jet quenching in a dense medium. The observed centrality trends are compared to perturbative QCD predictions computed in hijing, which serve as a theoretical baseline, and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium predicted by theoretical calculations and phenomenological models. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy-ion collision scenarios that invoke rapid parton thermalization. If the collision system turns out to be effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the present observations would be inconsistent with the minijet picture discussed here.

  15. Harmonic decomposition of two particle angular correlations in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abelev, B.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergmann, C.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biolcati, E.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Bugaiev, K.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.-P.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Erasmo, G. D.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Del Castillo Sanchez, E.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; di Bari, D.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Harmanova, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, M. A.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Larsen, D. T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mayer, C.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Midori, J.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Muhuri, S.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nagle, J. L.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Obayashi, H.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernekohl, D. C.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 < pTt,a < 15 GeV / c, where pTt >pTa. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval | η | < 1.0. Distributions in relative azimuth Δϕ ≡ϕt -ϕa are analyzed for | Δη | ≡ |ηt -ηa | > 0.8, and are referred to as "long-range correlations". Fourier components VnΔ ≡ < cos (nΔϕ) > are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies vn (pT) as VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) =vn (pTt)vn (pTa). This expectation is tested for 1 ⩽ n ⩽ 5 by applying a global fit of all VnΔ (pTt ,pTa) to obtain the best values vn { GF } (pT). It is found that for 2 ⩽ n ⩽ 5, the fit agrees well with data up to pTa ˜ 3- 4 GeV / c, with a trend of increasing deviation as pTt and pTa are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25

  16. Luminosity Correlations for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications for Their Prompt and Afterglow Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2012-10-01

    We present the relation between the (z- and k-corrected) spectral lags, τ, for the standard Swift energy bands 50-100 keV and 100-200 keV and the peak isotropic luminosity, L iso (a relation reported first by Norris et al.), for a subset of 12 long Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) taken from a recent study of this relation by Ukwatta et al. The chosen GRBs are also a subset of the Dainotti et al. sample, a set of Swift GRBs of known redshift, employed in establishing a relation between the (GRB frame) luminosity, LX , of the shallow (or constant) flux portion of the typical X-Ray Telescope GRB-afterglow light curve and the (GRB frame) time of transition to the normal decay rate, T brk. We also present the LX -T brk relation using only the bursts common in the two samples. The two relations exhibit a significant degree of correlation (ρ = -0.65 for the L iso-τ and ρ = -0.88 for the LX -T brk relation) and have surprisingly similar best-fit power-law indices (-1.19 ± 0.17 for L iso-τ and -1.10 ± 0.03 for LX -T brk). Even more surprisingly, we noted that although τ and T brk represent different GRB time variables, it appears that the first relation (L iso-τ) extrapolates into the second one for timescales τ ~= T brk. This fact suggests that these two relations have a common origin, which we conjecture to be kinematic. This relation adds to the recently discovered relations between properties of the prompt and afterglow GRB phases, indicating a much more intimate relation between these two phases than hitherto considered.

  17. Stratigraphy of the Devonian Chattanooga and Ohio shales and equivalents in the Appalachian basin: an example of long-range subsurface correlation using gamma-ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    Roen, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The correlations discussed demonstrate the utility of the gamma-ray log for regional, basinwide stratigraphic studies. Through the use of these logs, suggested correlations based on paleontologic evidence (Hass, 1956) were confirmed and new correlations were established in the Appalachian basin across at least 700 miles. These logs used in conjunction with a few lithologic logs and gamma-ray profiles of surface sections (Ettensohn and others, 1979) have proven to be a useful tool for long-range stratigraphic studies.

  18. Day-Scale Variability of 3C 279 and Searches for Correlations in Gamma-Ray, X-Ray and Optical Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Villata, M.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bock, H.; Boettcher, M.; Carini, M. T.; Collmar, W.; DeFrancesco, G.; Ferrera, E. C.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Light curves of 3C 279 are presented in optical (R-band), X-rays (RXTE/PCA), and gamma rays (CGRO/EGRET) for 1999 Jan-Feb and 2000 Jan-Mar. During both of those epochs the gamma-ray levels were high, and all three observed bands demonstrated substantial variation, on time scales as short as one day. Correlation analyses provided no consistent pattern, although a rather significant optical/gamma-ray correlation was seen in 1999, with a gamma-ray lag of approximately 2.5 days, and there are other suggestions of correlations in the light curves. For comparison, correlation analysis is also presented for the gamma-ray and X-ray light curves during the large gamma-ray flare in 1996 Feb and the two gamma-bright weeks leading up to it; the correlation at that time was strong, with a gamma-ray/X-ray offset of no more than one day.

  19. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  20. SEARCH FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN VERY-HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS AND GIANT RADIO PULSES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S. E-mail: mccann@kicp.uchicago.edu; and others

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays (E {sub {gamma}} > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On {approx}8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  1. Angular Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mouth. Overview Angular cheilitis (perlèche) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the corners of the mouth. Usually associated with a fungal ( Candidal ) or bacterial ( Staphylococcal ) infection, those ... people of all ages. Chronic pooling of saliva encourages fungal and bacterial growth, ...

  2. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  3. The source-sample stage of the new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectrometer at Technische Universität München

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) is a well established technique for the investigation of the electronic structure. A major limitation of ACAR studies is the available positron flux at a small spot on the sample. For this reason, the focus of this work is put on the discussion of a newly developed source-sample stage of the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at Technische Universität München which uses an optimized static magnetic field configuration to guide the positrons onto the sample. The achieved spot diameter is dFWHM = 5.4 mm, with a high efficiency over the whole energy spectrum of the 22Na positron source. The implications of the performance of the source-sample stage are discussed with regard to 2D-ACAR measurements of single crystalline α-quartz, which serves as a model system for the determination of the total resolution. A value of (1.53 × 1.64) mrad2 FWHM was achieved at room temperature.

  4. Electronic structure and orientation relationship of Li nanoclusters embedded in MgO studied by depth-selective positron annihilation two-dimensional angular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falub, C. V.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Eijt, S. W.; van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.

    2002-08-01

    Quantum-confined positrons are sensitive probes for determining the electronic structure of nanoclusters embedded in materials. In this work, a depth-selective positron annihilation 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation) method is used to determine the electronic structure of Li nanoclusters formed by implantation of 1016-cm-2 30-keV 6Li ions in MgO (100) and (110) crystals and by subsequent annealing at 950 K. Owing to the difference between the positron affinities of lithium and MgO, the Li nanoclusters act as quantum dots for positrons. 2D-ACAR distributions for different projections reveal a semicoherent fitting of the embedded metallic Li nanoclusters to the host MgO lattice. Ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker calculations of the momentum density show that the anisotropies of the experimental distributions are consistent with an fcc crystal structure of the Li nanoclusters. The observed reduction of the width of the experimental 2D-ACAR distribution is attributed to positron trapping in vacancies associated with Li clusters. This work proposes a method for studying the electronic structure of metallic quantum dots embedded in an insulating material.

  5. The source-sample stage of the new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Boeni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2013-04-15

    Angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) is a well established technique for the investigation of the electronic structure. A major limitation of ACAR studies is the available positron flux at a small spot on the sample. For this reason, the focus of this work is put on the discussion of a newly developed source-sample stage of the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen which uses an optimized static magnetic field configuration to guide the positrons onto the sample. The achieved spot diameter is d{sub FWHM}= 5.4 mm, with a high efficiency over the whole energy spectrum of the {sup 22}Na positron source. The implications of the performance of the source-sample stage are discussed with regard to 2D-ACAR measurements of single crystalline {alpha}-quartz, which serves as a model system for the determination of the total resolution. A value of (1.53 Multiplication-Sign 1.64) mrad{sup 2} FWHM was achieved at room temperature.

  6. Oxygen ordering in the high-Tc superconductor HgBa2CaCu2O6+δ as revealed by perturbed angular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, T. M.; Correia, J. G.; Haas, H.; Odier, P.; Tavares, P. B.; da Silva, M. R.; Lopes, A. M. L.; Pereira, A. M.; Gonçalves, J. N.; Amaral, J. S.; Darie, C.; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    Lattice sites and collective ordering of oxygen atoms in HgBa2CaCu2O6+δ were studied using the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique at ISOLDE/CERN. The electric field gradients (EFG) at 199mHg nuclei have been measured as functions of oxygen doping on the Hg planes, above and below Tc. In comparison with the results obtained for oxygen and fluorine doping in Hg-1201, the analysis shows a different oxygen ordering exhibited by Hg-1212. Moreover, for all studied cases, the experimental results show that at a local scale there is non uniform oxygen distribution. A series of ab initio EFG calculations allowed to infer that at low concentrations, regions without oxygen coexist with regions where O2δ dumbbell molecules are located at the center of the Hg mesh. On the other side, at high concentrations, O2δ dumbbell molecules coexist with single Oδ atoms occupying the center of the Hg mesh. The present results suggest that oxygen sits on the Hg planes in the form of a molecule and not as a single atom.

  7. Magnetic behavior of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} studied by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with {sup 111}Cd and {sup 140}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, I. T. Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-05-07

    In this paper, the local magnetic properties of La-doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (5% and 10%) bulk and Nanoparticles (NPs) samples were studied by measuring hyperfine interactions in a wide range of temperature from 10 to 900 K with perturbed γ-γ angular correlation spectroscopy using {sup 111}In({sup 111}Cd) and {sup 140}La({sup 140}Ce) as probe nuclei. Results for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) for bulk and NP samples, pure and doped with La show that its behavior follows a second order Brillouin-like transition from which the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) was determined (T{sub C} ∼ 855 K). Results also show two different regions in NP samples: the core where a minor fraction of probe nuclei with well defined magnetic dipole frequency was observed and the shell where a major fraction with broad distributed electric quadrupolar frequency (surface effect in NP) was observed. The Verwey transition T{sub V} ∼ 120 K, due the order disorder phase, was also observed in all samples. The results are discussed in terms of the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions in the two regions of NP.

  8. Magnetic behavior of La-doped Fe3O4 studied by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy with 111Cd and 140Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, I. T.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the local magnetic properties of La-doped Fe3O4 (5% and 10%) bulk and Nanoparticles (NPs) samples were studied by measuring hyperfine interactions in a wide range of temperature from 10 to 900 K with perturbed γ-γ angular correlation spectroscopy using 111In(111Cd) and 140La(140Ce) as probe nuclei. Results for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) for bulk and NP samples, pure and doped with La show that its behavior follows a second order Brillouin-like transition from which the Curie temperature (TC) was determined (TC ˜ 855 K). Results also show two different regions in NP samples: the core where a minor fraction of probe nuclei with well defined magnetic dipole frequency was observed and the shell where a major fraction with broad distributed electric quadrupolar frequency (surface effect in NP) was observed. The Verwey transition TV ˜ 120 K, due the order disorder phase, was also observed in all samples. The results are discussed in terms of the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in the two regions of NP.

  9. Studies of interaction between He and elements with mass number 140 in Fe by time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Yoshitaka; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Xu, Qiu; Tanigaki, Minoru; Sato, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    Room-temperature time-differential perturbed-angular-correlation (TDPAC) spectra of 140Ce arising through 140Ba-140La from 140Cs in He-doped Fe, unannealed and annealed in vacuum at various temperatures, were obtained in order to examine whether Ce (or rather, La and Ba) and He form complexes having a definite geometrical structure in Fe, as suggested by first-principles density-functional theory calculations. No clear signal of such complexes was observed in the TDPAC spectra. However, the TDPAC spectra indicate that Ce and He form complexes having a variety of geometrical structures. Comparison with reported TDPAC results on 111Cd arising from 111In in He-doped stainless steel shows that the parent atoms (La and Ba) of 140Ce trap He atoms more efficiently than In atoms do, indicating stronger bonding of He to the former atoms, while different from the present case, 111Cd (In)-He complexes form a unique geometrical structure.

  10. Electric field gradients at 181Ta probe in ZrNi: Results from perturbed angular correlation and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, C. C.; Das, Rakesh; Srivastava, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Results of temperature dependent perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in the equiatomic ZrNi alloy have been reported for the first time using 181Hf probe. At room temperature, values of quadrupole frequency and asymmetry parameter for the major component (~80%) are found to be ωQ=26.8(4) Mrad/s, and η=0.413(7). The resulting electric field gradient comes out to be Vzz=2.99 ×1017 V/cm2 and this corresponds to the probe nuclei occupying the regular substitutional Zr sites. In ZrNi system, no magnetic interaction is observed down to 77 K indicating absence of any magnetism in this material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies on an inactive but similarly prepared sample confirm the dominant presence of the orthorhombic ZrNi phase in the sample. A complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculation results in Vzz=-2.35×1017 V/cm2, η=0.46 at the 181Ta probe impurity site and zero magnetic moment on each atomic site, in close agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, it is found that electric field gradient for the regular component follows a T3/2 temperature dependence between 77 and 353 K, beyond which it varies linearly with temperature.

  11. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (ηΔΔ)

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity η of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that the glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although η elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.

  12. Nuclear structure at high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.S.

    1980-06-01

    This review paper begins by discussing the limits faced in the attempts to get nuclei to hold very high angular momentum. The method presently used to produce nuclei with the maximum angular momentum is described. Then the physics of high-spin states is taken up; some properties of a purely collective, classical rotor are described, and the effects of coupling single-particle motion to this are considered. Next, backbending, its causes, and a new spectroscopy of bands and backbends at high spin values are discussed. Noncollective states occur when the nuclear angular momentum is carried by a few high-j particles and is aligned along a symmetry axis. There results an irregular yrast line, along which there are no collective transitions. Noncollective behavior in the lead region, the hafnium region, and the N = 82 region is examined. Then the discussion moves on to collective behavior and recent studies on continuum spectra. Evidence for rotation is given, and effective moments of inertia for this rotation are evaluated. Finally, current ..gamma..-ray energy correlation studies are described. 68 references, 36 figures. (RWR)

  13. Mean Angular Momenta of Primary Photofission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bezshyyko, O.A.; Kadenko, I.M.; Plujko, V.A.; Yermolenko, R.V.; Mazur, V.M.; Strilchuk, N.V.; Vishnevsky, I.M.; Zheltonozhsky, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    Isomer ratios and mean angular momenta for photofission products of 237Np and 238U are obtained. The technique of gamma-ray spectrometry for isomeric ratio determination was used. Fissionable nuclei were irradiated by bremsstrahlung spectrum of microtron M-30 with electron energy 16 MeV. Calculations of mean angular momenta were performed by modified version of the EMPIRE II code.

  14. Cross-correlation method for intermediate-duration gravitational wave searches associated with gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyne, Robert; Corsi, Alessandra; Owen, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Several models of gamma-ray burst progenitors suggest that the gamma-ray event may be followed by gravitational wave signals of 1 03 - 1 04 s duration (possibly accompanying the so-called x-ray afterglow "plateaus"). We term these signals "intermediate duration" because they are shorter than continuous wave signals but longer than signals traditionally considered as gravitational wave bursts and are difficult to detect with most burst and continuous wave methods. The cross-correlation technique proposed by [S. Dhurandhar et al., Phys. Rev. D 77, 082001 (2008)], which so far has been used only on continuous wave signals, in principle unifies both burst and continuous wave (as well as matched filtering and stochastic background) methods, reducing them to different choices of which data to correlate on which time scales. Here, we perform the first tuning of this cross-correlation technique to intermediate-duration signals. We derive theoretical estimates of sensitivity in Gaussian noise in different limits of the cross-correlation formalism and compare them to the performance of a prototype search code on simulated Gaussian-noise data. We estimate that the code is likely able to detect some classes of intermediate-duration signals (such as the ones described in [A. Corsi and P. Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 702, 1171 (2009)]) from sources located at astrophysically relevant distances of several tens of Mpc.

  15. Empirical correlation of residual gamma radiation resulting from operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.L.; Ragan, G.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An empirical equation has been developed which gives gamma dose equivalent rate as a function of time, distance, and fission yield after a pulsed operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) unshielded Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). A related expression which is applicable to steady-state reactor operation has been mathematically derived from the aforementioned empirical equation. The two relations can be used to predict the gamma dose equivalent rate to within 25% for times between 1 minute and 90 minutes after reactor shutdown. Similar agreement is expected for up to several days. In most cases the relations are expected to overestimate the gamma dose equivalent rate. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Determination of Sea Ice Thickness from Angular and Frequency Correlation Functions and by Genetic Algorithm: A Theoretical Study of New Instrument Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Z. A.; Kuga, Y.; Ishimaru, A.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; McDonald, K. C.; Holt, B.; Pak, K.; Jordan, R.; Perovich, D.; Sturm, M.

    2004-12-01

    Thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice play a critical role in Earth's climate and ocean circulation. An accurate measurement of these parameters on synoptic scales at regular intervals would enable characterization of this important component for the understanding of ocean circulation and global heat balance. Currently, IceSAT (laser altimeter) and EnviSAT (radar altimeter) and the upcoming CryoSAT (radar altimeter) measurement systems provide estimates of the sea ice freeboard, i.e. that portion of the ice that is above the sea level. The sea ice thickness and changes in thickness are inferred from these measurements. In this paper, we develop the theoretical basis for application of radar interferometry in the VHF band to the direct estimation of sea ice thickness. We employ angular and frequency correlation functions (ACF/FCF) of the electromagnetic wave scattered from sea-ice, using small perturbation and Kirchhoff rough surface scattering and Rayleigh volume scattering models. The medium is modeled as multi-layered stratification consisting of snow, sea ice (including spherical particles of air bubbles and brine inclusions), and sea water. Each surface interface is modeled as a rough surface with a Gaussian roughness spectrum. To characterize the ACF/FCF, the correlation between two waves with different frequencies, incidence and observation angles, is employed, forming a combined spatial- and frequency-domain interferometer. This technique exploits the difference in the correlation properties (phase matching conditions) of surface and volume scattering. The surface correlation function exhibits a strong correlation along a "memory line." The volume scattering shows a strong correlation at specific points - "memory dots." The effect of volume scattering can be suppressed by choosing appropriate combinations of frequencies and angles. The phase of the surface correlation function depends on the scattering geometry (location of the antennas), and provides

  17. Harmonic decomposition of two particle angular correlations in Pb Pb collisions at s_NN = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Read, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Angular correlations between unidentified charged trigger (t) and associated (a) particles are measured by the ALICE experiment in Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.76 TeV for transverse momenta 0.25 < p{sub T}{sup t,a} < 15 GeV/c, where p{sub T}{sup t} > p{sub T}{sup a}. The shapes of the pair correlation distributions are studied in a variety of collision centrality classes between 0 and 50% of the total hadronic cross section for particles in the pseudorapidity interval |{eta}| < 1.0. Distributions in relative azimuth {Delta}{phi}{triple_bond}{phi}t-{phi}a are analyzed for |{Delta}{eta}|{triple_bond}|{eta}t-{eta}a| > 0.8, and are referred to as 'long-range correlations'. Fourier components Vn{Delta} {triple_bond} are extracted from the long-range azimuthal correlation functions. If particle pairs are correlated to one another through their individual correlation to a common symmetry plane, then the pair anisotropy V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) is fully described in terms of single-particle anisotropies vn(pT) as V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) = v{sub n}(p{sub T}{sup t})v{sub n}(p{sub T}{sup a}). This expectation is tested for 1 {le} n {le} 5 by applying a global fit of all V{sub n{Delta}}(p{sub T}{sup t},p{sub T}{sup a}) to obtain the best values vn{l_brace}GF{r_brace}(p{sub T}). It is found that for 2 {le} n {le} 5, the fit agrees well with data up to p{sub T}{sup a} {approx} 3-4 GeV/c, with a trend of increasing deviation as p{sub T}{sup t} and p{sub T}{sup a} are increased or as collisions become more peripheral. This suggests that no pair correlation harmonic can be described over the full 0.25 < pT < 15 GeV/c range using a single vn(pT) curve; such a description is however approximately possible for 2 {le} n {le} 5 when p{sub T}{sup a} < 4 GeV/c. For the n = 1 harmonic, however, a single v{sub 1}(pT) curve is not obtained even within the reduced range p{sub T}{sup a} < 4 GeV/c.

  18. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  19. Emotion-elicited gamma synchrony in patients with first-episode schizophrenia: a neural correlate of social cognition outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Leanne M.; Whitford, Thomas J.; Nagy, Marie; Flynn, Gary; Harris, Anthony W.F.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Gordon, Evian

    2009-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia may be understood as a disorder of neural synchrony. There is also increasing evidence that emotional and social cognitive impairments are central to this disorder. In patients with first-episode schizophrenia, we examined whether emotion perception is associated with disruptions to high-frequency (40 Hz) gamma synchrony and whether these disruptions predict self-regulatory adaptive compensations reflected in social cognitive behaviours. Methods We obtained electroencephalography recordings from 28 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and matched healthy controls during perception of facial emotion under both conscious and nonconscious conditions. We extracted gamma-band synchrony from the electroencephalogram. We also used behavioural measures of emotion identification, emotional intelligence, negativity bias and social function, along with ratings of first-episode schizophrenia symptoms. We analyzed group differences and predicted social cognition to assess the potential contribution of medication. Results Within 200 ms poststimulus, patients with first-episode schizophrenia showed alterations in gamma synchrony during both conscious and nonconscious emotion perception. Stimulus-locked synchrony was reduced in patients, particularly over the temporal cortex, whereas complementary enhancements in absolute gamma synchrony (independent of stimuli) were more distributed over temporal and left parieto-occipital regions. This pattern of altered synchrony predicted poor performance on each measure of social cognition among these patients. Medication dosage did not correlate significantly with either gamma synchrony or behavioural measures in this group. Limitations Limitations to our study include the lack of comparison between medicated and unmedicated patients or between types of medication. Conclusion These findings suggest that disruptions in integrative processing of motivationally important stimuli show promise as a potential

  20. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts detected by the SIGNE experiment. 1: Correlation between intensity and spectral hardness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargatis, Vincent E.; Liang, Edison P.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Barat, C.; Eveno, E.; Niel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We study the continuum spectral evolution of 16 gamma-ray bursts detected by the Franco-Soviet SIGNE experiment in 1981-1982 by fitting time resolved (0.5 s) spectra in count space with simple thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron models. We find that there is no single characteristic of spectral evolution: we see hard-to-soft, soft-to-hard, luminosity-hardness tracking, and chaotic evolution. We perform correlation studies between instantaneous burst intensity and spectral temperature for seven bursts. While we basically confirm the existence of a correlation between these variables as originally claimed by Golenetskii et al. (1983) we find higher values and a broader range of correlation indices.

  1. The correlated and shared gamma frailty model for bivariate current status data: an illustration for cross-sectional serological data.

    PubMed

    Hens, N; Wienke, A; Aerts, M; Molenberghs, G

    2009-09-30

    Frailty models are often used to study the individual heterogeneity in multivariate survival analysis. Whereas the shared frailty model is widely applied, the correlated frailty model has gained attention because it elevates the restriction of unobserved factors to act similar within clusters. Estimating frailty models is not straightforward due to various types of censoring. In this paper, we study the behavior of the bivariate-correlated gamma frailty model for type I interval-censored data, better known as current status data. We show that applying a shared rather than a correlated frailty model to cross-sectionally collected serological data on hepatitis A and B leads to biased estimates for the baseline hazard and variance parameters. PMID:19591117

  2. Mapping correlation of a simulated dark matter source and a point source in the gamma-ray sky - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Alexander

    2015-08-23

    In my research, I analyzed how two gamma-ray source models interact with one another when optimizing to fit data. This is important because it becomes hard to distinguish between the two point sources when they are close together or looking at low energy photons. The reason for the first is obvious, the reason why they become harder to distinguish at lower photon energies is the resolving power of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope gets worse at lower energies. When the two point sources are highly correlated (hard to distinguish between), we need to change our method of statistical analysis. What I did was show that highly correlated sources have larger uncertainties associated with them, caused by an optimizer not knowing which point source’s parameters to optimize. I also mapped out where their is high correlation for 2 different theoretical mass dark matter point sources so that people analyzing them in the future knew where they had to use more sophisticated statistical analysis.

  3. Hyperfine interaction measurements in LaCrO3 and LaFeO3 perovskites using perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, R.; Junqueira, A. C.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Moralles, M.

    2001-06-01

    The perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique was used to study the hyperfine interactions in the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic regions of the distorted perovskites LaCrO3 and LaFeO3. The dilute 111In-->111Cd nuclear probes were introduced into the samples through a chemical process. The present measurements cover the temperature ranges from 15 to 848 K for LaCrO3 and 77 to 1324 K for LaFeO3. Two distinct electric-quadrupole interactions were observed in each compound. The lower quadrupole frequency was assigned to the transition-metal atom site while the higher frequency was attributed to the lanthanum site in both cases. Temperature dependence of the electric-quadrupole interaction parameters indicated structural phase transitions at around 512 and 1223 K, respectively, in LaCrO3 and LaFeO3. The phase transitions were associated with the change from an orthorhombic to rhombohedral structure and characterized by a sudden increase in the electric field gradient Vzz and a decrease in the asymmetry parameter η for both sites. PAC spectra measured below the Néel temperature revealed that at 0 K the supertransferred magnetic hyperfine field on 111Cd at the Cr site in LaCrO3 (2.4 T) is much smaller than at the Fe site in LaFeO3 (19.4 T). The magnetic field on 111Cd at La sites in both compounds is of the order of 0.3 T. Additional measurements were made to determine the magnetic hyperfine field using the probe nucleus 140La-->140Ce. The result reconfirmed that a relatively weak hyperfine field is supertransferred to the probe atoms at La sites.

  4. Perturbed Angular Correlation Study of the Static and Dynamic Aspects of Cadmium and Mercury Atoms Inside and Attached to a C60 Fullerene Cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satyendra K.; Guin, Rashmohan; Banerjee, Debasish; Johnston, Karl; Das, Parnika; Butz, Tilman; Amaral, Vitor S.; Correia, Joao G.; Barbosa, Marcelo B.

    2014-11-01

    30 keV 111mCd and 50 keV 199mHg beams from ISOLDE were used to implant on preformed targets of C60 with a thickness of 1 mg cm-2. Endofullerene compounds, viz. 111mCd@C60 and 199mHg@C60 formed during implantation were separated by filtration through micropore filter paper followed by solvent extraction. Dried samples of the endofullerene compounds were counted for the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement using the coincidence of the 151 - 245 keV cascade of 111mCd and the 374 - 158 keV cascade of 199mHg on a six LaBr3(Ce) detector system coupled with digital electronics. The results for 111mCd@C60 indicate a single static component (27%) and a fast relaxing component (73%), the latter implying that the cadmium atom moves rapidly inside the cage at room temperature. The quadrupole interaction frequency and asymmetry parameter of the cadmium atom occupying the static site in C60 are wQ=8.21(36) Mrad s-1 and η = 0.41(9), respectively. The fast relaxation constant is 0.0031(4) ns-1. Similarly, mercury atoms also exhibit a single static and a fast component. The static site has a quadrupole frequency wQ=283.0(12.4) Mrad s-1 and η =0 with a fraction of 30%. The fast relaxation constant is 0.045(8) ns-1 with a fraction of 70%, very similar to that of cadmium.

  5. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack; Ostrowski, Michal E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl

    2013-09-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.

  6. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  7. SELECTION EFFECTS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST CORRELATIONS: CONSEQUENCES ON THE RATIO BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, M. G.; Shigehiro, N.; Vecchio, R. Del; Capozziello, S. E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2015-02-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the L{sub X} -T{sub a}{sup ∗} (hereafter LT) correlation between the X-ray luminosity L{sub X} (T{sub a} ) at the end of the plateau phase, T{sub a} , and the rest-frame time T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of L{sub X} and T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al. showing that in both cases the intrinsic slope of the LT correlation is ≈ – 1.0. This method is general and therefore relevant for investigating whether or not any other GRB correlation is generated by the biases themselves. Moreover, because the farthest GRBs and star-forming galaxies probe the reionization epoch, we evaluate the redshift-dependent ratio Ψ(z) = (1 + z){sup α} of the GRB rate to the star formation rate. We found a modest evolution –0.2 ≤ α ≤ 0.5 consistent with a Swift GRB afterglow plateau in the redshift range 0.99 < z < 9.4.

  8. Selection Effects in Gamma-Ray Burst Correlations: Consequences on the Ratio between Gamma-Ray Burst and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainotti, M. G.; Del Vecchio, R.; Shigehiro, N.; Capozziello, S.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the LX -T^*_a (hereafter LT) correlation between the X-ray luminosity LX (Ta ) at the end of the plateau phase, Ta , and the rest-frame time T*_a. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of LX and T^*_a. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al. showing that in both cases the intrinsic slope of the LT correlation is ≈ - 1.0. This method is general and therefore relevant for investigating whether or not any other GRB correlation is generated by the biases themselves. Moreover, because the farthest GRBs and star-forming galaxies probe the reionization epoch, we evaluate the redshift-dependent ratio Ψ(z) = (1 + z)α of the GRB rate to the star formation rate. We found a modest evolution -0.2 <= α <= 0.5 consistent with a Swift GRB afterglow plateau in the redshift range 0.99 < z < 9.4.

  9. Multiple gamma oscillations in the brain: a new strategy to differentiate functional correlates and P300 dynamics.

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol; Tülay, Elif; Güntekin, Bahar

    2015-03-01

    Brain oscillations in the gamma frequency band, - i.e. oscillations greater than 25 Hz - have attracted increasing attention over the last few decades in the research of sensory-cognitive processes. In the neuroscience research literature, a great number of reports aim to describe the functional correlates of oscillatory responses in the gamma frequency window. However, analysis using a broadband frequency window often leads to divergent functional interpretations and controversies. In order to provide a more exact approach, we have used a strategy by defining multiple frequency and multiple time windows according to the combined analysis of conventional power spectral windows, frequency adaptive multiple filters, and inter-trial coherence. The analysis in frequency windows of 25-30 Hz, 30-35 Hz, and 40-48 Hz enables the investigator to provide a distinction of cognitive and/or sensory responses. Moreover, according to topological differentiation and the consideration of neuroanatomic pathways, more reliable interpretations of gamma responses are reached. PMID:25660304

  10. The XMM-Newton survey of the ELAIS-S1 field. I. Number counts, angular correlation function and X-ray spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; D'Elia, V.; Pillitteri, I.; Feruglio, C.; Grazian, A.; Brusa, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Comastri, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; La Franca, F.; Sacchi, N.; Franceschini, A.; Berta, S.; Buttery, H.; Dias, J. E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.The formation and evolution of cosmic structures can be probed by studying the evolution of the luminosity function of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), galaxies and clusters of galaxies and of the clustering of the X-ray active Universe, compared to the IR-UV active Universe. Methods: .To this purpose, we have surveyed with XMM-Newton the central ~0.6 deg2 region of the ELAIS-S1 field down to flux limits of ~5.5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2~s-1 (0.5-2 keV, soft band, S), ~2 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (2-10 keV, hard band, H), and ~4 × 10-15 erg~cm-2~s-1 (5-10 keV, ultra hard band, HH). We present here the analysis of the XMM-Newton observations, the number counts in different energy bands and the clustering properties of the X-ray sources. Results: .We detect a total of 478 sources, 395 and 205 of which detected in the S and H bands respectively. We identified 7 clearly extended sources and estimated their redshift through X-ray spectral fits with thermal models. In four cases the redshift is consistent with z=0.4, so we may have detected a large scale structure formed by groups and clusters of galaxies through their hot intra-cluster gas emission. We have computed the angular correlation function of the sources in the S and H bands finding best fit correlation angles θ_0=5.2 ± 3.8 arcsec and θ_0=12.8 ± 7.8 arcsec in the two bands respectively. The correlation angle of H band sources is therefore formally ~2.5 times that of the S band sources, although the difference is at only ~1σ confidence level. A rough estimate of the present-day correlation length r0 can be obtained inverting the Limber equation and assuming an appropriate redshift distribution dN/dz. The results range between 12.8 and 9.8 h-1 Mpc in the S band and between 17.9 and 13.4 h-1 Mpc in the H band, with 30-40% statistical errors, assuming either smooth redshift distributions or redshift distributions with spikes accounting for the presence of significant structure at z=0.4. The relative density of the